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Nat DesMarais Rare Books

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Thomas Bros. Block Book of Oakland [CA]: Allendale, District 10.

OAKLAND: PLAT MAP ATLAS) First and only edition. Oblong folio (15 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches). Key map of Allendale in color, index leaf and maps in blue numbered 901-966. The plate maps are all in blue and printed on rectos only. Publisher's two-post binding of quarter red over black cloth, gilt cover lettering, floral pastedowns. Spine rubbed and edges strengthened but overall a very attractive and complete copy of this scarce real estate atlas.For many of us the firm Thomas Bros. connotes street guides used by drivers to find addresses but in the early 20th century they also made plate books for realtors. Indeed this copy seems to have been owned by a realtor as there are numerous corrections and in-fillings in pencil giving the correct homeowner's name, etc. Allendale is a former settlement in Alameda County, California now annexed to Oakland.[1] It was located 1.5 miles (2.4 km) northeast of Fruitvale. A post office opened in 1903 and by 1908 was a branch of the Oakland post office. Allendale was named for Charles E. Allen, a real estate broker. The commercial district of Allendale is located along 38th Avenue up and down from where it crosses Allendale Avenue. Allendale Elementary School is located there. Allendale is on what might be called the cinema archipelago of East Oakland. Each commercial district (with an exception or two) had a theatre beginning with the 1920s or so. This applied to not only Allendale District, but nearby Laurel (which had two), Fairfax, Dimond, and Fruitvale (which had a second one nearby at Foothill and 35th Avenue), and another at the foot of Park Boulevard on the east side of the lake. The Allendale theatre like most of the others, has been converted to another use. The one that has continued in use as a theatre is the Grand Lake, at the edge of East Oakland at the north end of Lake Merritt.
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Hitler’s Appeal Against the Madness of Versailles. No. 552H.

GERMANY: INTERWAR BROADSIDE) First edition. Broadside (11 1/4 x 9 inches). Printed on both sides and with a line drawing of Hitler. Fold line at center. Very good contion.Found as an insert in "Adolf Hitler an die deutsche Nation Die grossen Reden des FŸhrers auf dem NŸrnberger Parteitag 1933" (Berlin: 1933, 24 pp.). This broadside was issued in English to bemoan the effects of the Treaty of Versaille on Germany. "The Treaty of Versailles which had brought the First World War to an end in 1919 required Germany to accept responsibility for the loss and damage caused in warfare, forcing the country to disarm, make substantial territorial concessions, and pay reparations (fixed at £6.6 billion). These arguably excessive demands, the result of the Òlethargy and follyÓ of British and French governments, added to GermanyÕs resentment against the victorious Allied powers. When Germany proved unable to keep up with the reparation payments, France and Belgium invaded the Ruhr, taking control of the industry to extract the reparations themselves. The government tried to remedy the economic impact by printing more money, which led to hyperinflation. During the 1920s, the US government supported the German economy with loans in what became known as the ÔGolden YearsÕ, but the collapse of the American economy after the Wall Street Crash during the autumn of 1929 returned Germany to high unemployment and severe poverty. In this climate of disenchantment, Hitler appealed to the German people by promising to break free of the restrictions of the Treaty of Versailles" (International Churchill Society). Only one copy of the broadside located by OCLC (Deutsche Nationalbibliothek).
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Welcome, San Francisco Port of Embarkation. Camp Stoneman.

WWII) First edition. 4 1/2 x 5 2/4 inches. 32 pp. Illustrated. Publisher's stapled self wrapper with a depiction of a returning soldier in blue on the front. Very good. OCLC only locate three copies.Camp Stome was located near the town of Pittsbutgh, CA, in Conta Costa County, about 40 miles northeast of San Francisco. The idea for Camp Stoneman was born soon after Pearl Harbor in response for the urgent need for a large cantonment area at which port processing of troops in transit could be housed, fed and transported. The plans for such a camp were, of course, in the works of War Plans before the Japanese attack. The main requirement was that such areas have available three types of transportation--water, rail and highway. There were two rail lines in the Pittsburg area, Southern Pacific and Santa Fe. A mile from the camp was the San Joaquin River, offering a broad water channel into San Francisco Bay. There also were suitable paved highway routes in the area.,. The camp was a permanent base for 125 officers and 2,000 troops. Camp Stoneman could house and mess over 20,000 troops at a time on its 2,800 acres. Stoneman also housed German and Italian prisoners of war. In addition to almost 346 barracks (63-man), 86 company administrative and storehouses, 8 infirmaries, and dozens of administrative buildings, the 2,500-acre camp held nine post exchanges, 14 recreation halls, 13 mess halls, a 24-hour shoe repair and tailoring business, one post office, a chapel and one stockade. Overall, the camp was a city onto itself. It had a fire department and observation tower, water reservoir, bakery, Red Cross station, meat-cutting plant, library, parking lots and 31 miles of roads. For recreation, Stoneman boasted two gymnasiums, a baseball diamond, eight basketball courts, eight boxing rings, and indoor pool and a bowling alley. Officer and enlisted clubs provided everything from reading rooms to spaghetti dinners. The camp also contained the largest telephone center of its day, with 75 phone booths and a bank of operators who could handle 2,000 long-distance calls a day. Stoneman even had USO shows featuring stars such as Groucho Marx, Gary Moore, and Red Skelton. Lucille Ball once donned a swimming suit to dedicate an enlisted men's club. At the conclusions of the Second World War and the Korean War, Camp Stoneman was converted into a separation center, the function of which was to ensure that returning soldiers could be sent home as quickly as possible. After World War II, activity at Camp Stoneman declined. The area now consists mainly of residential homes, light industry, office buildings and Los Medanos College. The southern section of the former Camp Stoneman Rifle Range has been converted into an 18-hole public golf course. Other areas of the former rifle range have been developed into Stoneman Park" (Military Museum).
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Saar-Freund. Six Issues.

NAZI GERMANY: PERIODICAL) 6 issues of this Saarland (the smallest state in Germany) pro-Nazi periodical . Comprises Special Editions (Sondersgaube) Nos. 2 & 3, two issued form February of 1934 and 2 issues from March of 35. Continuous pagination but for one break. Each issue about 32 pp. Numerous half-tone photograph illustrations. Printed on wood-pulp paper. Very good condition.This periodical ended when Hitler came to power. As this state was close to France it likely did not feature the Third Reich until 1935, its last year of publication. Information about it is minimal. Neither of the Special Editions bear any illustrations. . But Saarland was important to both Hitler and Gen. Patton. Hitler's plans to strengthen Germany and undermine the Treaty of Versailles were given a boost in 1935. The German-speaking Saar region voted to reunite with Germany. Important for coal production, Saar had previously been removed from German control as a term of Versailles to weaken Germany industrially. Patton led the Saar Offensive through this region in 1945. The Saarland as we know it today is not that old. The region became part of the German Reich on March 1, 1935, and after the end of the Second World War fell into the French occupation zone. While it gained autonomy in 1947, the state remained under the influence of the French with the French franc still being the official currency, it was officially reunited with Germany in 1959.
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Personal Lessons, Codes and Instructions for Members of the Crystal Silence League by C. Alexander. A concise and comprehensive treatise embracing proper care of the Body and development of the inner or Mental Powers.

CONLIN, Claude Alexander First edition. Typescript. [40] pp. with the last two pages bearing ads for other works published by C. Alexander. Publisher blue printed wrapper with three metal grommets. Very good.[together with]Lecture on Geomancy. Chapters 1 forward. About 50 typed sheets, most with manuscript symbology and Hebrew characters. All on Portland Oregon letterhead (generic). These feel like they were copied from elsewhere but if so the author was quite skilled. Likely not related to Claude Aleander Conlin (his treatises are written in much simpler English). The date on these is various times in 1910.C. Alexander Conlin is mainly remembered as the magician and mentalist "Alexander". He was born in Sought Dakota in 1880 and by 1915 he was a well known performer. Between 1915 and 1924, Conlin, under the stage name "Alexander, The Man Who Knows," was a popular and highly paid stage mentalist. Alexander promoted his psychic act as a form of mental telepathy or mind reading. Audience members gave him sealed questions, which he answered from the stage. He was among the first to make use of technology in his act. In his turban was hidden a microphone though which his accomplice would give him the answers to the audiences questions. Interestingly he would send the Narell twins out to libraries where he was performing to research and steal pages from psychology texts and these formed the basis of his own book. He often ended shows saying Ôsomeday psychology will be taught in schoolsÕ much to the disbelief of his audiences. It is reported that Alexander earned around four million dollars during his relatively short career (equivalent to around £150-200 million in todayÕs money). He dominated the stage for nearly a decade before retiring in 1924, at the age of 43, the richest man in vaudeville, spending much of his time at his retreat, hunting and fishing and taking photos of nude women (a hobby from which he made a further $40,000 selling the images to various calendar companies)." (R. Forzoni)Like other stage magicians of the era he thought that Spiritualism held some kernels of truth. from 1919 onward he also operated a publishing house, the C. Alexander Publishing Company in Los Angeles, California, which released his own astrological, pro-Spiritualist, and New Thought material, including a 5-volume series called The Inner Secrets of Psychology and a booklet for his students titled Personal Lessons, Codes, and Instructions for Members of the Crystal Silence League. The latter is a manual that explains the technique of affirmative prayer, and presents methods for the development of Spiritualistic mediumship, and divination through crystal ball scrying. The back cover displays Alexander's connection to the New Thought movement, for it lists an extensive array of titles that Alexander offered for sale at his book shop, including works written and published by the New Thought author William Walker Atkinson under his own name and also under the pseudonyms Theron Q. Dumont, Yogi Ramacharaka, and Swami Panchadasi; as well as a book by Atkinson's sometime co-author, the occultist L. W. de Laurence. The title offered here is still in print but it is quite different from this. Rialto Beach in Washington State beach was named after him after the Rialto theater chain. Conlin had a home that overlooked the beach in the 1920s until it burned in the 1930s. No copies of this pamphlet are located by OCLC. We strongly suspect this is the first edition.An excerpt from "A Letter from C. Alexander" (1919): You have heard of Hindu swamis standing in the center of a crowd of spectators, and taking hundreds of pounds of live eels out of a small kettle that they had previously shown empty. You have heard of them planting a mango seed in a pot of earth and in less than fifteen minutes, before your eyes, a tree was grown covered with fruit. You have heard of how they were able to influence the most deadly of reptiles, the cobra snake, to do their bidding and follow an enemy hundreds of miles and kill in the middle of the night. You have heard of how they were able to influence others to do their bidding, even though miles away, through the power of silent mental influence. These things to the uninitiated look like miracles. But there is nothing that they have ever done any more than I have ever done that is supernatural. There is nothing that they do or have done that any human being with ordinary intelligence cannot do just as well as they can when once the secret is properly understood. And the secret of all of these mysteries of the Orient is CONCENTRATION".
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Conceptology: Phase 4.

FLEET, DR. Thurman First edition (reprinted many times). Parts 1-15 (complete). Quarto. Each "lesson" is bound at the top and all are printed on rectos only. Each lesson consists of a title page and 15 pages of text. All housed in the original cardboard mailer, front with a printed label of the Concept Therapy Institute (this set addressed to a Ron Rummel of Portland, OR). Very good and very scarce in the original edition (the earliest editions we find on OCLC all date in the 50s). Excellent condition.Dr. Fleet was a a very successful chiropractor in Texas before he saw the light. "With only a meager formal education and against tremendous odds, Fleet was an ordinary man who aspired to the extraordinary. As an infantryman, he earned a battlefield commission from the U. S. Army in World War I and became one of the nationÕs most highly decorated soldiers of that conflict. He emerged from the war an Òold manÓ of 23, suffering physically and mentally. Effects of mustard gas and shrapnel in his skull, and haunting, horrific memories plagued the young hero. Army doctors offered him little relief and no hope. With a family to provide for, he began a fascinating odyssey to rebuild his health and life. His journey led him into the realms of psychology, philosophy, theology, health and healing. Thurman Fleet regained his health and devoted his life to searching for, organizing and teaching the truth about the human condition in all its complexity. His legacy is Concept-Therapy." In an interview with William Wolff he states that he "psychically" received the basic 8 lessons and when he wrote them all down they were in a "strange and unfamiliar language". "Later some suggested that we send the strange writing to a professor of ancient language. We did this and it was then discovered that I had written in Sanskrit." The lure of the East was strong even in Texas. The Concept Therapy Institute is still alive and thriving outside of San Antonio. Dr. Fleet died in 1983 and the Institute is now headed by Martin O'Connell."Phase Four is the first phase to introduce the student to the higher path, to the science of soul, or to what we may also call spiritual science. The lower path is involved with the study of mind. It's important for the student of Concept-Therapy to be mindful of the fact that there is a higher path, one higher than a science of mind. The student who gets overly fascinated with Phase One and with the production of hypnotic phenomena may lose sight of the fact that there is a higher path, and a power higher than the power of the mind. This would be the power of the soul. In Phase Four, the instructor asks the you to examine your concepts of good and bad, religion, God, the Devil, and the question whether there is a superphysical world with the possibility of a life after death. At this point in the course of instruction in spiritual science, you are given Ten Rules to guide you in developing the spiritual powers of the soul. Having learned about these Ten Rules, you are then encouraged to return to the lower path and apply the rules in your daily life, at home, at work, and when socializing with friends. In this phase, the student is made aware of what was only intimated in the Concept-Therapy course of instruction and the first three phases of Conceptology, namely, that each of us is the master of our own thoughts, that we are the molder of our own character, that we are the shaper of our own destiny" (Conceptology website).
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The Romance of Second Avenue.

SAYRE, J. Willis First edition (a facsimile was issued in the 70s). Small pamphlet (4 1/4 x 6 1/2 inches). 16 pp. Publisher printed stiff orange wrappers. Excellent. Only three copies located by OCLC (all in WA).Sayre's family moved to the Northwest in 1890 when he was about 13. At the turn of the century, Sayre left Seattle to fight in the SpanishÐAmerican War in the Philippines. In 1903 he set the world record for circling the earth using public transportation exclusively, completing his trip in 54 days 9 hours and 42 minutes, Sayre's involvement with the theatre began around 1891 when he took a job at the Seattle Opera House folding programs. In 1899, Sayre began working as an advertising director for theater manager John Cort and soon opened Seattle's first theatrical advertising agency. In late 1907, he began his career as a theatrical critic with one of SeattleÕs weekly papers, The Argus. He worked briefly for the Seattle Star in 1909, then returned to the Seattle Daily Times, where he edited the paperÕs theatrical department and wrote reviews. He worked as the manager of the Seattle Symphony from 1908 to 1909. From 1924 to 1936 he worked as an independent promoter of theatre productions and films and wrote several books on the history of Seattle. One of these books, This City of Ours, was a standard history text in Seattle public schools for many years,This is a short essay on the cultural and historical importance of the then most cosmopolitan street in Seattle; Second Ave. He describes nearly every storefront and adds valuable commentary.
Official Programme of the 100 Mile Endurance Test to Be Held on Long Island

Official Programme of the 100 Mile Endurance Test to Be Held on Long Island, April 20th, 1901.

AUTOMOBILE; RACING) First edition. Octavo. 32 pp. printed on clay paper. Numerous half-tone illustrations plus a map of the course. Publisher's wrappers with covers lettered in red and black. A very good copy; no real flaws.No copies recorded by OCLC nor any at auction but there are copies in various museums and collections. "Three years before the first Vanderbilt Cup Race, the first major automobile competition on Long Island was a 100-year endurance test and a hill climb organized by the Long Island Automobile Club. As described by the New York Times "never before have so many machines propelled by gasoline, steam, and electricity have been seen together.to show the public just what they are good for in getting around the country conveniently and at a tolerable speed." (Vanderbilt Cup Races). The endurance test began in Jamaica [NY] and 67 cars participated with a speed limit of 15 miles per hour. The winner was determined by which automobile could finish the 100-miles within a fixed time limit. A total of 31 of the 67 cars completed the 100 miles. However, 14 cars were disqualified for exceeding the the 15 mph limit. The winner among the qualifying 17 cars was a 5-horsepower gasoline car driven by J.C. Chase and Dr. W.H. Hutchinson. The hill-climbing contest at Roslyn (2880 ft) had 12 entries with awards for the different classes of cars. A steamer won that test.
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Exposition de la Librarie Francaise.

ST. LOUIS WORLD'S FAIR) TERQUEM, Emile First edition of this French contribution to the St. Louis World's Fair. Octavo. [232] pp. Numerous illustrations, some in color. Publisher's gray cloth with cover device and lettering in white. Very old white stain to upper rear cover, some cloth soiling. a few pages with old and faint tidemarks to upper margins. Clean and tight if with a few cosmetic flaws.A bit of French braggadocio, A Collection of catalogues of the exhibits of French printers, publishers, etc., at the Louisiana Purchase Centennial Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. Numerous French publishing and printing houses are represented. It is likely that each printer or publisher had their own catalog printed and send the the Cercle de la Librarie for inclusion in this book meant for the Saint Louis Exposition as at the rear of many of the catalogs there is an imprint (e.g. Imprimee par Ch. Herrisey). A fine representation of the best printing available in France at the turn of the century, Many of the catalogs are very elaborate and colorful. Imprimerie L. Daniel (founded 1697) submitted just two leaves but each page is magnificent; the text on each page is printed on a page bearing differing color backgrounds but all with faint floral and geometric designs; each leaf with a very fine foliate border with another even finer border over the first. Octave Doin, Editeur, specializing in science, presents two leaves with machine-colored anatomical represetations (heart, eye, sinus, brain). The visuals (maps, plates, etc.) are all very fine but perhaps the most interesting illustrations are those of custom bindings offered by French binders.
Archive of Approximately 750 Original Animal and Nature Photographs.

Archive of Approximately 750 Original Animal and Nature Photographs.

ZEBOSKI, Walt [photographer] A fine and large collection of original photographs of animals by renown Northern California photographer Walt Zeboski. Almost all of the photographs are 8 x 10 inches and all but a few are monochrome. Plus a scrapbook. Very good.Part of a rare and significant archive of a leading Associate Press photographer from the 1960s to the 1990s, based in Northern California, first in the San Francisco Bay Area, then in Sacramento. These photos are loosely grouped together as "Animals and Nature" and include many shots of exotic animals as well as the inevitable shots of silly cats. Lots of cats.Walt Zeboski (1929 Ð 2012) was born in Sacramento, California and was an American photographer and photojournalist for the Associated Press for more than thirty years. Zeboski extensively photographed Ronald Reagan during his 1980 presidential campaign, snapping some of the most iconic pictures of Reagan's campaign. Zeboski, who often focused on California politics, covered the political terms of four consecutive Governors of California from the 1960s to the 1980s - Pat Brown, Ronald Reagan, Jerry Brown and George Deukmejian. Zeboski joined the Associated Press in 1966. In addition to Reagan and the Californian governors, some of his more famous subjects included Cesar Chavez, the Black Panthers, and Senator George McGovern. He also photographed Queen Elizabeth II's 1983 to Yosemite National Park.
Autograph Poem Signed plus 5 Postcards of Burdette and the Interior of His Pasadena Home.

Autograph Poem Signed plus 5 Postcards of Burdette and the Interior of His Pasadena Home.

BURDETTE, Robert J. The poem, finely penned, is on a plain (folded) sheet of paper measuring 10 x 8 inches and it reads; Ò Grant me Immortal Gods, this boon below/Let me forget one half that I now I know/And make me know the half I now forget, So ever prayethÉ Robert J. Burdett, Bryn Mawr, PA, October fifth, 1896.Ó It was never published. The five postcards are all polychromatic and feather Robert J. Burdette in His Library, Interior of BurdetteÕs Residence (on Orange Grove in Pasadena), Garden and Home of Robert Burdette, The Library, The First Collection of Bells in the World Owned by Mrs. Robt. Burdett. None bear any writing. Very good.Robert J. Burdett, 1844-1914, had a very succesfull career as a newspaper humorist before he became a pastor. He joined the staff of the Burlington Hawkeye in 1872, and his humorous paragraphs soon began to be quoted in newspapers throughout the country. With the encouragement of his first wife, the former Caroline S. Garret of Peoria, he began speaking in public and was very successful in this as well. He became a licensed minister of the Baptist church in 1897 soon after the death of his beloved Caroline. The poem was penned will he was studying theology in Pennsylvania. In 1903 he took charge of the new and massive Temple Baptist Church, Los Angeles, California, in 1903. The Temple Auditorium, located on the northeast corner of West Fifth and South Olive streets, was a stone brick, multi-story Gothic style building with towers, ogee arches, turrets and cupolas. A very imposing building. He was a congregation favorite and he stayed there until 1909 when he and his new wife (a rather unfortunate looking woman) retired to their palatial house on Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena. Soon after his retirement the Temple Auditorium became the Philharmonic Auditorium, and was home to Los Angeles Philharmonic from 1919-1964.
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The Wonders of the Jungle.

GHOSH, Prince Sarath First edition. Small octavo. 190 pp. including frontispiece and 18 full page monochrome illustrations. Publisher's green cloth with a dense illustration of life in the jungle in gilt and brown on the front, gilt spine lettering. A youngster by the name of John has affixed his naive signature to the front blank. Some minor wear to extremities. else a handsome, clean and tight copy.Prince A. Sarath Kumar Ghosh (Prince Sarath Ghosh), claimed to have been born in 1885 in India. He arrived in San Francisco on February 23, 1912 aboard the liner Siberia. This was a decade after Swami Vivekananda had made two tours of America, lecturing on Indian religion and society. He claimed to be a prince of the royal family of Ghosphara, and told everyone that he was making a trip to investigate the social, economic and religious conditions in the United States of America. At various times, he claimed to be the Maharajah of Patiala, head of the Sikhs, a nephew of the maharajah of Ghoshpara, and descendant of the royal line of Kannauj. Whoever he was, he quickly started making money by joining the lecture circuit and went across the States, giving lectures on various topics about India. He seems to have come prepared for this, for his shows included lantern slides of various temples, places and Indian conditions, and he would dress in various different Indian garb. In addition to the lecture circuit he sold stories to magazines and published a few children's books. He died in 1920 in the great Spanish Flu Epidemic.
Seen & Unseen; or

Seen & Unseen; or, The Monologues of an Homeless Snail.

NOGUCHI, Yone First edition. Signed in pencil by the author at the base of portrait (as in all copies). Small octavo. Frontispiece portrait, [69], [1, blank] pp. PublisherÕs red cloth, front cover with a dense gilt wave pattern, gilt spine and cover lettering. Previous ownerÕs calligraphic signature (Marmaduke L. Patterson) to front blank, slight wear to edges and extremities. A very good, tight and clean copy.Nine of the fifty monologues contained herein first appeared in another Burgett & Porter publication, The Lark, Yone Noguchi was the first Japanese-born writer to publish poetry in English; The Pilgrimage contained six haiku, a spare and direct form that inspired Ezra Pound and the Imagist movement. Yone Noguchi was born in 1875 in Tsushima. While studying at Keio Gijuku, Noguchi decided to travel to the United States. After arriving in San Francisco in 1893, Noguchi worked as a journalist and as a domestic servant before deciding to pursue poetry. A few years later, Noguchi published his first poems in a small San Francisco magazine called The Lark. He went on to publish many articles and several books of poetry and prose. He returned to Japan in 1905 and continued to publish extensively in English, including Selected Poems of Yone Noguchi (The Four Seas Company, 1921), establishing himself as a cross-cultural and transnational writer. Noguchi died in Toyooka-mura on July 13, 1947. The poet was also the father of Isamu Noguchi, the internationally renowned sculptor and de
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Be Wise as Serpents.

SPRINGMEIER, Fritz First and only edition, styled "Pre-Publication Edition". One of likely very few copies (this one bearing the following: Bk. No. [printed] 66 [manuscript]. Unpaginated by at least 500 pages. Numerous illustrations. Publisher's clear plastic post binding. Phone number in pen under the author's name on front wrapper (likely the author's phone number). A very nice copy. "BE Wise as Serpents is the history of the systematic destruction of Christianity and the building of a 1-world-religion. As you read this research based on, a. confidential interviews with participants within in the conspiracy, b. interviews of unwitting participants within the conspiracy, c. and historical documentation you will discover that there is great evidence for a history we have not been told, and a great struggle before mankind as the one -world-power/religion comes into focus." (Preface). He dedicated the book to about 30 people all involved in "unmasking" this great conspiracy;Alexander, Czar of Russia- for prohibiting all Masonic Lodges Giorgio Arabrosoli- His legal investigation into the P2 Masonic Lodge cost him his life. Randall Baer- Christian, ex-New Age leader, for knowing and saying too much. William Branham- Country preacher who learned how Illuminati- trained witches are infiltrating Christianity. Killed by an alcoholic, and false stories circulated to discredit him. Sen. Bronson- Cutting critic of Roosevelt's New Deal. His tampered with plane crashed. "Fritz Springmeier is probably the world's foremost authority on the bloodlines of the Illuminati and the techniques they employ to create a mind controlled slave. His books on mind control (co-authored with former Illuminati programmer Cisco Wheeler) are without peer in depth, rigorous detail, and uncompromising accuracy. His lecture on the Illuminati and mind control given at the Granada Forum in 1998 was the best and most astute presentation on the subject. Naturally, anyone who exposes the Illuminati's underbelly with Fritz's level of adroitness is going to come under attack by the Little Minions on the internet and from the 'justice' system, which usually has no trouble in conjuring up a suitable 'charge' to fit the frame."(Bibliotheca Playades).
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Time & Moments.

HILL, Robert Millard First edition. One of 18 numbered copies. Sixteenmo. [16], 2, colophon and blank] pp. Printed on rectos only and with 2 full page illustrations (presumably by the author). Publisher's string-tied green wrappers with a tree in re on the front. Some sunning to edges but very good.The only published (albeit self-) writing by this famed San Francisco printer. OCLC only locates one copy at the Bancroft. "Double-H Press, a print shop located in San FranciscoÕs Haight-Ashbury district, is best known for the posters in printed for rock concerts and other events during the late 1960s. Owned and operated by Robert Millard Hill (1918-2011) and his common-law wife Jennie Davis Hill (1914-1969), it was in business on Haight Street from around 1963 until around 1980. Hill was born in Seattle, grew up in Spokane and moved with his family to Los Angeles as a teenager, where he attended high school. After graduation he apprenticed as a printer and joined the lithographers union. He also studied at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree around 1940. Hill served in the U.S. Army during World War II, working at the Presidio of San Francisco as a physicianÕs assistant. After the war he worked for Schwabacher-Frey, a San Francisco printer and stationery house. In 1952 Hill went to New York City, where he met Jennie Davis; they would have two daughters. They drove to San Francisco in 1954, where Hill rejoined Schwabacher-Frey. He opened his own print shop around 1961, first on Union Street before moving to Haight Street. Named ÒDouble-HÓ after Hill and his wife, the shop carried on a general commercial offset printing business. Jennie Hill ran the business operation in the front of the shop while Hill did the printing. He also created oil paintings in a small room in the back of the shop. Their daughter Judith Hill recalls that the front of the shop became something of a social center on Haight Street. As San FranciscoÕs psychedelic era took off, Double-H began printing posters, such as the posters it printed for the dance concerts sponsored by Chet Helms (1942-2005) of the Family Dog at the Avalon Ballroom in 1966 and 1967, including posters designed by Alton Kelley (1940-2008), Stanley Mouse (b. 1940) and Wes Wilson (b. 1937). Sill a member of the union, Hill printed the union logo for Local #72 on some of the posters. Double-H printed a variety of posters for other music venues, including the Straight Theatre and the nightclub Whisky a Go-Go. A 1966 poster for The Psychedelic Shop on Haight Street was designed by Rick Griffin (1944-1991). It also printed GriffinÕs 1967 head shop posters promoting marijuana, published by The Berkeley Bonaparte, with ÒIn God We TrustÓ being the best known. Other print jobs included books of poetry, newsletters, calendars, invitations and other materials. Jennie Hill died in 1969, and Hill married Ruth Shobert the following year. His mother had purchased the building that housed Double-H Press. She died in 1979, leaving him the building. He closed the business, probably in 1980, sold the building and equipment and moved with his wife to Grass Valley, Calif., where he lived and painted for thirty years. He moved to Emmett, Idaho in early 2011, and died later that year." (TNB 12/2016)
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Invisible City. Nos. 1-27 (All Published).

BUKOWSKI, Charles) Edited by Paul Vangelisti and John McBride, this periodical was one of the most important poetry reviews in post-beat LA. Offered here are Nos. 1-27 in 19 parts, all issued and as published. Each issue generally runs around 16 pp. and is in newspaper format (11 x 17 inches) although printed on very good paper. A very good set; no issues.Published by the Red Hill Press whenever enough good material appeared. Now it is probably best known for containing many first printings of poems by Charles Bukowski. Issue No. 1 alone contains 10 poems by Bukowski and further poems by him appeared in Nos. 2, 3, 4, 7 & 8. But there are other important offerings herein. No. 6 is a an Artaud Anthology translated by Jack Hirschman. No. 16 features An Elegy for Pablo Neruda by Louis Aragon as well as a work by Lorca titled Poet in New York. Americans published include Charles Bukowski, Jack Hirschman, Robert Peters John Thomas, Carolyn Stoloff, Mike Finley, Samuel Menashe and others. Difficult to find complete."In 1971 Vangelisti started a poetry magazine entitled Invisible City with John McBride, a friend in San Francisco. They also initiated the book publishing company Red Hill Press. After Invisible City ceased publication with its 26th [sic] issue in 1982, Vangelisti successively worked on the periodicals Boxcar, which he co-founded with Leland Hickman; Forehead, co-published by Beyond Baroque Foundation; Lowghost; and was the editor of Ribot the annual publication of the College of Neglected Science from 1992-2002. He also co-founded Littoral Books as a co-operative publishing outfit with fellow Los Angeles poets Dennis Phillips, Martha Ronk, and Jed Rasula. Vangelisti has edited a half-dozen anthologies of poetry, including one each in Italian and Polish. His anthologies of Los Angeles area poets, such as Specimin '73, were among the first such collections to begin defining the historical trajectory of post-World War II poetry in Southern California. His first such volume, Anthology of L.A. Poets, was co-edited with Charles Bukowski and Neeli Cherkovski. In 1999, he co-edited L.A. Exiles: A Guide to Los Angeles Writing, 1932-1998, an anthology of displaced Los Angeles writers, and most recently edited SOS: Poems, 1961-2013 by Amiri Baraka (Grove Press, 2015)." (UCSD; Vangelisti Archive)
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Travelogue of a Trip Up the West Coast in the 50s; Annotated and with Many Images.

CALIFORNIA: TRAVELOGUE) DYER, Dr. Edwin L. & Zura Diary-like, annotated photo and postcard album of road trips taken in 1952, 1955, 1957/58 by Dr. Edwin L. and Zura Dyer of San Diego, California. A mixture of photos, post cards, typewritten daily accounts, ephemera, and clippings housed in a green Scrap Book and Album from the Educational Press, Inc., New York; measures 6 Ó x 9 Ó. Typed, dated diary entries bring the photos and postcards into context with several automobile trips taken by the Dyer family. The scrapbook was assembled by Dr. Edwin L. Dyer (1890-1971), an optometrist in San Diego, with frequent mention in the dated entries to his wife, Zura (1893-1962). The 1940 census lists three children, Marshall, Marian (or Miriam Lee), and Edwin, Jr. Prior to his optometry practice, Dyer had served as a Lieutenant in the 93rd Spruce Squadron, stationed out of Vancouver Barracks, Vancouver, Washington, during WW I. The first trip documented was to an annual convention of the California Optometric Association held in Sacramento, February, 1952. Zura Dyer is pictured in a newspaper clipping as one of four delegates for the WomanÕs AuxiliaryÕs convention which was held simultaneously with the state optometric associationÕs in Sacramento. The typed account of the trip includes sights along the way, where they ate and slept, and impressions. Ò8 p.m. off for Los. Slept in car by road Ð left at 7 a.m. Wed. Drove thru mts on way to Bakersfield. Tehachapi. 7:45 a.m. breakfast at a lovely road house. A 76 mile drive to Bakersfield thru hills and farm land. Cattle. Snow in mts. At Gorman. Sacramento 320 miles offÉÓ The trip is visually documented with colored postcard views of Sacramento, Fresno, Bakersfield, and Los Angeles, along with cut-out pages from the conferences they attended in Sacramento.The next trip documented was a vacation up the coast to Oregon and on to Seattle and the Vancouver, B.C. area in July, 1955. Sample entry from the return trip, ÒStayed in motel on S. side of Olympia, Wash. Cooked dinner and breakfast. Took picture. $5 lunch in Portland then on to WithamÕs. Arrived at WithamÕs 4 p.m. Perry milking. Helen showed all the beautiful flowers, etc. Ate cherries, red raspberries, cookies & cream. Left at 8: with car full of salmon, chicken, gooseberries, jam and cherries. Stayed at Motel near Eugene, double room, grapes and berries all around. $5.00 Thurs. 14th GrantÕs Pass. Warm. Ice-cream. 12:30 warm so decided to turn off into high mts. and visit Oregon Caves. Around side of mts., very tall pine trees. Two-hour trip thru caves conducted by young college boy. Very beautiful but damp trip.Ó A group of 3 Ó x 3 Ó photos document that trip Christmas time, 1957, found the Dyers making another trip up the California coast from San Diego to San Francisco. The entries for this trip are more detailed and extensive than the first two. ÒSaturday, December 21 / Up at 9 a.m. Had break-fast in Motel. Packed and started for San Francisco. CouldnÕt find any Motels nearer than Daly City without paying as much as Hotels charge, so went back to Daly City and found just what we wanted Ð Motel with kitchenette. We took it for 5 days and proceeded to make it look like home? Walked up to a beautiful big market on the corner and bought a boneless butt, eggs, bread, peaches, cheese and apple pie. Boy! Ham and eggs never tasted better. What a life! Sunday, December 22 / Arose at 8:30 a.m. and went to Golden Gate Park. Visited Aquarium, Science Building, planetarium and Botanical Gardens. Had lunch out of a slot machine. Arrived back at Motel at 6:30 p.m. Zura fixed a swell dinner. Wrote postals, read Sunday paper and went to bed 10 p.m.ÓThe scrapbook contains over 80 smapshots and 28 post cards that visually document Dr. DyerÕs daily travel accounts on three different automobile trips. Together, his entries and the images provide an interesting look at road travel in California and elsewhere in the 1950s
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Manuscript Diary of Chase Chairman Ellis J. Gittens’ Trip to South America.

J. I. CASE COMPANY) Original manuscript diary of E. J. Gittens documenting a tour of South American by this great American industrialist in 1925-26 (the diary covers only three months in 1926 but his Argentinian Identification Card is dated 1926). The red calf diary contains 38 leaves with entries composed in pencil producing 76 pp. Inserted in the rear pocket is a small book containing addresses and names, an Identity Card for Argentina bearing Gittis' photograph, signature and thumbprint, a membership card for the Association of Wisconsin, a small pencil-drawn map of some lake region in Wisconsin (fishing holes?) and a newspaper clipping telling of his trip to South America. Housed in a custom cloth clamshell case with gilt cover label. Very good.The Case Corporation was a manufacturer of construction equipment and agricultural equipment. Founded, in 1842, by Jerome Increase Case as the J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company, it operated under that name for most of a century. For another 66 years it was the J. I. Case Company, and was often called simply Case. In the late 19th century, Case was one of America's largest builders of steam engines, producing self-propelled portable engines, traction engines and steam tractors. It was a major producer of threshing machines and other harvesting equipment, The company also produced various machinery for the U.S. military (combat engineer equipment for the USMC, full-tracked tractors and scoop loaders for the U.S. Army, etc.). In the 20th century, Case was among the 10 largest builders of farm tractors for many years. In the 1950s its construction equipment line became its primary focus, with agricultural business second. n 1890, the Case Company expanded to South America, opening a factory in Argentina. In 1891, the company's founder died. By this time the Case company produced portable steam engines to power the threshing machines, and later went into the steam traction engine business. By the start of the 20th century, Case was the most prolific North American builder of engines. This diary consists of Chairman Gittis's trip to the Case factory in Argentina.Reared on the old homestead farm, Ellis J. Gittins obtained a country school education, supplemented -by study in the high school of Racine. He was twenty-one years of age when on the 1st of December. 1888, he became an employe of the J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company and, closely applying himself to the mastery of the tasks assigned him, he won promotion from time to time with its increasing responsibilities but also its increasing remuneration. In March. 1889, he was sent to Fargo, North Dakota, to take charge of the office at the branch house there established and subsequently he was given charge of the collection department. His next transfer took him to Lincoln, Nebraska, where he acted as local manager for the business for four years. Subsequently he spent two years in charge of the branch at Kansas City and then returned to Racine in 1902 as one of the sales managers. His next advancement brought him to the position of head sales manager and in October, 1915, he was elected to the vice presidency, continuing at the same time as sales manager. In 1920 Gittis was made Chairman of the Board of Directors, a position he held for 15 years. In 1925, Gittis took a three month tour of South America and visited various agricultural stations and Case offices in Chile, Argentina and Brazil. According to the newspaper clipping laid in, Gittens was very enthusiastic about the future of exporting Case agricultural equipment to Chile.