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F.A. Bernett Books

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book (2)

Histoire d'un traître

Color-illustrated poster, printed by the newspaper Libre Parole towards the end of the Dreyfus Affair, depicting in four rows of four illustrations each the most essential scenes from the story of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, told with an anti-Semitic and anti-Freemason slant, each cartoon with a lengthy caption underneath. Some mild toning, very minor chipping along edge, small repair to lower right corner, old creasing, overall very good. Sheet size approximately 41 x 54 cm. Loose as issued. Paris (Imprimerie Spéciale de la Libre Parole) n.d. (circa 1904). The Dreyfus Affair was a political scandal that divided the Third French Republic from 1894 until its resolution in 1906, with the pro-Army primarily Catholic "anti-Dreyfusards" on one side and the pro-republican Dreyfusards on the other. It remains today one of the most notable examples of wrongful conviction, with notable influence coming from the press and public opinion. In December 1894, Captain Alfred Dreyfus was convicted of treason and sentenced to life imprisonment for allegedly communicating French military secrets to the German Embassy in Paris. In 1896, evidence came to light identifying a different French Army officer, Major Ferdinand Walsin Esterházy, as the true culprit. High-ranking officers suppressed the evidence, and Esterházy was acquitted. Dreyfus was instead accused of additional charges based on falsified documents. Word of the cover-up spread, mainly owing to Zola's story in L'Aurore, and activists subsequently put pressure on the government to reopen the case. Finally, in 1906, Dreyfus was exonerated and reinstated as a major in the French Army. Ephemeral paper toys and items such as this one were distributed to help influence public opinion during the time of the Dreyfus Affair and helped contributed to the social and political divide in France at the time. Scarce; as of March 2020, WorldCat locates only two holdings of this broadside poster in North American institutions.
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Jeu des 36 têtes – Les Défenseurs du traître Dreyfus

Chromolithographed board game on paper published during the time of the Dreyfus Affair, in the style of the Game of the Goose, printed by L'Antijuif, an anti-semitic weekly newspaper and the official organ of the Ligue antisémitique de France, edited by noted anti-Dreyfusard Jules Guérin and drawn by A. Lambot, and published in response to the pro-Dreyfus "Jeu de l'Affaire Dreyfus et de la Vérité" published in L'Aurore, to be played with money and tokens instead of dice and depicting the heads of thirty-six villified Dreyfus supporters, including "the traitor" himself Alfred Dreyfus and German Emperor Wilhelm II. Some browning, minor soiling, old creasing, minor chipping along top edge. Sheet size approximately 61 x 43 cm. Loose as issued. Paris (L'Antijuif) n.d. (12 February 1899). The Dreyfus Affair was a political scandal that divided the Third French Republic from 1894 until its resolution in 1906, with the pro-Army primarily Catholic "anti-Dreyfusards" on one side and the pro-republican Dreyfusards on the other. It remains today one of the most notable examples of wrongful conviction, with notable influence coming from the press and public opinion. In December 1894, Captain Alfred Dreyfus was convicted of treason and sentenced to life imprisonment for allegedly communicating French military secrets to the German Embassy in Paris. In 1896, evidence came to light identifying a different French Army officer, Major Ferdinand Walsin Esterházy, as the true culprit. High-ranking officers suppressed the evidence, and Esterházy was acquitted. Dreyfus was instead accused of additional charges based on falsified documents. Word of the cover-up spread, mainly owing to Zola's story in L'Aurore, and activists subsequently put pressure on the government to reopen the case. Finally, in 1906, Dreyfus was exonerated and reinstated as a major in the French Army. Ephemeral paper toys and items such as this one were distributed to help influence public opinion during the time of the Dreyfus Affair and helped contributed to the social and political divide in France at the time. Likely quite scarce; as of March 2020, WorldCat does not show any individual holdings of this ephemeral game.
Looming [Creation]

Looming [Creation], I (all published)

Barbarus Johannes, Richard Roht, and Henrik Visnapuu Tartu: Odamees, 1920. Octavo (21.8 × 17.7 cm). Original pictorial wrappers by Natalie Mei; 69, [1] pp. Wrappers very lightly worn and discolored; very good. First and only volume of this important publication of Estonian modernist art and literature, which marked a radical break with the "Siuru" movement around Marie Under of the late 1910s. The aesthetic and political orientation of Barbarus, Roht, and Visnapuu-each of whose work would develop along avant-gardistic lines in subsequent years-was sharply opposed to Under's refined lyricism. In what can be considered the loose group's manifesto, Visnapuu proclaims: "Long live the fresh heaps of manure!" and calls for a new, more authentic sensibility in a way that harkens back to Nietzsche. "The carcasses of dead gods still lie in the streets," Visnapuu writes, and exclaims: "Long live the new pathos [...] the pathos of emergency after chaos threatens to bury everything." Describing the state of contemporary literature, Visnapuu writes: "Anarchist art, neo-romanticism, impressionism, symbolism, futurism are all lowered into one gray, misshapen, and infinite fermenting mass. There is great chaos. Things disappear into it..." In an article on the "death of Siuru" Visnapuu calls for literally enacting the destruction with the Italian Futurists spoke of "symbolically" (p. 56). In addition to Visnapuu's theoretical essays, the volume contains a selection of poems from Johannes Barbarus' forthcoming third volume of poems, Katastroofid, and prose by Richard Roht. With striking expressionist illustrations by Natalie Mei (or Mey, 1900-1975), a gifted, yet relatively unknown Estonian painter, set designer, and graphic artist associated with the "New Objectivity"-influenced period of Estonian art in the 1920s. Aside from a few smaller vignettes, her illustrations are in color and mounted on separate leaves, as well as the front wrapper. A very rare example of Estonian avant-garde book design, which had a brief idiosyncratic moment in the late 1910s and 1920s, when avant-garde visual art was centered in the Eesti Kunstnikkude Ryhm (Estonian Artists' Group), among other places, which emphasized geometric abstraction but was also influenced by movements such as Cubism and Russian Constructivism. Sources in English on Baltic Modernism are scarce, and this is still a topic that awaits further discovery and popularization in the West. KVK, OCLC show only one copy in Germany.
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Mtskhet i ego Sobor Sveti-Tskhoveli: istoriko-arkheologicheskoe opisanie [Mtskheta and its Svetitskhoveli Cathedral: a historical and archaeological description]. With 27 drawings and 55 ornaments

Natroev, A. and D. I. Ermakov, photographer Tbilisi: Izd. Komiteta po restavratsii Mtskhetskago sobora (Tipografiia K. P. Kozlovskogo), 1900. Octavo (25 × 16 cm). Later cloth binding, part of original front wrapper affixed to front board; XII, 464, XX, II, [2] pp. With nine full-page original photographic prints by D. I. Ermakov and thirteen lithographed illustrations, some of them on folding leaves. Very light wear and soil to wrappers; internally very good. Published on the one-hundred-year anniversary of the Russian annexation of Georgia, the present work is an in-depth description of the Svetitskhoveli Cathedral, an Eastern Orthodox cathedral north of Tbilisi, Georgia. Based on archival sources and personal research, the book explores the prehistory of the ancient Georgian city Mtskheta, declared a 'Holy City' by the Georgian Church in 2014, as well as the cathedral itself. First built in the fourth century, it underwent numerous changes, often as a result of foreign invasions, such as by the Arabs, Persians, and during Russian rule. All proceeds from the sale of the lavishly produced work were to benefit the restoration of the Cathedral. The book is particularly noteworthy for the photographic prints by Dmitrii Ivanovich Ermakov (1845-1916), an important photographer active in Tbilisi around 1870-1910, who was a corresponding member of the Caucasian Society of Fine Arts and the Caucasus Archeological Society. His photographic work "gives an ethnographic insight into some of the Russian Empire's remotest locations in the Caucasus region as well as of neighboring countries such as the Persian and Ottoman Empires. Based in Tbilisi with his own photographic studio -- considered 'a prototype of a photo-agency of today' (Logiinov 2008b, 1230) -- he frequently travelled abroad on business. His extensive estate included 126 sales albums and more than 25,000 negatives taken in Ottoman Turkey and Russian Turkestan, as well as in Iran where he had a Tehran branch and eventually received the prestigious title of 'Court Photographer to the Shah of Persia'" (Dominik Gutmeyr, Europe and the Black Sea Region: A History of Early Knowledge Exchange, p. 172). Text in Russian and Georgian. KVK, OCLC show copies at Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, the British Library, Harvard Fine Arts, Indiana, Urbana Champaign, Stanford, Yale, Collège de France, and the Warburg Institute.
Siuru I

Siuru I, II, and III (complete series)

Tallinn and Tartu: Kirjanikkude Ühingu "Siuru" Kirjastus; "Odamehe" kirjastus, 1917-1919. Quartos (27 × 19.2 cm). Later buckram bindings, preserving original pictorial wrappers by Nikolai Triik and Ado Vabbe (front and back); 148, [2]; 115, [4]; and 134 pp. Three full-page illustrations by Triik (volume I), six full-page drawings, of which one in red and black, and one vignette by Vabbe, as well as his publisher's and series device (volume II); Vabbe's wrapper design once reproduced within (volume III). Resized to bindings; one volume with owner signature and some foxing to wrappers; else very good, clean copies. Complete run of this short-lived expressionist-influenced anthology by the eponymous Estonian literary group, published from 1917-19. Centered around the leading modernist poet Marie Under, the "Siuru" group consisted of bohemian spirits whose work emphasized sensual experience and joyous optimism. Among its members were Friedebert Tuglas, Arthur Adson, August Gailit, Henrik Visnapuu and Johannes Semper. In addition to these writers' works, the anthology also contains poetry by Johannes Barbarus, Rudolf Reimann, Arthur Valdes, Jaan Oks, Aleksander Tassa, Richard Roht and Johannes Aavik. Work in translation includes writing by Georg Heym, Franz Werfel, and Paul Boldt, Aubrey Beardsley, Zigmunt Krasinski, and Emile Verhaeren The group took its name from the mythological fire bird "Siuru" that appears in the Estonian national epic "Kalevipoeg". Its members were very visible in Tallinn, meeting not only in Under's salon, but also in Tallinn's coffee houses, and some members had a reputation for rebellious behavior. Wrappers by Nikolai Triik in an expressionist style that corresponds to the aesthetics of some of the "Siuru" writers: "Es wäre falsch, die Siuru-Gruppe in eine ästhetisierende Ecke abzudrängen, die sich nicht darum kümmerte, was in der Welt um sie herum geschah. Schon die Illustrationen von Nikolai Triik im ersten Album wiesen in die Richtung eines Expressionismus im Sinne einer Anklage gegen die Unmenschlichkeit der Welt" (Hasselblatt 418). The first issue was printed in 780 copies, of which 40 copies were printed on Alexandria paper, numbered (these copies all unnumbered). No papier copies in North America: KVK, OCLC show a copy of the first volume at Munich, a complete run at the Finish National Library and a microfilm at New York Public Library.
1001 Izbrannyi Sovetskii Politicheskii Anekdot [1001 Selected Soviet Political Jokes]. Soviet samizdat edition

1001 Izbrannyi Sovetskii Politicheskii Anekdot [1001 Selected Soviet Political Jokes]. Soviet samizdat edition

[Telesin, Iuliius] 1989. [Soviet Union]: ca. 1986-1989. Ca. 110 leaves of computer-printed text to rectos and versos, measuring 29 x 20 cm, loose in unlabeled paper folder. First page creased to lower margin, else very good. Samizdat edition of this famous collection of Soviet political anecdotes and jokes, published in 1986 in Tenafly, New Jersey (Hermitage Press). It is unclear whether our copy precedes the printed emigre edition, or whether it was printed after the latter was smuggled to the Soviet Union. It was produced using a mainframe computer and captures the intriguing juncture of dissident practices and digital technology. Beginning in the late 1970s, during the early days of computing, employees at some Soviet institutions managed to print banned texts using line (or drum) printers, usually during night shifts (the use of duplication technology was usually tightly controlled by the state). By the 1980s, such printers produced text at a rate of several hundred lines per minute. The files containing the texts could be moved from mainframe to mainframe using magnetic tape. Regarding this collection, a scholar on Soviet anecdotes writes: "There are many collections of Soviet anecdotes. ... The funniest, most clever presentation of a large number of these that I have seen is Iulius Telesin's 1001 Izbrannyi Sovetskii Politicheskii Anekdot. Telesin arranged 1001 well-chosen anecdotes topically and added humorous rhyming quatrains called chastushki (the Russian equivalent of limericks), excerpts from Soviet dissident publications such as the Khronika tekushchikh sobytii (Chronicle of Current Events) and other snippets to make a very entertaining book" (Bruce Friend Adams 2005, 2). The compiler, Iuliius Telesin (1933), was a Soviet poet and translator, and a noted participant of Soviet samizdat culture of theh 1960s. After 1970, he lived in Israel. The original 1986 edition is well-represented in KVK and OCLC, but neither show a samizdat copy.
Bulletin de liaison surréaliste

Bulletin de liaison surréaliste, nos. 1-8 (of ten printed)

Jean-Louis Bédouin, editor 1974. Paris: 1970-1974. Quartos (29 × 18 cm). Original pictorial wrappers; 18 to 30 pp. each. Most copies very good, only four and five with light creasing to wrappers and upper spine of issue 4 lightly frayed. Substantial run, lacking only the final two issues, of this illustrated surrealist periodical issued from 1970 to 1976 (with a pause in 1975). The periodical was an important international signal against the supposed death of the surrealist movement post-1969, when it was denounced by leading members of the French Surrealist group: "The Parisian Surrealists who refused to abandon the movement regrouped, in close relation with their friends in Prague, around the Bulletin de liaison surréaliste. They were also supported by Surrealists in the United States" (Michael Löwy, Morning Star, 108). Indeed, the high number of contributions reflecting the Czech surrealist experience is noteworthy, especially by post-war representatives, such as the Švankmajers, Marenčin, Stejskal and Vratislav Effenberger. With a joint introductory statement by Jean-Louis Bédouin, Jean Benoît, Vincent Bounoure, Jorge Camacho, Joyce Mansour, and Michel Zimbacca ("No one has the right to dictate a Surrealist 'line' and still less to set it down" / transl. by Löwy). Among the contributors are Karol Baron, Bédouin, Vincent and Micheline Bounoure, Vratislav Effenberger, Robert Guyon, Marianne van Hirtum, Ted Joans, Robert Lebel, Mansour, Albert Marenčin, Renaud, Cabanel, Nicolas Calas, Camacho, Herbert Marcuse, Morin, Martin Stejskal, Svab, Švankmajer, Švankmajerova, and others. Illustrated with drawings and photographs, the issues contain poetry, prose, manifestos and theory, surrealist games, as well as lists of recently published surrealist works. The journal appears to be quite scarcely represented in institutions, which typically only show the 1977 reprint by Savelli.
Machinae novae Fausti Verantii siceni: cum declaratione Latina

Machinae novae Fausti Verantii siceni: cum declaratione Latina, Italica, Hispanica, Gallica et Germanica [New machines of Fausto Veranzio: with Latin, Italian, Spanish, French and German text]

Veranzio, Fausto Venice: self-published, [ca. 1616]. Folio (37.3 × 25 cm). Contemporary full vellum; engraved title within architectural element; forty-nine large numbered copper engravings on facing pages, followed by letterpress-printed text in Italian, German, French, Spanish, and Latin, each with a vignette headpiece at the head of the section. Binding with repairs; occasional light soil and foxing; small paper repairs to first few leaves and one plate with larger repair, slightly affecting the image; else about very good, and an apparently unresized copy with wide margins, retaining all five text parts. First and only edition of this important survey of mechanical, architectural, and technological designs and projects, the magnum opus of Fausto Veranzio (1551-1617), a Croatian polymath, diplomat, and priest, who was born in Šibenik on the Adriatic Coast, then part of the Republic of Venice. Veranzio attended school in Venice and studied law, engineering, mechanics, and physics at Padua, before entering the services of Rudolf II in Prague, as whose secretary he is thought to have conversed with Johannes Kepler and Tycho Brahe. He also published works of lexicography and logic. Following the death of his wife, he relocated to Venice, where he joined the Barnabite Order, and devoted his remaining years to the study of science and engineering. The large plates depict designs for flotation devices, a bridge using suspension cables, oil and wine presses, a rotary printing press, a universal clock, various types of mills (including a design that was used for one of New York's earliest tide mills), fountains, as well as the famous image showing a man gliding safely from the Campanile di San Marco in Venice, likely inspired by Veranzio's familiarity with da Vinci's drafts for a parachute. "It is difficult to determine with certainty whether Veranzio saw Leonardo's notes. Regardless, he certainly shared Leonardo's Renaissance spirit. They were both self-taught lovers of learning across different fields, including philosophy and history. Like Leonardo, Veranzio also harbored a passion for hydraulics and spent 2 years in Rome trying to regulate the flow of the Tiber. Back home in Venice, he maintained the wells and water supplies" (Innicenzi, The Innovators Behind Leonardo, p. 69)." Veranzio's book also proposes various means to harness solar and hydraulic power. One of the plates shows the church in his birthplace Šibenik. Veranzio's work is undated, but based on several notes of thanks by friends from July 1616, was presumably printed in or around that year; occasionally, it is dated as early as 1595. It has also been suggested that it was financed by the author and thus issued in small installments over a longer period of time. Complete copies are very scarce. Most copies in the market over the last decades have also either lacked one or more of the plates, or one or more of the language sections. This copy includes all five versions known to have been issued: Italian, German, French, Spanish, and Latin, as well as all plates. Copies with some colored plates are also known. As of February 2020, KVK and OCLC locate copies at McMaster, Harvard, NYPL, the US Air Force Academy, and the Getty (the copies at Chicago and the Huntington are noted to be incomplete, missing several and all of the plates respectively).
Soubor ex libris ze soutěže Spolku typografia v Praze; I. soutěž spolku na knihtiskařské ex libris [Set of ex libris from the competition of Typografia in Prague]. Complete portfolio of typographic bookplates

Soubor ex libris ze soutěže Spolku typografia v Praze; I. soutěž spolku na knihtiskařské ex libris [Set of ex libris from the competition of Typografia in Prague]. Complete portfolio of typographic bookplates

Typografia; Rudolf Hála, 1892-1968 1927. Prague: Spolek Typografia v Praze; Orbis, 1927. Octavo (25 × 17 cm). Original printed card folder, with thirty-four bookplates mounted on black card stock and loosely inserted; string-bound text part (14 pp.) laid in. Signed and inscribed by the editor, Rudolf Hála. Folder lightly worn; largely lacking green tie strings; else very good, with contents in fine condition. [Bookplates By and For Typographers]. A complete portfolio containing thirty-four bookplates printed for a competition held by the Typographia Society in Prague, in order to encourage the development of bookplate arts incorporating type-setting, rather than only using drawing, etchings, or other forms of graphic arts. The portfolio reproduces thirty-four of sixty-nine entries submitted, in order of the jury's selection, which are mounted on black card stock, with the designer's name and the award printed below. While some are purely based on set type and printed ornaments, others incorporate drawn elements, or even include iconographic elements such as a typesetter's cabinet or punches. Among the designers and illustrators are J. Vichnar, J. Dyntar, Ed. Svoboda, V. Ambrosi, Ant. Mašek, Ant. Řehák, O. Poskočil and others. With an introduction by the editor and publisher Rudolf Hála, which reflects on the significane of the typographic ex libris and its future development. Signed and inscribed by Hála. One of 150 copies printed. KVK and OCLC show the copies at the Czech National Library, Yale, and the New York Public Library.
Jonáš: nepravidelník klubu spřízněných duší při divadle Semafor [Jonas: an irregular publication of the Club of Kindred Spirits at the Semafor Theatre]

Jonáš: nepravidelník klubu spřízněných duší při divadle Semafor [Jonas: an irregular publication of the Club of Kindred Spirits at the Semafor Theatre], nos 1-33, 36-37 (all published)

Drozda, Zdeněk, Karel Hausenblas, and Jiří Gut, editors 1971. Prague: Semaforklub, 1967-1971. Quartos (A4). Single leaves of differently colored stock, with mimeographed text to rectos and versos, stapled to upper left corner; most issues ca. 16-22 pp. About very good; a few first and last leaves detached from staple, but present. One of the issues features an original ticket to the sixth meeting of the Club, stapled to the last leaf. A nearly complete run (lacking only two issues) of the first series of this publication, a Czech samizdat journal which was forbidden by a court in 1971, along with the eponymous club. Its publication began in parallel with the inception of the Semafor Club in 1967, during the laxer political climate of the pre-Prague Spring months. The Semafor Theatre is an important cabaret theatre, founded in 1959 by the popular songwriter and actor duo Jiří Suchý und Jiří Šlitr. It was to be site for screening films, poetry readings, jazz performances, puppet theatre, dance, musical comedy, cabaret, and other "smaller forms." The theatre was inspired by the interwar tradition of the "Liberated Theatre" and would siimilarly become a major venue for pushing the limits of both the political and the artistic. Although the affiliated club was twice dissolved by the communist regime (in 1971 and 1986), both times it managed to circumvent the ban by renaming itself (Jonáš-Klub and J-Klub) and has continued to publish its journal under various titles until today. Started as a fanzine, 1969 and the early 1970s saw Jonáš take on the more important function of an underground periodical that could publish writings by individuals which were either banned from publishing, or that would not publish such politically bold articles in other organs of official culture. Though technically published only for club members, Jonáš became a highly sought semi-samizdat whose articles often had little to do with theatre. It is an intriguing example of the use of "internal bulletins" (which were legal to publish) as a subterfuge to reach a wider readership. Each issue features a governmental registration number, and after 1968 the added note: "only for members of the club, gratis." The print runs were low, probably never exceeding 500 copies during this period. The contributions are by Jiří Suchý, Jakub Deml, Miloš Macourek, Josef Bílek, Pavel Spunar, Jiří Novotný, Ludvík Vaculík, and countless others (including many shorter reviews and letters to the editors). The issues also contain numerous reports on activities at the club and the theatre, scheduled performances, lists of members' addresses, and much else, making it a key source on activities of this important collective. The publication is pictured and discussed in the recent reference work on Czech samizdat periodicals, Český literární samizdat: edice, časopisy, sborníky, 1949-1989 (Michal Přibáň et al., 2018), p. 38. We cannot locate the periodical in KVK or OCLC. The only issues appear to be held by Libri Prohibiti Library in Prague.
Pesni Bor'by [Songs of struggle]

Pesni Bor'by [Songs of struggle]

Arskii, Pavel St. Petersburg: Proletkul't, 1919. Octavo (21 × 14.5 cm). Original illustrated, staple-stitched wrappers; 37, [2] pp. Wrappers very lightly chipped; paper restoration to spine extremities and wrapper edges. Still about very good. Fifth edition of the debut collection of poetry by one of the early members of Petrograd (St. Petersburg) Proletkult, the journalist, poet, and playwright Pavel Arskii (1886-1967). The Proletkult movement aimed to create a uniquely proletarian culture by encouraging and supporting artistic work by the members of the working class. Arskii's rise through the Proletkult movement was indicative of the movement's early success. Born into a peasant family, like many young men of his generation Arskii came to the city (Pskov) to work in a factory, where he was eventually arrested for "revolutionary activity." Mobilized during WWI, he took part in the storming of the Winter Palace. In 1918 Arskii joined the Bolshevik party. This was Arskii's first Proletkult publication, soon followed by the collection of short stories "Krov' rabochego" [The blood of the worker]. Arskii also wrote plays for Proletkult theater and was eventually elected to the national board of the organization along with other leaders from the "lower classes" such as Valerian Pletnev. Wrappers illustrated with a street barricade scene, signed by S. Vidbergs. This design was used starting with the third or fourth edition; earlier editions featured a printed cover. А Latvian graphic artist, Sigismundis Vidbergs (1890-1970) studied at the St. Petersburg Academy of Art and Design. In 1921 he returned to Latvia, and joined the "Riga Artists Group", a modernist artist collective inspired by fauvism and cubism, becoming one of the top Latvian artists of the period. A catalog of St. Petersburg Proletkult appears on the rear wrapper of this publication. As of February 2020, KVK and OCLC show three copies in North America.
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Ugro-russkii teatr [Ugro-Russian Theatre]

Nedziel'skii, Evgenii [Uzhhorod]: "Unio", 1941. Octavo. Original pictorial wrappers over blind wraps; 112 pp. and [16] pages of plates. Fifty-three photo-illustrations in the text. Text detached from wrappers; light chipping to wrapper edges; private inventory number; else about very good. A history of the professional theatre of the Ugro-Russian (Rusyn) people, an ethnic minority of East Slavs living in the historically contested Carpathian region. The book provides a history of performance of the Rusyn people, including all manner of rituals, and contains a list of the plays written for and staged by the Ugro-Russian theater in Russian. The text was published for the fifth anniversary of the creation of the theater (1936-1941) in Uzhgorod (modern-day Ukraine), then a part of Czechoslovakia and previously part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The author, Evgenii Nedziel'skii (1894-1961) was a poet, critic, and translator, best remembered for his many translations of Czech poets into Russian. Of Rusyn origin, Nedziel'skii studied at history and philology at Moscow State University, emigrating with the army of General Wrangel into Czechoslovakia in 1921. He was a Russophile and promoted the practice of Rusyn culture in Russian (see Elaine Rusinko, "Straddling Borders: Literature and Identity in Subcarpathian Rus'," pp. 407-411). This copy is no. 2 of 200 hand-numbered, illustrated copies (of a total print-run of 1500). Advertising of local businesses to last pages offers insight into the life of the community. As of March 2020, KVK and OCLC show only the copies at NYPL and Urbana Champaign.
La figuration narrative [La figuration narrative dans l'art contemporain]. Galerie Václava Špály

La figuration narrative [La figuration narrative dans l'art contemporain]. Galerie Václava Špály, červen 1966

Eva Petrová and Gérald Gassiot-Talabot 1966. Prague: SČSVU, 1966. Octavo (22 × 16.5 cm). Original pictorial self-wrappers; [16] pp. Twenty black and white illustrations. Very good. Rare catalog devoted to an exhibition of French painters of the New Figuration (or "Narrative Figuration") movement of the early 1960s. Artists such as Francois Arnal, Eugenio Barbieri, Eduardo Arroyo, Biro Atila, Gianni Bertini, Yannis Gaitis, Ruben Gerchman, Jacques Monory, and Bernard Rancillac turned to figuration in an attempt to "reinvent painting, reincorporating the images that had transformed the pictorial universe of the 1960s: cartoon, film, photography ... In that sense, the narrative figuration accompanied social, political and economic upheavals of this period. It also participated in raising the question of the role of the artist in society" (Ameline and Ajac 2008, 3). A preface by the editor, Eva Petrová, is followed by Gérald Gassiot-Talabot's essay "La figuration narrative" and a Czech translation. Important example of a foreign exhibition held at the Václav Špála Gallery, where literary and art critic Jindřich Chalupecký (1910-1990) created numerous international links in his programming (among others, Chalupecký also arranged a Duchamp retrospective in 1969 and supported young Czech performance artists). The liberal period of the 1960s, which resulted in the infamous Prague Spring, would soon come to an end: after the Soviet Invasion and ensuing wave of repressions, arts and culture would be under strict ideological control into the late 1980s. Not in KVK, OCLC. We only locate the copy at the Czech Museum of Decorative Arts. Not in NYARC.