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BORDERERS IN BATTLE. The War Story of the King's Own Scottish Borderers 1939 - 1945.

BORDERERS IN BATTLE. The War Story of the King?s Own Scottish Borderers 1939 ? 1945.

Gunning, Captain Hugh. [Berwick-upon-Tweed]: [Martin?s Printing Works], 1948. 8vo. 287 pp. 4 pages of maps, 22 black and white photographs and 1 coloured frontispiece. Tan cloth, very slightly bubbled at rear. Clean near fine condition in a very good, slightly aged dust jacket. The book opens in the grand manner with a ?roll of drums? to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the Regiment in 1939. From this spirited start the book moves to a steady recital of the battalions' activities in the chronological sequence of events. It is a story of the war in North-West Europe and in Burma, with the Leslie tartan of The King's Own Scottish Borderers weaving in and out of the general narrative. There were eight K.O.S.B. battalions in this war, and six of these went into battle. The 1st Battalion was at Dunkirk, and four years later returned to France in the D-Day assault. The 2nd Battalion fought in Burma, being one of the units in the famous battle of the "Ad min Box" of the 7th Indian Division. The 4th, 5th, and 6th Battalions with 1st, were in the campaign of the British Army of Liberation, from Normandy to the Baltic. The 7th Battalion fought at Arnhem with the 1st Airborne Division. The story is not only a record of training and of battle, but is also a crisp " documentary "on the Army. It describes the soldier's life : what he wore, the jokes he cracked, the songs he sang, his food, his billets. It never loses sight of the big picture, and it gives previously unpublished accounts of General Eisenhower in his own special railway train, and of Montgomery addressing his soldiers in the field. Montgomery s address is one of the few recorded accounts of a front-line talk and it makes a released "top-secret '' revelation giving the Field-Marshal's version of the battle of Caen in which two battalions.
THE HISTORY OF THE CORPS OF ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS. 2 volumes. 1749 - 1939; 1936 - 1946.

THE HISTORY OF THE CORPS OF ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS. 2 volumes. 1749 ? 1939; 1936 ? 1946.

Kerry, Colonel A. J. & Major W. A. McDill. Ottawa: The Military Engineers of Canada, 1962. Volume 1. 389pp. 6 folding maps. Map end papers; 19pp of black and white photographs. Maps drawn by Corporal P. Heinriches. Volume 2. 713pp. 10 coloured folding maps plus maps on the end papers, 37pp. of black and white photographs. Maps complied by Sergeant E. H. Ellwand. Blue cloth in fine condition. Dust jacket for Volume 2 with chipping on the fore edge and top. The first Military Engineers in Canada date back as far as the early 1600s, when the French built a number of defence fortifications in Quebec and Acadia. It wasn't until 1 July 1903, however, that a permanent corps of Military Engineers was organized. After the South African War at the turn of the 20th century, the Canadian Government recognized the need for a permanent army and it was then that the General Officer commanding the Canadian Militia recommended that a permanent corps of Military Engineers be formed. In 1904, His Majesty the King honoured the Corps by adding the prefix "Royal", making them the Royal Canadian Engineers (RCE). Since their beginning, the role of the Canadian Military Engineers has been to conduct specialized military operations which contribute to the effectiveness of the other branches of the Canadian Military. On 1 July 1939, when the Second World War was declared, RCE units were quickly reorganized and re-equipped and in December of that year the First Canadian Divisional Engineers were dispatched to England. Over the course of the five-year war, RCE units were involved in the majority of operations, including the Dieppe Raid, 19 August 1942. The Germans, anticipating the Dieppe Raid, had, in the early hours of August 19, fortified the beach with a variety of obstacles, including pill boxes and barbed wire. The plan for the RCE on that ill-fated day was to blast a path through enemy obstacles at Dieppe. Much to their dismay, Canadians had underestimated their German enemies, and all who landed on the shores of Dieppe that day were met with heavy gun fire. The Royal Canadian Engineers suffered 27 fatal casualties. By the end of the Second World War, the RCE had proved to be a strong and contributing force for Canada. They were equipped with 685 officers and 15,677 other ranks. It has been argued that there are few other Canadian civilian and military organizations that have contributed as much to the defence and development of Canada as the Canadian Military Engineers. HEAVY SET. EXTRA POSTAGE WILL BE REQUIRED. Signed by the author. Includes Historical Resume by General Sir Arthur Currie. Comprehensive history of the development of the Intelligence Service in the Infantry divisions during the Great War, with aerial photograph plates that reflect the evolving development of aerial reconnaissance during the war.
THE TRIAL OF KURT MEYER.

THE TRIAL OF KURT MEYER.

Macdonald, Lieut.-Colonel B. J. Sl. Toronto: Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited. 1954. 8vo. 216pp. 4pp. black and white photographs, including a map of Normandy June 1944. Cloth in fine condition, with slightly chipped but very good dust jacket. Penciled name on the front free endpaper. Macdonald was Canada?s representative at the controversial trial of Brigadefuhrer Kurt Meyer of the 12 SS Panzer Division, who captured and killed Canadians soldiers in cold blood during the Normandy campaign. Controversy surrounded the commuting of the death sentence and the quick release from prison of Meyer. The first Military Engineers in Canada date back as far as the early 1600s, when the French built a number of defence fortifications in Quebec and Acadia. It wasn't until 1 July 1903, however, that a permanent corps of Military Engineers was organized. After the South African War at the turn of the 20th century, the Canadian Government recognized the need for a permanent army and it was then that the General Officer commanding the Canadian Militia recommended that a permanent corps of Military Engineers be formed. In 1904, His Majesty the King honoured the Corps by adding the prefix "Royal", making them the Royal Canadian Engineers (RCE). Since their beginning, the role of the Canadian Military Engineers has been to conduct specialized military operations which contribute to the effectiveness of the other branches of the Canadian Military. On 1 July 1939, when the Second World War was declared, RCE units were quickly reorganized and re-equipped and in December of that year the First Canadian Divisional Engineers were dispatched to England. Over the course of the five-year war, RCE units were involved in the majority of operations, including the Dieppe Raid, 19 August 1942. The Germans, anticipating the Dieppe Raid, had, in the early hours of August 19, fortified the beach with a variety of obstacles, including pill boxes and barbed wire. The plan for the RCE on that ill-fated day was to blast a path through enemy obstacles at Dieppe. Much to their dismay, Canadians had underestimated their German enemies, and all who landed on the shores of Dieppe that day were met with heavy gun fire. The Royal Canadian Engineers suffered 27 fatal casualties. By the end of the Second World War, the RCE had proved to be a strong and contributing force for Canada. They were equipped with 685 officers and 15,677 other ranks. It has been argued that there are few other Canadian civilian and military organizations that have contributed as much to the defence and development of Canada as the Canadian Military Engineers. HEAVY SET. EXTRA POSTAGE WILL BE REQUIRED. Signed by the author. Includes Historical Resume by General Sir Arthur Currie. Comprehensive history of the development of the Intelligence Service in the Infantry divisions during the Great War, with aerial photograph plates that reflect the evolving development of aerial reconnaissance during the war.