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Andrew Cahan: Bookseller, Ltd.

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TELEGRAPH POLES

TELEGRAPH POLES

White, Clarence H. Hand-pulled photogravure, 7 7/16 x 4 3/16 inches [18.89 x 10.50 cm] printed on tissue, tipped to the original laid paper leaf, 11 3/4 x 8 1/8 inches [29.85x 20.96 cm]. Fine. The image is a fine full-tone photogravure from CAMERA WORK 3, 1903. Clarence H. White (1871 - 1925) was born in West Carlisle, Ohio and moved to Newark, Ohio in 1887. An early interest in art was thwarted by his parents. Employed by a wholesale grocery firm, he began making photographs after a visit to the Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. In 1898, he exhibited ten photographs at the First Philadelphia Photographic Salon, which brought him to the attention of Alfred Stieglitz and other Pictorialists. By 1899, he was exhibiting widely, acting as a juror for salons, and organizing exhibitions of Stieglitz, Day, Keiley, Käsebier, et al. In 1906, he moved to New York, assisting at the Photo-Secession Galleries. In 1907, he collaborated with Stieglitz on a series of portrait and figure studies, which were subsequently published in Camera Work, and began his first appointment as a lecturer in photography at the Teachers College, Columbia University - followed in 1908 with an appointment at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, and in 1914, he opened the Clarence H. White School of Photography, New York. As a teacher he profoundly influenced the art and technique of a number of important photographers, including: Margaret Bourke-White, Anton Bruehl, Laura Gilpin, Dorothea Lange, Paul Outerbridge, Ralph Steiner, Karl Struss and Doris Ulmann.
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ÉLECTRICITÉ DIX RAYOGRAMMES DE MAN RAY ET UN TEXTE DE PIERRE BOST.

Man Ray Folio, two unbound folded sheets to make [6] pp. text, with 10 photogravures plates 8 1/16 x 10 1/4 inches [20.48 x [26.03 cm] tipped to a stiff art paper mount 10 7/8 x14 3/4 inches [27.62 x 37.46] each with a titled protective vellum wrapper. The text and prints are laid-in a blank vellum folder, which is mildly creased, and laid-in the four-point printed paper portfolio. This copy has the complimentary slip from the CPDE, which is seldom included. Each plate bears the signature of Man Ray, which was signed in the original negative. This is copy number 409 from a total edition of 500 copies. A fine, near new copy. Aside from a slight bit of toning to the printed four-point paper folder, this is a fine, near new copy contained in a newly made gilt titled leather-backed cloth over boards chemise with matching cloth slipcase. In 1931, the Paris electric company, CPDE, commissioned Man Ray to produce a series of images promoting the various uses of electricity. The resulting portfolio of ten Rayogrammes was issued in 500 copies, which were distributed to the CPDE's best and prospective clients, and not commercially offered for sale. The photogravure prints made from original Rayograms are titled: Electricité, La Ville, Salle de Bain, La Maison, Lingerie, Salle a Manger, Cuisine, Le Souffle, Electricité, Le Monde. In 2014, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Curator in Charge, Department of Photographs, Jeff R. Rosenheim, stated: "This remarkably seductive album of photogravures is an exquisite example of his legacy as America's greatest Surrealist photographer." "Man Ray's ÉLECTRICITÉ is not only one of the most ravishing and sought-after of company photobooks, but it contains a cogent suite of photographs that the leading American Dadaist and commercial photographer himself never bettered." Parr and Badger, The Photobook: A History. Volume II, p.183.
UNTITLED GELATIN SILVER PRINT

UNTITLED GELATIN SILVER PRINT

Chappell, Walter Vintage gelatin silver photograph 7 3/8 x 9 3/16 inches [18.54 x 23.34 cm.] The verso bears the printed label of the Carl Siembab Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts, which reads, " Walter Chapel Photograph/ Please return the Print to Gallery." Written in the photographer's distinctive hand, " Return to Walter Chappell, For one-time Repro only, 1958." A fine print. Walter Chappell (1925 - 2000) was affiliated with a long list of noted American photographers: Edward Weston, Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Paul Caponigro, Carl Chiarenza, et al. His association with Minor White, as a student, coworker at the George Eastman House, and with Aperture Magazine was one of his most enduring. He was represented by the Carl Siembab Gallery, one of the first galleries devoted solely to photography. In the early 1960s, the home he shared with his wife, the painter, Nancy Barrett Dickinson, was destroyed by fire, taking most of his negatives and prints. Photographs made prior to the fire are rare. This photograph was reproduced as plate XXXVI, the final image in, UNDER THE SUN: The Abstract Art of Camera Vision, By Nathan Lyons, Syl Labrot, Walter Chappell. New York: George Braziller, Inc., 1960. "Chappell's Plate XXXVI suggests a galaxy in colliding upsweep. Whatever the photographic source, he has swirled a majestic rhythm of purest spontaneity." Barbara Morgan, 5 REVIEWS OF "UNDER THE SUN", Aperture, Volume 8, N0. 4, 1960.