John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller

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Aphorisms on Man: translated from the Original Manuscript.

Aphorisms on Man: translated from the Original Manuscript.

Lavater, John Casper. London: J. Johnson, 1789. Small 8vo, viii, 224 pages. With a frontispiece engraved by Blake after Fuseli. Contemporary calf, red morocco label, a little rubbed along the upper joint, generally a very good copy. Neat ink inscription on a front blank and ink signature of the period on the title-page "Mich Kearney". § Second edition (first printed in 1788), first state of the plate. The frontispiece is after a drawing by Fuseli (see Essick, Blake and His Contemporaries., 43 for the original drawing) and is a powerful image. The text notes "End of Vol. I" but no further volumes appeared as a fire destroyed Lavater's manuscript at the printer. The Huntington Library has Blake's own copy, extensively annotated throughout. Bentley, Blake Books, 480. Essick and Easson 2, XXXII, 1c. Essick, William Blake's Commercial Book Illustrations, XVIII. kearney might well be the scholar mentioned in DNB: "Kearney published Lectures Concerning History (1776), a slender work but clear and stimulating, and contributed two papers to the Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy, the first on the origins of the alphabet, the second on Sir Joshua Reynolds's Discourses. He also contributed some notes to Edmond Malone's edition of Boswell's Life of Johnson. He died in Dublin on 11 January 1814, and was buried in St Ann's, Dublin. His obituary notice in the Gentleman's Magazine unusually suggests that he was a very talented man who had failed to fulfil expectations. Kearney, the notice stated, was 'deeply read in divinity, versed in all the subtleties of metaphysical disquisition, unequalled as a historian, skilled alike in the learned and modern languages and critically acquainted with English literature', but for thirty-six years this profound scholar resided on his benefice 'in a remote country where his talents and learning were lost to the world' (GM, 84/1)."
Illustrations of the Book of Job.

Illustrations of the Book of Job.

Blake, William. London: [plates dated] 1825 [but published 1826]. Folio, 320 x 254 mm, engraved title and 21 plates. Proofs on India paper mounted on handmade paper, some leaves (2, 5, 6, 11, 14, 17, 18) watermarked J. Whatman Turkey Mill 1825. Gilt-ruled green morocco over thick boards, fleurons at the outer corners, double-rule inner frame enclosing a bloom roll, gilt-ruled spine, sewing bands with gilt red morocco onlays, thick dark blue endleaves, all edges gilt, by Riviere: a brilliant set with no foxing at all, interleaved with blanks at the time of binding with no offsetting. Lower cover of the binding at some time tied up with string with ensuing indentation. § First edition, limited to 150 proof sets (65 sets were also printed on French paper, and 100 sets on drawing paper with the word 'proof' removed). This is one of finest sets of the proofs I have ever seen, and far outshines the other two original printings and the later re-issue. The India paper set is the best printing of these famous plates which comprise Blake's major single achievement as a printmaker after the illuminated books. Illustrations of the Book of Job was Blake's last completed prophetic book: the text, a series of biblical quotations, is above and below each image. "It was produced while Blake was still working on Jerusalem, his most obscure book; yet the illustrations are Blake's most lucid; and they are the supreme example of his reading the Bible in its spiritual sense" (S. Foster Damon, A Blake Dictionary, p. 217). "The modest size of the central panels does not prevent them from ranking with the supreme masterpieces of graphic art" (Ray, Illustrator and the Book in England #8). Note: as always, the first plate after the title-page is misdated 1828.
The Making of the Nuremberg Chronicle.

The Making of the Nuremberg Chronicle.

Wilson, Adrian. Amsterdam: Nico Israel, 1976. 4to, 253 pp. [12] pp of plates, ills (some in color). Grey cloth with pictorial dust-jacket. Fine in a fine dust-jacket with original prospectus laid in. § First edition of the "first work in English on the entire production of an early illustrated printed book, from concept through distribution." Wykeham quotes from a review by Fredric J. Mosher: " [a] magnificent book. While most of the materials on which [the author's] examination is based have long been known to exist, Wilson is the first to study them all together and write a connected account in English of the history of the Chronicle. In this lavishly illustrated account of what is known about the production of one of the most famous and significant books of the cradle period of printing, a detailed picture is presented of how such a book was produced. The extant contracts, dated 1491, between the publishers (Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermaister), artists (Michael Wolgemut and Wilhelm Pleydenwurff), and the printer (Anton Koberger) show that the artists were required to prepare an exemplar or manuscript-layout volume for each of the two editions (one in Latin, one in German) of this history of the world from the Creation to 1493. These exemplars also exist. Together with other archival documents, including a Final Settlement in 1509, these contracts and exemplars give information available for no other fifteenth- century book that enables the reader of Wilson's account to follow the course of the preparation of what David Bland called . "a landmark in the history of illustration"." Presentation copy inscribed by Adrian Wilson to a private collector with an ALS from Joyce Wilson and a birthday note loosely inserted.
Bleak House.

Bleak House.

Dickens, Charles. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1852-1853. 19 parts (20 numbers) in 2 vols. Vol. 1: 8vo, xiv, 624 pp. with the full text, 40 plates etched by "Phiz", including the engraved title, plus the original wrappers and some ads bound in. Full green morocco gilt with pink silk doublures, t.e.g. Vol 2: Bound ads (the majority), various sizes and paginations. Half green morocco gilt with marbled paper sides and endpapers, t.e.g. Very handsome bindings by Zaehnsdorf, slightest rubbing to morocco, the finest set known. § First edition, bound from the original parts, with the advertisements collected in a separate volume. Dickens' great byzantine tale of family secrets, rapacious lawyers, and innocent victims, which helped lead to actual legal reform in the United Kingdom. Originally serialized in 19 parts (the final part contained two numbers), this is surely the finest bound set known, presented with the wrappers, illustrations, and advertisements in a superb Zaehnsdorf binding. Lacking only 2 of 16 slips for Household Words (issues 5 and 6 per Hatton & Cleaver), and the slip announcing the plate mishap from part 9. The ad for "The Village Pastor", often lacking, is present, as are all issues of the Bleak House Advertiser (divided between vols. 1 and 2), and 80 additional ads and inserts. Previously sold by Colin Franklin to a private collector and thence to us. Eckel 79-81. Sadleir 682. Hatton & Cleaver pp.275-304.
He kaine diatheke [in Greek] Novum Testamentum Graecum; Editionis Receptae Cum Lectionibus Variantibus Codicum MSS

He kaine diatheke [in Greek] Novum Testamentum Graecum; Editionis Receptae Cum Lectionibus Variantibus Codicum MSS, Editionum Aliarum, Versionum Et Patrum Nec Non Commentario Pleniore Ex Scriptoribus Veteribus Hebraeis, Graecis Et Latinis Historiam Et Vim Verborum Illustrante.

Bible. New Testament. Greek. Wettstein, Johann Jakob, editor. Amsterdam: Officina Dommeriana, 1751. 2 vols., [vi], 966, [2]; 896, (list of codices) 1-26 in reverse order, 897-920 pp. (final 1 1/2 pp. are errata). With an engraved vignette on the title-pages, and an engraved alphabet leaf at p.2; a little browned and dusty here and there. Contemporary red morocco very richly gilt, gilt-panelled backstrips with black labels. § A superb copy of a renowned Greek edition of the Bible with a fascinating association. This copy was in the choice Greek library of Sophia Streatfeild; prior to that there is the bookplate of an earlier Streatfeild with their motto "Data Fata Sequutus" (sic), and the modern bookplate of Joseph M. Gleason whose library was at Lone Mountain College in San Francisco until they sold it en bloc to John Howell-Books who dispersed the books far and wide. This book recently turned up in a yard sale in Central California and was bought by a scout purportedly for $5.Sophia Streatfeild was a brilliant classical scholar, a stunningly beautiful woman, and a renowned flirt, whose charms and amorous conquests were recorded at length by Hester Thrale with equal parts admiration and exasperation: "a Young Coquet whose sole Employment in this World seems to have been winning Men's hearts on purpose to fling them away. How She contrives to keep Bishops, & Brewers, & Doctors, & Directors of the East India Company all in her Chains so?& almost all at a Time would amaze a wiser Person than me". Thrale's own husband was one of the many much taken with Streatfeild, as was Samuel Johnson, although he apparently regarded Fanny Burney's Greek scholarship higher. The DNB heads her entry simply "Streatfeild, Sophia(bap.1755,d.1835),beauty". A women of fierce intellect and wild reputation, she died unmarried at around 80 years of age and remains one of the period's more enigmatic figures. Her entire Greek library (all 43 volumes bound to match) was sold by the Robinsons in 1935 for £195. It was #1 in their catalogue 56.
The British Librarian: exhibiting a compendious Review or Abstract of our most scarce

The British Librarian: exhibiting a compendious Review or Abstract of our most scarce, useful, and valuable Books in all Sciences, as well in Manuscript as in Print: with many Characters, historical and critical, of the Authors, their Antagonists, &c. In a Manner never before attempted, and useful to all Readers.

Oldys, William. London: Printed for T. Osborne., 1738. 8vo, [ii], vii [xii, contents], 402 pp. Contemporary calf, backstrip consolidated and upper hinge with slight splitting but quite firm, a good sound copy. § First edition of the first Library Manual in English and one of the earliest (if not the earliest) books in English on old and rare books. DNB notes: "In 1737 Oldys began publishing his own researches in The British Librarian, a miscellaneous bibliographical compilation of rare books and manuscripts. It was published in six monthly numbers, from January to June 1737, and was thereafter issued as a composite volume with an index of subjects in 1738. It was designed to bring to light 'curious' publications and to offer a bibliographical record for early books: three William Caxton items, from the collection of Peter Thompson, are described, together with works by St Gildas, Thomas More, Richard Hakluyt, Thomas Elyot, William Prynne, Elias Ashmole, and Robert Plot. Each number contained at least one manuscript item. Oldys had used the libraries of the duke of Montagu, John Anstis, Thomas Ames, and some of his neighbours in Gray's Inn?Nathaniel Booth and Charles Grimes. The book was prefaced by an optimistic statement of editorial intention, but in the postscript (from Gray's Inn, dated 18 February [1738]) Oldys cites the 'vast and unseen Mass of Reading' needed to produce the comparatively 'small Quantity of Writing' (W. Oldys, The British Librarian, 1738, 375) as a reason for discontinuing the project for the time being." ESTC T147996 notes a final leaf of ads, not recorded in any other copy.
Remember Me! A New Years Gift or Christmas Present

Remember Me! A New Years Gift or Christmas Present, 1826.

Blake, William. London: I. Poole, [1825?]. 12mo, frontispiece "A Tribute of Regard."; title-page "Remember Me" etc. with 1826 beneath "Christmas Present"; second engraved leaf recto "Calendar and Album 1826.", verso January and February, next three leaves with the rest of the Calendar; verso of third leaf "The Virgin Child and St. John"; 8 pp. of engraved music; contents and introduction [i] ii-xxiv; plate "Her screams aroused her servant"; [1] 2-336. With the Blake plate at p. 32, and color plates at 42, 73, 88, 89, 93, 148, 149, 275 (b/w The Storm), and 326 (color). Publisher's original printed yellow paper boards, no backstrip, occasional spotting, but a good copy of this fragile booklet in its rarest format, preserved in a cloth box. § Second issue of the book (no variance in the plate, the contents omits the blank leaves and the misnumbered leaves at the end). One of the rarest of all of the plates designed and engraved by Blake, here in its rarest format. The plate, titled 'The Hiding of Moses' was the last plate designed and engraved by Blake himself for a commercial publication; the original drawing 'Moses placed in the Ark of Bulrushes', which closely echoes a tempera now untraced that was executed some 25 years earlier, is in the Huntington Library. BB #490B. Easson and Essick, William Blake Book Illustrator, XI (recording the Rosenwald proof and 3 copies). Keynes, Blake Studies, XIX (recording 7 variants but not mentioning the 1826 printing). Also see Bentley's detailed essay and census of copies in "Remember Me! Customs and Costumes of Blake's Gift Book," University of Toronto Quarterly, 80.4 (fall 2011): 880-92.
Wak-Tae-Geli

Wak-Tae-Geli, A Sioux Warrior [Tableau 8 ].

Bodmer, Karl. London: Ackermann & Co. 1839. Aquatint engraving with contemporary hand-coloring, 24.6 x 18 inches, with blindstamp "C.Bodmer/Direct". Fine condition. § First edition, an illustration from the celebrated book, Travels in the Interior of North America, 1832-1834, by Maximilian, Prince of Wied, Germany, after Bodmer's watercolors.Prince Maximilian was a German explorer and naturalist who hired the Swiss artist Karl Bodmer (1809-1893) for an expedition to examine and describe the wildlife and Indian tribes of the American West. For 13 months, the men travelled up the Missouri River from St. Louis to Montana, recording the people and landscapes they encountered with unprecedented sensitivity and detail, just on the eve of rapid white Western expansion and genocidal conquest. "For over a century Bodmer's aquatints have been regarded as one of the most significant contributions to the iconography of the western frontier." In his portraits of American Indians, Bodmer "achieved a level of accuracy and sensitivity that no other artist of the American frontier has ever surpassed. His work is particularly valuable for its detailed rendition of the Indians' ornamentation, attire, and implements. Indeed, Bodmer was far superior to his better-known contemporary George Catlin, whose work lacks the Swiss artist's fidelity and meticulous attention to detail." (American Dictionary of National Biography).