Bartleby's Books

  • Showing all 25 results

JOAN OF ARC vs. STOOGE

JOAN OF ARC vs. STOOGE

Muncaster, Robert; and E. McAllister Davis Broadside. "Permission Granted to Reprint," at bottom left corner of text. 58 x 38 cm. Text printed in two columns, on poor quality buff paper, old fold lines, a few closed tears along lower margin, not affecting text. Signed in type by Muncaster and Davis. The authors protest the Federal Court Order calling for "the total integration of Alabama's school system," and support Gov. Lurleen Wallace's declaration that Alabama and its elected officials would "dare defend our rights" against the three Federal judges who issued the order. "Her supporters stand at ready, waiting for her call to arms." Muncaster and Davis go on to argue that the 14th Amendment to the Constitution was "never properly ratified." They also assert that the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education of 1954 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 are both unconstitutional because the United States had allowed itself and its constitution to be subsumed by its membership in the United Nations when the U.S. Congress passed the United Nations Participation Act in 1945. From that time all of its actions were controlled by U.N. dictate. In this broadside, the authors see Gov. Wallace as Joan of Arc and the Federal government as "the stooge of the United Nations Organization." Muncaster and Davis promote a bill "to rescind and revoke membership of the State of Alabama in the United Nations and the specialized agencies thereof. Anything less than this Law of Repeal will serve as proof that the State of Alabama has betrayed her people to serve another master: The U.N. Government controlled by the sons of Satan!" Robert Muncaster continued to protest integration and to rail against the influences of the United Nations. A court case involving his son's refusal to sign his draft card cites Robert Muncaster's testimony that he forbade his son to register for the draft because "the war was being perpetrated by the United Nations in violation of the United States Constitution." [see the article on the family in the New York Times, Feb. 6, 1972].
LONG TAIL BLUE. As Originally Sung by Mr. T.B. Nathans. In All the Southern and Philadelphia Circuses. [Caption title]

LONG TAIL BLUE. As Originally Sung by Mr. T.B. Nathans. In All the Southern and Philadelphia Circuses. [Caption title]

Early Minstrel Competitor of Jim Crow] Broadside. 24 x 23 cm. Printed in two columns within a typographical border. Right corner outside border missing, some holes from folding, not affecting lettering, general wear. Twelve four-line verses, plus a 4-line verse chorus (printed twice). The narrator, he of the Long Tail Blue, goes to the City of Washington and visits "one of Jackson's levees," and the President offers "champaign," while Major Downing follows him about: "Some niggers they have but one coat,/ But dis child you see got two,/ I wears a Jacket all the week,/ And on Sunday my long tail blue.Jim Crow was courting a brown gal,/ And the white folks call'd her Sue./ But I guess she let that nigger drop,/ When she seen my long tail blue./ Jim Crow got mad and swore he'd fight,/ With sword and pistol too,/ But I guess I back'ed that nigger out,/ When he saw my long tail blue." The chorus: "Just look at my long tail blue,/ O! how do you like my blue,/ I'll sing you a song, it's not very long,/ It's about my long tail blue." T.B. Nathans is likely Thomas B. Nathans (1807-1889), who, with his brother J.J. Nathans, traveled the country with various circuses in the early nineteenth century. He began his circus career with Don Champlin, a wire walker, at age 16 in New York. He was associated with Brown's Circus, which is noted as the first circus to use a canvas tent. Thomas Nathans was known as a comic singer. His brother J.J. Nathans was a talented horseback rider and performer. "By the late 1820's, blackfaced white American performers.toured the nation, performing alleged Negro songs and dances in circuses and between the acts of plays. Like much of the rest of American culture, the melodies for many of these songs were of British origin.'My Long tail Blue' followed a Scottish folk song.'My Long tail Blue' told of a Negro dandy frivilously boasting about his clothing." [see Robert Toll's "Blacking Up: The Minstrel Show in Nineteenth-Century America," (NY: 1974)]. Dichter & Shapiro list a song of the title "My Long Tail Blue," published by Hewett & Co. in 1836-37. Brown University records a similar broadside, but with an illustration, published in Boston ca.1834-35, which evidently does not mention T.B. Nathans. Other copies listed on OCLC vary in size from the copy here, or include an imprint, and all refer to an illustration, not present on this copy.
ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF THE COON VALLEY RAILROAD CO. [Caption title]

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF THE COON VALLEY RAILROAD CO. [Caption title]

Railroad] [Iowa] [Broadside] Broadside. 30 x 17.5 cm. Text in three columns, signed in type by six officers of the corporation. Margins cropped very close, touching the bottom line of text in each column, with slight loss. An ink notation on verso has migrated through, faintly, to recto. The company, to be headquartered at Adel (Dallas Co.), west of Des Moines, apparently never got off the ground. The History of Dallas County (1879) mentions only two other railroads in Adel Township. The purpose of the Coon Valley Railroad Company was to construct a line from Adel along the Raccoon River Valley to Van Meter, Iowa, a distance of about 6 or 7 miles, connecting there with the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific line. Operations were to commence on December 4, 1868. Seven directors are named: F.S. Graham; Benjamin Greene; Era Willard; J.R. Van Meter; Emanuel Goughnour; William A. Wilson; and James B. Brenton [Brenton's name does not appear with the other typed signatures at the end of the broadside, possibly trimmed?]. Joseph H. Strong is to be Secretary and Treasurer. The History of Dallas County states that Adel, the county seat, was laid out in 1847. Joseph H. Strong built a grist-mill there in 1856 and Benjamin Greene had a vineyard as well as thirty acres in fruit trees. No publications relating to the Coon Valley Railroad found in OCLC. WE WILL HAVE A RAILROAD CATALOG LATER IN THE SUMMER. LET US KNOW IF YOU WOULD LIKE AN EMAIL COPY.
TO THE PEOPLE OF PENNSYLVANIA. FELLOW CITIZENS: Those of you who have perused the remarks which I have recently addressed to the members of the legislature.will have observed that I have been reluctantly dragged before the public in defence of myself and family from having been assailed with unprovoked virulence.and you will have seen that the only offence I have committed was the opposition

TO THE PEOPLE OF PENNSYLVANIA. FELLOW CITIZENS: Those of you who have perused the remarks which I have recently addressed to the members of the legislature.will have observed that I have been reluctantly dragged before the public in defence of myself and family from having been assailed with unprovoked virulence.and you will have seen that the only offence I have committed was the opposition, or rather the supposed opposition, I have given, or should give, to the election of Gen. Jackson as a president of the United States.; [Caption title and beginning of text]

Jackson, Andrew] Lacock, A[bner] (From the Pennsylvania Intelligencer.) Broadside. 45 x 29 cm. Text in four columns, signed in type by A. Lacock at Spring Dale, [Pa.], June 28, 1828, at end, along with a printed note: "Let us read this and then lend it to our neighbors." Docketted on verso: "Lacock v Jackson 1828." Paper uniformly browned, some faint old staining, ink note on verso bleeds through, slight printers error at a fold affecting a few letters. Not in AMERICAN IMPRINTS. OCLC lists a copy at Michigan, with the following catalogue note: "An attack upon Jackson's conduct in the Seminole War. Lacock had conducted an investigation of Jackson's conduct at the time." Lacock investigated Jackson as member of the U.S. Senate from Pennsylvania, issuing a report in 1818 (Sabin 38471) in which he concluded that Jackson had lied repeatedly in an attempt to justify his actions. He says in the present piece that Jackson "delighted to dwell with composure scenes of blood and carnage." After leaving the Senate Lacock returned to western Pennsylvania. A surveyor, he devoted much of the rest of his career to the promotion and construction of the Pennsylvania & Ohio canal (see DAB).