Recent Highlights
(Updated 6/25/2020 at 7.30 AM EST)

Zur Farbenlehre / Erklärung der zu Goethe's Farbenlehre gehörigen Tafeln / Anzeige und Uebersicht des Goethischen Werkes zur Farbenlehre / Sechzehn Tafeln zu Goethe's Farbenlehre und Siebenundzwanzig Tafeln zu Dessen Beiträge zur Optik nebst Erklärung.

Zur Farbenlehre / Erklärung der zu Goethe’s Farbenlehre gehörigen Tafeln / Anzeige und Uebersicht des Goethischen Werkes zur Farbenlehre / Sechzehn Tafeln zu Goethe’s Farbenlehre und Siebenundzwanzig Tafeln zu Dessen Beiträge zur Optik nebst Erklärung.

GOETHE, Johann Wolfgang von I: Zur Farbenlehre. Tübingen: Cotta, 1810. Two parts bound in two volumes. 8vo (198 x 121 mm). xlviii, 654; xxviii, 757 [1] pp. Contemporary dark-green glossy paper boards, spines ruled and lettered in gilt (wear to extremities, corners scuffed and bumped), bound without endpapers. Very light age-toning and occasional minor spotting to final pages of second vol., otherwise crisp and clean. II: Erklärung der zu Goethe's Farbenlehre gehörigen Tafeln. Geistinger: Vienna, 1812. [3] 4-24 pp, with 17 engraved plates (12 hand-coloured, including the extra plate IIa) bound at end. Text little browned and foxed, first 3 plates with brown spot at gutter. The three smaller plates IIa, VI and XII laid down on paper of the time. [Bound with] III: Anzeige und Uebersicht des Goethischen Werkes zur Farbenlehre. Geistinger: Vienna, 1812. [1] 2-12 pp. Text little browned and foxed throughout. Two parts in one volume. 4to (220 x 180 mm). Recent half cloth, new endpapers. IV. Sechzehn Tafeln zu Goethe's Farbenlehre und Siebenundzwanzig Tafeln zu Dessen Beiträge zur Optik nebst Erklärung. Stuttgart and Tübingen: Cotta, 1842. 4to (232 x 190 mm). [2], 24; [2] pp. With 17 (12 hand-coloured) engraved plates und 27 (13 hand-coloured) lithographs on 9 plates. Contemporary dark-green glossy paper boards matching to text volumes, spines ruled and lettered in gilt (wear to extremities, corners scuffed and bumped). Text little browned, stronger foxing to first and final pages. Altogether a very good set. ---- Goedeke IV/3, pp. 14 (IV), 583, 45 (I), 46 (II), 46 alpha (III); Hagen 347 (I), 348b (II), 348c (III), 24b (IV); Kippenberg 386 (I), 389 (II), 388 (III); Roller-Goodman I, 468; Honeyman 1524; DSB V, p.445. Goethe's principal scientific work, the "Farbenlehre", including the quarto-sized "Erklärung der zur Goethe's Farbenlehre gehörigen Tafeln" and the "Anzeige und Uebersicht" in a mixed edition (I and IV in first, II and III in second counterfeit edition). "Goethe's first publication on optics culminated in his 'Zur Farbenlehre', his longest and, in his own view, best work, today known principally as a fierce and unsuccessful attack on Newton's demonstration that white light is composite" (DSB V, p.445). Whereas Goethe?s theories were in fact wrong from a purely physical standpoint, the fact remains that Goethe's theories were epoch-making in their physiological and psychological aspects. Indeed, the science of physiological optics was directly stimulated by it and one of its dominant schools in essence represented his approach long after him. His theories still have great value, and a more than scientific validity, to artists and to all those who want to achieve a personal understanding of the natural world - who want to establish their own relationship with that world rather than merely accept what modern science has to say about it. This first edition, aside from its value as an object, is the only edition to contain the complete text, which is in two volumes. Volume I contains a discussion of physiological, physical and chemical colors and a detailed study of Newton?s Optics. Volume II is a historical study of colors as shown in the work of the famous theorists and artists of Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. There are important sections on Robert Boyle, Erasmus Darwin and Benjamin Franklin. The plate volume includes 12 handcolored plates. They are of various sizes. The "Anzeige und Uebersicht" with drop title only as issued. In the appendix to the Farbenlehre published in 1842, 13 additional illustrations on 9 lithographed plates were issued (cf. Hagen, p.89). - Visit our website to see additional images!
DO ANDROIDS DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP?

DO ANDROIDS DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP?

PHILIP K. DICK Stated First Edition, First Printing. Scarce true first edition, beautiful clean, crisp book with a stunning original dust jacket, not price clipped. The book is in beautiful crisp condition for this title which is otherwise often found very well ?loved?. Clean grey cloth boards unfaded gilt titles to spine. The book has sharp corners with no bumps, and no edgewear. The binding is tight and square. The end papers are clean with no inscriptions, no owner names and no bookstore stamps. The internal pages are very crisp, clean, bright and flat with no writing, no handling marks, no stains, no foxing, and no bent pages. The binding is still fairly tight so if the book appears as unread or perhaps only once. All in all a stunning copy of an extremely rare book which usually sells for upwards of $4000 even for unrestored ex-library copies! Please see images. The original striking dust jacket benefited from some slight restoration to the spine/corner tips by an expert paper conservator, and as such present in near fine condition. The dust jacket has strong, rich, vibrant colors with No rips, No chips, No stains, No rubbing, No edgewear, No chips, and No foxing. The jacket is complete and NOT price clipped and has stated price of $3.95. Please see the many included images. A very stunning dust jacket! An extremely handsome, clean copy of a scarce collectible book. Perhaps the most well known of Philip Dick?s novels, ?ANDROIDS? was the basis of the film Blade Runner which was made into a film twice. Extremely scarce. ADDITIONAL IMAGES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Please see our ABE store for other SciFi titles
Frankenstein

Frankenstein

Shelley, Mary The First UK printing of the Third Edition published by Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, London in 1831. Bound with Vol.1 of Schiller's The Ghost-Seer as issued. The BOOK is in Very Good+ condition. The publisher's original plum coloured boards with fading of colouring to the spine and some offsetting to the rear board. Some very slight loss at the rear upper spine fold with some light edge wear at the spine ends. Early splitting at the spine folds but the binding reminds tight. One penned previous owner’s name to the front pastedown. The original publisher’s labels to the spine are lightly rubbed and only have a hint of edge-wear. The book has a slight lean. The contents are complete as published : 4 pages of National Library Advert, Blank page, Standard Novels No 1X half title page with the Theodor von Holst engraving frontispiece to the verso (which is offset and toned), Title page with vignette (which is toned and offset), Second title page, Introduction (By Mary Shelley), 'Frankenstein' pp 3-202. 'The Ghost-Seer' : Half-title, Title page, Introduction, 'The Ghost-Seer' pp 9-163, 3 pages of Standard Novels adverts to the rear. Toning to the text-block with the occasional age related spotting and markings throughout. The First illustrated edition of Frankenstein, the third overall, and the first substantially revised by Mary Shelley alone as the sole author. Published in an edition of 3,500 copies, it was the first truly popular edition and the first to contain an illustration depicting Frankenstein and the Creature. Bentley insisted that all Standard Novel authors should revise their texts, and Mary took the opportunity to retain most of minor changes introduced by William Godwin into the 1823 second edition, as well as making substantial revisions, including an entirely new chapter and the celebrated Preface in which she describes the novel's genesis at the nocturnal storytelling session with Shelley, Byron, and Polidori at the Villa Diodati (including the misleading suggestion that she been married at the time). Though Mary Shelley lived for another 20 years, this was the final revision she made in her lifetime. It was issued as volume IX of Bentley's Standard Novels series alongside the first part of Johannes Schiller's Ghost Seer. The book is protected in a removable Mylar archival cover. An increasingly elusive title which often turns up rebound with the prelim pages and adverts missing. The first copy we have handled which is complete with the original boards and labels. Collectible. More images available on request. Ashton Rare Books welcomes direct contact.
Institutionum [bound with] Infortianum [and] Digestum Novum

Institutionum [bound with] Infortianum [and] Digestum Novum, 1553-56

Justinian I, Emperor of the East A Collection of Texts from the Corpus Juris Civilis in Handsome Uniform Contemporary Paneled Pigskin Bindings Justinian I [483-565 CE], Emperor of the East. Accorso, Francisco (Accursius) [c.1182-c.1260], Glossator. Gaius [Active 130-180 CE]. Institutionum D. Iustiniani Sacratissimi Imperatoris Libri Quatuor: Ad Vetustissimorum Simul et Emendatissimorum Exemplarium Fidem Summa Diligentia Recogniti, Emendati. Cum Scholiis Accursii. Adiecimus Pluribus Locis Annotationes ex Doctissimorum Hominum Commentariis, Ex Quibus non Parum Lucis ac Dignitatis his Iuris Civilis Elementis Accedit. Accessit Corpus Legum, Antea non Impressum, Ac Caii Institutionum Libri Duo. Lyon: Apud Hugonem a Porta, 1553. Pp. [24], 290, [2] pp. Large woodcut image of Justinian surrounded by his court. Main text in parallel columns with linear gloss. [Bound with] Justinian I, Emperor of the East. Accorso, Francisco (Accursius), Glossator. Volumen hoc Complectitur (Sic Enim Peculiari Vocabulo Vocant) Novellas Constitutiones Iustiniani Principis Post Repetitam Codicis Praelectionem Aeditas: Authentica Vulgo Appellant. Tres Item Posteriores Libros Codicis; Feudorum seu Beneficiorum Duos; Constitutiones Friderichi Secundi Imperatoris; Extravagantes duas Henrici Septimi Imperatoris; & Tractatum De Pace Constantiae. Omnia ad Vetustissimorum Simul & Emendatissimorum Exemplarium Fidem Recognita, Emendata. Accesserunt nunc Primum, & Nunquam Antehac Aediti, Iustiniani Novellarum Constitutionum Libri Duo, Cum Multis Annotationibus ex Doctissimorum Hominum Commentariis, Quae non Parum Lucis ac Dignitatis Huic Volumini Afferunt. Lyon: Apud Hugonem a Porta, 1553. [xvi], 276, 148, 99, [1] pp. Woodcut table of descents (in the form of a tree). Main text in parallel columns with linear gloss. [With] Justinian I, Emperor of the East. Accorso, Francisco (Accursius), Glossator. Infortiatum, Pandectarum Iuris Civilis Tomus Secundus: Quartae Partis Reliquum, Itemque Quintam Digestorum Partem, Ac Sextae Partis: Libros Continens, Ex Pandectis Florentinis Ita in Universum Recognitus ac Emendatus, Ut Nihil Praeterea, Quod ad Puram Eorum Librorum Lectionem Attinet, Desiderari Possit. Lyon: Apud Hugonem a Porta, 1556. [xxxvi], 923, [1] pp. Main text in parallel columns with linear gloss. [And] Justinian I, Emperor o.
IF.

IF.

KIPLING. RUDYARD. SECOND SEPARATE ENGLISH EDITION. 8vo. (6.5 x 4.6 inches). A rare bibliographical variant, printed in black on white paper cover plus 4pp rather than than the dark burgundy ink on light grey or brown paper noted in the bibliography (Richards; A269 - note). This copy also varies from Richards A269 with the addition of a portrait frontis of Kipling after an illustration by M. Webb which is printed on stiff dark grey paper. The pages are then bound in a contemporary full burgundy soft suede binding with red, white and blue silk tie to the spine. Front panel lettered in gilt and with blind stamped line ruled border with floral corner pieces. Neat three line inscription, dated Xmas 1916, to the front free endpaper and previous owner bookplate, of the noted Kipling and Boer war collectors John and Maggie Phillips on front pastedown. The Phillips' collection was sold by auction in 2017. A little rubbing to the suede binding but overall a lovely presentation of this important work. One of an unknown number that were bound at the time of publication probably by either a bookseller or gift shop to make the thin paper wrappered poem more suitable for presentation as a gift. No copy in this format with this binding and with the portrait has been seen by the author of the most recent and comprehensive Kipling bibliography so this is very likely not a publishers variant, but this is the second copy I have had in this format so it is not a one off bespoke binding. An attractive copy of this rare edition----- The Poem first appeared in the book Rewards and Fairies (October 1910), this separate publication was issued to capitalise on the huge, and instant, popularity of what has become Kipling's most enduring work of verse. A poll taken by the BBC in the UK in 2005 voted it as Britain's favourite Poem, poling twice as many votes as the number 2 choice, Lord Tennyson's The Lady of Shallot. Originally written in 1895, IF was inspired by the actions of Dr. Leander Starr Jameson, a British Officer whose forces were defeated by the Boers in 1895, but who was portrayed as a victorious hero by the British press, the poem is a powerful masterclass in maintaining the British stiff upper lip. ---- David Alan Richards. Rudyard Kipling. A bibliography. A269. Note.
Kriegszeit. Künstlerflugblätter [War time. Artistic broadsides]

Kriegszeit. Künstlerflugblätter [War time. Artistic broadsides], nos. 1 (August 1914) through 64-65 (March 1916) (all published)

Liebermann, Max, et al. Berlin: Verlag Paul Cassirer, 1914-1916. Folios (ca. 47.5 × 32 cm). Original pictorial self-wrappers; most issues 4 pp. Housed in original cloth-backed printed card portfolio; the latter professionally repaired; most issues toned due to stock, as usual, and with a few occasional nicks but overall an about very good set. A complete run of the important WWI-era periodical, richly illustrated with lithographs by leading German artists of the day, including Max Liebermann, Ernst Barlach, August Gaul, Hans Baluschek, Georg Kolbe, Käthe Kollwitz, Hans Meid, Max Slevogt, Max Beckmann, Willy Jaeckel, Max Unold, Rudolph Grossmann, Franz Heckendorf, Erich Büttner, Oskar Nerlinger, Max Oppenheimer, and many others. Most of the illustrations depict scenes from the war front and everyday life in German society. The texts range from largely patriotic statements by military and government leaders to writings by social critics. The publisher, Ernst Cassirer (1871-1926), a Jewish-German art dealer and publisher, was enthusiastically for the German national cause in the war, and founded the journal before volunteering for front service himself. Most of the artists involved were part of the "Freie Sezession" around Max Liebermann, although their depictions of the wartime events varied considerably in terms of their enthusiasm.
One of the Earliest Announcements of Independence

One of the Earliest Announcements of Independence

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE The Pennsylvania Magazine; Or American Monthly Museum for January-July, 1776. Philadelphia: Robert Aitken. [5]-344pp. A bound volume containing a remarkable issue-one of the most historic magazines ever printed."July 2. This day the Hon. Continental Congress declared the UNITED COLONIES FREE AND INDEPENDENT STATES." These issues are the final seven from the only American magazine published in America during the Revolutionary crisis. With maps and other rare woodcut illustrations.As the publisher reports, the June issue was slightly delayed due to a paper shortage. "To our Correspondents. Hermes came too late for insertion this month. Our customers will excuse us, though the day of publication be sometimes delayed: The great difficulty we have procuring printing paper, renders it impossible for us to publish always on the first Wednesday of the month [July 3]."This delay would have left just enough time for the last-minute addition of one of the very first reports of Independence. It was likely published on July 4 to 6; had it been any later, it would have been able to include or at least mention the full text of the July 4th Declaration of Independence (which appears in the July issue, published in the first few days of August.)The full text of the Declaration appears on pp. 328-330, followed by the Constitution of New Jersey approved July 2, the Constitution of Virginia approved July 5, and a summary of the Constitution of Connecticut. There are also military notices from Canada, South Carolina, and Washington at New York. Other highlights include an address from the House of Commons to the King of England lamenting "the condition of our unhappy fellow subjects in America; seduced from their allegiance by the greatest misrepresentations" (February), a graphic account of the siege and capture of Boston by the Continental Army, accompanied by General Washington's letter to Brig. General Stirling that "we are now in full possession" of the town (March), Phillis Wheatley's Ode to Washington (April), a report on the Virginia House dissolving itself and instructing its delegates in the Continental Congress to vote for independence, as well as a resolution issued from Congress calling for each colony that has yet to do so to separate itself from England and form its own state government (May).Including two in-text engravings, and one folding map, "A New Map of North and South Carolina and Georgia" with old repairs and paper loss to the Bottom outer edge of the map. Lacks the four engraved plates and one of the engraved maps. No frontal material was issued for this volume, hence there never were pages 1-4, and this volume starts with page 5, as issued. Condition: Later three-quarter calf in antique style, with contemporary marbled boards. Toning and scattered old foxing and dampstains. In the January 1776 issue, pages 5-6, the cover/contents page of and the Meteorological Diary are supplied in facsimile. In the July 1776 issue, the Declaration pages (p328-30) are fine, but the final pages (p343-44) are supplied in facsimile. Historical BackgroundConceived by printer and bookseller Robert Aitken, best known for his work for the Continental Congress, the Pennsylvania Magazine was launched in January 1775. Soon enough, Aitken found himself needing an editor. For £50 a year, he hired Thomas Paine, who had only arrived in America in December 1774. Paine served as editor from February through July or August 1775. While serving as editor, Paine also became a major contributor, sometimes under the pseudonym "Atlanticus," and at others with no by-line. He wrote prolifically on many topics, including descriptions of inventions, and most of the magazine's revolutionary-era political material. According to John Tebbel, in The American Magazine: A Compact History (New York, 1969), "Paine (and Aitken) did not permit The Pennsylvania Magazine to be simply a propaganda organ. It contained a wide variety of other. (See website for full description)
Julia Ward Howe Biography

Julia Ward Howe Biography, with Autograph Manuscript on Suffrage

JULIA WARD HOWE Autograph Manuscript, n.d. [ca. 1882], tipped into Laura E. Richards and Maude Howe Elliott, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, 2 vols. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1915. First edition. Two volumes in original cloth-backed boards and the scarce dustwrappers and original slipcase. Copy #438 of 450 copies of the Large-Paper Edition. [x],392,[2]; [x],434,[2] pp. "I believe in suffrage. I believe in the great awakening by the womanly soul a conscience which will rise up like a flood, & sweep away the petty & effete prejudices."This biography of Julia Ward Howe by two of her daughters, assisted by a third, is illustrated with plates and portraits, including a facsimile manuscript of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." It won the 1917 Pulitzer Prize for Biography. Special edition, including a page handwritten by Howe on women's suffrage. Howe refers to her first interest in suffrage "about fourteen years ago." She helped found the New England Woman Suffrage Association in 1868, so we date it as ca. 1892, 14 years later. But she might consider her interest in suffrage to have started a bit earlier, right around the end of the Civil War. Complete transcript of Autograph Manuscript"let me finish, as I began, with saying that I believe in suffrage. I believed in it, with unavoidable doubts, when I first began to work for it, perhaps fourteen years ago. I believe in it now without doubt or misgiving. And I no longer believe in it as an abstract right to be dreamed of by philosophers but more to be embodied in humane legislation. I believe in the great awakening by the womanly soul a conscience which will rise up like a flood, & sweep away the petty & effete prejudices." Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910) was born in New York City. Her father was a banker. Her mother died (in childbirth) when she was five years old. Raised as an Episcopalian, she became a Unitarian by 1841. She married Samuel Gridley Howe (1801-1876), a physician and reformer, in 1843, she had six children between 1844 and 1859. Her marriage was difficult, and they separated for a time in 1852. Raising her children in South Boston, and in 1852, she and her husband purchased a country home in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. Howe attended lectures, studied foreign languages, and wrote essays, plays, and dramas. She published two volumes of poetry anonymously in the 1850s. She was an abolitionist, but like many of her day, she did not believe in racial equality. Her husband was one of John Brown's "Secret Six." After meeting Abraham Lincoln at the White House in November 1861, she was inspired to write "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," which was first published in February 1862. She continued writing and became involved in pacifism and women's suffrage. She became editor of the suffragist Woman's Journal in 1872 and contributed to the publication for twenty years. She published a biography of Margaret Fuller in 1883 and her own memoirs in 1899. She served as president of a number of organizations, including the Association for the Advancement of Women and the New England Woman Suffrage Association, and in 1869 the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA), which championed the Fifteenth Amendment (although it granted voting rights only to African American men, which caused a break between a significant part of the women's suffrage movement and the abolition and civil rights movement.) Condition: Fine in Very Good printed white dustwrappers with edgewear and a chip at the top of the spine of the second volume in a complete Good slipcase with an old tape repair on the bottom and torn at the top.
Articles of Confederation’s Weaknesses Become Evident in New Hampshire

Articles of Confederation’s Weaknesses Become Evident in New Hampshire

NEW HAMPSHIRE GENERAL COURT Manuscript Document Signed by a Clerk, June 23, 1785, [Exeter], New Hampshire. Blindstamped "Archives de Chastellux" at top left. 4 pp., 8 x 13 1/2 in. New Hampshire Act providing "for the Regulation of navigation and commerce," featuring strict prohibitions against imports to or exports from New Hampshire in ships "being the property of any of the Subjects of the King of Great-Britain." It also establishes mechanisms for enforcement and penalties for disregarding the law. Provenance: François-Jean de Beauvoir, Marquis de Chastellux (1734-1788)Historical BackgroundThe Second Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation in 1777, after sixteen months of debate. It then took until March 1781 to be ratified by the states. The system was inherently flawed; each state, no matter its size, had one vote in Congress; every act of Congress required the approval of nine states; there was no chief executive; Congress could not levy taxes (instead having to beg for requisitions from the states and loans from abroad); Congress lacked the authority to establish uniform regulations for foreign and domestic commerce. While the Treaty of Paris to end the Revolutionary War was pending in 1783, Great Britain closed its West Indian ports to most American goods. Once the war was officially over, British goods flooded American ports. The Confederation Congress had no power to respond. New York imposed a stiff duty on British West Indian imports, but voted against a 5 percent federal import tax. Massachusetts and Rhode Island passed their own protective tariffs. Inconsistent polices increased tension between the states and damaged already strained financial prospects.An emerging nationalist bloc, led by Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, proposed reforms. In September 1783, a Congressional committee concluded that Congress should ask the states to cede the power to set duties and regulate trade. On April 30, 1784, Congress passed a resolution asking to states to give it the power to regulate trade and negotiate commercial treaties. The resolution also mandated the power to set discriminatory duties or restrictions against trade with countries, such as Great Britain, who would not treat with the United States."Unless the United States in Congress assembled shall be vested with powers competent to the protection of commerce, they can never command reciprocal advantages in trade; and without these, our foreign commerce must decline and eventually be annihilated. Hence it is necessary that the states should be explicit, and fix on some effectual mode by which foreign commerce not founded on principles of equality may be restrained."Resolved, that it be, and it hereby is recommended to the legislatures of the several states, to vest the United States in Congress assembled, for the term of fifteen years, with power to prohibit any goods, wares or merchandize from being imported into or exported from any of the states, in vessels belonging to or navigated by the subjects of any power with whom these states shall not have formed treaties of Commerce."Only Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, and Virginia agreed to give Congress the requested power. Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and North Carolina added various qualifications or provisos.On March 3, 1786, Congress passed new resolutions, including, "That the states of states of New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and North Carolina, be solicited to reconsider their acts, and to make them agreeable to the recommendations of the 30th April, 1784," and "That the recommendations of the 30th April, 1784, be again presented to the view of the states of Delaware, South Carolina, and Georgia, and that they be most earnestly called upon to grant powers conformable thereto."That October, a Congressional committee examined the acts passed by the states, including new ones passed by Delaware and Georgia, finding seven to be in complian. (See website for full description)
Musaeum Kircherianum

Musaeum Kircherianum

KIRCHER, Athanasius]; BONNANI, Filippo The Rare Catalogue of the Great Kircher Museum [KIRCHER, Athanasius]. BONANNI, Filippo. Musaeum Kircherianum, sive Musaeum a P. Athanasio Kirchero In Collegio Romano Societatis Jesu jam pridem incoeptum Nuper restitutum, auctum, descriptum, & Iconibus illustratum. Roma: Typis Georgii Plachi Caelaturam Prositentis, & Characterum Fusoriam propè S. Marcum, 1709. First edition of Bonanni's catalogue of the Kircher Museum in Rome. Folio (14 5/8 x 9 3/4 inches; 372 x 247 mm.). [xii], 1-39, [40, blank], [21 leaves of illustration numbered 40-60], 61-79, [80, blank], [4 leaves of illustration numbered 60-63], 84-115, [12 leaves of illustration numbered 116-127], 128-146, [147, blank], [14 leaves of illustration numbered 147-160], 161-183, [184, blank], [15 leaves of illustration numbered 184-197.2], 198-224, [225, blank], [2 leaves of illustration numbered 248-226], 225-247, [248, blank], [18 leaves of illustration numbered 284-300], 264-283, [21 leaves of illustration numbered 284-300], 302-312, [313, blank], [4 leaves of illustration numbered 313-316], 316-319, [2 leaves of illustration numbered 320-321], 322-361, [28 leaves of illustration numbered 362-387, 391], 392-411, [1 leaf of illustration numbered 412], 412-522, [1, blank], [48 leaves of illustration numbered a-bbb], [7, index], [1, blank] pp. Plate numbers 299 & 364 are double-page folding. A4-H2, I4-N4, O6, P4-T4, U6, X4-Z4, Aa4, Bb6, Cc6, Dd4-Gg4, Hh6, Ii4-Zz4, Aaa6. Text printed in two columns. Engraved portrait frontispiece of Prince Ruspoli, and 190 engraved plates, two of which are double-page. Leaf Hh2 (pp. 352/353 with small, neatly repaired lower marginal tear. Some light occasional browning to a few leaves, otherwise fine and clean. Contemporary vellum, manuscript title on spine, all edges sprinkled red. Slight cracking to upper and lower portions of spine. Engraved portrait of Athanasius Kircher on front paste-down, rectangular bookplate of Bibliotheca Kircheriana on front paste-down. Albert Vialis was an early twentieth century French translator and avid collector of Kircher material. Most copies that have appeared at auction have lacked plates or other imperfections. Just four copies have appeared at auction over the past fifty years, with only two of those purportedly complete. Our copy has 190 engraved plates which is 28 more than any other copy cited. In 1698, Jesuit Filippo Bonanni (1638-1723) was appointed curator of the internationally known cabinet of curiosities, the Musaeum Kircherianum, gathered by Athanasius Kircher and lodged in the Jesuit Collegio Romano. The museum was created in the middle of the seventeenth century. Because Kircher was interested in everything the museum included objects of every kind from many emerging disciplines: antiquities, archaeology, ethnography, natural history, etc., and also included a number of mathematical, scientific, and physical instruments. The Museum does not exist any more as such, its collections having been disbursed among the other Roman museums. It is possible, however, to reconstruct it in one's imagination, because of the elaborate description of it by Buonanni, who published this detailed, if not exhaustive, catalogue of the amazing collection of his Jesuit colleague, which, in addition to the items above, clocks, artwork, coins, mummies, a "mermaid's tail," an extraordinary collection of shoes, the first cuneiform document known in Europe, and a large collection of seashells. The catalog is divided into twelve sections (Classes) concerning the various categories of objects. These range from antiques to the natural sciences, physics and mathematics, in order to illustrate what Nature "his sinus inexausto effluxu produxit" (Proemium). The antiquities occupy the first five sections and are collected in ethnographic criteria. The critical assumptions cards to each category focus on the use and characteristics of individual types of objects. Cicognara 3372. Caillet 5784. Honeyman 550. Brunet I,1086. Nissen ZBI 2198.
Installing Jefferson’s Great Clock at Monticello

Installing Jefferson’s Great Clock at Monticello

Thomas Jefferson Autograph Letter Signed ("Th: Jefferson") as President, to James Dinsmore. Washington, January 28, 1804. With integral transmittal leaf addressed in his hand with his franking signature ("free Th: Jefferson Pr. US.") at top left. 8 x 10 in. A significant letter concerning Jefferson's long-planned installation of large cannonball weights that powered the seven-day clock being installed in Monticello's front entrance hall. Making room for the Great Clock at Monticello and designing a better lumber kiln. Here Jefferson objects to Dinsmore's suggestion to "cutting the wall, not even the cellar wall, to make a space for the descent of the clock weights." He preferred to "have them advanced into the room so as to descend naked till they get to the floor from where they may enter a square hole & go on to the cellar floor."Still operational today, the Great Clock, has faces for both the interior and exterior of the mansion, and operates with a pair of eighteen-pound weights that descend on ropes through open holes in the floor into the cellar.Jefferson then addresses the matter of the recent fire that consumed a large quantity of lumber intended for expanding the mansion. Rather than wait another year to allow green lumber to dry, he suggests a design for an arched, brick roof for the lumber kiln to reduce the threat of more valuable building material being consumed by fire: "we must therefore purchase bricks somewhere, cost what they will, to cover the house with an arch as here represented, it will take about 1500 whole bricks, clinkers. The gable ends may be closed with stone, leaving the Southern one a smoke hole as is shewn in this drawing, so that stopping that and the firehole at the bottom of the other end, a fire may be extinguished in a moment for want of air."In the letter Jefferson sketches a cross-section of the kiln, recommending a 60-degree arch.Condition: Small losses at left margin not affecting text, mostly separated at spine, but reinforced where still attached, loss from seal tear to transmittal leaf. Complete TranscriptDear Sir Washington Jan. 28.04I return you the drawings for the architrave of the front of the gallery, with a preference of that marked b. with the rounded listel. I do not approve of cutting the wall, not even the cellar wall, to make a space for the descent of the clock weights; but would have them advanced into the room so as to descend clear even of the cellar wall. should the box in this case encroach too much on the window, we may avoid the eye sore by leaving them unboxed, to descend naked till they get to the floor whence they may enter a square hole & go on to the cellar floor.The loss of so much plank by fire & otherwise is one of the most afflicting circumstances I have had to meet in the whole course of my building: & the only term to it seems to be the conclusion of the work. to cover the kiln-house with slabs will be only to require double time & fuel to season with and probably to consign another kiln full to the flames. we must therefore purchase bricks somewhere, cost what they will, to cover the house with an arch as here represented. it will take about 1500. whole bricks, clinkers. the gable ends may be closed with stone, leaving in the Southern one a smoke hole as is shown in this drawing, so that stopping that and the firehole at the bottom of the other end, a fire may be extinguished in a moment for want of air, even if it has already made some progress. so the external1 covering of wood may burn down without affecting the plank. speak to mr Lilly to get the bricks, and to mr Hope to do the work as soon as the weather will admit, and in the mean time endeavor to provide make a new provision of plank. John Perry proposes to get the scantling for the N.W. offices this winter, which I should prefer if it can be secured from waste. I am afraid the flooring plank he was to lay upstairs is among that lost, and that we shall not have those ro. (See website for full description)
Jefferson’s First Inaugural Address

Jefferson’s First Inaugural Address, Rare Printing on Silk

Thomas Jefferson Broadside, The inaugural speech of Thomas Jefferson. Washington-City, March 4th, 1801 - this day, at XII o'clock, Thomas Jefferson, President Elect of the United States of America, took the oath of office required by the Constitution, in the Senate Chamber, in the presence of the Senate, the members of the House of Representatives, the public officers, and a large concourse of citizens. Previously to which, he delivered the following address. [Boston]: From the Chronicle Press, by Adams & Rhoades, Court-Street. [March 19, 1801]. On silk. 16 1/2 x 22 1/2 in. 1 p. Jefferson's most famous speech lays out his political program, but also makes a ringing call for patriotism beyond partisanship. It is considered to be one of the most important presidential speeches, and is widely quoted even today - by President Clinton, President Bush, and almost every other current political figure. Alluding to the recent controversial and acrimonious presidential election, Jefferson calls for a calming of partisan passions, and outlines "what I deem the essential principles of our government. . . . We have called by different names brethren of the same principle. We are all republicans; we are all federalists." Excerpt".though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will, to be rightful, must be reasonable.the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression. Let us then, fellow-citizens, unite with one heart and one mind; let us restore to social intercourse that harmony and affection without which liberty, and even life itself, are but dreary things. And let us reflect, that having banished from our land that religious intolerance under which mankind so long bled and suffered, we have yet gained little, if we countenance a political intolerance, as despotic, as wicked, and capable of as bitter and bloody persecutions.every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle. We have called by different names brethren of the same principle. We are all republicans; we are all federalists. If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve the Union, or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated, where reason is left free to combat it." Historical Background The "Revolution of 1800" marked the downfall of Federalism and the ascension of Republicanism. The election saw the first peaceful transfer of power from one party to another - with few parallels in the history of the world. (Though particularly bitter, the election proved to be a great test of the strength of the Constitution.) Federalist campaigners, who characterized Jefferson as subversive and an enemy to the republic, urged voters to choose "God - and a religious President" over "Jefferson.and no God." The election was also marred by the Adams administration's persecution of opposition editors and politicians under the Sedition Act, designed to silence pro-French Republicans in Congress at a time when war with that country appeared imminent. But Adams lost his bid for re-election, in large part due to opposition from within his own party - Hamilton and his followers were infuriated with Adams for making peace with France.The election became even more controversial when it was found that Jefferson had received an equal number of votes as his running mate, Aaron Burr. At that time, the Constitution still specified that electors were to vote for two candidates, without specifying who was to be president or vice president. The election was thus thrown into the House of Representatives, which took a week - and 36 ballots - to decide in Jefferson's favor.
Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story Writes to Secretary of the Treasury Alexander J. Dallas During the War of 1812

Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story Writes to Secretary of the Treasury Alexander J. Dallas During the War of 1812, Giving Remarkable Advice on the Need to Re-Shape the Entire Government, With Far More Influence for the Courts

JOSEPH STORY Autograph Letter Signed, to Alexander J. Dallas, December 13, 1814, Salem, Massachusetts. 16 pp., 7 7/8 x 9 7/8 in. One of the most important letters we have ever seen of a Supreme Court Justice writing in detail about his plans that would affect political policy and the power and relationship of the courts vis-à-vis the other two branches of government."I would give to the courts of the U.S. the whole jurisdiction of the Constitution. Even in respect to your taxes. If difficulties arise in the collection or exposition of these acts, with few exceptions, those causes must be exclusively tried in the state courts. Are the state courts the only proper tribunals to be entrusted with the execution of the laws of the U.S.?"."If Congress will be so far beyond state jealousy & prejudice as to pass the Bill respecting the Judiciary now before them, almost all the practical difficulties on this subject will cease, and this alone will greatly aid in suppressing conspiracies & misdemeanors ag't the U.S.""What I chiefly wish now to bring into consideration are measures adopted to secure the permanence of the Union under the existing constitution & to counteract the almost over whelming influence of the great states. And this as I have before observed can only be done by great public institutions & by spreading the arms of the U.S. over every legitimate object of patronage & constitutional authority.""In a free Govt like ours it is essential the public opinion should be enlightened on all public & political topics. If the Govt. do not defend itself; it will find few defenders elsewhere. It cannot" Democratic-Republican Supreme Court Associate Justice Joseph Story cautions Secretary of the Treasury Alexander J. Dallas about forces of disunion. (Within the next year, Dallas also served as Secretary of War and Secretary of State). Two days after Story wrote this letter, New Englanders gathered in Hartford, Connecticut to express their grievances over the War of 1812 and their concerns about the federal government's increasing power. They continued secret meetings through January 5 and adopted a series of proposed constitutional amendments, though they stopped short of proposing the secession of New England.Story's solution was the opposite: increase federal power, especially toward large states like Massachusetts that he thought threatened the Union. He advocated an increase in the authority and jurisdiction of federal courts, a national bank, a national bankruptcy law, a small standing army to enforce the laws, and the appointment of patriotic Federalists to some federal positions.Less than two weeks after Story's letter, negotiators signed the Treaty of Ghent on December 24, 1814, ending the War of 1812. When messengers from the Federalists' Hartford Convention reached Washington in February, their demands were eclipsed by news of the Treaty of Ghent and of Andrew Jackson's overwhelming victory at New Orleans on January 8. Victory halted the movement towards disunion, and many of Story's proposals eventually found their way into law.Excerpts"the critical state of our country calls on every citizen however humble, or however retired from public or political life to state with frankness & candour such considerations & facts as may be useful to the functionaries of the nation.""I will venture also to assert that your propositions for a national bank & for a vigorous system of taxation have met the unanimous approbation of every friend of the Govt. in this section of the nation; and if these propositions had been promptly met & acted upon by Congress I am entirely persuaded that the public confidence in the credit & resources of the nation would have been restored. Unfortunately, Congress have seen fit to do other wise; & their disunion, their want of energy & their delays have absolutely prostrated the national faith & shaken the national patriotism.""Indeed I can say with sorrow & regret that ne. (See website for full description)
Menachem Begin Organizing Opposition and Criticizing Prime Minister Ben-Gurion

Menachem Begin Organizing Opposition and Criticizing Prime Minister Ben-Gurion

MENACHEM BEGIN Autograph Manuscript Signed, in Hebrew, Speech on Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion, [November 1, 1950-July 30, 1951]. 3 pp., 5 x 7 3/4 in. "To the Mapai regime: 'Neither farewell nor see you again.'" Complete TranslationMr. Ben-Gurion feels that the governmental control he longs for[1]- an [autocratic?]government of his party and himself - has irreparably collapsed. For the time being, the change is psychological, but with respect to someone possessing a [tyrannical?]soul who cannot chop the heads off his opponents, the "psychology" is [illegible]. Mr. Ben-Gurion senses that his partners in the disbanded coalition and the candidates for the alternative coalition - their style of speaking is different than it was in times past. To be sure they are willing to have truck with him, but [illegible]: Not over the [illegible]. The "equilibrium" of Mr. Ben-Gurion the [aggressor?]has been destroyed starting from the day he was unsuccessful in convincing [himself?]that he had established the State, the result being that the head of Mapai[2] has in the meanwhile lost his psychological equilibrium. Amongst the public, they still go on assuming that all his steps are calculated in advance, but the truth is that the man has become enmeshed in difficulties[3] ever since [he?]went - or was pushed - blindly[4] into an additional entanglement.Generally speaking, does Mr. Ben-Gurion believe that he will achieve an absolute majority in the next elections for his list?[5] The answer is: "No." Mr. Ben-Gurion knows that even were his emissaries, "the guides"[6] to arrange "[light?]processions" in certain immigrant camps,[7] Mapai would remain in the minority and would be in need of partners in order to maintain its regime. However, that same psychological change, which drives Mr. Ben-Gurion mad - would it not grow deeper during the period of electoral war? How does he stand to achieve his stable government? [Surely?], in his eyes there is no stable government unless it is his?It appears that Mr. Ben-Gurion is thinking about two options. One is - using the precedent that was created in the first Knesset. Mr. Ben-Gurion submits his resignation to the President; the President accepts the resignation, but along with that, "arrives at the conclusion" ahead of time that there is no[8] prime minister save the prime minister who is resigning. And Mr. Ben-Gurion, who will have resigned, continues "to fulfill his duties." Until when? The Transition Law[9] did not limit the time for a dismissed Cabinet[10] to "continue to fulfill the role." Mr. Ben-Gurion can "rule via[11] resignation" to his heart's content.[12]The second option that is pictured in the insurrectionist soul of Mr. Ben-Gurion are new elections following the new elections. Should there not be, in the second Knesset, that "stable majority," about which Mr. Ben-Gurion is dreaming, it may be that he will [propose?]another appeal to the voter[13] until - so hopes, perhaps, the head of Mapai - the voter will grow weary and say: "So be it, better Mapai rule than elections over and over again".Both options alike are [illegible]to the political demoralization being sown by Mapai and its head, out of their ambition for [autocratic?]government. The Mapai regime has destroyed the country's economy. Now it is trampling arrogantly[14] on the law in the country. And it is still not finished[15] making a laughingstock of the status of the parliament in Israel.And if the nation wants to put an end to the destructive demoralization, it must "[illegible] [illegible]" over the calculations of Mr. Ben-Gurion. Mapai will, in any case, be in the minority in the second Knesset, however the voter must see to it that it will be possible to establish a government without Mapai. Then, only then, will there be a stable governing authority in Israel, a governing authority that enjoys the trust[16] of the majority of the nation, the confidence of most parts of the Knesset, a constructiv. (See website for full description)
Le digest des briefes originals

Le digest des briefes originals, et des choses concernants eux.

THELOALL, Simon. 8vo, ff. [viii], 424; woodcut criblé initial, running titles; outer margin of quire G trimmed a little shorter, some water-staining mostly in the last quires, occasional light soiling; a good copy, bearing extensive ink marginalia throughout (a little trimmed) in law French in a neat strictly contemporary single chancery hand, bound in seventeenth-century calf, sides filleted in blind with bind-stamped palmette cornerpieces, panelled spine; covers reattached, spine partly perished, still holding, corners worn, surface scratches and scuffs; contemporary ownership inscription on title (?Robbart), purchase date on the verso of the last leaf: 25th May 1580; preserved in a cloth box.First edition, scarce, of Theloall's early work on writs, a remarkable copy, intensively annotated by a single contemporary owner evidently versed in the Common Law.Theloall's Digest established itself as the accepted Register of Writs, effectively filling a crucial vacuum: 'The common law had grown up round the royal writs. They formed the ground plan upon which its builders worked; and it is for this reason that the learning of writs was the first thing taught to students of the law. Seeing that the choice of a wrong or inappropriate writ meant loss of the action, this learning continued to be of the utmost importance to the practitioner all through his career' (Holdsworth, A history of English law, II, p. 431); yet no official register of writs appears to have been produced in the mediaeval era. In the absence of official collections of Chancery forms, within the legal professions there circulated unofficial compilations. The earliest printed attempt appeared in 1531 (Register brevium). Theloall's authoritative work 'deserved to be printed, as it is the most orderly treatise on procedure, founded on the Year Books, that had yet appeared. Historically, it comes between the older commentaries upon writs and the modern books on procedure' (ibid., V, p. 381).In contrast with the text proper, in law French, the dedicatory epistle is in English; the Digest is dedicated to the Lord Chancellor Sir Thomas Bromley, 'From my poore house neere Ruthvin in Wales'.STC 23934; Beale T499.
Julius Caesar. A Tragedy

Julius Caesar. A Tragedy

SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM FIRST QUARTO EDITION of Julius Caesar, the first separate edition of one of Shakespeare’s best-known and most-performed plays. Quarto. Dark red morocco gilt by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, all edges gilt. Some browning and staining, lower corner of C3 torn not affecting printing. Very good condition. “Something extraordinary was beginning to happen as Shakespeare wrote Julius Caesar in the spring of 1599 as if all his energies were self-consciously focused on a new and different kind of invention The result was a significant breakthrough,” one expressed in “the extraordinary lines of Brutus, deep in thought, as he sets in motion one of the most consequential events in Western history. It is one of Shakespeare’s first great soliloquies and conveys a sense of inwardness new to the stage” (Shapiro, Year in the Life). Julius Caesar was first performed in 1599 at the Globe Theatre. After the theaters re-opened at the start of the Restoration era, it became a favorite. “There was no more potent story for seventeenth-century Englishmen than that of Julius Caesar, and it spoke to people across the political spectrum, whether republicans, royalists, or constitutional monarchs” (Roberts, Thomas Betterton). Six quarto editions appeared between 1684 and 1700, an indication of the play’s great popularity in the wake of the 1684 production starring Thomas Betterton as Brutus. Julius Caesar was one of the few Shakespearean plays that was not extensively modified or adapted during the Restoration period and the eighteenth century. The play has been a touchstone of popular culture for centuries. One of the earliest cultural references was in Shakespeare’s own Hamlet. When Hamlet asks Polonius about his career as an actor at university, Polonius replies “I did enact Julius Caesar. I was killed i’ th’ Capitol. Brutus killed me.” This line would have resonated with the Globe audience: Richard Burbage is generally accepted to have played the lead roles Brutus and Hamlet, and John Heminges is thought to have played both Caesar and Polonius. Countless lines from Julius Caesar are heard to this day in conversation and in references on stage and screen: “Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears” (Antony), “The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones” (Antony), “Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look: He thinks too much: such men are dangerous” (Caesar), “Et tu, Brute?” (Caesar), “This was the most unkindest cut of all” (Antony), “Beware the Ides of March” (the Soothsayer), “There is a tide in the affairs of men. Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune” (Brutus), “the fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves” (Cassius), and many more. The first quarto editions of Shakespeare’s plays are among the most sought-after books in English literature.
PatternPattern: The Geometry of Motion.

PatternPattern: The Geometry of Motion.

Heavenly Monkey Press]. Hodgson, Barbara, and Claudia Cohen. PatternPattern is the latest HM Editions collaboration between book artists Barbara Hodgson and Claudia Cohen, preceded by their collaborative books Cutting Paper (2013), Decorating Paper (2015), and Folding Paper (2017). The extensive bibliography and list of pattern sources included in PatternPattern (pp. 45-49) cite numerous influences from all over the world and throughout history. A post on the Heavenly Monkey Blogspot site explains that the focus of PatternPattern Òis on design development, progression, and variety, emphasizing the possibilities for infinite interpretations of basic styles.Ó In an interview included in the same post, Hodgson explains the decision to hand-draw rather than print the illustrations in PatternPattern: ÒFor me, there wasnÕt a choice. DrawnÊpatterns relate to the principlesÊof design by showing, at least in part, the rationale orÊbasis of the pattern and the sequence of its development. Here, the human hand andÊmind is visibly at work.Ó Quarto, 9 inches by 9 inches. 50 pp. With 38 plates, including a leaf of wire mesh, hand-painted patterned paper, and drafting vellum leaves hand-illustrated in red and black. Includes 23 mounted paper samples decorated with patterns from sources including Japanese, Indian, and Moroccan artwork (full list of sources on p. 49). Also with a fold-out (17.5Ó x 13.25Ó) textile grid design leaf from Franz DonatÕs Grosses Bindungs Lexikon (1904). All text was handpress-printed by Rollin Milroy on dampened Arches paper. Bound in gray calf with red-and-yellow onlay and gilt patterns. Title in gilt on spine. With hand-stenciled patterned endpapers in red and yellow. Housed in a blue-gray clamshell case with patterned paper accents and a gray calf label lettered in gilt. A blue drafting vellum portfolio with three additional textile grid leaves (all also 17.5Ó x 13.25Ó) from DonatÕs Lexikon is included in the clamshell case, along with two additional blue paper portfolios (both 10Ó x 13Ó). Portfolio one contains 10 samples of patterned paper by Cohen and Hodgson; portfolio two contains 11 samples from Russian, German, and French sources, ca. 1900-1940 (sources listed on p. 51). As new. One of 10 deluxe copies in a special full calf binding by Claudia Cohen, with the two added portfolios of pattern prints, and signed by Barbara Hodgson and Cohen on the colophon. 20 regular copies and 6 hors commerce copies were also made.
Romantic dadas. Involved in flying superlatives with Miguel Angel Rios

Romantic dadas. Involved in flying superlatives with Miguel Angel Rios

Rothenberg, Jerome No. 4 of 12 copies, numbered and signed by artist and author on colophon inside final gathering. 5 gathering in folder. Suffice to say that this tour de force is "constructed" out of BFK Rives and consists of a paper cover containing 6 loose gatherings of 8 pages each. . . sort of! Some of the pages are half-pages opening in various directions to expose the unexpected when turned. Nearly all are collaged, perforated, die-cut, even sliced! Ths is one of five similar works; the others are designed by Elana Herzog, Ruizhong Yao, Elana Herzog again (bound by Brigitte Benoist), and Julião Sarmento; All were published by Gervais Jassaud. Only one copy of each of these located in OCLC. The Rios version is in the Koopman Collection at the Koninglijke Bibliotheek, den Haag / the National Library of the Netherlands. In "Artists & Others: the imaginative French Book in the 21st century," Paul van Kappeleveen writes extensively of Jassaud and "Romantic Dadas." "The work of Rios is rooted in Argentinian culture but incorporates many elements of present-day American politics and society. His Romantic dadas is reminiscent of a wall covered with graffiti." "Jassaud's template for the publication was based on the idea that every page would be divided into two vertical strips, some of which were eut open. In each quire there was therefore a left or right-hand portion of the page that could be opened either up or down. That explains why Rothenberg's poems had to have short lines. The two panels on each page constitute an oblique reference to the Twin Towers." "The pages of this edition are packed with images of dogs and f!ies. Parts of pages were eut out, which meant that in the 'coupage' process words or lines of poetry occasionally disappeared altogether. Paper patterns were also added. For example, the spiralling of flies circling around rotting meat was shown. He introduced drawings done in pencil as well as in pen and ink, sometimes in dotted line patterns, at other times so lavish that Rothenberg's poems became secondary to Rios' graffiti." Very fine condition, of course.
A volume combining "Zoology of New Holland"

A volume combining “Zoology of New Holland”, with “A Specimen of the Botany of New Holland. The figures by James Sowerby”, two original watercolours by F.P. Nodder, and an original letter from George Shaw to James Sowerby

SHAW, George Kearsley, James Edward SMITH, and Frederick Polydore NODDER Quarto, four works together: 1. The Shaw Zoology with ten engraved plates (of twelve, lacking v & vi), plate xi with a repaired tear; the plates beautifully handcoloured after James Sowerby; 2. The Smith Botany with nine finely handcoloured engraved plates (of sixteen, without plates i-vi and viii); text leaves for missing plates v & vi present, plate vii embothrium speciosissimum present without text leaf; lacking half-title, title, and preface; 3. F.P. Nodder's two original botanical watercolours of Banksia serrata, each signed "F.P.N '89", on Whatman paper corresponding to paper used in the Smith Botany, bound after the waratah plate in the Botany; 4. George Shaw manuscript letter to James Sowerby loosely enclosed, 2 pp, regarding drawing the opossum from a live specimen for inclusion in the Zoology (plate xi). The four items a contemporary assembly in a handsome binding of the period of half green morocco, marbled boards and title-label. Assembled in the 1790s, this remarkable volume contains a deliberate selection of the groundbreaking earliest scientific and artistic work on the natural history of New South Wales from its first European settlement, and connects six figures each of individual importance to that remarkable story: George Shaw, James Edward Smith, F.P. Nodder, James Sowerby, Thomas Wilson and Surgeon John White. The four separate components, all of considerable individual interest, must have been gathered together by someone in or close to the immediate circle of figures involved in the earliest publications of Australian natural history. 1. Shaw's Zoology and 2. Smith's Botany Shaw's Zoology and Smith's Botany rank separately among the rarest of Australian colour-plate books; there is an uncertain history surrounding their initially joint publication. Originally Shaw and Smith had combined forces to produce a work in two parts containing just four plates each, with the undated title-page Zoology and Botany of New Holland. Both those parts appeared in 1793, each consisting of two zoology plates and two botany plates. This combination issue was quickly abandoned in favour of two separate works, with Shaw producing the Zoology of New Holland in 1794, and Smith A Specimen of the Botany of New Holland in four parts between 1793 and 1795. Here, we have the Zoology all but complete, missing two plates, and the Botany with nine of the sixteen plates published, all but one of them being plates from the third and fourth of the four published parts (the extra plate here is the wonderful image of the waratah which, unlike the others, does not have its accompanying leaf of printed text), therefore dating from the later part of the publication period for the four parts of the Botany of 1793-1795. The Botany is also missing its title and preliminaries which in keeping with contemporary publication practices would be likely to have been the final piece of the completed publication to be set, providing a likely terminus ante quem for compilation of the volume. (Interestingly the dedication to Thomas Wilson as ultimately published is therefore not included). 3. Nodder watercolours The two fine watercolours signed "F.P.N." by Nodder and dated "'89" are images of Banksia serrata that were not included in Smith's Botany, but perhaps based on their inclusion in this volume may have been originally considered for it. However, they were engraved from Nodder originals for John White's Journal of a Voyage to New South Wales, published in 1790. The first watercolour, with the faint notation in graphite "Banksia serrata in fruit" and the second (untitled, but "Banksia serrata in bud") both show slight but clear differences to those published plates. Importantly both are dated 1789, the year preceding publication of White's Journal. John White, First Fleet surgeon, was of course a botanical enthusiast and an assiduous collector for his London correspondents, the chief of whom was Thomas Wilson, who assisted in the preparation and publication of White's Journal of a Voyage which specifically notes (pp 222-223) that 'Mr. White has sent imperfect specimens and seeds of four species of Banksia, which we have endeavoured to settle.'. Those four specimens were of Banksia serrata and Banksia conchifera, which were illustrated in five full page hand-coloured engravings in White's Journal. Banksia serrata in fruit and in bud were the only two of the five engravings to have been based on drawings by Nodder and unlike the other three have his signature at lower left; clearly Nodder's watercolours offered here are the original watercolours used in the preparation of White's Journal. Signed and dated 1789 these watercolours are therefore at the very forefront of the European recording of Australia's exotic flora. 4. Shaw's letter to Sowerby The manuscript letter from George Shaw to James Sowerby adds remarkable immediacy and insight into the working production of Shaw's Zoology. Shaw informs Sowerby that a live specimen of the "quadruped" for inclusion in the "ensuing No." is available at "Mr Wilson's", that is Thomas Wilson mentioned above. The manuscript gives a beautiful description of the "Opossum with the aspect of a squirrel" and polite suggestions for the rendering of the illustration, as well as its dietary requirements: "The quadruped intended for the ensuing No. of [?] New Holland Zoology is now at Mr. Wilson's & if Mr. S. will send a messenger for it he may have it at his own home for some days. to study its several attitudes, & to give as elegant a figure of it as possible. It is an Opossum with the aspect of a Squirrel & is a very beautiful animal. As soon as the drawing is made Dr. S.[haw] will be glad to see it. Mr. S. will take notice that the tail is strongly prehensile & may therefore be represented in such a manner as to shew that particular, unless it shd. be thought to interfere with the elegance of the plate. It is to be fed with bread & milk. It is nearly torpid by day, but very active
Illustrations of the Book of Job.

Illustrations of the Book of Job.

Blake, William. London: [plates dated] 1825 [but published 1826]. Folio, 320 x 254 mm, engraved title and 21 plates. Proofs on India paper mounted on handmade paper, some leaves (2, 5, 6, 11, 14, 17, 18) watermarked J. Whatman Turkey Mill 1825. Gilt-ruled green morocco over thick boards, fleurons at the outer corners, double-rule inner frame enclosing a bloom roll, gilt-ruled spine, sewing bands with gilt red morocco onlays, thick dark blue endleaves, all edges gilt, by Riviere: a brilliant set with no foxing at all, interleaved with blanks at the time of binding with no offsetting. Lower cover of the binding at some time tied up with string with ensuing indentation. § First edition, limited to 150 proof sets (65 sets were also printed on French paper, and 100 sets on drawing paper with the word 'proof' removed). This is one of finest sets of the proofs I have ever seen, and far outshines the other two original printings and the later re-issue. The India paper set is the best printing of these famous plates which comprise Blake's major single achievement as a printmaker after the illuminated books. Illustrations of the Book of Job was Blake's last completed prophetic book: the text, a series of biblical quotations, is above and below each image. "It was produced while Blake was still working on Jerusalem, his most obscure book; yet the illustrations are Blake's most lucid; and they are the supreme example of his reading the Bible in its spiritual sense" (S. Foster Damon, A Blake Dictionary, p. 217). "The modest size of the central panels does not prevent them from ranking with the supreme masterpieces of graphic art" (Ray, Illustrator and the Book in England #8). Note: as always, the first plate after the title-page is misdated 1828.
THE GIRL WITH THE ROSEWOOD CRUTCHES

THE GIRL WITH THE ROSEWOOD CRUTCHES

Anonymous] and Harrison Cady (illustrator) 8vo. Red pictorial cloth. Minor bumping to spine ends and corners; sparse toning/foxing to pages. About near fine. 267pp. Early work featuring an independent and successful disabled protagonist, first serialized in 1908. A first-person narrative, ostensibly by an anonymous young woman, recounting her ambitions and achievements following the loss of one leg in early childhood and the consequent physical and social restrictions imposed on her. Presented as nonfiction and received as such by contemporary reviewers, with the publisher responding to one enthusiastic contemporary reader: "Our contract with the author especially provides that we are not to reveal the identity, and we cannot give the names of any other books by this author without violating our agreement." ("Travel," Jan. 1913.) Another memoirist, however, in her own account of life with a similar disability, wrote: "The book proved to be the bastard brain child of a big and bouncing and very jolly New York businessman and writer. He does use crutches, having a pair of unreliable knees [.] but he is definitely not a fascinating little feminine hopper. Although he admits openly to a new legitimate book every year or so, he never confesses his paternity to THE GIRL WITH THE ROSEWOOD CRUTCHES, that poor love child of his careless youth." ("Out on a Limb," Louise Baker, 1946.)Despite the book's sentimentality and inspirational appeal, its treatment of disability is engagingly modern and matter-of-fact in many respects: as the heroine's need for crutches is both permanent and nonprogressive, she evades the common literary fates of miraculous recovery or tragic death, and holds eternal grudges against well-meaning men who call her a "cripple" to her face. Fighting to make her way in New York, 'Kate' endures an interview with a newspaperman who thinks her only fit for desk work: "'I have used them [crutches] for fifteen years,' I told him, letting him know how clearly I read his prejudices. 'They are no handicap to me. For the life of me I cannot see how they would affect my ability to work upon a newspaper.'" The narrator finds ultimate success as a concert-hall pianist and singer -- no longer excusing, hiding, or defending her "wonderful crutches" but proudly using them on stage, to applause and acclaim.
PERELANDRA

PERELANRA

C.S. LEWIS Stated First Edition, First printing Beautiful book and vibrant original dust jacket in near fine condition. This title is the second in the C.S.Lewis?s iconic ?Space Trilogy?, which he referred to as ?a modern fairy tale for grown-ups? The book has blue cloth and gilt titles to spine, with some of the common typical fading to the gilt. The book has sharp corners and no edgewear. The binding is tight. Slight fading/mottling to the spine cloth. The end papers are clean with one delicate owner name, otherwise no bookplates, no inscriptions and no bookstore stamps. The internal pages are clean, with a hint of light very faded foxing/toning to the first few pages, otherwise no stains, no marks, no foxing, no writing, and no bent pages. Beautiful book, which is most unusual for this title as the paper used was cheap wartime paper which tore easily and is very fragile. Please see images. The original dust jacket has benefited from very slight restoration and presents as a near fine example. The jacket has unusually strong vibrant colors with no edgewear, no rips, no chips, no tears, no rubbing, no fading, and no foxing. The dust jacket is NOT price clipped and has a stated price of 8s. 6d. on the inside front flap. Please see detailed images. A very handsome example of this scarce C.S. Lewis title in beautiful clean collectible condition with a very vibrant near fine dust jacket. This title was printed on inexpensive ?war time? paper stock and as such is often found in poor condition. ADDITIONAL IMAGES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Please see our ABE store for other rare SciFi titles