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Bruce Marshall Rare Books

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Plans and Photographs of Stonehenge, and of Turusachan in the Island of Lewis; with Notes relating to the Druids and Sketches of Cromlechs in Ireland.

JAMES, COL. SIR HENRY [Southampton: Ordnance Survey], 1867, 8 zincographed plates and plans, 8 mounted albumen prints of Stonehenge, Folio,(18.5 x 23.5 cm), 2 further mounted albumen prints from drawings by Henry James, one of these loose, minor dust-soiling, original cloth gilt, rebacked. In his preface, Henry James states that "this short account of Stonehenge and Turusachan, with the few well-known passages from ancient authors relating to the Druids, and to the progress made in the mechanical arts in Gaul and Britain, at, and for some time before the Roman conquest, is circulated for the information of the Officers of the Ordnance Survey, in the hope that it may stimulate them to make Plans and Sketches, and to give Descriptive Remarks of such Objects of Antiquity as they may meet with during the progress of the Survey of the Kingdom" (Southampton, 29th May 1867). Col. Sir Henry James was the Director General of the Ordnance Survey. In 1855 he created a photographic department for the Ordinance Survey as a means of reducing the scale of maps. He claimed to have invented photozincography, a photographic method for the reproduction of images, manuscript text, and outline engravings on printing plates. It is likely that it was invented by the department he created. This copy of a scarce and important photographic incunable differs slightly from most copies. The unnumbered illustration titled 'Turusachan, Callernish, or, the place of pilgrimage on the bleak headland in the Isle of Lewis' is usually reproduced as a zincograph, as the following illustrations numbered 12 to 15 at the end of the volume. However, the illustration here is a mounted albumen print of the same illustration. The additional mounted albumen print found loosely inserted bears the printed title 'Stonehenge restored: Druidical sacrifice'. Gernsheim, 359.
  • $7,872
  • $7,872
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Euclidis Elementorum Libri XV. Graecè & Latinè

EUCLID; GRACILIS, STEPHANUS; MARNEF, JEROME DE; CAVELLAT, GUILLAUME A Scarce Edition of an Important Work 350, [2]pp., woodcut printers device to title, enlarged version on verso of final leaf, woodcut initials, head and tail-pieces, numerous text diagrams, library, manuscript note to title in Greek, annotations throughout in an old hand, stamp to title, marginal worm trail not affecting text, occasional light foxing, later half green calf over decorated boards, 8vo, Paris, Apud Hieronymum de Marnef, Gulielmum Cauellat, 1573 A very scarce copy of the second printing of the Cavellat Greek/Latin edition of the Elements, corrected from the 1557/1558 edition. The edito princeps of the Greek text was published by Simon Grynaeus in Basel in 1533. Euclid's Elements was widely used from the 15th century. Across Europe, the Elements was printed on average nearly once a year from the edito princeps of 1482 to the end of the seventeenth century. It is still considered a masterpiece in the application of logic to mathematics, and has been enormously influential in many areas of science. Scientists from Copernicus to Newton were influenced by the Elements, and applied their knowledge of it to their work. This edition has over 300 woodcut diagrams ".curiously decorated with floral ornaments" - Thomas-Stanford, p12. Many of the diagrams of this copy have been redrawn in the margins in an old hand. Provenance: contemporary inscriptions; Francis Brethren (inscription); unidentified stamp from a Jesuit Seminary [Thomas-Stanford 32; Riccardi 1573.1; Adams E-1001]
  • $1,115
  • $1,115
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Art du Relieur, nouvelle edition, augmentee de tout ce qui a ete ecrit de mieux sur ces matieres en Allemagne, en Angleterre, en Suisse, en Italie, etc.

DUDIN, RENE MARTIN,  LEON GRUEL'S COPY , 110pp 2 engraved plates, old light circular stain in upper blank margin of title, dark red morocco backed marbled boards, spine gilt, 4to, Paris, J. Mornonvl, 1820. Originally published as part of the Description des Arts et Metiers (1761-1788); the section by Dudin was first published as a separate volume with the title L'art du relieur-doreur des livres in 1772. Although this manual was not the first to be illustrated, it was the first to have large detailed plates which could be helpful not only to those learning binding techniques but also to those who planned to make standing - and other presses. The two engraved plates illustrate 42 separate illustrations of the details of bookbinding including several illustrations of decorated covers and spines.Dudin based his text on earlier descriptions by Jaugeon and Gauffecourt, and the plates were prepared by Louis Simonneau. As a layman, Dudin depended heavily on the advice of France's foremost bookbinder of the period, Jean Charles Henri le Monnier. Monnier even arranged for him to watch books being bound. The general coverage of operations is good, and reasons are given for the various methods described, a virtue which has not been a strong feature in English manuals until fairly recently. This new edition is furnished with footnotes by J.E. Bertrand which are sometimes quite extensive. All separate editions are rare. A translation into English by Richard MacIntyre Atkinson was published in 1977. This copy belonged to and was presumably bound by the celebrated Parisian bookbinder, bibliophile, collector and scholar Leon Gruel (1841-1923); it bears his bookplate. It was subsequently in the library of Pierre Beres. [Pollard 45, Middleton 4]
  • $8,528
  • $8,528
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Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft, addressed to J. G. Lockhart, Esq.

FIRST EDITION, [4], IX, [1], 402p., engraved uncoloured frontispiece after J. Skene, extra illustrated with 12 plates by Cruikshank, light toning to plates and frontispiece, lacking half title, contemporary newspaper clippings of supernatural phenomena tipped in, slightly later dark green calf, boards ruled in gilt, spine gilt with morocco label, speckled edges, blue silk page-marker laid in, engraved bookplate of Henry Latham to front pastedown, bookplate of Micheal Ernest Sadler to flyleaf, 12mo, London, John Murray, 1830. First Edition of Walter Scott's popular work on witchcraft and the supernatural. A lifelong student of folklore, Scott had long harboured the idea of writing about witchcraft. He was able to draw on a wide-ranging collection of primary and secondary sources, including the large occult library at his stately home at Abbotsford. Empirical archivist, Robert Pitcairn, had been greatly influenced and inspired by the work of Sir Walter Scott and sent copies of the more dramatic cases to the author almost as soon as he found them. Pitcairn's private generosity with his research notes, and the public interest they generated through their serialised publication in popular literary magazines, ensured that there would be a ready market for a book on witchcraft by Scotland's foremost historical novelist. The resulting book, Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft, was written very quickly during the summer months of 1830 and published together with a series of illustrative plates by Cruikshank in time for Christmas. The work was a bestseller and exercised a significant influence in promoting the Victorian vogue for Gothic and ghostly fiction. The book takes the form of ten letters addressed to J. G.Lockhart, the epistolary mode permitting Scott to be both conversational in tone and discursive in method. In these, Scott presents a wide survey of attitudes to demonology and witchcraft from the Old Testament period to his own day. Scott's account is amply illustrated with anecdotes and traditional tales and may be read as an anthology of uncanny stories as much as a philosophical treatise. He also considers the topics of ghosts, fairies, brownies, elves, second sight and mythologies of the various Germanic peoples. Belief in these phenomena is presented as the result of ignorance and prejudice, which eventually dispersed by the rise of rational philosophy in the 18th century. Examining Scottish criminal trials for witchcraft, Scott notes that the nature of evidence admissible gave free reign to accusers and left the accused no chance of escape. Prisoners were driven to confess through despair and the desire to avoid future persecution. One trial which Scott had been quick to realise the importance of is that of Isobel Gowdie. Her confessions, rediscovered by Pitcairn in the archives of the Edinburgh High Court, became a sensational new source of Scottish witchcraft, bringing the term 'coven' - to denote a group of witches- into popular usage and attesting to a wealth of fairy lore in the highlands of Scotland, that was far removed from the traditional demonologists. Scott also observed that trials for witchcraft were increasingly connected with political crimes, just as in Catholic countries accusations of witchcraft and heresy went together. Throughout he treats his subjects in an analytical, rationalist manner, although pockets of superstition remain. Lockhart was Scott's friend, and later his son-in-law, and biographer. He was married to Scott's eldest daughter Sophia, and they settled on Scott's estate until he became editor of The Quarterly Review in London. His biography of Scott was his greatest book. Provenance: Bookplate of Henry Latham, a Cambridge priest and academic, and Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, from 1888 until his death in 1902. Bookplate of Sir Michael Ernest Sadler, father of the publisher, bibliographer and book collector Micheal Sadler. Sadler was a university administrator who stud
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A Picturesque Voyage to India; by the Way of China.

FIRST EDITION, 50 fine hand-coloured aquatint plates on thick paper, each accompanied by explanatory text, at least 2 leaves watermarked "Whatman 1808', Introduction and Cape of Good Hope leaves printed upside down to versos, faint blindstamp to title, occasional light offsetting, photocopied bookplate of Thomas Bulkeley-Owen pasted to front endpaper, contemporary gilt calf, a.e.g., rebacked with original spine, hinges reinforced, boards a little rubbed, oblong folio, London, Thomas Davison for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and W. Daniell, 1810. 'A collection of beautifully coloured engravings illustrating places and scenes of interest on the voyage from Gravesend to China and India.' (Mendelssohn). Thomas Daniell had received permission from the East India Company in 1784 to travel to India, accompanied by his nephew, William, with their travels documented through these illustrations. The Daniells left England in April 1785 on board the Indiaman Atlas, going via Madeira, the Cape of Good Hope and Java, arriving in Whampoa, China, in August. Having spent several months in China they then sailed on to Calcutta. The journey, financed in part by the sale of oil paintings of their travels, was documented in William's journal and by the publication of Oriental Scenery in 1795-1808 and A Picturesque Voyage to India, by the Way of China in 1810. The album opens with the Indiaman's departure from Gravesend and includes, among others, depictions of the East Indies and the Straits of Malacca. The majority of the views depict native life in Java (including shark fishing) and nautical scenes along the Chinese coast and Canton River, with some scenes of Chinese dress and manners. "Thomas Daniell played an instrumental role in graphically documenting a wide geographical and cultural range of sites across the Indian subcontinent, travelling more extensively than any of his contemporary colonial artists, and earning him the title 'artist-adventurer'. Assisted by his nephew, Daniell made three tours: from Calcutta to Srinagar (1788-91), a circular tour from Mysore to Madras (1792-3), and in 1793 they visited Bombay and its temple sites-always sketching, drawing, and painting intensively as they travelled" (ODNB). The Daniells' original watercolours for the scenes depicted herein are now at the Yale Center for British Art, Department of Rare Books and Manuscripts, bound with a printed copy of the work Provenance: Radnorshire County Library blind stamp to title Bookplate of Thomas Bulkeley-Owen. [Abbey Travel 516; Colas 797; Lipperheide 1523; Mendelssohn I, p.413; Tooley 173]
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Important letter to Sir John Harmer on Carnivorous Beetles

Autograph letter signed, concerning carnivorous beetles. Down, Beckenham, Kent, 13th September, 1881, 8vo (205 x 131mm), horizontal mailing folds, 1pp., in fine condition, signed Charles Darwin ; with retained copy of Harmer s letter to Darwin, Wick, near Arundel, 1881, 8vo (205 x 130mm), horizontal mailing folds, weak at folds. A fine unpublished letter to John Harmer, thanking him for his account of a beetle attacking a six-inch worm, and for the beetle itself, which Harmer had enclosed. Harmer had captured the beetle in Arundel Park in Sussex, after witnessing the beetle attack the worm he writes not having noticed any thing of the kind before I carried him home to satisfy myself whether such was his food or whether his appetite would be affected by captivity. He has since disposed of the fluids of two more which he cuts up in a very business like manner. Harmer fed it more worms, then sent it to Darwin in case there was an element of interest in the circumstance . Darwin s response reads I am much obliged for your kindness. I had read that beetles attacked worms, but did not know how far this was authentic. The beetle sent is Carabus Violaceus; & the genus may be considered as the tiger of the insect world. The posthumous revised edition of The Formation of Vegetable Mould, Through the Action of Worms (1882) notes that the larger species of Carabus and Staphylinus attack [worms] ferociously . This observation is absent from the first edition of 1881, so it seems Harmer s efforts were put to good use. Not in the Darwin Correspondence Project, but Harmer s letter to Darwin is (DCP-LETT-13332).
Bibliopegia; or

Bibliopegia; or, the Art of Bookbinding, in All its Branches

[HANETT, JOHN], PSEUD. ARNETT, JOHN ANDREWS 9 steel engraved plates (including frontispiece), slight spotting throughout, publishers decorative cloth, rebacked, original spine laid on, 12mo, London, Richard Groombridge, 1835. This was the sixth bookbinding manual to be published in England. Although this volume lacks the interesting trade lists and tables contained in Cowie's manual of 1829, it is the more significant, and it is interestingly illustrated. It was published at a time of many changes in the structure of the trade which were brought about by the introduction of new techniques and equipment, which in turn resulted from the rapid evolution of industry and society in general. Bibliopegia was the first English manual to carry illustrations of equipment, the frontispiece depicting the machine that led to one of the most significant changes in trade binding in the 19th century; the Imperial Arming Press. "The invention of the blocking machine in the 1830s made stamping into the cloth casing possible - the first blocked title appeared in 1832." The making of the cases became an operation of mass-production, and also of cost-reduction. "The effect of the new regime on working practices and conditions, and the bindings themselves, was profound. The development of the case binding market created within the bookbinderies a new class of work and a recomposition of labour, the skilled job of 29 forwarding in leather becoming marginalised in favour of the segregated mass-production of the simply constructed cloth cases." - Factory Manoeuvres Trade Binding and Labour in London: 1780-1850 - Dominic Riley and John DeMerritt. It is interesting to note that Arnett, an intelligent man of integrity and kindly disposition, appears to accept current practices without question, as did almost everyone else, at least in public. Changes were rapid and commercial pressures were very strong, so it was likely to be hazardous to demur, and it should be noted that Arnett was working for a large publisher at this time. The illustrations and fairly detailed descriptions of techniques makes this work a useful source of information about early nineteenth-century binding practices. It was reprinted several times, including in 1980, with an introduction by Bernard C. Middleton. [Bookbinder Vol. 19 Dominic Riley and John DeMerritt; Middleton, 17]
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Esperienze intorno alla generazione degl’insetti in una lettera all’illustrissimo signor Carlo Dat

FIRST EDITION, half title without armorial, title printed in red and black, engraved device of the Accademia della Crusca on title, 28 engraved plates including 3 folding, numerous text illustrations, occasional slight toning, bookplate and deaccession stamp of John Crerar Library, 19th century half morocco over marbled boards for the John Crerar Library, gilt stamped spine, red speckled edges, 4to, Florence, Insegna della Stella, 1668. First edition of Redi's famous attack on the theory of spontaneous generation. The invention of the microscope had led Redi to the investigation of minute life, and in this work insects are revealed with a degree of anatomical detail that must have struck the book's earliest readers as a genuine marvel. It contains his experimental demonstration that "flesh and plants and other things whether putrefied or putrefiable play no other part, nor have any other function in the generation of insects, than to prepare a suitable place or nest into which, at the time of procreation, the worms or eggs or other seeds of worms are brought and hatched by the animals." He applies the same principle to parasites, and in this text provides the first description of ectoparasites in his discussion of kinds of ticks. Some copies of this book have a 29th plate depicting a fly, but it seems to have been added towards the end of the print run. Garrison and Morton 97; Grolier/Horblit Science 88 (with 29 pls.); Norman 1812; Prandi, Redi 7. Provenance: John Crerar Library
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Libri de piscibus marinis in quibus verae piscium effigies expressae sunt [including] Universae aquatilium historiae pars altera cum veris ipsorum imaginibus.

RONDELET, G. Lugduni [Lyon], Matthias Bonhomme, 1554-1555. Two volumes in one. Folio (32.0 x 20.4 cm). Title page with an engraved allegorical vignette, [xiv], 583, [xxii] pp.; second title, [x], 242, [ix] pp., for a total of 880 pp., including two with an engraved (frontispiece) portrait of the author; ca 470 woodcut illustrations, including one mounted (as usual). Embossed vellum. Spine with five raised bands and script title. Boards richly blind-tooled, with rolled, floral borders and central oval cartouche with coat of arms dated 1676. Brass clasps. Edges speckled red. This is widely regarded as the most important of the three first works on fishes published almost simultaneously in the 16th century. It covers more species than the works of Belon (1553) and Salviani (1554-1557). As indicated by the Latin title, this work deals with real marine fish: the descriptions and illustrations are not fantasies. This mostly true, but the work does also contain some mythological sea creatures. All are represented in nice, detailed woodcuts. Apart from fishes, over a hundred molluscs and several other invertebrates, notably echinoderms and crustaceans are illustrated. A few shells are clearly from other locations, notably the West and East Indies. In the rear there is a section on freshwater fishes and invertebrates, as well as some terrestrial species, mainly amphibians and reptiles. "In his own day Rondelet was almost as well-known as an anatomist as a zoologist. A popular lecturer, Rondelet attracted scholars from all over Europe: . Gesner and Aldrovandi also studied briefly under him . For those fish he could inspect on the coast of Languedoc, Rondelet is thorough and usually accurate" (DSB). This work actually consists of two books; the second, which appeared a year later, is titled Universae aquatilium historiae pars altera cum veris ipsorum imaginibus. The second book includes a long poem and - again - Rondelet's portrait. Usually, these two books are found bound together, as in this copy. Here they are bound in reverse order. A replacement woodcut of a fish is mounted on page 238 of the first book (as usual). A fine, complete copy with strong impressions, in an attractive 17th century binding. The spine label is from a later date. Light damp-staining to the lower margin of the last few leaves, stronger on the rear free endpaper; a few, shallow, traces of worming in the inner boards; otherwise, surprisingly clean inside; no foxing and hardly any browning. Skilful repair to the clasps. Caprotti I, pp. 18-19; Dean III, p. 309; DSB XI, pp. 527-528; Nissen Schöne Fischbücher, 105; Nissen ZBI, 3475.
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An essay towards a Natural History of Serpents: In Two Parts

FIRST EDITION, 7 engraved plates, 15-page list of subscribers, contemporary calf twice ruled in gilt, spine gilt, spine rubbed, 4to, London, for the Author, 1742. A work by Presbyterian minister and political dissenter, Charles Owen. This work on natural history is a strange mixture of fact and fable, as much symbolic as it is scientific. Owen draws on classical, Biblical and mythological sources for his information on snakes, turtles, wasps and scorpions. He also examines the physical nature of serpents, including a section on poison and antidotes, and describes the folklore associated with such animals in all countries of the world. Owen's aim was not just to inform and entertain, but to share his belief that the natural world, as created by God, had moral qualities, which could guide people as to how to live their lives. Some of the snakes Owen describes are familiar link adders and blind snakes but others are purely mythological, such as dragons, basilisks and griffins, all of which he classified under the title 'serpent'. There is a surprising amount of biological information on dragons, given that they don't exist. "Dragons are Inhabitants of Africa and Asia; those of India exceed most in Largeness and Longitude: In the Tower of London, is the Skin of one, which is of vast Bulk". p. 74. It is possible that these reports are sightings of the large snakes that inhabit these areas. Burmese pythons and reticulated pythons are found across South East Asia, and African rock pythons in Africa. These species are the giants of the snake world, with reticulated pythons reaching over seven and a half metres. [ESTC: T99397.; Nissen ZBI 3033]
La Geografia di Claudio Tolomeo Alessandrino. Translated from the Greek by G. Ruscelli.

La Geografia di Claudio Tolomeo Alessandrino. Translated from the Greek by G. Ruscelli.

Venice: Giordano Ziletti, 1574-73. 3 parts in one volume, 4to (225 x 157mm). Each part with separate title-page, woodcut illustration of Ptolemy on *2, repeated on *4v, with 65 engraved double-page maps (of which 27 are of the ancient world and 38 of the modern world), woodcut illustrations and initials, with the 3 blanks H4, 4, and H6, later full calf gilt with gilt boss on covers, minor worming to the top margin of a few maps in the Ancient Geography section but not affecting the images, a little occasional browning to a few text leaves but an attractive copy of this important edition. This edition of Ptolemy includes early examples of maps concerned with the search for the North West Passage - the Zeno Brothers map showing a wide strait beyond the southern tip of Greenland, and the Gastaldi map with America and Asia separated by a narrow strait. This is Ruscelli's translation of Ptolemy, the first revised and corrected by Giovanni Malombra. The maps and text are the same as those in the preceding two editions, and the Latin edition of 1562 but one new map has been added, 'Territorio di Roma' (no. 13). The table is bound in a different order. Giacomo Gastaldi, one of the leading cartographers of the sixteenth century, composed a set of maps for an edition of the 'Geographia', published in Venice in 1548. It is among the earliest examples of his work, in a long and distinguished career. Despite being prepared on a small format, the maps are clearly and attractively engraved. Gastaldi was the first to add regional maps of the American continent, with important maps of the eastern seaboard, a map of what is now the southern United States, of South America, and separate maps of Cuba and Hispaniola. Gastaldi's maps were re-engraved on a slightly larger format for this edition published by Vincenzo Valgrisi, in Venice, in 1574. For this edition, Valgrisi (or the editor Girolamo Ruscelli) added four maps: a double-hemisphere map of the World (the first appearance of this projection in an atlas), a map of Brasil and amongst the most important of these is the second appearance (and first widely circulated) of the famed Zeno map. It shows Greenland connected to Norway in the north, and two land masses which are believed to correspond to Labrador and Newfoundland. The map was first published in Venice in 1558 by Nicolo Zeno, a descendant of a person by the same name, Nicolo Zeno, of the Zeno brothers. The younger Zeno published the map, along with a series of letters, with the claim that he had discovered them in a storeroom in his family's house in Venice. According to his claim, the map and letters were made around the year 1400 and purport to describe a voyage by the Zeno brothers made in the 1390s under the direction of a prince named Zichmni. The voyage supposedly traversed the North Atlantic and, according to some interpretations, reached North America. Adams P-2236; Sabin 66505; Shirley 133.
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An Authentic Account of An Embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of China; .Together with a relation of the Voyage undertaken on the occasion by H.M.S. The Lion, and the Ship Hindostan, in the East India Company’s service, to the Yellow Sea, and Gulf of Pekin; . Taken chiefly from the papers of His Excellency the Earl of Macartney, . 

2 vols. plus Atlas. Lond: Printed by W. Bulmer, 1797. Text vols. in 4to. full diced calf, hinges repaired, Atlas folio, matching half calf over marbled sides, rebacked to match text. Spines uniformly gilt, with 2 engraved frontispieces, 26 engravings in text, and 44 plates & maps in Atlas some of which are folded. On September 21, 1792, Lord Macartney set sail from Spithead charged with Britain's first official embassy to China. The embassy was conceived on a grandiose scale for the aim was to break down the aged Emperor Chien-Lung's disdain and suspicion of Europeans; he was to be dazzled by the grandeur of the British delegation and the cargo of rich presents. Staunton, a medical doctor and friend of Dr Johnson, had already served in many diplomatic posts, some as aide-de-camp to Lord Macartney, when governor of the Caribbee Islands in the West Indies. When Macartney was appointed governor at Madras, Staunton accompanied him as secretary. After a period of retirement he was again called to serve Macartney, as secretary to the embassy to China. He compiled this book chiefly from the papers of the Ambassador and his fellow envoys. His work was remarkably successful: fifteen editions were issued in seven countries in thirty years. The account of this famous Embassy was prepared at Government expense. Apart from its Chinese importance, it is of considerable interest owing to the descriptions of the various places en route which were visited, including Madeira, Teneriff, Rio de Janeiro, St. Helena, Tristan d'Acunha, Amsterdam Island, Java, Sumatra, Cochin-China etc.