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Stuart Lutz Historic Documents, Inc.

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The Duke Of Lauzun, In Newport And Awaiting A March To Yorktown, Promises A “Recounting Of The Battle Of 16th March”, The Battle Of Cape Henry Off Of Virginia

(DUC DE LAUZUN) ARMAND LOUIS DE GONTAUT, THE DUKE DE LAUZUN (1747-1793). Gontaut was a French soldier who fought in the American Revolution. He helped the French army at Yorktown, marching his troops from New England to Virginia. he was guillotined during the Reign of Terror. ALS. 1pg. 7" x 9". March 27, 1781. Newport [Rhode Island]. An autograph letter signed "Le Duc de Lauzun" in French to an unidentified correspondent: "Newport 27th March 1781 I ask your forgiveness, sir, for all the trouble and confusion caused you by my business affairs. I am writing in strong terms to M. Marchand and M. de Guéménée. I ask that my tableware be returned to Frantz; I beg you to sell it and to dispose of the money. If you find yourself in difficulties, either from paying the nine thousand francs, which I drew upon you in January, payable on sight within six months, or from any other causes, send to M. Pays to share this burden with you and assist you with the resources that can be found in the remainder of my little fortune. If, by the next post, which we await daily, I don't learn that all has been restored to order, I will send you a general proxy. I enclose here a life certificate and a recounting of the battle of 16th March. Be assured, sir, of my complete and sincere affection for you. The Duke de Lauzun". The combat of March 16th mentioned was the Battle of Cape Henry off the Virginia coast in which a British squadron met the French fleet; the result was a draw. Lauzun's biographer identifies M. Marchand as the duke's steward, and M. Pays as the keeper of his accounts. The letter has a vertical and horizontal fold and the usual light soiling.
  • $1,000
  • $1,000
book (2)

Early American Connecticut Document Sending Tax Collector To Prison For Not Paying Taxes: “Collector Of The State Taxes For Said Town?Has Neglected To Make Payment Of The Three Penny Tax”

JEDIDIAH HUNTINGTON JEDIDIAH HUNTINGTON (1743-1818). Huntington was an American general during the Revolution before serving as Treasurer for the State of Connecticut and a customs house collector for Rhode Island and Connecticut from 1789 until his death. DS. 2 pg. 7" x 12". February 16, 1789. Connecticut. A partly-printed document signed "Jed Huntington Treasurer" and directed "To the Sheriff of Litchfield". This official state document, partially handwritten and partially printed, asserts that "Mr. Elijah Woodward who was Constable of the town of Watertown in the County of Litchfield and Collector of the State Taxes for said Town?has neglected to make payment of the Three penny Tax?amounting to the Sum of Two hundred twenty two pounds fourteen shilling & six pence". As a result, that amount, plus a one shilling and six pence penalty, will be taken from Woodward's possessions or he must be imprisoned within the next sixty days. On the back of the document, in the hand of the Sheriff referenced above, is his response: "Then by virtue of the Execution and for want of Estate I Levied the same on the Body of the within named Elijah Woodward - and said the same in his hearing; and before I had opportunity to convey hm to Goal; I recd a Discharge from under the hands of the Selectmen of the Town of Watertown". This response confirms that Woodward was not imprisoned or fined, at least initially. Little record remains of Woodward; in his obituary from 1840, it only notes that his age, 92, fit within a pattern of longevity for his immediate family. Regardless, debtors' prison was a common way to deal with debt and financial mismanagement, deliberately or otherwise, in the early United States and Western Europe. The United States ostensibly eliminated the imprisonment of debtors under federal law in 1833, but individual states maintained the practice for decades longer. Therefore, this document is a fascinating reminder of a common early American legal practice. It is in fine condition, though the paper is thin.
  • $350
Shenandoah Valley Resident Writes To Confederate Colonel Kenton Harper Discussing Defense Of The Valley And Seeking Promotion For His Disabled Brother

Shenandoah Valley Resident Writes To Confederate Colonel Kenton Harper Discussing Defense Of The Valley And Seeking Promotion For His Disabled Brother

ROBERT BURKE (CIVIL WAR IN VIRGINIA). ALS. 1 pg. 8" x 10". August 31, 1864. Richmond, Virginia. An autograph letter signed "RW Burke" to "Col Kenton Harper": "I learn from the authorities that there are at least forty thousand detached men in Virginia who will legitimately belong to the reserve force - and in addition to these there are many below the age who would be willing to unite with it provided it is properly officered. For this reason Gen Kemper has in his appointments endeavored to select at Colonels gentlemen who possess large sectional influence, as well as Tried military capacity - I do not flatter you when I say that your acceptance of the Colonelcy of the August regiment would give great satisfaction not only to your fellow citizens of the Valley but to your many friends here -. In the event you accept?my brother Capt Thomas J Burke can secure the Lieut Colonelcy, and he is perfectly willing to relieve you of the trouble of organizing the regiment - Hoping that this will receive your?consideration". This letter reveals how military matters during the Civil War often worked in tandem with self-serving advancement. By August of 1864, the Shenandoah Valley, the breadbasket of the Confederacy, was under mortal threat from Union General Philip Sheridan. Though the Confederate forces under General Jubal Early, under whom Kenton Harper served, had once been able to hold their own, by the end of the summer they were collapsing under Sheridan's constant and successful military actions and his total war tactics similar to Sheridan's concurrent March to the Sea. To increase Early's army, Robert W. Burke discusses an effort by General James Kemper, leader of the Virginia Reserves, to send a force to unite with Early's. Burke proposes that Harper lead such a force and that Burke's brother, Captain Thomas J. Burke be his second. Such a promotion would have been laughable given Captain Burke had been listed as "Wounded leg, permanently disabled" after the 1862 Battle of Gaines' Mill. In the end, nothing seems to have come from Burke's proposal as Harper led no such force, the Valley was lost for the Confederacy after October's Battle of Cedar Creek, and Thomas Burke left active duty that December. The letter is in excellent condition with some folds.
  • $150
1762 Land Indenture Signed By Francis Hopkinson

1762 Land Indenture Signed By Francis Hopkinson, Future Signer Of The Declaration Of Independence, And Elizabeth Graeme, Early American Female Poet And Intellectual

FRANCIS HOPKINSON FRANCIS HOPKINSON (1737-1791). Hopkinson was a signer of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey. He later designed Continental paper money and an early version of the United States flag. DS. 1 pg. 15" x 21". October 1, 1762. Pennsylvania. A partially printed document signed "Fra. Hopkinson" and "Eliza Graeme", among others. It is for an early land sale in Manheim, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania between Henry William Stiegel, Charles Stedman, Alexander Stedman, and Benjamin Mishy. Additional signatories include Ann Stedman, Charles Stedman, Elizabeth Stedman, Alexander Stedman, Elizabeth Stiegel, Henry William Stiegel, and Justice Adam Simon Kuhn. The area was first gifted to James Logan in 1734 by William Penn's heirs, then sold by Logan's granddaughter in 1762 to the three men named in this document: German glassmaker Henry William Stiegel (1729-1785), Scottish immigrant Alexander Stedman (1703-1794), and his brother Charles Stedman. The reverse contains a lengthy endorsement signed by Mishy and his wife Elizabeth, who can only sign with an "X" mark. The previous summer, these individuals escaped Philadelphia's spotted fever outbreak for a trip to Manheim, amongst other stops in Lancaster County. Being friends, the Stedmans and Stiegel surely saw Hopkinson and Grame as credible witnesses to the transfer. Graeme would later start America's first literary salon in 1767, to which Hopkinson and other Founding Fathers like Benjamin Rush would attend. One of her contemporaries called her "The Most Learned Woman in America." The document is in very good condition but does contain some folds and tears and is lightly toned.
  • $1,500
  • $1,500
A Document For Revolutionary War Service Signed By Benjamin Harrison V

A Document For Revolutionary War Service Signed By Benjamin Harrison V, Signer Of The Declaration Of Independence And Father And Great-Grandfather To Presidents

BENJAMIN HARRISON BENJAMIN HARRISON V (1726-1791). Harrison served as the 5th Governor of Virginia between 1781-1784 and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. DS. June 29, 1784. Council-Chamber. A partly-printed document signed "Benj Harrison": "I DO Certify, That Benjamin Smith XX of Edward Clark is entitled to the properties of land allowed a Sargeant of the Continental line, for three years service". In addition to Harrison's signature, "Tho Merriwether" signed the document. This document represents a land grant given to a veteran of the American Revolution. According to the Library of Virginia, the state offered bounty lands for Revolutionary War military service who had served at least three years continuously in the Continental or state forces. This land was in western Virginia, which is present-day Kentucky or Ohio. No bounty land was given by the state for militia service. After reviewing the claims and affidavits, the Governor's office reviewed the claims and had final say. Once a claim was approved, the Governor's Office issued a military certificate that authorized the Land Office to issue a warrant for a specific amount of land based on the veteran's military rank and length of service, from 100 acres for a soldier or sailor to 15,000 acres for a Major General. Thus, this certificate notes that Smith was a Sargeant. In total, the Governor's Office issued 9,926 certificates between 1782 and 1876, as veterans' heirs continued to make claims. These land certificates, rather than direct payment, were the most prominent reward granted to veterans of the American Revolution, and therefore this document is a key reminder of the practice. The document is cut into black cardstock and placed below an engraving Governor Harrison, whose distinguished political service before, during, and after the Revolution was overshadowed by the political success of his son and great-grandson. Both items are placed into a black and gold wooden frame, which is in fine condition.
  • $1,500
  • $1,500
Contemporary Manuscript Copy Of The Quadruple Alliance Treaty Of 1718

Contemporary Manuscript Copy Of The Quadruple Alliance Treaty Of 1718

(QUADRUPLE ALLIANCE TREATY OF 1718) (QUADRUPLE ALLIANCE TREATY OF 1718). AM. 71 pg. 7" x 14". August 2, 1718. London. A contemporary manuscript copy of the Quadruple Alliance Treaty of 1718. This copy is believed to be that of William Wake, Archbishop to Canterbury and one of the signatories to the original treaty. This document also includes the signature of "Georgius R". British King George I was one of several Western European royal leaders that was a party to this treaty, which launched war against Spain. In 1713, the Peace of Utrecht had ended the War of Spanish Succession upon the king of Spain, Philip V to retain the Spanish throne in exchange for renouncing the French throne and holdings in modern-day Italy to Hapsburg Austria. However, by 1717, the Spanish monarchy desired to expand and successfully seized Sardinia in October 1717, followed by an invasion of Sicily the next year. In response, Great Britain, France, the Dutch Republic, and Hapsburg Austria created the Quadruple Alliance, which this treaty codified. Written in Latin and signed in London, the Treaty of London was a mutual defense pact between these four powers with the goal of restoring the pre-1717 boundaries in Western Europe. Signatories included King George I of Great Britain, King Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire, and King Louis XV of France. Over the next two years, a world war broke part between Spain and the Quadruple Alliance, which included a failed Irish invasion of Great Britain sponsored by Spain, a failed Spanish invasion of Brittany France, the French capture of Spanish Pensacola, and an Austrian attack on Spanish forces in Sicily, among other theaters of war. In the end, the conflict ended with the Treaty of The Hague on February 17, 1720, which resulted in Spain ceding all territory gained since 1717 in exchange for France returning Spanish territory it captured. This conflict is notable for the final alliance between Britain and France until the 19th century, for France subsequently allied with Spain in the Bourbon Compact. Spain would regain Sicily during the War of Polish Succession in 1735. This copy is written in Latin, folio on gilt edged paper, and sewn together in book form. It is in good condition, though the binding is aged.
  • $750