John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller Archives - Rare Book Insider

John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller

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A Shimmer of Joy One Hundred Children’s Picture Books in America.

Loker, Chris. Boston, MA: Godine, 2020. 4to (11 x 8.5 inches), 256 pp. full color illustrations throughout. Red cloth,spine titled in gilt, in color illustrated dust jacket. § The trade edition of a sumptuous celebration of children's picture books as art and literature. How do simple words and images make a children's picture book so magical that one reading can create a cherished memory for life? Here are 100 books that amply prove the picture book is an art form. There are books you'll remember and new gems to discover. From The Tale of Peter Rabbit (1901) to Last Stop on Market Street (2015), each of the 100 books is presented with a cover and inside spread as author Chris Loker explains the qualities that combine to make a successful picture book: the interplay between words and images, the dynamic pulse of picture and narrative that compels us to turn the page and follow the story, the sometimes quirky elements that appeal to both children and adults alike. It af?rms what we all instinctively know, and have known since childhood ? that a picture book is literature, art, and theater all rolled into one, miraculously blended and irresistibly presented.Additionally, A Shimmer of Joy provides an intriguing array of information, not only about the books but also about the authors, artists, publishers, and designers who created them. Along the way, the reader gains insight into the evolving eras of children's literature and book publishing in the 20th and 21st century, with fascinating stories of its publication history and biographies of the creators.Here's a book that will give the reader a new appreciation for the picture book while bringing back memories of the time when, sitting in a classroom or on a lap, someone read you a book and opened up your world."All spot-on choices?.a shop-window of the creative versatility embedded in children's picture books over the decades."?The Book Collector
  • $35
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The Humourist. A Collection of Entertaining Tales, Anecdotes, Epigrams, Bon Mots, etc.

[Cruikshank, George]. London: J. Robins and Co., 1819-1820. 4 vols, 8vo. Forty hand-colored etched plates after Cruikshank, including four frontispieces and four vignette titles. Full brick red morocco, backstrips lightly sunned, scattered foxing. Bookplates of Albert Ramsay-Cohn and of one other; early ownership inscription of Adam Paterson on front blank in each vol. Very good. § First edition with second issue of Vol. 1 title page (with "Vol.1" and dated 1819) but with all other first issue points: "Dr Johnson" title on Vol.1 page 44, and undated imprints on all four vignette title pages, on plate 7 of Vol. 2, and on plate 4 of Vol. 3. The Humourist "gave Cruikshank his first sustained opportunity to devise illustrations; Blanchard Jerrold calls it 'his first remarkable separate work.' Robins issued forty six-penny parts?with a colored etching in each, during 1819 and 1820?The vignette title page for volume 4 shows a grotesque dandy holding a cocked hat, grinning at the audience from a stage whose proscenium arch is decorated with swagged curtains and comic masks. The illustrations preserve that sense of theater: each scene takes place within a frame surmounted by emblematic props aspiring to a pedimental shape and supported by a base on which the title is inscribed, along with additional scenes and props" (Patten, George Cruikshank's Life, Times, and Art, I, p. 190). Cohn 419.
  • $1,250
  • $1,250
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A Shimmer of Joy One Hundred Children’s Picture Books in America.

San Francisco: The Book Club of California, 2019. 4to (11 x 8.5 inches), 329 pp. over 200 full-color illustrations. Hand-numbered and signed by the author. Red cloth, titled in gilt on upper cover and spine, with decorative endpapers photo-reproduced from hand-painted paper by Eric Carle. § From the regular edition of 200 copies, this is #180. From the prospectus (The Book Club of California, 2019), "A Shimmer of Joy is an exciting and colorful presentation of one hundred children's picture books published in?or imported to?America from 1900 to 2015. Each of the one hundred books profiled has been selected based upon its notable fame or collectability by Chris Loker, an authority on children's literature. Among the best-known and most loved books included in A Shimmer of Joy:* The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter (1901)* The Story of Babar by Jean de Brunhoff (1933)* Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown (1947)* The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats (1962)* Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems (2003)Specifically, A Shimmer of Joy offers readers:* A vital definition of the picture book, with an overview of its history and significance in American children's literature.*Intriguing in-depth essays on the past, the present, and the possible future of the picture book, written in enlightening detail by three scholars in the field.* Fascinating profiles of one hundred famous or collectible picture books, accompanied by two to four color photographs of each book.
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Diaries of a young American man in Europe in 1933 and in Charleston, SC, in 1939.

1933-1939. 2 journals with laid in ephemera. Journal 1: 8vo, c.250 unlined pages bound in red pebbled cloth with "Notes" gilt-stamped on upper cover; c.200 pages filled with legible ink entries in French. Journal 2: 8vo, 252 lined and numbered pages bound in red, straight-grained cloth with "Record" gilt-stamped on upper cover; 132 pages filled with legible ink entries in English. French driving license and other ephemera laid in inside envelope. Condition: very good with minor rubbing to the cloth bindings and minimal age toning. § Personal diaries for the years 1933 and 1939 belonging to Benjamin Schuyler Clark (1908-1993) of Pound Ridge, New York. The diaries are an interesting combination of daily record, European and South Carolina travel journals, extensive reading log, and bird watching notes.Clark was born in Englewood, NJ, attended Harvard, and then spent his career as an investment banker. The diaries reveal a thoughtful young man with a passion for bird-watching, books, and philosophical reflection that clearly stayed with him through life: his obituary in the New York Times on March 24, 1993, records that "A lifelong interest in ornithology and conservation led him to bequeath land to the Pound Ridge Conservancy and the Maine Heritage Trust for Acadia National Park. He also left books to the rare-book collection of Harvard's Houghton Library."The first diary records 1933, the year Clark turned 25, and is written largely in French for practice in the language. Clark notes hours studied at Harvard Law School, the many books bought and read, musical programs attended, as well as diversions such as squash, golf, movies ("King Kong bon"), and social events. In June he finishes his final exam, makes a brief visit home, and then sails to the continent for a tour of Italy, Spain, and France, whereupon the diary (still in French) becomes an enthusiastic and detailed travel journal, logging views, buildings, and artworks as thoroughly as any Baedeker. At the beginning of August he returns to New York via Gibraltar and his reading shifts to courtship dramas: Jane Austin, George Eliot, and R.D. Blackmore. In September, an hour before he meets the father of his beloved and asks for her hand in marriage, he rehearses his speech in his diary. A newspaper clipping containing the engagement announcement is laid in, as is an envelope containing a French driving license with a photograph of Clark and two immigration cards issued for him as a passenger on the S.S. Empress of Japan.The second diary, for 1939, opens in South Carolina, where Clark and his wife Charlotte Condit Lyman (1911-1997) are taking a winter vacation away from their two young children. Charlotte's family had deep business interests in the local textile industry and the town of Lyman, South Carolina, had been renamed after her grandfather, Arthur T. Lyman, in 1927. The couple visit many houses and people from her youth as well as doing a thorough tour of other historic houses, churches, and gardens. Clark also records the results of many bird watching outings. At one point the stench from the Kraft Paper Mill force them to relocate from Yeamans Hall country club to a hotel in Charleston. The diary is interesting as a tourist's checklist, as an ornithological snapshot, and as a psychological portrait of a literary and religious man probing questions of civic duty and ambition in the political environment of the 1930s. The couple return from vacation to family life in New York and the diary ends on April 5th with several lines of musings on Adolf Hitler.The diaries have not been fully transcribed and much detail remains to be discovered, particularly concerning Clark's observations of Europe in 1933 and South Carolina in 1939.
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Kissing.

[England]: William Simpson, 1883. 8vo, 49 pp. containing pasted and tipped in manuscript and printed sheets including 10 pp. autograph MS signed by Simpson; 2 pp. ALS from George Grove to Simpson; 2 pp. ALS from Alfred "Hajj" Browne to Simpson; 2 pp. ALS from Father A. Richardson to Simpson; various manuscript transcriptions by Simpson of others' work; and extracts from printed books and periodicals. Original red buckram, Simpson's Tibetan device in gilt on upper cover, title "Kissing" in gilt on backstrip. Simpson's bookplate on front pastedown. Cloth lightly sunned and slightly bubbled, contents with scattered foxing and offsetting unsurprising for the number and variety of unconventional papers bound. Very good overall. § A fascinating compilation of manuscript and printed texts on the symbolic and mystical significance of kissing, assembled by the Victorian war artist William Simpson with contributions from several learned friends. Simpson appears to have been considering publishing a scholarly work on the subject but there is no evidence the manuscript ever appeared in print. The numerous entries have been carefully bound with a fine original gouache title page dated 1883.William Simpson (1823-1899) was a pioneer war artist who traveled extensively for the Illustrated London News. Born to working class parents in Glasgow in 1823, his adventures took him around the world several times and made him an eye witness to many of the major events of the 19th century including the Crimean War, the Franco-Prussian War, and the Abyssinia Expedition. "As an observer and reporter for over forty years, he had contacts and friends all over the world; he mixed with people of every rank and learned many European and oriental languages and dialects needed on his innumerable travels." (DNB)Simpson is fascinated by the origins of kissing, and by the likelihood that contemporary customs contain echoes of the religious rites of ancient peoples. The heart of the collection is a ten-page, minutely-lettered manuscript, "the result of notes made while wandering in various regions of the world, and also from wanderings in some not much frequented regions of the world of books." The essay touches on customs of Ancient Greece, Abyssinia, Peru, and India, on Biblical and Talmudic scriptures, Tantric Mantras, the Vedas, Islamic traditions, and etymological evidence in Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, and Hebrew. His intent is to trace the connections between the breath of life, the creative power (of God), the word (the Logos), and the kiss. ("God breathed into man's nostrils the breathe of life, and he became a living soul. Here is the first kiss recorded.") "The practice of kissing I take to be that of a custom which has descended from the past when it was an act of adoration from its being a form of breathing. As an act of love or close friendship it has now lost its connection with the old symbolism although this is the case there yet remains rites and customs which are vestiges of the old relationship and which receive their explanation by the theory suggested in this paper."Bound in with Simpson's manuscript are many manuscript notes and transcriptions from others sources made in the course of his research, as are extracts from printed articles and books pertaining to the subject. Most interesting are the several manuscript contributions from friends and correspondents, including one from Sir George Grove, the first director of the Royal School of Music and the author of Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians.The whole eccentric document forms a fascinating unpublished source text for research into Victorian sexuality, British Orientalism, and perennial philosophy, greatly deserving of further attention.
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Address of the New York Herald, To Their Patrons. January 1st, 1846. [Together with a single issue of the Sacramento Union, January 7, 1846, containing a similar address].

New York: Herald Book and Job Office, 97 Nassau Street, 1846. Two sheets. 1) New York Herald: Folio, 492 x 628 mm. Printed on recto only, title and three columns of verse surrounded by a highly elaborate border composed of printer's ornaments. Very good with old folds, slightly toned, two 30 mm closed tears to top margin, minor loss to right margin at point of fold, no loss of image. 2) Sacramento Union: Folio, 430 x 585 mm, 4pp. Very good, lightly toned and foxed, with evidence of a former binding along left margin. § A New Year's address to the readers of the New York Herald reviewing the events of 1845 in enthusiastic verse, the broadsheet is notable for an extraordinarily elaborate decorative border composed primarily of printer's ornaments. The review runs through the highlights of 1845's local, national, and international events, among them the Great Fire of New York, the election of Polk, and the Irish Potato Famine. Accompanying the broadside is a contemporaneous issue of the Sacramento Union, which on its back page bears a similar New Year's address with border composed of printer's ornaments. It is interesting to compare the two, both for the news reviewed and for the typographic resources available to the East and West coast printers. Both addresses refer to the imminent statehood of Texas and Oregon; the Sacramento Union alone spends several lines decrying the issue of slavery.