F.A. Bernett Books Archives - Rare Book Insider

F.A. Bernett Books

  • Showing all 25 results

NLO - nevidimaia real'nost' [UFOs - the invisible reality]? Samizdat edition with original photographs

NLO – nevidimaia real’nost’ [UFOs – the invisible reality]? Samizdat edition with original photographs

Kuzovkin, A. S. and A. E. Semenov [Moscow], ca. 1988. Quarto (30 × 21.5 cm). Blind side-stapled wrappers on pink stock, with authors' names to front wrapper in red pencil; 22 leaves of computer-printed text and typescript to rectos, with 5 original photographs glued in and 2 drawings. Occasional corrections in pen; traces from glue to versos; still very good. Rare artifact of late-Soviet underground UFOlogical research, evidently published during Perestroika, but before the complete legalization of such studies in 1989. The study of intelligent non-human life in space was intermittently encouraged, censored and classified by the Soviet state. Open lectures on the topic were offered by the astronomer and physicist Iurii Zigel' at the Moscow planetarium as early as 1947, followed by the lectures of Iurii Fomin in 1957-1960. This openness alternated with aggressive debunking campaigns published by the central newspaper "Pravda" disputing the UFO myth in 1961. In 1967 Zigel' was allowed to appear on national television to solicit observations of "unidentified aerial phenomena" from the viewers for scientific analysis. His project was terminated with directives from the state in 1968, followed by another set of attacks in the media. The topic nevertheless captured the popular imagination, pushing underground all information gathering of the sightings of "unidentified phenomena". Unofficial UFO study groups appeared across the Soviet space, in Moscow, Yaroslavl, Novosibirsk, Tomsk, Kharkov etc. leading to the flourishing of UFO samizdat in the 1970s and 1980s. Aleksandr S. Kuzovkin was a Soviet optician and physicist, who became involved in the study of UFOs after making a personal sighting in 1964. From 1977 onward, he was part of an unofficial research group around Zigel'. His co-author, Aleksandr E. Semenov, was a Soviet defense and space engineer and the head of an informal research group called "Ecology of the Unknown" (AEN) in the 1990s. He was likewise active in the environment of Iurii Zigel' and Kuzovkin from the 1970s onward. In their captivating essay, which includes both detailed eyewitness reports, and cultural references ranging from Orson Welles to Erich Maria Remarque, the authors assert the pervasiveness of paranormal phenomena: "Not only are they being observed by numerous witnesses, they are also being registered by radiolocation devices, documented by photographs and film camera, and can be sensed by animals. UFOs at times have adverse effects on our technology. They have been shot at using air defense weapons and rockets, they have been chased by war planes. They have been observed in the air, in space, on the earth, in the water, underwater, in all regions of the planet." The eyewitness reports described range from Moscow sightings, to the Tunguska event in 1908, to a 1978 sighting in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria, which was captured via Polaroid.
  • $1,250
  • $1,250
Group of letters with photographs and drawings of UFO sightings in Soviet Union

Group of letters with photographs and drawings of UFO sightings in Soviet Union, 1978-1988

Nine letters, on blank stationery of varying sizes, usually handwritten in ballpoint pen or pencil, with smaller drawings; five submissions retain the original addressed postal envelopes. One report has been copied by typewriter, including the eyewitness drawings. Very good. A fascinating group of letters by ordinary Soviet citizens, describing UFO sightings in Moscow, Kharkiv, Dnepropetrovsk, Kislovodsk, and elsewhere, all with small drawings illustrating the observed phenomena. The study of intelligent non-human life in space was intermittently encouraged, censored and classified by the Soviet state. Open lectures on the topic were offered by the astronomer and physicist Iurii Zigel' at the Moscow planetarium as early as 1947, followed by the lectures of Iurii Fomin in 1957-1960. This openness alternated with aggressive debunking campaigns published by the central newspaper "Pravda" disputing the UFO myth in 1961. In 1967 Zigel' was allowed to appear on national television to solicit observations of "unidentified aerial phenomena" from the viewers for scientific analysis. His project was terminated with directives from the state in 1968, followed by another set of attacks in the media. The topic nevertheless captured the popular imagination, pushing underground all information gathering of the sightings of "unidentified phenomena". Unofficial UFO study groups appeared across the Soviet space, in Moscow, Yaroslavl, Novosibirsk, Tomsk, Kharkov etc. leading to the flourishing of UFO samizdat in the 1970s and 1980s. Four of the present letters were submissions to the Commission for the Investigation of Anomalous Phenomena (Komissiia po AIa), founded by Soviet scientists in Moscow in 1984. The letters were sent from Dnepropetrovsk, Rostov, Kislovodsk, and Kyiv. Three additional manuscript letters with drawings are concerning a sighting in Kharkiv in 1978 and were likely submitted to a Ukrainian UFO research group. The typewritten copy of a letter ("Nabliudenie NLO v Moskve 4 iulia 1978 goda") also dates to the earlier period. A ninth letter from Ochakiv, in southern Ukraine, was written in 1990.
  • $450
Le Motographe Album d'Images Animées

Le Motographe Album d’Images Animées

[Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de.] (Cover illustration) Paris: Clarke & Cie, 1899. Quarto (29.5 x 23.6 cm). Original red cloth-backed pictorial boards with cover design by Toulouse-Lautrec; unpaginated (28 leaves printed recto only), with 23 full-color optical images and the original "transparency" viewing card held within a pocket inside the front cover. Some slight bumping to spine, minor browning and staining to boards, light rubbing to extremities, some light browning to interior primarily along margins and endpapers, the transparency professionally repaired, overall a clean and bright copy. The rare first French edition of this volume of optical illusions for young children, with a charming front cover illustration after a specially commissioned drawing by Toulouse-Lautrec. The 23 optical images are meant to be viewed through the accompanying transparent viewing card, which is covered with a series of very fine black lines. Passing the transparency over the images is meant to convey a sense of movement. The optical images each feature viewing instructions underneath the picture, and include geometric shapes, a water wheel, a dancer, a harlequin, a train, a ship, a volcano, fish, a firefighter, a fountain, butterflies, and other images. This work first appeared a year prior, in an English-language edition published in 1898 by Sands. The first version had only 13 black-and-white plates and the viewer, preceding an expanded color edition published in both London and New York. As of March 2023, OCLC locates holdings of the French edition in only three North American institution and the V&A, and approximately ten holdings of the earlier English edition. Reference: Dortu, Toulouse-Lautrec et Son oeuvre, 4442-4444. Colta Ives, Toulouse-Lautrec in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, July 2-September 29, 1996.
  • $5,500
  • $5,500
Bibliofil: časopis pro pěknou knihu a její úpravu [The bibliophile: a journal for the beautiful book and its design]

Bibliofil: časopis pro pěknou knihu a její úpravu [The bibliophile: a journal for the beautiful book and its design], vol. VIII, nos. 1, 2-3, 4, 5-6, 7, 8, 9-10 (complete run)

Beneš-Buchlovan, Bedřich, editor Uherské Hradiště: Skupina moravských knihomilů, 1931. Octavos (24 × 16.3 cm). Original decorative printed wrappers; 247, [1] pp. (consecutive pagination). Twenty-two illustrations in the text and thirty leaves of supplements, including photo-reproductions, linocut and woodcut prints, and other ephemera. A few wrappers with light dust-soiling; one page with smudge; overall a very good set. Complete yearly run (vol. 8), with all supplements, of the Czech bibliophile publication which appeared in Brno and Uherské Hradiště from 1924 to 1941. Contributions by Miloslav Novotný, Jaroslav Červený, Beneš Buchlovan, Josef Hladký, Richard Martinčík, Oldřich Menhart, Petr Píštělka, Jan Prokeš, and others. With artwork both in the text and on supplementary plates by Ferdiš Duša, M. Galanda, F. Krajs, Ruda Kubíček, František Kysela, Alois Moravec, Jan Šembera, Karel Štika, Oldřich Menhart, and many others. Topics covered include typography, the art of the bookplate, bibliophile culture, gatherings of collectors and bibliophiles, exhibitions, book history in Czechoslovakia and abroad, and particular publishing phenomena such as Czechoslovak legion publications in Siberia. Both in the text and on the supplements a variety of typefaces and prints are featured. Sáňka 2566. As of March 2023, KVK, OCLC show two holdings in North America, one of them only for one year (1940).
  • $600
Krytyka: zhurnal-misiachnyk marksysts'koi krytyky ta bibliohrafii [Criticism: a monthly journal of Marxist criticism and bibliography]. 16 of 24 issues published in the original series

Krytyka: zhurnal-misiachnyk marksysts’koi krytyky ta bibliohrafii [Criticism: a monthly journal of Marxist criticism and bibliography]. 16 of 24 issues published in the original series, in fifteen fascicles

Kharkiv: Derzhavno vydavnytstvo Ukrainy, 1928-1932. Octavos (ca. 23 × 17 cm). Original decorative wrappers by Vadym Meller, printed in orange and red; ca. 120-220 pp. per issue. Most issues with several leaves of plates on coated stock. Good to very good, with some issues uncut and unopened; stamps of the State Library of Central Asia (Uzbekistan) from the 1920-30 (see below); occasional light wear and creasing to wrappers; some nicks to spines. Significant run of one of the leading modern Ukrainian journals of literature and the arts, with coverage of avant-garde art and literature from a Marxist point of view, and a domestic and broadly international focus. Edited by Mykola Skrypnyk, A. Khvylia, V. Desniak, V. Koriak, F. Taran, I. Kulik, T. Stepovyi, and Ia. Savchenko. Apart from them, the circle of contributors included Iv. Vrona, E. Perlin, S. Utevs'kyi, I. Kahanov, I. Aizenshtok, V. Sedliar, A. Shamrai, M. Dolengo, Mykola Baikov, I. Kulyk, Hr. Maifet, and many others. Among the leading subjects are the necessity of a Marxist literary criticism; the work of Lesya Ukrainka, Shevchenko, and Vynnychenko; and various emerging literary tendencies. Issue 4 contains a translation of an article about American proleterian writers by young American poet Robert Wolf. The issues also contain ongoing reviews of recent Ukrainian, Russian, and Western books and journals, sometimes alongside valuable illustrations of wrapper designs. The journal also reviewed foreign journals, such as Der Sturm and New Masses. Wrappers designed by a leading theatre designer of the period, Vadym Meller, the head artist of Les Kurbas' avant-garde Berezil Theatre. Meller (1884-1962) studied in Kyiv and Munich, where he was close to the Blaue Reiter group. He later exhibited alongside Kazimir Malevich and Aleksandra Ekster. The overall design is by his wife, Nina Henke-Meller (1893-1954), a noted Ukrainian suprematist artist who studied at Ekster's studio and was later active in Kyiv futurist circles. Most issues contains numerous black-and-white reproductions, with subjects including constructivist architecture in Kyiv, works by Vasyl Yermylov, Anatol Petrytsky, V. Kasyan, Les Kurbas, B. Kratko, M. Shekhtman, M. Rokyts'kii, Solomon Yudovin, and others. One issue contains several reproductions of the work of Diego Rivera. Some issues contain group photographs of Ukrainian writers visiting the Donbass or Belarus. The first series comprised 24 issues. In 1930, the journal was continued as "Za markso-lenins'ku krytyku" through 1932, for a total of 52 issues. The numbers included here are: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 (1928); 1, 4, 5, 7-8, 11, 12 (1929). The print runs range from 1000 to 2700 copies per issue. The journal was apparently published under the patronage of Mykola Skrypnyk (1872-1933), an old Bolshevik leader and leading figure of Soviet Ukraine. While not a nationalist, Skrypnyk had been a crucial driver behind the Ukrainization policy of the 1920s, which aimed at broadening Soviet power by relying on and fostering Ukrainian language and cultural life. By the early 1930s, this policy was re-branded as a nationalist counter-revolution and Stalin forced its reversal as part of a centralization effort in 1933, as a result of which Skrypnyk committed suicide to avoid recanting. Provenance: late 1920s or 1930s rubber stamps of the State Public Library of Central Asia ("G.P.B-ka Sr. Az." and "GPB Sr.Az."), subsequently renamed the State Public Library of Uzbekistan. As none of the issues feature later stamps following the renaming and restructuring in the early 1930s, the journal was evidently deaccessioned or moved to the exchange fund at this time. Periodicals with similar stamps are occasionally seen in commerce. As of March 2023, KVK, OCLC show three holdings in North America, ranging from one to three issues, as well as one holding of "Za markso-lenins'ku krytyku.
  • $3,500
  • $3,500
N. Rerikh [N. Roerich]

N. Rerikh [N. Roerich]

Mantel', A[leksandr] Kazan': Izd-vo knig po iskusstvu, 1912. Quarto (27.5 × 21 cm). Original pictorial stiff boards designed by Dmitrii Mitrokhin; 68 pp. and 11 leaves of plates. Frontis by Ernest Lanceray. Additional tipped-in reproductions throughout. Boards with traces of water damage; a reproduction on page 11 is missing. In protective mylar. First and only edition of the first monograph about the artist and archaeologist Nikolai Rerikh (Roerich, 1874-1947). The author was Aleksandr Mantel' (1880-1935), an artist, art historian, collector and curator. Mantel was the first to orginize an exhibition for artists of one of the most significant artistic movements of the time, "Mir Isskustva," in Kazan in 1910. In a foreword, Mantel' defends Roerich's mysticism, metaphysical approach to painting, and the sketch-like nature of the drawings, which were heavily criticized at the time. Also includes the facsimile of a letter by Roerich to Mantel'. Roerich's remarkable and long career brought him wide recognition in a variety of fields, including his famous designs for Sergei Diaghilev's "Ballets Russes" ballet company and multiple nominations for the Nobel Peace Prize for his active stance on the importance of cultural preservation. The monograph belongs to the early period of Roerichs artistic career, where his bond with Russian Symbolism, a movement blooming at the beginning of the twentieth century, is clearly visible. He was known for drawing inspiration for his art from Medieval history and the field of archeology, and a series of literary exerpts in this monograph lay out Roerich's theosophic views on the medieval past and the development of art forms. Roerich's works are held by GRM, GTG, the Roerich Museum in Moscow and St. Petersburg, the A. A. Bakhrushin museum and others. As of July 2022, KVK, OCLC show four copies in North America.
  • $600
Civilian Exclusion Order No. 79

Civilian Exclusion Order No. 79

San Francisco: n.p., May 15, 1942. Broadside (sheet size 56 x 35.5 cm). Mounted to foam board and matted. Minor toning, very small tear to right side margin of sheet, some soiling to mat, overall very good. Broadside notice from the Western Defense Command and Fourth Army Wartime Civil Control Administration regarding the 1942 relocation of Japanese Americans, dated May 15, 1942, excluding all persons of Japanese ancestry from a portion of Military Area No. 1 within King County, Washington, with specific boundary streets provided outlining the designated area, and calling for individuals residing in that area to report to the Civil Control Station in Auburn, Washington within the following two days, with required relocation by May 22. From late March to August 1942, a series of 108 civilian exclusion orders were issued by Gen. John L. DeWitt, head of the Western Defense Command (WDC), which directed the exclusion of "all persons of Japanese ancestry, including aliens and non-aliens" from designated areas along the West Coast of the United States. These orders systematically facilitated the removal of all Japanese Americans in California, Washington, Oregon, and parts of Arizona, neighborhood by neighborhood. The first proclamations on February 19 and March 2 created Military Areas 1 and 2, the former including the western half of Washington and Oregon, the southern half of Arizona, and the western half of California from the Oregon border to Los Angeles and the area immediately south of the city. The initial proclamations encouraged "voluntary evacuation" from Area 1 to inland states and to Area 2. The voluntary resettlement did not produce significant results, and so the WDC moved to organize forcible removal of Japanese Americans from these areas. 99 exclusion areas were carved out, encompassing Military Area 1. The Census Bureau illegally provided confidential demographic information to the WDC to assist in the defining of these areas. Exclusion orders were then issued sequentially, with areas deemed to be the most sensitive militarily given highest priority. Exclusion Order No. 1 was issued on March 24, 1942, and targeted Bainbridge Island, Washington. The orders were posted on buildings, billboards, telephone poles, and other high visibility spots, giving Japanese Americans one week's notice to prepare.
  • $1,500
  • $1,500
book (2)

Java Danse

Gurvich, Aleksandr and Aleksandr Frolov, artist Moscow; Izdanie avtora, 1926. Folio (35.2 × 26.7 cm). Original decorative wrappers; 3 pp. Name inscribed on cover in pencil: Barbara Palosh; some small tears around edges of front wrapper; remnants of stamp, P R; some light staining to reverse wrapper; stamp on reverse; else very good. The Java was a novel form of the waltz that originated in France during the 1920s. Set to a bouncier beat, Java dance choreography delighted and scandalised in equal measure on account of its close embrace. Java was popularised in the USSR during the relatively liberal NEP years, and would be phased out soon after, when Stalin's regime began to tighten the screws on acceptable forms of music and entertainment. The wrapper for this sheet music features a constructivist design by Aleksander Ivanovich Frolov, whose monogram can be discerned on the front wrapper (identified based on Morozov, Opredelitel' monogramm, 2008). Frolov was one of the 'Magnificent Four' sheet music artists, whose designs were used prolifically in sheet music publication. Artists of sheet music art often laboured in obscurity. Their designs functioned to attract the atttention of listeners and to distinguish the dances. To find sheet music from this time with its original cover is a rarity: covers at the time were often torn off, used for other pieces of music, and ultimately discarded. As of February 2023, OCLC locates only one holding of this title in North America.
  • $350
Russkii i germanskii voennyi mir o tvorchestve K. Popova [The Russian and German military world in the writings of K. Popov]

Russkii i germanskii voennyi mir o tvorchestve K. Popova [The Russian and German military world in the writings of K. Popov]

Bulgakov, K. G. Buenos Aires, 1957. Octavo (19.5 × 14.5 cm). Original printed wrappers; 104 pp. Stamp of the Union San Alejandro Newsky, a defunct private diaspora library, on title page, faint outline of a previously attached price sticker on the upper left-hand corner of the wrapper. Some light signs of wear; else very good. Added title in Spanish: Juicio del Mundo Militar Ruso y Alemán sobre los Escritos de K. Popov. Konstantin Sergeevich Popov was a significant military historian and memorialist in the early twentieth century. Despite losing his left hand in combat early on during WWI, Popov continued to serve for a large portion of his life, and wrote prolifically about the Russian war effort from a first-hand perspective. In this book, Popov's regiment general, K. G. Bulgakov, offers his own comments on Popov's writings, which detail the battles undertaken during World War I by his regiment, His Majesty Mikhail Fyodorovich's 13th Yerevan Grenadier Regiment. Reviews of Popov's writings from the era praise the author for his rousing portrayal of the Russian Empire's military prowess; some critics even went so far as to suggest the book as prescribed reading for young men, so that they might familiarise themselves with the Russian Empire's great military history. This edition was published in 1957 by Anton, a Russian-owned publishing house based in Buenos Aires. As of March 2023, KVK, OCLC show four copies in North America.
  • $250
Slate Pencil Drawings for the Self Instruction of Children

Slate Pencil Drawings for the Self Instruction of Children

Canton, R[obert] London: R. Canton, n.d. [ca. 1850]. Duodecimo (16.7 x 10.5 cm). Original glazed pictorial wrapper, front wrapper printed in gold, green, and black and with embossed design; 12 leaves printed on one side only. Some light handling wear and marginal tears along edges, some bumping along spine, rubbing and scuffing to covers, light wear to extremities, prior repair to spine, overall good condition. A sweet little 19th century instructional volume aimed at children. The 12 leaves are lithographed and printed as mostly black backgrounds highlighted with white drawings on them, forming twelve 2-page spreads mimicking a school blackboard. The illustrations range from simple geometric shapes to game boards, birdcages, animals, houses and other building, furniture, fruit, toys, and other items. The illustration to the cover depicts three children sitting quietly, teaching themselves how to draw. At the time of this volume's publication, Robert William Canton (1821-1893) described himself as a lithographic printer and publisher who later moved into the printing and publishing of valentines, bookmarks, conversation cards, and other similar items. In an advertisement from the time, Canton "calls the attention of the Trade to the facilities he possesses for executing first-class Colour Printing, and informs them that he is at all times ready to make Sketches, emblazon Testimonials to Clergymen, Public Servants, and others, on the shortest possible notice. Work of this description can also be executed for working at the Establishments of his Customers with their own imprints; and is a class of work to which he directs his particular attention, and in which he has had a most extensive patronage for a series of years." (The Bookseller, 1862). There is not much additional information on Canton's business or his publications, although he was a participant in the 1862 International Exhibition and continue to print advertisements for his business into the 1880s. A very scarce and delightful volume; as of March 2023, OCLC locates only two holdings in North American libraries and two in Australia.
  • $1,250
  • $1,250
Cherez polius v Ameriku. Risunki A. Deineka [Across the Pole to America. Drawings by A. Deineka]

Cherez polius v Ameriku. Risunki A. Deineka [Across the Pole to America. Drawings by A. Deineka]

Baidukov, G[eorgii], Geroi Sovetskogo Soiuza [Hero of the Soviet Union] and Aleksandr Deineka, artist Moscow-Leningrad: Izdatel'stvo detskoi literatury (Fabrika detskoi knigi), 1938. Octavo (24.5 × 19 cm). Original pictorial card boards with cloth spine; 38, [2] pages. Numerous color illustrations and portraits. Light rubbing to edges and corners; else about very good. Soviet children's book commemorating the world's first successful voyage by plane across the North Pole, from Moscow to Vancouver, which Baidukov (1907-1994) executed together with V. Chkalov and A. Beliakov in June 1937. For an audience of pre-schoolers, Baidukov here recounts the three-day journey from a first person perspective, describing the actions of his colleagues and finally their enthusiastic arrival in the United States and their reception back in Moscow. In 1941, Baidukov would be dispatched to the US by Stalin to discuss the Soviet purchase of American fighter planes with President Roosevelt, shortly after the Soviet Union entered the war in June 1941. Illustrated by Aleksandr Deineka (1899-1969), a leading modernist figurative painter. From 1920-1925, Deineka studied at VKhUTEMAS, a hotbed of artistic experimentation in the 1920s. In 1925 he became a founding, and perhaps the most prominent, member of "OST" (Obshchestvo stankistov), or the "Society of Easel Painters", active in Moscow in 1925-1931. The group's objective was to fight against traditional realism, and to move toward "a new, modern realism." OST artists were most interested in contemporary and urban themes, machines, sport, and similar reflections of modernity. The group also positioned itself against abstraction and constructivism, advocating a return to figurative art. Nevertheless, their stylistic origins were precisely in left art in combining multiple perspectives, choosing sharp diagonals, and flattened blocks of color all evident in this book. Contemporary critics called OST artists "formalist realists" and noted influences of German expressionism among others. As of February 2023, KVK and OCLC show four copies in North America.
  • $1,500
  • $1,500
Vyznachni zhinky Ukrainy: Olena Pchilka

Vyznachni zhinky Ukrainy: Olena Pchilka, Staryts’ka-Cherniakhivs’ka [Remarkable women of Ukraine]

Drazhevsʹka, Liubov and N. Danylevs'ka [Munich or Canada]: Ob'iednannia ukrains'kykh zhinok na emigratsii, 1950. Octavo (17 × 11.8 cm). Original printed wrappers; 64 pp. Portraits. About very good. First and only volume of this planned series of biographical essays on remarkable female figures of Ukraine's history and cultural life. The book features no publisher's information, but judging from paper and typefaces used, it was most likely published in North America or Canada by various members of the Ukrainian Association of Women in Exile, which was founded in Augsburg in 1945 and existed until 1950, after which many members left Germany and it became the Organization of Ukrainian Women in Germany. The present volume contains essays by Liubov Drazhevs'ka about Olena Pchilka and by N. Danylevs'ka about Liudmyla Starytska-Cherniakhivska. Pchilka (1849-1930) was a Ukrainian writer, ethnographer, and civil activist, as well as the mother of Ukraine's most important modern woman writer, Lesya Ukrainka. In addition to her wide activities in publishing, translating from the Russian, documenting Ukrainian folk art, and her own output of poetry, she was also active in the Ukrainian women's movement. Starytska-Cherniakhivska (1868-1941) was a writer and literary critic close to Lesya Ukrainka, who, along with many family members, was ultimately punished for her nationalist leanings during the 1930 Stalinist show trial against the Union for the Liberation of Ukraine. While in exile, she was arrested again in 1941 and died en route to exile in Kazakhstan. She had also been a prominent women's right activist, co-founding the National Council of Ukrainian Women in Kamianets-Podilskyi in 1919. Scarce in the trade.
  • $450
40 wood-cuts: Paulus Augius Augustinavičius

40 wood-cuts: Paulus Augius Augustinavičius, Viktoras Petravičius, Vaclovas Rataiskis-Ratas, Telesforas Valius. Text by Paulius Jurkus

Jurkus, Paulius Augsburg: "Žiburiai," 1946. Folio (35 × 24.7 cm). Original printed boards, quarter cloth binding; [19] pp., 40 leaves of plates. Signed in pencil by Telesforas Valius. Good or better; trace of private library label to lower spine; some scuffing and rubbing to corners and spine extremities; stamps of a non-existing Latvian library in Connecticut. Important work on the vibrant modern Lithuanian graphic arts, which developed from the 1930s onward as a result of the encounter of traditional folk motifs with Western influences, and led to a flowering in the 1940s and 1950s, with many of the prints focused on the trauma of war and exile. "Lithuanian graphics, whose many representatives were studying in Europe, made their way through all the doctrines' letters and have poured in our art a great originality.... We find in them the pulsation of the Lithuanian soul having taken a liking to symbolism and mysticism. Our traditions and our inner liking for stylization have led our engravers far from realism" (from the preface). Preface and artist biographies in English, French and Lithuanian. With woodcut prints by Paulius Augius (1909-1960), Viktoras Petravičius, Vaclovas Rataiskis-Ratas, and Telesforas Valius (1914-1977), leading figures of the Lithuanian graphic arts movement, which was revived in Lithuanian camps for Displaced Persons (DP), who had fled their country during WWII. There, various studios were established, an Applied Arts Institute was created in Freiburg by artists from Kaunas, and a series of exhibitions were held. This copy indicates a print run of 425 numbered copies, of which 25 on "offset-paper" and 400 on regular paper (Werkdruckpapier). Other copies state a print run of 300 copies on wove paper. This copy is signed in pencil by Telesforas Valius below the colophon, and with an additional gift inscription to title (dated Freiburg 1948). Valius has also signed all of his woodcut prints in the book. For more information aboutt modern graphic arts in Lithuania and the movement which is commemorated in the present work, see Paulius Jurkus, "The New Lithuanian Graphic Arts" in Lituanus no. 2 (7), June 1956. Scarce in the trade.
  • $750
Jak válčily houby s brouky: ukrajinska pohádka [How the beetles went to war against the mushrooms: a Ukrainian folktale]

Jak válčily houby s brouky: ukrajinska pohádka [How the beetles went to war against the mushrooms: a Ukrainian folktale]

Sudomora, Okhrim Kyiv-Prague: Péčí Ukrajinského Vydavatelského Družstva "Čas" v Kijevě; Dědictví Komenského (Tiskem Lidové knihtiskárny J. Skalák a spol. v Praze), 1919. Quarto (28.8 × 22.8 cm). Original staple-stitched chromo-lithographed wrappers; 7, [1] pp. of quatrains with accompanying illustrations, of which four pages are in color. Very good; only minor foxing and discoloration to upper and lower spine. Czech translation of a rare Ukrainian children's book, with striking chromolithograph illustrations throughout by Okhrim Sudomora, an artist who worked as an illustrator in Lviv and Kharkiv up through World War II, but about whom little else is known. He also illustrated the book "Fun Work, a Folk Song" (Krakow and L'viv, 1944) and may have been involved with a series of powerful anti-Soviet and anti-Nazi propaganda produced by Ukrainian nationalists in post-war Germany. In 1949, he was arrested for anti-Soviet activities in 1949 and received a twenty-five-year sentence, later living in poverty and obscurity. The present edition was published in Kyiv and printed in Prague, in a translation by Fr. Tichý and with a full-page explanatory postscript addressed to Czechoslovak children, sympathetically explaining the situation of the Ukrainians. The original was also published in 1919. The book is a curious example of a Ukrainian cultural phenomenon: the habit of viewing political upheavals through a mycological fairytale prism. The folktale "War of the Mushrooms", published by Russian ethnographers Vladimir Dal' and Aleksandr Afanas'ev in the nineteenth century, was reinterpreted in 1909 by Heorhii Narbut as an allegory of Ukraine's national predicament vis-a-vis the Russian Empire. The present edition revisits the tale in light of the successful Bolshevik revolution. See: Philip Rogosky, "Fungi and War in Ukraine" (FUNGI Volume 15:4, Fall 2022). Rare; as of January 2023, KVK, OCLC show a single copy at Boston Public Library.
  • $1,250
  • $1,250
Literatura v obozie [Literature in the camp]

Literatura v obozie [Literature in the camp]

Borwicz, Michał Kraków: Centralna Żydowska Komisja Historyczna przy C.K. Żydów Polskich - Oddział w Krakówie, 1946. Octavo (15.5 × 22.5 cm). Original pictorial wrappers by cartoonist and satirist Karol Ferster; 76, [8] pp. Numerous illustrations and decorative initials throughout. Light chipping to spine; evenly discolored; still very good. This collection of essays by Michał Borwicz about life in a concentration camp was published as part of a larger effort for the preservation of memory of the Holocaust by the Central Jewish Historical Committee. The Committee was active in Poland in the years 1944-1947 and was originally involved in collecting the testimonies of Holocaust survivors. The effort was large-scale and several thousands of such responses were collected, which were then organized in annotated editions and published in the immediate after-war period when the memory of the Holocaust was still a topic largely unregulated by the communist government or any political agenda. Michał Borwicz himself worked for the Committee, coming in with a background of a scholar and a writer. His life during the war was marked by turbulence, as he managed to escape the extermination camp in Lviv and was also involved with the underground. In the introductory note by the editors, they present this collection as another step towards telling the full story about life under the Nazi occupation and about the work of the underground resistance movement.
  • $250
Eolova arfa: stikhi i proza

Eolova arfa: stikhi i proza, kniga pervaia [The Aeolian harp: poems and prose, book one]

Tufanov, Aleksandr and Ivan N. Nefedov, artist Petrograd: Izdanie individual'noe (self-published), 1917. Octavo (25.4 × 15 cm). Original pictorial wrappers; 91, [5] pp. Light fraying to spine extremities; Soviet bookstore stamp inside rear wrapper; else about very good. First book of poems by the author (with the added specification "book one", but all published), which is more conservative in design and content than Tufanov's later publications, but already gestures towards lyrical experimentation on the level of both format and subject matter. In the book's preface, "Tufanov uses the figure of an actor on stage to represent the self-alienation that his generation feels, especially when faced with the horrors of the First World War" (Geoff Cebula, :"Aleksandr Tufanov's Ushkuiniki, Historicist Zaum', and the Creation of OBERIU", SEEJ, 2014). Tufanov (1877-1943) is a still largely neglected Russian futurist writer and theoretician, who owes much to Velimir Khlebnikov's theoretical and poetic attempts to create a transrational poetic language based on abstract sounds rather than established semantic sense. He is perhaps best known for his "Ushkuiniki", an epic poem that strives to create a "historicist" zaum that harkens back to old Russian roots and themes. His "K zaumi"(1924) also contained a manifesto outlining the zaum worldview, the foundations of transrational (zaum) creativity, and a "declaration" signed by Tufanov, who usurped, with a small modification, the title which Khlebnikov gave himself: Charman of the Terrestrial Globe of Zaum. Tufanov was also close to Daniil Kharms and Aleksandr Vvedenskii, two main figures of the 1920s avant-garde association OBERIU. Getty 792. As of February 2023, KVK, OCLC show four holdings in North America.
  • $950