Antiquariat INLIBRIS Archives - Rare Book Insider

Antiquariat INLIBRIS

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Report to the General Assembly by the United Nations Special Committee on Palestine.

[United Nations - UNSCOP]. 8vo. 2 vols.: IV, 98 pp.; IV, 103, (1) pp. With a plan in the text and 3 folding plates in the rear pocket of vol. 2. Original printed wrappers. Historical report of the UN Special Committee on Palestine, supporting the termination of the British Mandate. Completed only three months after the Committee was founded on 15 May 1947. - UNSCOP was created to investigate the cause of the conflict in Palestine, and, if possible, devise a solution. Made up of representatives of eleven countries, the committee visited Palestine and the neighbouring states in the summer of 1947, gathered testimony from Zionist organisations both in Palestine and in the U.S., toured displaced persons camps in American and British occupation zones in Germany and Austria, and held twelve public hearings from 4 to 17 July, during which 31 representatives from twelve Jewish organizations gave testimony and submitted written depositions, totaling 32 tonnes of material. In August the Committee set out to Geneva to write their report, a process complicated by Jewish, Arab, and British pressure. Eventually, the report, present here, supported the termination of the British Mandate in Palestine. It contains a majority proposal for a plan of partition into two independent states with economic union (chapter VI) and a minority proposal for a plan for one federal union with Jerusalem as its capital (chapter VII). The majority plan was supported by eight of the eleven members, with Iran, India and Yugoslavia voting against. The Zionist side accepted the partition plan, while the Arab side rejected both proposals. - The plates in volume 2 (Annexes, Appendices & Maps) show proposed boundaries of Jerusalem, the Committee's itinerary through Palestine during their enquiry, a map for a two-state solution, and a map for a single federal state. - Stamps of ownership and shelfmarks of the Bolton Reference Library. An admission card for a Jewish Agency representative to an UNSCOP public hearing (surname deleted) is loosely enclosed. - OCLC 5058339.
  • $723
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[United States Geological Survey of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia].

[Saudi Arabia]. 15 sheets in full colour, c. 100 x 100 cm approx., folded. 13 in original printed envelopes with individual titles, another in a later envelope, and one stored loosely. English and Arabic. Scale 1:500,000; relief shown by hachures and spot heights. Extensive collection of these hugely important geographico-geological maps of Saudi Arabia: the groundbreaking, fully bilingual and dual-dated series prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Arabian American Oil Company under the joint sponsorship of Saudi Arabia and the U.S. State Department. The first to produce a full series of geological and geographical maps of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the venture was instrumental in establishing the country as a major global force in the production of natural resources and must count as "a unique experiment in geological cooperation among several governments, petroleum companies, and individuals" (Seager/J.). The area covered also includes the territories of Bahrain and parts of Qatar. "The plan for a cooperative mapping project was originally conceived in July 1953 [. By 1955] there was established a cooperative agreement between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the U.S. Department of State, and the Arabian-American Oil Co. to make available the basic areal geology as mapped by Aramco and the U.S. Geological Survey". The surveyors divided the Peninsula into 21 quadrangular sections (numbered I-200 through I-220), each to cover an area 3 degrees of longitude and 4 degrees of latitude. All maps were produced on a 1:500,000 scale and issued in two series: a combined map of geography and geology (marked by the appendix 'A') and a map of geography only ('B'). "High altitude photography [.] was [.] completed in 1959 [.] This controlled photography resulted in highly accurate geographic maps at the publication scale which then served as a base for the geologic overlay. The topography of the sedimentary areas was depicted by hachuring and that of the shield region by shaded relief utilizing the airbrush technique. The first geographic quadrangle was published in July 1956 and the last in September 1962 [.] The first of the geologic map series was published in July 1956 and the final sheet in early 1964" (ibid.). - Although it was the search for oil, gas and minerals that "was ultimately to drive geological survey work across the region [.], in its early years it was the need for water that was the catalyst for Saudi Arabia's resource exploration. In 1944 King 'Abd al-'Aziz approached the United States for a technical expert who could assist with the identification and plotting of the kingdom's natural resources, particularly its groundwater reserves [.] By 1954 the Saudi Ministry of Finance, USGS and Aramco were working together to produce the first full series of geographic and geologic maps of the country. The first of their type in the Peninsula, these were published [.] in both Arabic and English versions, and the information they contained formed the basis of subsequent Saudi national development plans" (Parry). Indeed, the project was considered highly important by Ibn Saud, and its aims encompassed all aspects of cartography. It was to enable not only the search for natural resources but also aid in advances for agriculture, civil and military engineering and general infrastructure projects. The results were seminal for the mapping of the region: "To this day, all modern maps of the kingdom trace their roots back to these first publications" (ibid.). - Of the 21 sections, 13 are covered by the present collection, which focuses on the less common geologic series: 200-202 A, 205 A&B, 206-207 A, 208 B, 212 A, 214 A, 217-220 A (219 including B). All are first editions, except 205A is present as "Geologic Map GM-205A", the 1979 reprint of "I-205A" as released in 1963. - In excellent state of preservation. - James V. Parry, "Mapping Arabia", in: Saudi Aramco World 2004/1, p. 20ff. O. A. Seager/W. D. Johnston, Foreword to the Geology of the Arabian Peninsula series (U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 560-A-D, 1966).
  • $5,565
  • $5,565
Mohammedia filii Abdallae pseudo-prophetae Fides Islamitica

Mohammedia filii Abdallae pseudo-prophetae Fides Islamitica, i.e. Al-Coranus. Ex idiomate Arabico, quo primum a Mohammede conscriptus est, latine versus per Ludovicum Marraccium [.]. Cura et opera M. Christiani Reineccii.

[Qur'an - Latin]. 8vo (117 x 172 mm). (12), 114, (2), 558, (34) pp. Title-page printed in red and black. With 2 woodcut headpieces. Contemporary half vellum over marbled boards with handwritten spine-title. First printing thus. - The edition of Christian Reineccius (1668-1752) contains the Latin text of Luigi Marracci (1612-1700), to which are added a history of the Qur'an and an account of the Muslim faith. Marracci's text, published in 1698, constituted the first accurate Latin translation, the first scholarly printed Qur'an (including a much more accurate Arabic text than any previously printed). "It was a considerable progress that the Qur'an, much maligned by so many in the West possessing no familiarity at all with its content, now was made generally available" (cf. Fück). Reineccius' edition was considered "more convenient" (cf. Pfannmüller) than that of Marracci, as it comprises the complete text in Latin translation, omitting the Arabic text. - Some browning throughout, as common; old ownership "Steph. Manno" stamped to title page. Altogether very well-preserved in an immaculate contemporary full vellum binding. - Binding slightly waterstained, covers a little rubbed. Several pages, including the title-page slightly waterstained, a faint ink smudge to p. 415 (not touching text), else fine. - Schnurrer p. 413f. Fück 95, n. 251. BM Arabic I, 896. Enay 164. Zenker I, 1396. Woolworth p. 286. VD 18, 10327843. Graesse IV, 43. Pfannmüller 208 and 214. Ebert 11520. EROMM 19960910.
  • $3,116
  • $3,116
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Persia, Afghanistan & Beluchistan. Compiled under the supervision of Hon. G. Curzon, M.P.

[Persia and the Gulf - Royal Geographical Society]. Original colour-printed map. 49 x 62 cm, on sheet 56 x 68 cm. Scale 1:3,810,000. 60 miles to an inch. Extremely detailed early mapping of Persia, Afghanistan, Beluchistan, and the Gulf, focusing on the physical geography, settlements, roads, railways, telegraph lines and other features of this geopolitically vital area. The future United Arab Emirates are still labelled the "Pirate Coast", with Abu Dhabi, "Debai", "Sharkah", and several other cities named. Qatar is called "El Katr", an early use of this name, with cities El Bidaa, Ras Laffan, Ras Rekkan, and Zabara named. Also, "Koweit" is named and located. - The map title credits George Curzon, one of the most important British statesmen of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as the supervisor of the production of the map, with William John Turner, Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, as the mapmaker. Around 1890 Turner partnered with W. Shaweto and founded "Turner & Shawe", a lithograph company working for the Royal Geographical Society. The present map bears the "Turner & Shawe" imprint in the lower right corner. The map was later reproduced by the Intelligence Division, War Office, under the direction of Lieutenant Colonel C. J. Dalton and appeared as a foldout in the 1900 confidential "Report on the Persian Army" by H. P. Picot. - A few small marginal tears. A fine copy. - OCLC 182541176.
  • $501
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The private library of Ludwig Landgrebe, assistant to Edmund Husserl.

Landgrebe, Ludwig, Austrian philosopher (1902-1991). 116 works in 122 volumes, mostly 4to and 8vo. Includes a folder of ephemera comprising correspondence, photographs, newspaper clippings, and personal notes. The library and papers of the Viennese philosopher Ludwig Landgrebe, from 1923 to 1930 the personal assistant to the father of phenomenology, Edmund Husserl (1859-1938). Landgrebe's personal books, presented here, include a first edition of Husserl's groundbreaking "Logische Untersuchungen", and the first ever printing of Martin Heidegger's seminal "Sein und Zeit," published in the 1927 "Jahrbuch für Phänomenologie", which was produced and edited by Heidegger's teacher and mentor, Husserl himself. - Landgrebe's collection spans the philosophical developments of the 20th century and is supplemented with the library of the late curator of the Cologne Husserl Archive, Dr. Elisabeth Ströker (1928-2000). Altogether, the collection comprises over 110 works and numerous ephemeral pieces - including letters, manuscripts, postcards, notes, photographs, and more - documenting the evolution of the school of philosophy Husserl founded. - Many volumes are inscribed; Landgrebe himself has inscribed one of his own works to Elisabeth Ströker, his fellow custodian of Husserl's legacy, and eleven other works are inscribed to Landgrebe from a range of former students and colleagues, including Yoshihiro Nitta (1929-2020), Alwin Diemer (1920-86), Josef Speck (1927-2003), Bernhard Rang (1935-99), David Carr (b. 1940), and Marvin Farber (1901-80). - Edmund Husserl, who died in 1938, was one of the most influential philosophers of the 20th century. It is clear from letters addressed to Landgrebe that even thirty years after Husserl's death, Landgrebe was considered a close confidant and expert on Husserl's life and legacy. This is especially important with regard to Husserl's relationship with his former student Martin Heidegger, whose works are the most common in Landgrebe's library after Husserl's. Heidegger famously chose not to support Husserl when, under Nazi policy, Husserl was denied access to university resources and finally was removed from his position. Heidegger, a member of the Nazi party, subsequently took Husserl's place, though he resigned a year later; the debate around the depth of Heidegger's dedication to Nazism can be seen in Landgrebe's library itself in the form of postwar newspaper clippings, and at least one letter sent to Landgrebe to ask for his side of the story in 1967. - A trove of Landgrebe's personal and professional history, and through him, one of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger. A detailed catalogue is available on request. - Some light wear, and expected toning or edgewear to ephemera (such as newspaper clippings, letters, and photographs). Altogether in very good condition. - 1) From the library of Ludwig Landgrebe, with many instances of his personal library stamp and later pencil notes reading, "ex-bibl. Prof. Dr. Ludwig Landgrebe". - 2) Later owned by Landgrebe's descendants, who were able to augment the collection with the partial library of Elisabeth Ströker, several books containing notes in her hand. - 3) German private collection, with a few relevant addenda from the collector's library.
  • $38,953
  • $38,953
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Society for the Extinction of the Slave Trade and for the Civilization of Africa.

[Slave Trade] - Trew, J. M. Mulready stationery letter sheet, 227 x 220 mm. Addressed and stamped. A call for public donations for the ill-fated Niger Expedition, which aimed to suppress the African slave trade via treaties, agricultural trade, and Christian evangelism. Beginning by announcing that "upwards of 30 years, and more than 15 millions of money, have been consumed fruitless attempts to put down the Slave Trade", the letter sheet goes on to detail the action plan of Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton (1786-1845), a Member of Parliament and abolitionist who had previously pushed for full emancipation across Britain's colonies, and had by 1839 developed a plan for a "New Africa" movement based on colonization by missionary groups. The first attempt, however, went very wrong, with more than forty of the original 150 members of the expedition quickly dying of various illnesses before the completion of the first year. This resulted in the cancellation of the project, which had been funded by the British government under the Whig Prime Minister Lord Melbourne. - Published by Buxton's influential Society for the Extinction of the Slave Trade and for the Civilization of Africa (which counted Queen Victoria's husband Prince Albert as an honorary member), and printed on a Mulready 1d. letter sheet. Mulready sheets, which could simply be folded, addressed, and mailed, were an easy way to spread the word about social causes within England. - Small chip and closed tear, minor staining, and addressed to the Revd. T. V. Fosbery, Godshill, Isle of Wight, postmarked Petworth, 5 November 1840. In good condition.
  • $390
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Diwan-i Sam’i.

Sam'i, Mustafa (Arpaeminizade). 8vo (160 x 250 mm). 104, 47, 67 pp. In Ottoman Turkish. Contemporary leather binding with fore-edge flap, rebacked with cloth spine, covers ruled and stamped in gilt, with gold tugra stamp of Mahmud II in the centre on both covers. The first printed collection of the verses of Sam'i, a famous Ottoman poet in the 19th century. Supposedly based on the comparison of six manuscripts, the book contains three separately paginated parts, "Diwan-i Sami", "Iptida-i tevarih", and "Iptida-i gazeliyat". The first part of the Diwan (104 pp.) is mostly composed of qasidas, ghazals, murabbas, museddeses; the second (47 pp.) consists of historical accounts in verse form; the third part (67 pp.) includes mostly ghazals. - Mustafa Sam'i Arpaeminizade, who used pen-name Sam'i in his poetry, was born in Istanbul into a family of high-ranking civil servants. From 1715 until his death in 1734, he was also a civil servant in various offices. During his lifetime he was mostly known for his poetry. 18th century Ottoman poetry was dominated by styles consciously different from classical Ottoman poetry and by experiments with various new styles. Sam'i is known for his works in the Hikemi style, which emphasizes wisdom and thoughts, and in "Sebk-i Hindi" ("Indian Style"), which heavily relies on symbolic language to create complex and deep meanings. - Covers rubbed, gilt a little faded on covers. Occasional small paper tears (not touching the text); marginal dampstains on last pages, occasional foxing and browning. On the last page, date written in pencil and page calculation in blue pencil. - Özege 4218. OCLC 20839739. Kutlar Oguz, Fatma Sabiha (eds.), Arpaemini-zade Mustafa Sami, Divan (KTB Yayinlari, 2017).
  • $3,895
  • $3,895
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Algae from the Red Sea.

[Red Sea Algae Specimen Album]. Husson, Anne Henry, French naturalist (1814-1855). Album of 18 well-preserved algal specimens carefully mounted on individual sheets of white wove paper, each approximately 330 x 155 mm. Loosely laid in to folding portfolio, housed in a marble clamshell box. A rare and early ensemble of algae specimens collected from the Red Sea, from different areas between Suez and Yemen, including one specimen from Alexandria. All items identified with the Latin name and details of the location around the Red Sea and date of collection written in French on the mounts, e.g., "Caulerpa prolifera: très commune dans toute la mèr rouge á la prodondeur de 1½ mètre à 2 [.] Avril 1844", or "Mer rouge dans le Golfe de l'Acaba, Juillet 1844". - The French botanist A. H. Husson, a native of Nancy, was also a pioneer of early photography. He lived in Egypt, where he worked as the director of the botanical garden and conservator for the Museum of Natural History for the Qasr Al-Ainy, the Cairo University's Faculty of Medicine. - "The Red sea has been a region of natural history exploration by European scientists from about 240 years. The first record of marine algae in the Red Sea was by Strand (a pupil of Linnaeus's), who in his thesis on the flora of Palestine listed three species. The first person to collect marine algae from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea Coast was the Danish botanist and explorer Forsskal in the 18th century who, in the month of November 1762, made a collection of seaweeds from the Sea of Jeddah [.] In the early years of the 19th century a British admiral Viscount Valentia made collections of algae from the Red Sea [.] Several other workers, including medical doctors and amateurs, collected marine algae from the Red Sea during the rest of the 19th century" (Beni-Suef Univ. Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences, Vol. 3/4 [Dec. 2014], pp. 278-285). - Includes the offprint of a short biography of Husson: Christian Debize, "L'album photographique d'Anne-Henry Husson. Regards d'un colon nancéien dur l'Egypte moderne", Annales de l'Est (1985), no. 4, pp. 261-299. Stab-sewn in wrappers. - A most exceptional and scarce collection of preserved algal specimens from the Red Sea. Provenance: from the property of the botanist Dr. Eugene L. Vigil (b. 1941), of Lynden, Washington, USA.
  • $20,590
  • $20,590
Taqasim al-'ilal [Classification of Diseases].

Taqasim al-‘ilal [Classification of Diseases].

Razi, Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyya al- (Rhazes). 2 vols. Tall 8vo (100 x 185 mm). 109 ff. 89 ff. Arabic manuscript on paper. Black naskh script with important words and phrases picked out in red. Originally bound as one. Sans binding, and housed in custom red cloth box. Rare and little known to scholarship: a medical work by one of the greatest physicians in Muslim history, copied quite early. Abu Bakr Al-Razi (ca. 864-925) is known by the name of Rhazes in the Latin tradition; few if any can claim his scope of influence on medical thought in the Christian and Muslim worlds alike. - While the manuscript of al-Razi's "Kitab al-Mansuri" ("The Book of Medicine for Al-Mansur") was translated into Latin by Gerard of Cremona around 1180 and disseminated to the West, the "Taqasim al-'ilal", sometimes also known as "Taqsim wa al-Tashjir" ("Dividing and Diagramming"), remains almost unknown among al-Razi's prolific productions, the present example being one of very few surviving manuscripts. A critical edition was not published until 1992, by the University of Aleppo. - Rather than following the traditional method of treating body parts in order in an anatomical "head to toe" approach, the "Taqasim al-'ilal" details a series of case studies of each ailment in 31 themed chapters. Each chapter begins with the general and then narrows its focus for very careful and deliberate diagnosis. The first chapter, for example, is titled simply "On headaches," but gives an immediate distinction between a headache and migraine, after which symptomatology is further distinguished: there is a headache affecting the auricular region (suda' ma'a waj' al-udhn), the eye (al-'ayn), or a headache-causing cough (suda' ma'a al-su'al). - In the present manuscript, the "Taqasim" is followed by a copy of al-Razi's "Aqrabadin", itself the source of Masawaih's "Antidotarium". The final section of the treatise deals specifically with surgical procedures, such as the cauterization of wounds or the setting of dislocated or fractured bones. - An highly important and very early copy from one of the great names in the history of science, and one which would benefit greatly from the scholarly attention it has lacked for centuries. - In two volumes, originally bound as one, complete in spite of one loose quire. Some paper repair, generally marginal. Well preserved. - GAL I, 223, no. 9.4, 9.5. Taqasim al-'ilal. Aleppo, Ma'had al-Turat al-'Ilmi al-'Arabi, 1992.
  • $72,342
  • $72,342
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Annual Report of the Director of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East. Covering the period 1 July 1954 to 30 June 1955. General Assembly, Official Records: Tenth Session, Supplement No. 15 (A/2978).

United Nations - UNRWA. 4to (215 x 278 mm). IV, 37 pp., (3 blank) pp. With 3 folding maps (Annex I,1, I.2, I.3) inserted in the rear pocket. Original printed wrappers. Stapled. Thorough report on the tireless efforts of UNWRA to provide relief to Palestine refugees since its establishment after the 1948 Palestine War, describing all aspects of the agency's work including general welfare, health service, nutrition, medical supply, edcuation, and self-support projects. This is the fourth such annual report altogether, the first having been issued in 1952. The discussion is illustrated by several tables showing the distribution of refugees per country of residence or the numbers of refugee children receiving education. In addition, the account features details on the agency's expenditures and future financial requirements. - While the first map is a more general sketch of the area showing boundaries and demarcation lines, the second and third maps show refugee camps and agricultural projects operated by UNRWA in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Gaza, and Sinai. Each map gives a summary of refugee populations both in and out of camps in Gaza, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria, their numbers adding up to a total of 905,986 persons. - Wrappers somewhat rubbed and creased, a few marginal flaws. Ballpoint underlinings on pp. 2 and 30. - ZDB-ID 773142-5. OCLC 643805553.
  • $668
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Meteorological Charts of the Red Sea.

[Red Sea - Saudi Arabia]. Large folio (340 x 555 mm). (6) pp. With 24 charts. Original publisher's morocco-grain limp cloth, title in gilt on front cover. First and only edition of this scarce meteorological atlas of the Red Sea with an excellent provenance; only 650 copies were printed, and only 15 are currently listed in institutions on OCLC. A hugely detailed scientific undertaking: much of the information collected here would have been of great military and commercial interest, and also quite relevant to British surveillance of the Red Sea, including traffic through the still relatively new Suez Canal and the movements of pilgrims to Mecca during the Hajj. - The charts were prepared from logs and observations made by the British Royal Navy, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, and the Royal Meteorological Institute of the Netherlands at Utrecht. As Robert H. Scott, executive head of the Meteorological Office, notes in his preface, ''very few observations have been obtained prior to the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 and nearly all the material [.] is of necessity from steamships which follow much the same track within very narrow limits". However, in certain cases further anecdotal evidence is included, such as an 1879 report by the H.M.S. Seagull, which describes a difficult approach to the port city of Jeddah, where she contended with shifting currents and winds. - The charts are divided into two sections, "Winds" and "Currents", with each section covering twelve months each. Beyond their main subjects, the charts provide a wealth of related information on barometer readings, air temperature (both wet bulb and standard), sea temperature, and incidences of stormy weather and gales. The charts also name key ports along the Red Sea and especially along the Saudi Arabian coast, including Al Muwaileh, Yanbu, Jeddah, and Al Lith. - No copies traced in auction records. An uncommon and important maritime record of what is now perhaps the most important shipping lane in the world. - Deaccessioned library copy, with small stamps and other subtle markings; in very good condition. - 1) From William Haultain Milner (d. 1901), with the presentation label, "Presented by the Meteorological Council to Captain W. H. Milner, R.M.S. 'Para', as an Acknowledgement of his Valuable Meteorological Observations". The Para was a ship of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company (1839-1930), commissioned in 1875. - 2) With three small "British Museum (Natural History)" collection and deaccession stamps to the title-page and blank verso of the final chart. Milner was a regular donor, credited by the museum in 1896 for donating numerous samples gathered "with great zeal" from Cartagena and the midAtlantic. - OCLC 17283647.
  • $5,008
  • $5,008
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[Zanzibar and the Slave Trade: correspondence and reports, 1874-1904].

[Slave Trade]. Folio. A total of 24 reports. Disbound from volumes of parliamentary papers, individually stitched. Housed in two grey cloth clamshell boxes with black leather spines, titled in gilt. A collection of rare British parliamentary papers and correspondence with local agents and officers on the slave trade, of immense importance to the history of slavery and its suppression in Zanzibar, East Africa, Oman, and the Gulf. - Reports, communications, and treaties provide the backdrop for thirty years of history, including the text of two treaties closed between Britain and Sultan Barghash bin Said of Zanzibar regulating the powers of British officials to seize ships suspected of carrying on the slave trade, two colour lithograph maps (one folding) showing "The slave caravan route from Dar es Salam to Kilwa" and a "Sketch of coast visited by Vice Consul Elton", and a paper on the traffic of slaves in Zanzibar, with a report on slaves there kidnapped, with reference to "the Arabs who come down from the Gulf of Oman and the Persian Gulf with a view to procuring slaves". - Reports give detailed information from men on the spot; one titled "Slave Trade No. 7 (1874). Further Reports on East African Slave Trade" describes how "At Brava and Lamo slaves are in large demand, and Pemba is still unsatisfied; neither will Arabia and the Persian Gulf be contented to forego their usual supplies" (p. 25). Yet, a year later, the British are much more confident: "Slave Trade No. 1 (1875). Correspondence with British Representatives and Agents Abroad" states firmly that "the Treaties entered into last year with the Sultans of Oman and Zanzibar, for the more effectual suppression of the Slave Trade, have so far resulted satisfactorily, in that no importation of African slaves has taken place this season to the Dominion of Oman and the Persian Gulf". The author adds, "I am confidently of opinion that the importation for the present has wholly ceased. This result, moreover, has been confirmed to me by his Highness Seyyid Toorkee" (p. 90). The latter refers to Sultan Turki bin Said (1832-88), fifth son of Said bin Sultan. - The papers cover an immense range of geography and politics. One paper might make references to slavery on Pemba and dhows trading from the Arabian Gulf and Oman, and the liberation of several slaves; another gives reports of fugitive slaves having claimed protection from British vessels in the Gulf (Bandar Abbas, Bandar Lengeh) and off Muscat, and others of the ramifications, both legal and social, of the progress of the abolition of slavery and the new "free" status of former Zanzibar slaves after their emancipation. - A detailed list is available upon request. - Disbound from one or more volumes of parliamentary papers. Occasional chipping or repairs, but altogether in very good condition. - 1. One report (Africa No. 4 [1901], Correspondence respecting Slavery and the Slave Trade in East Africa and the Islands of Zanzibar and Pemba) features the stamp of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society on its title-page. 2. The clamshell boxes with the monogrammed ExLibris (HW) of the last owner, who assembled the present collection. - Bennett 498, 499, 500, 501, 502, 510, 2240, 2243, 2244.
  • $27,824
  • $27,824
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Kitab al-Nuqayah.

8vo (140 x 210 mm). 103 ff. (of which 95 ff. comprise the Kitab al-Nuqayah). Arabic manuscript on paper. Black script, main text ruled in gilt and beginning with an index arranged in gilt squares followed by an 'unwan in gold and blue. - (Bound with) II: Imam al-Quduri. (One chapter of) Mukhtasar al-Quduri. 2 ff. - (Bound with) III: Talib, Shihab ibn 'Ali. Jawhar-i Fara'id. 5 ff. plus final single leaf of notes. - 19th century brown calf with fore-edge flap, ruled in blind with central floral medallions. A finely decorated manuscript on Muslim Hanafi law known as the "Kitab al-Nuqayah". Composed by an unknown author, it was based on a well-known medieval work titled "Fatawa Qadi Khan", completed by the jurist Qadi Khan in the 12th century CE. The "Fatawa Qadi Khan" was widely read among Muslim jurists, and the present text based upon it was also well known in its time; today, this work can be found in at least one printed edition. Its authorship, however, remains a mystery, having been variously attributed to at least three different Hanafi scholars. This copy was completed by the scribe Muhammad bin Jalil in the city of Amasiyah (Amasya), in what was then Ottoman Turkey. - Two other texts on Muslim law are bound together with the "Kitab al-Nuqayah"; all three were completed at roughly the same time as the main manuscript, and likely also in Amasya or the immediate surroundings. These texts comprise: - I. The complete chapter on inheritance from the immensely popular Hanafi fiqh manual by Imam al-Quduri (973-1037 CE), titled "Mukhtasar al-Quduri", so important that it is known among Hanafi scholars simply as "al-Kitab". - II. A seven-page work on inheritance law titled here as "Jawhar-i Fara'id" by Shihab ibn 'Ali Talib, a compendium on the Islamic law of succession. - Taken together, this manuscript provides a glimpse into the range of scholarly texts with which an 18th century Hanafi scholar would be expected to be familiar, and includes a nicely hand-gilded copy of the "Kitab al-Nuqayah". - Light exterior wear, small waterstain to top edge not affecting text; in good condition. - Cf. GAL S II, 977, No. 59.
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Correspondence with the British Commissioners, relating to the Slave Trade.

5 vols. VI, 168 pp. (2), 172 pp. VIII, 95 pp. XI, (1), 9-140 pp. VIII, 79 pp. Comprises: - I. Class A. Correspondence with the British Commissioners, at Sierra Leone, the Havannah, Rio de Janeiro, and Suriname. 1826-27. London, R. G. Clarke, 1827. - II. Class A. Correspondence with the British Commissioners, relating to the Slave Trade. 1837. London, Clowes and Sons, 1838. - III. Class A. (Further Series.) Correspondence with the British Commissioners, relating to the Slave Trade. 1837. London, Clowes and Sons, 1838. - IV. Class B. Correspondence with Foreign Powers, relating to the Slave Trade. 1837. London, Clowes and Sons, 1838. - V. Class B. (Further Series.) Correspondence with Foreign Powers, relating to the Slave Trade. 1837. London, Clowes and Sons, 1838. Removed from original binding, papered spines. Collected correspondence on the slave trade sent between the Foreign Secretary and future British Prime Minister Lord Palmerston and his official informants across the British Empire. Stationed in the major ports of the slave trade, the informants describe the situation in the trade (and legal entanglements on all sides), as well as agreements, treaties, ship seizures, and difficulties. A Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell passes along news from Cairo-based British Consul Dr. John Bowring (elsewhere famous for diplomatic incidents with the Chinese, but apparently in Cairo a trusted source) that the Pasha's troops have been "employed in collecting slaves," and indeed that officers in arrears of pay were receiving enslaved persons in place of that pay. The ruler of Cairo at the time was Muhammad Ali Pasha, who was "very willing to have the whole matter investigated" once the British had found a way to bring up what they considered a delicate topic. - Other reports describe the slave trade between Cuba and Texas, actions taken to consider the slave trade as an act of piracy in Brazil, and the status of previously enslaved people in Cuba. - Altogether, a thorough set of documents relating to the global suppression of the slave trade in the years surrounding the 1834 abolition of slavery in most of the British Empire and colonies. Their main author, Lord Palmerston, was twice the Prime Minister of Britain, and one of the most influential Foreign Secretaries to have shaped the British Empire. - Disbound from larger volume. In good condition, with only light soiling. - With the ex-libris stamp of the University College of Southampton.