Nat DesMarais Rare Books

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The Machados & Rancho La Ballona: The Story of the Land and its Ranchero. Jose Agustin Antonio Machado, With a Genealogy of the Machado Family.

WITTENBERG, Sister Mary Ste. Therese First edition. One of 325 numbered copies printed at the Plantin Press, signed by the author. Tall octavo. [8 including frontispiece portrait], 72, [1, blank], [1, colophon] pp. With t he color folding map of the Rancho. Publisher's quarter white cloth over blue boards, front board with title and surrounding floral frame in red, printed paper spine label. An excellent copy. One of the Dawson's most beautiful productions. "n 1819, Agust’n and Ygnacio Machado joined with Felipe Talamantes and his son, Tomas, to acquire grazing rights to 14,000 acres of land. The family lore relates that Agust’n was chosen, by virtue of his skill as a horseman to ride his fastest steed, from dawn until dusk, beginning at the foot of the Playa del Rey hills to claim Rancho La Ballona, or Paso de las Carretas. It stretched to Pico Boulevard (abutting Rancho San Vicente y Santa Monica) and to what we know as Ince Boulevard, where Rancho Rinc—n de los Bueyes began. The Machados' first adobe home on Ballona washed away in flooding creekwaters. Agust’n Machado rebuilt nearby, probably on Overland Avenue at Sawtelle or Jefferson. Initially, Agust’n traveled from the pueblo to tend his herds of cattle, horses, and grapevines. By the late 1820s, Ygnacio Machado planted corn and 6,000 grapevines at Centinela Springs nearby. The Talamantes family lived east, on Policarpio Higuera's Rancho Rinc—n de los Bueyes. machado brand Rancho La Ballona. Agust’n Machado married in 1824, but his wife, Mar’a Petra Buelna, died while giving birth to their first child, Juan Bautista. In 1826, Ygnacio Machado married Estefana Palomares. The following year, Agust’n Machado married Ramona Sepœlveda, who in turn gave him another 14 children. They were: Mar’a Josefa Delfina, Martina, Vicenta Ferrer, JosŽ Domingo, JosŽ Dolores, Mar’a Ascencion, Susana, JosŽ Franciso, Bernardino, Candelaria Onofre, JosŽ Ram—n Tom‡s, Jose Juan Rafael, Andres Manuel, and JosŽ de la Luz de los Reyes. In 1834, Ygnacio Machado built the Centinela Adobe. Although Ygnacio Machado received clear rights to Centinela in 1844, he traded the land to Bruno Avila for a house in the pueblo and two barrels of brandy in 1849! The adobe is preserved and the Centinela Valley Historical Society maintains it today. Agust’n Machado took charge of the undivided Rancho La Ballona for the partners. He was respected and well known, politically, and for his white wine He traveled to San Pedro to trade for luxury items from overseas. The Machados held their rancho and other land through three governments: Spanish, Mexican and the U.S. In 1873, years after Agust’n Machado's death, Rancho La Ballona's title was finally clear. The James Machado family donated the last linen partition map for display at Loyola Marymount University, which reflects the effect of interest rates and land lost. Ygnacio Machado died in 1878. He and Estefana had seven children: Luisa, Versabe, Mar’a, JosŽ, Andres, Francisco and Rafael. In 1994, Culver City dedicated Machado Road, a connector road between Sepulveda and Jefferson Boulevard" (Culver City Historical Society).
book (2)

St. James Oil: It Radiates Health.

BROOK, Harry Ellington) First edition [?]. Octavo. Bifolium forming four pages. Printed n purple ink. Couple of light creases else a very good copy.The 1880s through the 1920s was the golden age for snake-oil purveyors. Harry Ellington Brook, styling himself Dr. in this publication even though he never matriculated from any accredited medical school (though he did receive an honorary degree from a Naturopathin Institute). From 1885 to 1926 (but for a 5 year hiatus during which he published a magazine called "Brain and Brawn"), Dr. Brooks wrote a health column for the LA Times entitled "Care of the Body." Judging from this flyer (of which OCLC records no copies) Brook felt that he deserved more salary than he was receiving at the Times and that probably pushed him into quackery and boosterism. He is most famous for his book ÒThe City and County of Los Angeles in Southern California,Ó published by the Chamber of Commerce in 1907. A basic for any collector of L.A.-iana.The fake medicine offered in this pamphlet was researched and prepared solely by Dr. Brook (as a mark of his ignorance of real medicine was once quoted as saying that tuberculosis was not contagious). In 1906 The Pure Food & Drug Act was the first of a series of significant consumer protection laws which was enacted by Congress in the 20th century and led to the creation of the FDA. Its main purpose was to ban foreign and interstate traffic in adulterated or mislabeled food and drug products. Previous to this, the patent medicine industry with its high-alcoholic content patent medicines, soothing syrups for infants with opium derivatives, and "red clauses" in newspaper contracts providing that patent medicine ads (upon which most newspapers of the time were dependent) would be withdrawn if the paper expressed support for food and drug regulatory legislation, had manufactured and sold numerous spurious or downright dangerous patent medicines. This well-thought of one, St. James's Oil, is a classic example of the quack medicine industry that flourished in LA at that time.
Original Albumin Photograph Entitled: Incline of the S. N. W. & L. Co."

Original Albumin Photograph Entitled: Incline of the S. N. W. & L. Co.”

LAKE TAHOE) WATERS, R. J. [photographer] Original boudoir albumen photograph (4 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches) on photographer's mount with caption at the bottom margin and on the reverse a map of Lake Tahoe and an ad for R. J. Water. Very good condition.Located on the shores of Lake Tahoe, the Sierra Nevada Wood and Lumber Company came into being mainly to supply the needs of the Comstock. The Comstock Lode had hundreds of steam engines that were hungry for four foot split pine and fir, using in excess of 100,000 cords a year. Most of the wood was cut from the tops of trees cut for lumber, but young trees of every size were also cut. Most timber operators clear cut every tree in their tracts, but the Tahoe lands were cut with conservation and second growth in mind. Founded in 1873, the company moved a few times before they built their sawmill at Crystal Bay. But getting the timber from there to the mines posed many difficulties so in 1880 they built the Incline Railroad. Once the lumber was sawn, it was loaded on to small railcars, and these cars were lifted up the mountain by the famous Incline Railroad. The incline was built in 1880, with the 8000 feet of cable weighing 14,000 pounds, taking almost a week to haul and ship from Truckee. The lift was 1400 feet vertically and the rail line 4000 feet long. As four loaded cars was being hauled up on the endless cable by the steam engine located at the top, four empty ones was let down the other rail, adding to the efficiency of the operation. The trip took about twenty minutes with one and a half cords of wood or 1500 board feet of lumber being hauled each trip. At the top of the incline, the lumber was dumped into a large wooden V flume that carried it south to the Virginia & Gold Hill water tunnel. There the lumber floated through the mountain in its own flume in the 3994 foot long tunnel, then down into Little Valley, landing down on the Virginia & Truckee Railroad at Lakeview Station, on the divide between Washoe Valley and the Carson City" (Truckee-Donner Historical Society).
Pictorial of California Landscape. Stray Leaves from the Pacific! Life and Scenery in the Western Slopes. Photographs from Originals.

Pictorial of California Landscape. Stray Leaves from the Pacific! Life and Scenery in the Western Slopes. Photographs from Originals.

VISCHER, Edward First edition of this rare precursor of Vischer's Pictorial of California Landscape (1870). Quarto made entirely of loose plates (as issued). The main part of the work is the same as that of his later edition; 60 original albumin photographs of drawings by Vischer divided into five groups of twelve; each group with its own plate list. Complete as issued. They, like the remainder of the prints in this offering, are 9 x 7 1/4 inches in size and each photograph has a printed purple frame and the copyright information beneath the image is printed in purple as well. There are an additional 64 supplemental albumen plates, again divided into sections and each section with a printed list of views. In the original folding brown morocco box that has a wallet-type closure and gilt cover lettering. Most of the inside of the box is of patterned paper but the top inner panel has pasted to it a label reading "Vischer's Miscellaneous Views of California." Some expected wear to box joints but overall an excellent copy; complete with all 124 plates, all clean and fresh, and in the original publisher's box. Considerably rarer than the better known 1870 edition.This 1867 Pictorial represents Vischer's first foray into the format for which he was to become so famous; using photography to illustrate his own works of art detailing California history. Vischer was, and is, a bibliographer's nightmare as he often did not follow his own printed plans. There is no hard and fast rule when cataloging Visher as he was very loose in his offerings and virtually no two copies are alike. For example, this copy is missing one of the [unnumbered] farming plates but has an additional and different Santa Cruz Wharf plate plus a plate not called for anywhere (but of extreme interest); "Snow Skating in the Sierras." Apparently as of that date there was no word for a skier. So, in actuality, this copy bears 125 disparate plates. Currey & Kurska #380 states; A forerunner of Vischer's Pictorial of California, which included the first sixty plates found in the 1870 compilation as well as forty-seven other plates comprising a miscellany of California scenery, including views of the giant sequoia of the Calaveras Grove and of the Yosemite Valley. Thus the bibliographers, who could only locate two copies, state that a full complement bears 107 plates. We can say with surety that this is incorrect. The only copy to have come up at auction states that the correct number is 115 (although that copy was lacking two of the first sixty views).This copy with a letter from California bibliographer Robert Ernest Cowan presenting (i.e. selling) this work and Visher's Mammoth Tree Grove to an equally illustrious author and collector, Francis P. Farquhar, in 1930. Cowan also included in the sale the text volume of the 1870 Vischer's Pictorial (this 1867 edition was issued without a text volume); and this actually is appropriate as the first 60 plates in each edition of the Pictorial are the same and the text volume is comprised of descriptive text for those 60 plates. Vischer was fascinated with California's Mexican heritage.
A Huge and Fastidious Collection of Plant Specimens from This Renown Wine Region.

A Huge and Fastidious Collection of Plant Specimens from This Renown Wine Region.

SOUTHWEST FRANCE: WINE GROWING REGION) A large gathering of plant specimens from the wine growing regions of southwest France. Each specimen is mounted via paper holders to bifoliums measuring 12 1/2 x 20 inches and each specimen within a genus folder containing differing amounts of specimens. Each specimen is named in French on the front of the bifolium and and, in much more detail, in a small square on the bottom right of the page bearing the specimen .E.g.: Scrofularinees [for Scrophulariaceae]; In this folder are 3 specimens of species of this genusÑÑ Linaria Cymbalaria; Linaria arvensis; scrofularinee aqua. All data is in French and in manuscript and gives the French [translated from the Latin] name of the plant, the flowering season and the type of habitat and flower color (if applicable). There are 15 genus folder bearing 76 actual species specimens. The specimens are, on the main, very large. All housed in a custom wooden slipcase with extensive brass fittings. Box measures 24 1/2 x 15 1/2 x 6 inches. No specimens broken or missing. Stock paper and chemise by Moullot Fils AinŽ Marseilles. A wonderful assemblage.South West France, or in French Sud-Ouest, is a wine region in France covering several wine-producing areas situated respectively inland from, and south of, the wine region of Bordeaux.[1]These areas, which have a total of 16,000 hectares (40,000 acres) of vineyards, consist of several discontinuous wine "islands" throughout the Aquitaine region (where Bordeaux region itself is situated), and more or less to the west of the Midi-PyrŽnŽes region. Thus, South West France covers both the upstream areas around the rivers Dordogne and Garonne (which also flow through Bordeaux where they combine to form the Gironde estuary) and their tributaries, as well as the wine-producing areas of Gascony including Bearn, and the Northern Basque Country. However, only areas closer to the Atlantic than to the Mediterranean are included in the region, with the city of Toulouse being situated roughly halfway between the South West wine region and the Languedoc-Roussillon wine region on the Mediterranean. The brandy-producing region Armagnac is situated within Gascony and the wine region of South West France, and some of its grapes are used to make Vin de Pays under the designation Vin de Pays de C™tes de Gascogne or mixed with Armagnac to produce the Mistelle Floc de Gascogne.South West France is a rather heterogeneous region in terms of its wines and how they are marketed. It is rare to see wines being sold as Vins du Sud-Ouest. Rather, the smaller areas and individual appellations market their wines under their own (smaller) umbrella, in contrast with common practice in e.g. the Bordeaux region.