Recent Highlights
(Updated 7/25/2020 at 11.30 AM EST)

PICTORIAL EDITION OF THE Tilton – Beecher TRIAL.

PICTORIAL EDITION OF THE Tilton – Beecher TRIAL.

[Frank Leslie?] PICTORIAL EDITION OF THE Tilton – Beecher TRIAL. A COMPLETE HISTORY, Containing over One Hundred Engravings of this Famous Trial. PRICE, 30 CENTS. No date, no publisher. [1875] 29.3 cm x 21.5 cm. Back cover is a full-page advertisement for The Days' Doings! Listing the Days' Doings Co., at 535 Pearl St., N.Y. Four signatures of 16 pages each of machined paper, 64 pages, 72 in-text engravings not the "over one hundred" proclaimed on the cover and first page of text, 73 engravings counting the portrait of Henry Ward Beecher on the front cover. There are 8 full-page engravings, 2 nearly full-page and 62 other text illustrations of varying sizes. The publisher of this large case history in large-pamphlet form was probably Frank Leslie, as he had changed the name of his newspaper, The Last Sensation, to The Days' Doings in 1867. Two copies of this pamphlet in addition to the copy offered here make three recorded copies of this contemporaneous imprint. This copy is untrimmed and in near-fine condition. Tilton versus Beecher was the most sensational trial in nineteenth-century America. Tilton brought a legal action his wife's lover, Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, for alienation of affection. The trial was lurid front-page news in every major newspaper in America for months, and the trial ended with a hung jury. On May 22, 1871, a letter to the editor of the New York World written by Victoria Woodhull was published, in which she said, among other things, adapting Matthew 23:27 to her purpose, "My judges preach against free love openly and practice it secretly; their outward seeming is fair [but] inwardly they are full of 'dead men's bones and all manner of uncleanness.' For example, I know of one man, a public teacher of eminence, who lives in concubinage with the wife of another public teacher of almost equal eminence." The "public teacher of eminence" was Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, and the wife was Mrs. Theodore Tilton. For the better part of three years, many measures were taken to protect the reputation of Harriet Beecher Stowe's brother from exposure and ruin. As in politics, the cover-up of Mrs. Tilton's adulterous relationship with Beecher was ultimately unsuccessful and Victoria Woodhull had her satisfaction.
Claude Monet

Claude Monet, A. Rodin

MONET, Claude & RODIN, Auguste) Claude Monet, A. Rodin. 89, [1] p. 8vo (250 x 165 mm.), orig. tan printed wrappers, ms. ink title on spine, leaves uncut. Paris: Galerie Georges Petit, 1889. One of only 20 copies on fine papier Japon (just 60 printed), this is the scarce catalogue for the storied collaborative exhibition between Monet and Rodin at the Galerie Georges Petit, organized in the summer of 1889 to coincide with the Paris Exposition Universelle. Monet displayed 145 of his recent works, and Rodin 36 of his sculptures. Up to that point the art world had rejected Monet's groundbreaking compositions, but the event proved to be a turning point in Monet's career. The two essays, printed herein, by the critics Octave Mirbeau and Gustave Geffroy on Monet and Rodin, respectively, praise the artists' originality and daring. Laid in with this copy is the extremely rare printed invitation. The installation of the exhibition did not unfold smoothly. Put in place on the morning of the vernissage, Rodin's sculptures obscured many of Monet's paintings, leading Monet to worry in a letter to Georges Petit that his best works would be "lost." According to Edmond de Goncourt, the normally soft-spoken Rodin, made aware of Monet's consternation, blurted, "I don't give a damn about Monet, I don't care about everyone else, I will just take care of myself!" The tension between the artists soon dissipated and the exhibition proved an enormous success and precipitated the recognition of Monet as a visionary of modernity. Mere acquaintances before this exhibition, the two artists maintained a regular correspondence until Rodin's death in 1917. In his review of the exhibition, the journalist Charles Frémine wrote in Le Rappel (in trans.): "The one seems to complete the other. Rodin could find no better frame for his sculpture than the painting of Claude Monet.At first glance, one sees that they are a force unto themselves. One is really in their space, and nature is at home here. It is to nature alone that they address their work.Result: surprise, novelty, originality.What they found is life." The catalogue lists chronologically the 145 works selected by Monet, executed between 1864 and 1889, and the 36 works by Rodin. The owners of many of the pieces are noted. Superb copy of an important exhibition catalogue. Limited to 60 copies total, the present copy is no. 2 of 20 numbered copies on papier Japon. ? Musée Rodin website, "Rencontre: Rodin et Monet.".
Der Schatzbehalter oder schrein der wahren Reichtümer des Heils und ewiger Seligkeit.

Der Schatzbehalter oder schrein der wahren Reichtümer des Heils und ewiger Seligkeit.

FRIDOLIN, Stephan Provenances : Hieronymus Münster (fin XVe siècle - attribué à) ; Hieronymus Holzschuher, ami de Dürer (fin XVe début XVIe - attribué à) ; Ferdinand Hoffmann (1540-1607) ; Prinz Ferdinand Von Dietrichstein (1628-1698) ; Paul Harth (11/03/1987) ; Pierre Berès ; Marc Litzler. Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 8 novembre 1491.In-folio de (353) ff., signés a-z6 (a6 blc), ab-ad6, ae8, A-Z6, Aa-Gg6, Hh10 (Hh10 blc), pts. trous en marge des 4 premiers ff., gde. initiale enluminée au f. aiiii verso, ancien petit travail de vers dans la marge intérieure des cahiers x, y et ab sans atteinte à la gravure, infime mouillure angulaire aux ff. 310-311 et 340. Le dernier feuillet Hh10, blanc, n'a ici pas été conservé. Le texte, orné d'une grande initiale enluminée, a été rubriqué en rouge et bleu.Veau brun sur ais de bois, plats décorés d'un décor estampé à froid de motifs végétaux et animaliers dans des encadrements de filets, aux angles et au centre, cinq bouillons de cuivre, sur le premier plat, titre de l'ouvrage [Schatzbehalt D'Ewige Seligkeit] en lettres dorées usées, dos à nerfs orné d'un motif de roses à froid répété, tranches naturelles, traces de fermoirs ouvragés. Petits défauts à la reliure. Reliure de l'époque. 329 x 228 mm. / Provenances: Hieronymus Münster (end of the 15th century - attributed to); Hieronymus Holzschuher, friend of Durer (end of the 15th beginning of the 16th centuries - attributed to); Ferdinand Hoffmann (1540-1607); Prinz Ferdinand Von Dietrichstein (1628-1698); Paul Harth (11/03/1987); Pierre Berès; Marc Litzler. Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 8 November 1491.Folio [329 x 228 mm] of (353) ll., signed a-z6 (a6 blc), ab-ad6, ae8, A-Z6, Aa-Gg6, Hh10 (Hh10 blc), small holes in the margin of the first 4 ll., large illuminated initial on the back of l. aiiii, former worm track in the inner margin of quires x,y and ab not touching the engraving, minor waterstain in the corner of ll. 310 to 311 and 340. The last leaf Hh10, blank, wasn't preserved.Brown calf over wooden boards, covers decorated with a blind-stamped decor of vegetal and animal patterns in fillets frames, five copper spandrels in the corners and the center, title of the work stamped in gilt letters on the upper cover [Schatzbehalt D'Ewige Seligkeit], spine ribbed and decorated with a repeated blind-stamped motif or roses, natural edges, remains of crafted clasps. Contemporary binding.
LORD OF THE FLIES (with Autograph Letter Signed by Golding)

LORD OF THE FLIES (with Autograph Letter Signed by Golding)

William Golding First Edition, First Printing Near Fine. Beautiful bright, clean book with a magnificent near fine vibrant original unclipped FIRST ISSUE dust jacket. Accompanied by an autograph letter SIGNED by William Golding discussing his books! A Near fine beautiful example of this book with stunning ruby red cloth boards with sharp corners and no edgewear. The binding is tight and square. Strong, unfaded white titles to the spine. The end papers are in perfect condition, with a slight touch of foxing, and with no owner names, no bookplates and no bookstore stamps. The internal pages are clean, bright and flat, internally appearing as fresh and unread. Accompanied by an autograph letter SIGNED by William Golding discussing his books! The separate letter n on his letterhead of ?Ebble Thatch Bowerchalke Salisbury Wiltshire. Dated ?4th September? Goldberg writes: ?Thank you for your letter. I?m glad your class has suffered an impact, tell them it?s what wisdom teeth do. Paul I cant answer your questions or tell the story of my life ? I get that request three times a week and still have some books to write. After all there are books about my books! Yours, Williams Goldberg? This ORIGINAL First Issue Dust Jacket with the summary of ?Lord of the Flies? on the front flap, (later editions were changed to blurbs), is vibrant in color and received only a tiny touch of restoration to the upper tip of the jacket spine, not affecting any of the lettering. The jacket presents in magnificent near fine/fine condition. The dust jacket maintains the strong vibrant colors with no rips, no chips, no edgewear, no fading, no foxing and no stains. The dust jacket is NOT price clipped and is priced 12s 6d net. A stunning dust jacket, scarce in this condition. Originally published in 1954, The Lord of the Flies was named to Modern Library?s 100 Greatest Novels List of the twentieth century. In the early 1960s cultural commentators noted that Lord of the Flies was replacing Salinger?s Catcher in the Rye as the bible of the American adolescent. Since then, this masterpiece has established itself as a modern classic. ?This brilliant work is a frightening parody on man?s return to that state of darkness from which it took him thousands of years to emerge. Fully to succeed, a fantasy must approach very close to reality. Lord of the Flies does. It must also be superbly written. It is? (The New York Times Book Review). A very handsome copy of this scarce title in fantastic condition with a superb autographed signed letter by Golding discussing his books! Presents extremely well on the shelf. ADDITIONAL IMAGES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Please see our ABE store for other important Rare Books and Original Illustration art
FROM AN EXTREMELY LARGE ANTIPHONER IN LATIN

FROM AN EXTREMELY LARGE ANTIPHONER IN LATIN

VELLUM MANUSCRIPT LEAVES, OFFERED INDIVIDUALLY, SOME WITH GORGEOUS ILLUMINATION 532 x 379 mm. (21 x 15"). Six four-line staves of music with text beneath in a pleasing rounded gothic hand. Rubrics in red, a variable number of large initials in blue or red with elaborate penwork in red or purple, some of the leaves WITH FINE, LARGE ILLUMINATED INITIALS IN BLUE, MAROON, GREEN, YELLOW, AND WHITE ON A BURNISHED GOLD GROUND (measuring approximately 60 x 70 mm.), SEVERAL LEAVES WITH VERY LARGE AND ESPECIALLY STRIKING INITIALS IN THE SAME COLORS AND ON THE SAME SHIMMERING GOLD GROUND (these measuring approximately 160 x 160 mm.). The usual slight yellowing on the hair side of the leaf, occasional fading of the text, other trivial imperfections, but generally IN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE CONDITION, the leaves clean and bright, and the illumination particularly fresh and lustrous. These are memorably beautiful and very well-preserved leaves from an antiphonal (also called an antiphonary or antiphoner), the service book that contains the sung portions of the Divine Office, the cycle of daily devotions performed by members of the clergy and by members of religious orders. All of the leaves offered here come from a large fragment of a one-volume Temporale that would have been part of a vast multi-volume antiphonal. The texts include Saturday offices from the beginning of the year until Easter. The illumination is localizable by the presence of classical motifs in the foliage, and it is of a very high quality. Although the leaves show some traces of use, they are generally in a remarkable state, with especially smooth vellum, with richly opaque painted initials, and with glittering burnished gold. For additional leaves with varying degrees of decoration and at different price points, please check our website.
FROM AN EXTREMELY LARGE ANTIPHONER IN LATIN

FROM AN EXTREMELY LARGE ANTIPHONER IN LATIN

VELLUM MANUSCRIPT LEAVES, OFFERED INDIVIDUALLY, SOME WITH GORGEOUS ILLUMINATION 532 x 379 mm. (21 x 15"). Six four-line staves of music with text beneath in a pleasing rounded gothic hand. Rubrics in red, a variable number of large initials in blue or red with elaborate penwork in red or purple, some of the leaves WITH FINE, LARGE ILLUMINATED INITIALS IN BLUE, MAROON, GREEN, YELLOW, AND WHITE ON A BURNISHED GOLD GROUND (measuring approximately 60 x 70 mm.), SEVERAL LEAVES WITH VERY LARGE AND ESPECIALLY STRIKING INITIALS IN THE SAME COLORS AND ON THE SAME SHIMMERING GOLD GROUND (these measuring approximately 160 x 160 mm.). The usual slight yellowing on the hair side of the leaf, occasional fading of the text, other trivial imperfections, but generally IN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE CONDITION, the leaves clean and bright, and the illumination particularly fresh and lustrous. These are memorably beautiful and very well-preserved leaves from an antiphonal (also called an antiphonary or antiphoner), the service book that contains the sung portions of the Divine Office, the cycle of daily devotions performed by members of the clergy and by members of religious orders. All of the leaves offered here come from a large fragment of a one-volume Temporale that would have been part of a vast multi-volume antiphonal. The texts include Saturday offices from the beginning of the year until Easter. The illumination is localizable by the presence of classical motifs in the foliage, and it is of a very high quality. Although the leaves show some traces of use, they are generally in a remarkable state, with especially smooth vellum, with richly opaque painted initials, and with glittering burnished gold. For additional leaves with varying degrees of decoration and at different price points, please check our website.
Zoku Koya Bunko ?????

Zoku Koya Bunko ?????, 5 vols

Ch? Gessho ??? and Kazaore Y?jo ????, artists Ch? Gessho ??? and Kazaore Y?jo ????, artists. Zoku Koya Bunko ?????, 5 vols. Nagoya, Kansei ?? 10 [1798]. 5 volumes 27 X 18cm string-bound, Japanese-style, fukuro-toji. Original format with original covers and title labels, housed in a modern striped chitsu with clasps 27.3 x 19cm. Original monochrome woodblock prints, many double page, with Japanese text. Edited by B?k? ??? A sequel to Koya Bunko ????, done in 1768. The "Sequel to the Koya Library," done by principal artist Ch? Gessho ??? 1765-1832 and Kazaore Y?jo ????, is a remarkable rarity that captures the vibrant world of art and poetry centered on haikai and haiga in Nagoya. It is justly celebrated by critics from Brown to Hillier and was featured in the Library of Congress' major Japanese art exhibition, "The Floating World of Ukiyo-e: Shadows, Dreams and Substance." With hundreds of full-page black and white woodblock images, it is probably the most extensive original example of the Haiga aesthetic in existence. Vol 1 has 52 cho, Vol 2 has 50 cho, Vol 3 has 53 cho, Vol 4 has 53 cho and Vol 5 has 56 cho including colophon. Identical to Volumes held in ARC Koten Seki portal database online (Ritsumeikan University ?????), with the exception of an added modern page to their introduction in Vol 1. In very good condition throughout, worn original covers and title labels, worming on rear wrapper of vol 5, very good impressions. (Mitchell 564).
An impressive collection of 45 invitations

An impressive collection of 45 invitations, flyers, and posters produced by Ulises Carrión publicizing events at his Amsterdam bookstore (which was converted into an archive in 1979) from 1975 to 1984. The artists, authors, and curators featured include very influential figures such as Allan Kaprow, Guy Schraenen, Dorothy Iannone, Richard Kostelanetz, and Jackson Mac Low. All of these materials are very rare individually. Amsterdam: 1975-1984

CARRIÓN, Ulises & OTHER BOOKS AND SO A substantial group of scarce exhibition ephemera distributed by Carrión to advertise exhibitions and events held at his short-lived bookstore Other Books and So. In the course of its four-year existence, this bookshop hosted a large number of shows related to bookworks, mail art, and conceptual art. Carrión's vibrant schedule presented artists from countries such as Brazil, Japan, Mexico, France, United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Czech Republic, Netherlands, Argentina, Colombia, etc. This collection also includes materials related to Carrión's best-known artworks such as Namen en Adressen, Van kunstenaarsboeken tot postkunst, and Lilia Prado Superstar Film Festival. The majority of these items are neither noted nor pictured in the authoritative reference on Carrión and Other Books and So, the catalogue for the 2016 exhibition Dear reader. Don't read., held at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía. Every piece in this collection is in fine condition, except for no. 45, which bears some minor ink stains. ? A. Borsuk, The Book (2018), p. 141-"Specializing in artists' books and multiples, [Other Books and So] was also an artist-run exhibition and event space that distributed the kind of work [Carrión] wanted to see more of in the world: books conceived of as a whole, rather than 'texts' bestowed by the author on a publisher for dissemination to a reading public. In an advertisement for the space, he called them 'non books, anti books, pseudo books, quasi books, concrete books, visual books, conceptual books, structural books, project books, statement books, instruction books,' a list suggestive of his vexed relationship with the marketplace." 1. VALOCH, Ji?í. Books Prints & Poems, 8 July - 2 August [1975]. Single sheet folded in half. Mailed copy addressed to "Peter van Beveren." 2. NATIONS, Opal L. Either, or Inside Opal L. Nations - the recent written works. 7 October to 1st November, 1975. Single illustrated sheet, printed on one side. 3. VAN DER WAL, Eric. 15 years of making books. 25 November to 20 December 1975. Card, printed on one side. 4. LORA-TOTINO, Arrigo. Recent Works of Visual Poetry. 3-21 February 1976, opening: 3 February, 20.00 hrs. / 21.00 hrs. 'A performance of Athletic, Liquid and Phonic Poetry.' Card, printed on one side. 5. MARROQUIN, Raul. - Original Books -. March 30 - April 17 1976. Card, printed on one side, and stamped "Opening" with date & time. 6. STAMP ART, 200 Artists. 27 April - 15 May 1976, opening: 27 April, 20.00 hrs., Music: E. Carl. Card, entirely stamped on one side. 7. AS, Tom van. tekeningen. 7-25 September 1976. Single sheet with text in Dutch by the artist. 8. OTHER BOOKS AND SO. an exhibition of a selection of BOOKS from. Sept. 27 till Oct. 22, 1976. Single xeroxed sheet. This exhibition was hosted by The Two or Three Gallery in Emmastad, Curaçao, a space run by Hetty Huisman and Grietha Jurriëns. 9. ROOK, Gerrit J. de. four works and books. October 5 - October 23 [1976]. Single sheet printed in red on one side. 10. Newspaper Art / Art Newspapers. 30 November - 23 December 1976. Single pictorial sheet printed on one side. Design by Tom Gravemaker. 11. SCHUMANS, Marjo. tentoonstelling van een werk. 25 - 29 January [1977]. Index card, manuscript text on one side. 12. CARRIÓN, Ulises. Definitions of art. 1st March to 26th March 1977. Glossy blue postcard, printed on one side & stamped on reverse: "Art is:" 13. MOL, Pieter. Life as a Golden Thought. N.d. [1977]. Card, printed on one side and title of exhibition stamped. 14. HARTWELL, Richard. 'recent works.' March 29 - April 16, 1977. Single pictorial sheet, printed on one side. 15. KOSTELANETZ, Richard, MAC LOW, Jackson, & McCAFFERY, Steve. Tuesday Night Readings at Other Books & So. May 16 & May 23 [1977]. Single sheet, printed on both sides, red stamped hands next to the dates. Biographies of the readers on the reverse. 16. IANNONE, Dorothy. A Show of Books and Cards. June 21 to July 9, 1977. Single pictorial sheet, printed on one side. 17. ZABALA, Horacio. Today, Art is a Prison. 9 - 27 August [stamped over]: "July" 1977. Single sheet, printed on one side, with list of participants in the artist's project. 18. TOEBOSCH, Moniek. "15 minuten solozang." 6 September 1977.20.00 hrs. Single sheet, mimeographed on one side with two stamped illus. 19. KAPROW, Allan. posters and flyers of activities and happenings from Backworks? 6-24 September 1977, Opening: 6 Sept. '77, 20.00 hrs. Single pictorial sheet, printed on one side. 20. SCHRAENEN, Guy. typewriter works / a show from the small press archive guy schraenen antwerp. 8 - 26 November 1977. Single sheet, printed on one side. 21. -. Guy Schraenen, éditeur. 29 November - 24 December 1977. Single sheet, printed on one side. 22. AARSEN, Ruud van, JOSEPH, Robert, & ROOK. Gerrit J. de. 1968-1978 tien jaar bloknoot. 3-21 January '78. Single sheet, mimeographed on one side, with "Other Books and So" stamp on lower right corner. 23. IMOOS, Franz. I am waiting for your picture for the exhibition from You and Me. 10 Janaury - 28 January, 1978. Pictorial postcard, printed on reverse. 24. BENTIVOGLIO, Mirella. letraset metaphors. 31 January - 18 February 1978, opening 31 January 17-19.30pm. Single illustrated sheet, printed on one side. 25. SAITO, Takako. Exhibition of Publications. April 21 - May 20, 1978. Single illustrated sheet, printed on one side. 26. printed in brazil. 25 April - 13 May 1978. Single sheet, mimeographed on one side. 27. DERMISACHE, Mirtha. - Books - Graphics - Letters - Postcards -. 13 - 24 June 1978. Single sheet, printed on one side. 28. Other Books and So / boeken, multiples, posters, kaarten, kranten / Beau Geste Press, Fandangos, Daylight Press, Dynamo Press. N.d. [1978]. Card, printed on one side. 29. VILLERS, Bernard. "Un poids deux mesures." 21 June 1978. Single xeroxed sheet. 30. GAGLIONE, Bill & BANANA, Anna. Futurist Sounds. 29 September 1978. Single sheet, printed on one side. 31. Van kunstenaarsboeken tot postkunst, o
A General History of the Lives and Adventures of the Most Famous Highwaymen

A General History of the Lives and Adventures of the Most Famous Highwaymen, Murderers, Street-Robberies, &c. To which is added A Genuine Account of the Voyages and Plunders of the most Notorious Pyrates. Interspersed with diverting tales and pleasant songs.

Johnson, Captain C. London: Olive Payne, 1736. Folio, (2), 235, 226-484, (2)pp. Frontispiece and 25 other plates engraved after Joseph Nicholls and William Jett by Isaac Basire, Thomas Bowles, W. H. Toms and others. Title page in red and black, text in two columns. Full red crushed morocco by Bedford, panelled in gilt, backstrip gilt, gilt dentelles, all edges gilt. Near fine, binding lightly worn at extremities, a magnificent copy from the library of C.L.F. Robinson (1874-1916), president of Colt Firearms, with his bookplate. § The classic account of Britain's most notorious outlaws, from Robin Hood, to Edward "Blackbeard" Teach, wonderfully illustrated with portraits and scenes of high drama "engraved by the best masters". Originally issued in 73 weekly or 20 monthly numbers beginning 30 June 1733; the first collected issue was published by Janeway in 1734. This is a straight reissue of the first edition with a cancel title-page, and with all the pagination errors of the first edition uncorrected. It is far less common than the Janeway edition: around a dozen copies are recorded in the US and three in England, although none at the British Library, Trinity Dublin, Yale, or Harvard.The text largely came from Captain Alexander Smith's The history of the lives of the most noted highway-men.(1714) and from Captain Johnson's A general history of the robberies and murders of the most notorious pyrates.(1724). Sabin notes that Johnson's 1724 text "embodies many items relating to the Colonial History of British America, nowhere else extant, as, the Adventures of Blackbeard, and his Capture by Lieut. Maynard in the James River, V.a. etc." It was long believed that Captain Johnson was a pseudonym of Daniel Defoe, although evidence now points to the sailor, printer, and journalist, Nathaniel Mist.The section on pirates is one of the best accounts of the lives and careers of the most famous pirates of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, with entries on Mary Read, Ann Bonny, Edward "Blackbeard" Teach, Captain Avery, Henry Morgan, and others, with several fine engravings.This copy was in the library of Col. Charles F.L. Robinson, a president of Colt Firearms and a noted collected of early Americana. His impressive library, including the Hoe copy of Exquemelin's Bucaniers, was auctioned in 699 lots over three days by Anderson in 1917 and made over $66,000. (The Dial, Vol.LXII, reported the results at length.) Hill p.461. Sabin 36195, see also 36188. ESTC N18300.
Autograph Letter Signed [ALS] from Vicksburg

Autograph Letter Signed [ALS] from Vicksburg, 1863

GRANT, ULYSSES S. AN HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT LETTER: GRANT DEFINES THE TERMS OF SURRENDER AT VICKSBURG. Background: The climactic fall of the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg on July 4, 1863, is often regarded as the turning point of the American Civil War, for by destroying the Confederate control of the Mississippi River, the Union Army, led by Ulysses S. Grant, effectively divided the Confederacy in two. As "Sherman told a friend after Vicksburg had fallen, 'they have fought battles and maneuvered fast armies. Here he has achieved a real conclusion." (Donald L. Miller, Vicksburg: Grant's Campaign That Broke the Confederacy). Before the Union could declare victory, however, terms of surrender had to be drawn between General John C. Pemberton, representing the Confederacy, and Grant, representing the North. The main issue at stake was what to do with the approximately 30,000 captured Confederate soldiers. "That evening [July 3], as northern and southern soldiers socialized between the lines, Grant gathered his officers for a war council, one in which he alone would wield ultimate power. The debate hinged on whether the Confederate garrison should be ferried north as prisoners or paroled, sending them home and effectively excluding them from the war. Despite Grant's reservations, his generals convinced him of the wisdom of the parole option; instead of tying up Union soldiers and monopolizing transports to steer more than thirty thousand rebels to northern prisons, Grant's army would immediately be freed up for fresh military adventures. As the years went by and his name became synonymous with reconciliation, Grant tended to forget that he had started out favoring harsher treatment for Pemberton's men. As he wrote in 1884, 'The men behaved so well that I did not want to humiliate them. I believed that consideration for their feelings would make them less dangerous foes during the continuance of hostilities, and better citizens after the war was over.'" (Ron Chernow, Grant, pp.287-88). "Once the war council ended, Grant presented Pemberton with generous terms, which would enable Confederate soldiers to save face and surrender with traditional war honors: 'As soon as rolls can be made out and paroles signed by officers and men you will be allowed to march out of our lines the officers taking with them their side arms and clothing, and the Field, Staff & Cavalry officers one horse each.' Turning up the pressure on Pemberton to accept these honorable terms, Grant slyly leaked the news to Confederate pickets. Once the rebel rank and file realized Grant was offering them a chance to head home, it would be difficult for Pemberton to reject his offer. He largely accepted the terms and said his men would march out the next morning with colors flying and stack their arms. Sometime around dawn [the next morning, July 4,] the siege ended. At breakfast time, Grant sat in his tent, composing dispatches on a small table, when an orderly arrived with Pemberton's submission to his final terms. Wan, exhausted from the siege, Grant stood up and said with tangible relief to his son Fred, 'W-e-e-e-ll, I'm glad Vicksburg will surrender.'' (Chernow). "Regarding Pemberton's captured army, Grant had quickly deduced that parolees were preferable and POWs acceptable, but escapees (armed or unarmed) were neither. To Pemberton's embarrassment, some of his former troops preferred the brutality of Northern prison camps to the future prospect of being conscripted back into the Confederate army, and Grant would not force anyone to sign their paroles. Then as Pemberton and his official parolees marched east to eventually rejoin their comrades and countrymen, most of them stole away into the countryside, never to bear arms again for the Confederacy. By the time Pemberton found Johnston in mid-July, reposing with his army still relatively intact, Pemberton's over 30,000 parolees had reportedly melted away to fewer than 2,000 over the course of two weeks. As Cadwallader observed, 'The wisdom of Grant's releasing them on parole was thus early proven.'" (William Farina, Ulysses S. Grant, 1861-1864). General James B. "McPherson became the point man for the surrender, and Grant had special instructions for him regarding the parole process. He wanted it done quickly to relieve the burden he felt about the Confederate army, but he also wanted it done right. He told McPherson to 'take immediate charge of the paroling of the capitulated Confederate State forces, and hurry the same forward with all possible dispatch.'" (Timothy B. Smith, The Decision Was Always My Own: Ulysses S. Grant and the Vicksburg Campaign, p. 198). The letter: In this July 8, 1863 letter, written from Grant to his "point man" McPherson, Grant clearly and strongly defines the terms of surrender (revealingly noting that there has been "some misunderstanding" on the part of Pemberton) and gives McPherson very specific instructions as to how to handle the prisoners. The text reads in full: Head Quarters, Dept. of the Tenn. Vicksburg Miss. July 8th 1863. Maj. Gen. J.B. McPherson, Comdg 17th Army Corps. Gen: There apparently being some misunderstanding between Lt. Gen. Pemberton and the paroling officers as to the method of conducting the paroling of prisoners I will give you the following rules for your guidance. That there may be no misunderstanding no prisoners will be allowed to leave our lines until all are paroled who will accept. Those who decline will be confined on Steamers anchored in the stream until they accept and consent to march out with officers appointed over them. Declining this they will be sent North as prisoners of War to be held for exchange. When all those able to leave the lines are paroled, and the rolls are approved by Gen. Pemberton, or any officer designated by him, the whole will be required to leave our lines. Those declining to leave will be sent out under guard. Gen. Pemberton's acceptance of the terms proposed to him binds the Confederate Govt. not
Bertolt Brecht: Die Gewehre der Frau Carrar. Dezember 1937 / Sonderdruck aus den "Gesammelten Werken"

Bertolt Brecht: Die Gewehre der Frau Carrar. Dezember 1937 / Sonderdruck aus den “Gesammelten Werken”, Band 2.

Brecht, Bertolt, einflussreicher deutscher Dramatiker, Librettist und Lyriker des 20. Jahrhunderts (1898-1956). Bertolt Brecht: Die Gewehre der Frau Carrar. Dezember 1937 / Sonderdruck aus den "Gesammelten Werken", Band 2. Druck von Heinr. Mercy Sohn in Prag. Printed in Czechoslovakia. Malik-Verlag London. 8vo. eigenhändige Widmung von Bertolt Brecht auf dem Vorsatzblatt. Original Stoffeinband + ungebundene Ausgabe des Buches + gedrucktes Material bezüglich der dänischen Übersetzung Alles aufbewahrt in einer Box mit roter Kennzeichnung auf dem Buchrücken. Der Sonderdruck von „Bertolt Brecht: Die Gewehre der Frau Carrar. Dezember 1937 / Sonderdruck aus den "Gesammelten Werken", Band 2" enthält eine eigenhändige Widmung von Bertolt Brecht für den dänischen Schriftsteller Martin Andersen Nexø (1869 - 1954): „dem genossen Martin Andersen Nexø in verehrung und kameradschaft. bertolt brecht."Das Theaterstück „Die Gewehre der Frau Carrar" ist im Jahr 1937 entstanden. Es gilt als Brechts Antwort auf den Spanischen Bürgerkrieg und war zu Lebzeiten Brechts war es eines seiner am häufigsten gespielten Stücke. Die Uraufführung fand am 16. Oktober 1937 in der Salle Adyar in Paris statt, die Titelrolle spielte Helene Weigel.Andersen Nexø wurde über seine politische Arbeit hinweg als Autor des Jugendbuchs „Pelle der Eroberer" (1910) bekannt. In seiner Rolle als Journalist hatte Nexø über die „Carrar"-Premiere am 14. Februar 1938 an der Borups Højskole berichtet. Helene Weigel spielte die Hauptrolle. Die Kritik erschien zunächst im Arbejderbladet (18. Februar) und wurde von Margarete Steffin übersetzt und erschien schließlich im Exil-Periodikum Das Wort in Moskau (Heft 6, Juni 1938).Brecht befand sich seit 1933 im Exil. Einen Tag nach dem Reichstagsbrand flüchtete er mit Familie und Freunden zunächst nach Prag, die Schweiz nach Paris und schließlich nach Skovbostand bei Svendborg in Dänemark, wo er fünf Jahre verbringen sollte.
Eigenhändiger Brief mit Unterschrift.

Eigenhändiger Brief mit Unterschrift.

Liebknecht, Wilhelm, Politiker und Gründervater der SPD (1826-1900). 3 engbeschriebene Seiten (S. 3 verso mit eigenhändiger Adresse). 4to. Mit kl. Fehlstelle im Rand durch Entfernen des Siegels (mit Wortverlust). Warmherziger Brief des SPD-Mitbegründers aus der Berliner "Gefangen-Anstalt" an seine Frau Ernestine in Leipzig.Wilhelm Liebknecht verbrachte aufgrund seiner politischen und publizistischen Tätigkeiten insgesamt 6 Jahre in Haft. Im August 1866 hatte er gemeinsam mit Otto Freytag und August Bebel in Chemnitz die linksliberale "Sächsische Volkspartei" gegründet. - ". Du hast recht, zum Lachen ist die Geschichte nicht, aber das meinte ich auch nicht; im Gegentheil, es würde mich sehr ärgern, wenn Du sie lächerlich fändest; ich wollte bloß sagen, daß Du meine Haft nicht allzu ernst nehmen solltest. - Die ersten Tage, das kann ich dir versichern, waren fürchterlich; die Ungewißheit um Dich, oder richtiger die Gewißheit, daß Du völlig unversorgst warst und dazu Deine schwache Gesundheit -- mein Innres wurde bis auf den Grund aufgepflügt . Was Du mir von Bebel schreibst, wundert mich nicht; ich wußte, daß er ein nobler Bursche ist. Danke ihm tausendmal in meinem Namen, ihm und dem guten Benedikt . Heut habe ich noch 2 Monate, Du siehst die Zeit vergeht - feiern wir Alice's Geburstag, Baby's Geburtstag und Weihnachten zum zweiten mal. - Daß Alice Dich auf das Wiedersehn vertröstet, hat mich gerührt .". Liebknechts Sorge um die Gesundheit seiner Frau war berechtigt, 1867 starb sie 35jährig an Tuberkulose. Mit seiner zweiten Frau Natalie hatte er u. a. die Söhne Theodor, Otto und Karl Liebknecht.Autograph letter signed by politician and publicist Wilhelm Liebknecht, later father of politician Karl and chemist Otto Liebknecht), to his first wife Ernestine, from a Berlin prison. About conditions in prison, family matters, the fragile health of his wife and news from friends and political comrades. 3 pp., with the address on verso of page 3. - With small defect in paper where the seal was removed, with loss of words.R)
The Mint

The Mint, copy #17 of 50 of the first American Copyright Edition with the ownership signature of T. E. Lawrence’s brother and literary executor, A. W. Lawrence

T. E. Lawrence, This is the true first edition of T. E. Lawrence’s unstintingly candid portrait of life in the Royal Air Force ranks, a magnificent example of the U.S. "copyright edition", one of just 50 copies, none of which was circulated to the public. Given that it was never intended to be seen by the public, this edition was quite handsome, bound in half vellum with blue-gray paper-covered boards (evoking RAF color) and a black leather spine label. The contents, printed on mould-made, watermarked paper with untrimmed fore and bottom edges and gilt top edges, are bound with blue-gray endpapers and a red and gold head band.This copy, hand-numbered "UK 17" is truly fine, nearly flawless. The binding is immaculately square, clean, and tight with sharp corners and no reportable wear or soiling. The vellum is quite mildly and evenly mellowed, as is inherent to and intended with vellum, but there is no acute browning or differential spine toning. The contents are likewise immaculate with a crisp, untouched feel. We find no spotting. The only previous ownership marks are those of T. E. Lawrence’s youngest brother and literary executor, Arnold Walker Lawrence (1900-1991). A. W. wrote in black ink on the front free endpaper recto "the property of A. W. Lawrence." Additionally, A. W. wrote in four lines on the copyright page "The property of A. W. Lawrence | c/o Tamplin & Co., Solicitors. | 52, Bishopsgate, | London, E.C."The book is protected beneath a clear, removable mylar cover and housed within a modern blue cloth-covered slipcase.Thomas Edward Lawrence (1888-1935) found fame as instigator, organizer, hero, and tragic figure of the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Empire during the First World War, which he began as an eccentric junior intelligence officer and ended as "Lawrence of Arabia." This time defined Lawrence with indelible experience and celebrity which he spent the rest of his famously short life struggling to reconcile and reject, to recount and repress. In 1922, in a state of nervous exhaustion following the First World War, his work on the post-war settlement, and writing and re-writing Seven Pillars of Wisdom, Lawrence enlisted in the ranks of the R.A.F. under the name of John Hume Ross. He swiftly concluded "there is grand stuff here, and if I could write it." so he began making notes "scribbled at night, between last post and lights out, in bed." Interruptions ensued. In January 1923 Lawrence’s identity became public and he was discharged from the R.A.F., but allowed to re-enlist two and a half years later, this time using the surname "Shaw". "The project was set aside, not to be taken up again until he was posted to India in 1927, during which interval he oversaw publication of Seven Pillars of Wisdom and its abridgement for Cape, Revolt in the Desert. In March 1928 he sent a clean copy of the revised text to Edward Garnett. Garnett circulated typed copies to a small circle, among them Air Marshal Trenchard." A saga ensued. Cape claimed publication rights but Lawrence successfully resisted. In the meantime, "Trenchard’s concerned response led Lawrence to guarantee that it would not be published at least until 1950." Nonetheless, "The manuscript found its way to America and in 1936, in order to control publication, it was found necessary to have a copyright edition published in the USA." The resulting edition was just 50 copies, of which just ten were for sale at the intentionally prohibitive price of $500,000 per copy. (O’Brien, pp.119-120)This 1936 U.S. copyright edition is not only rare, but also preceded eventual publication by nearly two decades and differs from the final text. Lawrence made revisions in the last months of his life and "a revised manuscript was found later", finally published in 1955 in Britain and America after the death of an officer described unfavorably in the text. Even then, libel concerns led the British publisher, Cape to remove all objectionable words, leaving blank spaces. Limited, hand-numbered,
Rendezvous with Rama [with] Rama II [and with] Garden of Rama [and also with] Rama Revealed

Rendezvous with Rama [with] Rama II [and with] Garden of Rama [and also with] Rama Revealed

Clarke, Arthur C.; Lee, Gentry (co-author, sequel volumes) First printing, octavo size, 256 pp., signed by Arthur C. Clarke, in a custom box (see below for details on the three sequel volumes). Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (1917-2008) was an incredibly talented man; by the time of his death he had earned a number of Hugo and Nebula awards for his science fiction, he received the Kalinga Prize in 1961 for popularising science, served twice as the chairman of the British Interplanetary Society, was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1989 and was knighted in 1998. Perhaps best known to most Americans as the author of "2001 A Space Odyssey", the "Rama" series is "regarded as one of the cornerstones in Clarke's bibliography", having been awarded both the Hugo and Nebula awards upon publication. The story is set in the 2130s, when a group of humans intercept an alien ship: ".it was only when it was realised that it had a diameter of some twelve miles and that its course might completely upset the delicate balance of the solar system that scientists became at first intrigued and then worried." (from dust jacket flap). Immensely popular, the "New York Times" reviewer wrote that the book had "that chilling touch of the alien, the not-quite-knowable, that distinguishes sci-fi at its most technically imaginative". The next three novels in the series (included here) were co-written by Gentry Lee; eventually Lee would go on to write himself the final two volumes in the series (not included here). ___DESCRIPTION: "Rendezvous with Rama": bound in full green paper (textured to look like cloth), gilt lettering on the spine, gold endpapers, signed in blue ink by Arthur C. Clarke on the title page with the date of "2 Aug 86", first printing per Currey (no statement of printing on copyright page); octavo size (8" by 5 1/8"), pagination: [1-5] 6-256. The dust jacket is not price-clipped, showing the original price of 2 British Pounds Sterling on the lower right of the front flap, jacket design by Bruce Pennington with a pictorial depiction of the interior of the spaceship on the front with yellow and white lettering, white lettering on the spine, back panel a solid black, front flap a summary of the book, back flap blank other than the ISBN number at the bottom; the book is encased in a custom solander box covered with black cloth, the inner trays lined with white paper, two red leather spine labels with gilt lettering and rules. "Rama II" published by Victor Gollancz in 1989, this the first printing: bound in full black textured paper, gilt lettering on the spine, octavo size (9.5" by 6.25"), pagination: [1-7] 8-379; dust jacket with the original price of 12.95 British Pounds, circular graphic presumably of a spaceship in yellow on the front, white and silver lettering, same on the spine, back panel blank (other than ISBN), front flap with a short summary and back flap with a short author bio. "Garden of Rama" published by Bantam Books in 1991, this the first U.S. printing (with the full number line): bound in blue paper over boards with a purple linen shelfback, silver lettering on the spine, octavo size (9.25" by 6.25"), pagination: [i-vi], [1-3] 4-441; pictorial dust jacket shows the original price of $20.00 on the front flap, with a wrap-around illustration by Paul Swendsen showing multiple ships in space, raised lettering in metallic blue on the front panel, blue and white lettering on the spine, review blurbs on the back panel, summary of the book on the front and back flaps, short author bios on the back flap. "Rama Revealed" published by Victor Gollancz in 1993, this the first printing, bound in full black textured paper, gilt lettering on the spine, octavo size (9 3/8" by 6 3/8"), pagination: [1-7] 8-479; pictorial dust jacket shows the original price of 15.99 British Pounds on the front flap illustration on the front panel by Bob Corley with white and silver lettering, white lettering on the spine, summary on the front flap and author bios on the back flap, review blurbs on the back panel. ___CONDITION: "Rendezvous with Rama" fine overall, with clean boards, perfectly straight corners without rubbing, a strong, square text block with solid hinges, the interior is clean and bright, and entirely free of prior owner markings; some light foxing to the top edge of the text block, text block very slightly cocked, and a small chip from the rear pastedown at the top fore-edge corner (presumably as it came from the binder, as there is absolutely no evidence of wear); the unclipped dust jacket fine overall, clean, not sunned, perhaps a minute amount of wear at the head of the spine and a hint of toning at the edges; the solander box fine, clean, strong and study, without wear. "Rama II", "Garden of Rama" and "Rama Revealed" all fine in fine, unclipped dust jackets; "Garden of Rama" showing some lift to the thin plastic coating the publishers applied to the paper (due to the raised lettering, an unfortunate choice). ___CITATION: Currey p. 115. ___POSTAGE: International customers, please note that additional postage may apply as the standard does not always cover costs; please inquire for details. ___Swan's Fine Books is pleased to be a member of the ABAA, ILAB, and IOBA and we stand behind every book we sell. Please contact us with any questions you may have, we are here to help.
Stockholmska Scener Tecknade och lithografierade. [Caricature Scenes of Stockholm in Lithograph]

Stockholmska Scener Tecknade och lithografierade. [Caricature Scenes of Stockholm in Lithograph]

MÖRNER, Carl Gustav Hjalmar A Remarkable Suite of Sixteen Lithograph Plates - Including Four with Hand-coloring A Wonderful Caricaturists View of Stockholm MÖRNER, Carl Gustav Hjalmar. Stockholmska Scener Tecknade och lithografierade. [Caricature Scenes of Stockholm in Lithograph] Stockholm: Gjöthström & Magnusson, [1830]. First Edition in Book Form. Folio (14 x 10 1/8 inches; 355 x 257 mm.). Original pictorially engraved gray paper wrapper for part one, bound in as title-page, the remaining front and back wrappers bound in at end. Sixteen superb, large lithographed plates including four that are hand colored, all by Gjöthström and Magnusson after Mörner. Bound by G. Hedberg of Stockholm ca. 1960 (stamp-signed on lower verso of front free endpaper). Full russet morocco, covers ruled in gilt, front cover with circular gilt wreath design. Spine with five raised bands decoratively ruled and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt ruled board edges, decorative gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers. top edge gilt. A wonderful copy. Published in four parts, each with three uncolored and one colored plate. Excessively rare with only two copies listed in institutions worldwide: Kunstbiblio Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin (Germany); National Library of Sweden. (both with just four hand colored plates). Not in any of the standard bibliographies although Colas 2141 & 2142 does make mention of the two editions of one of Mörner's other works Scènes populaires de Naples. (1828 edition & 1829 edition). The plates (translated from the Swedish) 1. Roddare Båt - Rowers Boat 2. Musikaliskt Sállskap - Musical Society 3. Kládstånd - Clothes Shop 4. [Untitled] - [Two Police Officers escorting a criminal?] 5. Á ju full? Sa du - Did you say you are full? 6. Hyrvagn - Slå bak! - A rental carriage with two stowaways 7. Restauration - Jungfru! Ska bli - Restoration - Oh, my God! To be young. 8. Thé Visit - The Visit 9. Division hallt - Division kept 10. Upphålls váder - Staying wet 11. Kállare - The Cellar 12. Får jag den áran att proponera - May I propose that year 13. Brunns Bal - Wells Ball 14. [Untitled] - [A country picnic in the rain] 15. Vira - The card game 16. Si opp! - Get up! Carl Gustav Hjalmar Mörner, born May 7, 1794 in Stockholm, died September 15, 1837 in Paris, was a Swedish artist. He devoted himself first to the military court and participated in the battles of Grossbeeren, Dennewitz, Leipzig and Bornhöved. As with many other officers at the same time he devoted himself to amateur painting, which is testified by many of his sketches from youth, conviviality and the campaign in Germany. Later he turned seriously to art and traveled in 1816 over Germany and France to Italy, where he stayed until 1828. Mörner tried to paint larger compositions with historical or folklore motifs in oil, but had little success with them. One of the more famous paintings in this genre include Odin's arrival to Sweden's Rosendal Palace. His greatest contribution was made as a draftsman and lithographer. In 1820 he published a series of Roman carnival images in outline etching Il Carnevale di Roma, but these was later transformed into lithographs, which suited his drawing much better, as shown in Italian costume pictures (1825), Scenes populaires de Naples (printed in Naples in 1826, French edition 1828), Travel Memories France, Germany and Italy (1829) and Stockholmska Scenes (1830). During a stay in London from 1830-36, Mörner published a lithographic album, Miscellaneous Sketches of Contrasts (1831). A scheduled work on physiognomy was not completes due to the artist's death in Paris in 1837. Hjalmar Mörner's work is represented in the Gothenburg Museum of Art, Östergötland County Museum, Orebro County Museum, and the University Library in Uppsala.
Snickerty Nick

Snickerty Nick

RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator; FORD, Julia Ellsworth BYNNER, Witter RIDGWAY, Arthur (Music) Snickerty Nick with the Music Near Fine in original Printed Dust Jacket [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. Snickerty Nick & the Giant. By Julia Ellsworth Ford. Rhymes by Witter Bynner. Music by Charles Arthur Ridgway. Los Angeles San Franciso: Sutton House, [1935]. [Third edition, the first with the music included]. Quarto (9 1/2 x 7 3/16 inches; 242 x 183 mm.). [viii], [1]-81, [1, blank], [83]-132 pp. Three full-page monotone plates (facing pp. 16, 20 & 42), eight full-page black & white drawings and two line drawings. Original 'bright yellow' cloth with pictorial stamping in black on the front cover in black. A near fine copy in the original yellow pictorial dust jacket, some light chipping to extremities, some tiny tape repairs, otherwise an excellent example of a dust jacket that we have never seen before. The differences between this and the 1933 edition are as follows: The title-page of the 1933 edition has the imprint Suttonhouse: Los Angeles 1933 whilst the 1935 edition has Suttonhouse Los Angeles San Francisco and no date (the date 1935 is on the verso of the title-page]. The text and illustrations are identical but the 'Suggestion for Production' p. 77- 80 (in the 1933 edition), has now been changed and extended to p. 81. Following p. 81 is an additional title-page for the music which follows from p. 85 through p. 132. "The idea of the Selfish Giant in this play has been taken from the story of Oscar Wilde's Selfish Giant. Spring would not come to his garden because he would not let the children play in it. It was always winter there. One morning he woke up hearing the music of a linnet singing in his garden. He jumped out of bed and saw a most wonderful sight, "flowers were looking up through the green grass and laughing," and in every tree was a little child; but one little boy was too tiny to climb the tree and the Giant's heart melted and he helped the little child into the tree. The little child kissed him and forever after the children played in the Giant's garden, because his heart had softened through love of the little child. The children never saw the child again. But one day he came to the Giant, who saw on the palms of the child's hands "the prince of two nails and the prince of two nails were on the little feet". The little child had come to take the Giant to play in his garden, "which is Paradise." My indebtedness to this story is the character of the Selfish Giant. The little play of Snickerty Nick is not a dramatization of The Selfish Giant. The character of Snickerty Nick is an original character and the play centers around him. The little boy is only a loving and beloved child, and Spring and Winter are personified by faeries and gnomes. To Arthur Rackham I tender my most sincere thanks whose magic touch, as in Peter Pan, Grimm's Faery Tales and Undine, making real all faeries and gnomes, endears all child life to grown-ups as well as to children." (Forward by Julia Ellsworth Ford). This edition with the music not recorded in Riall In over fifty-five years of specializing in the work of Arthur Rackham I have never seen the 1933 edition, and I have only seen one other example of the 1935 before. According to Riall (see p. 180) the 1933 edition is listed as a "reprint of 1919 edition, with same coloured illustrations. Bound in bright yellow cloth. 3 full page illustrations in full colour. 8 drawings in black and white. This edition has the music added at the end of the book." OCLC locates just seven copies of the 1933 edition and twelve copies of the 1935 edition in libraries and institutions worldwide - none of the copies cited have any bibliographical details other than the book has 80 pp. (1933) or 132 pp. (1935). Both of these editions are unknown to The Arthur Rackham Society. The two books were produced in 1933 & 1935 to accompany the first Hollywood production of Snickerty Nick on April 8th, 1933. Julia Ellsworth Ford's famous little 'folk' play was directed by Pauline Parker.
Nova demonstratio immobilitatis terrae petita ex virtut magnetica

Nova demonstratio immobilitatis terrae petita ex virtut magnetica

GRANDAMI, Jacques A Fine Presentation Copy of Jacques Grandami's Nova demonstratio immobilitatis terrae petita ex virtut magnetica Athanasius Kircher's Correspondent on his Works on Magnetism GRANDAMI, Jacques. Nova demonstratio immobilitatis terrae petita ex virtut magnetica. La Flèche: George Griveau, 1645. First edition. A fine presentation copy presented by the author to an unidentified recipient I.B.' (frontispiece inscribed at foot 'I. B. Auctor D[ono] D[edit]' in contemporary hand); subsequently given to the library of the Jesuit domus professae in Antwerp by Daniel Papebroch in 1682 (printed title inscribed at head 'Domûs Professae Soc: Jesu Antuerpiae', front free endpaper with inscription 'Musei SS. in Domo professâ Soc. Iesu Antuerp. Dedit Bibliothecae ejûsdem Domûs R. P. Papebrochius 1682') Quarto (8 3/4 x 6 5/8 inches; 222 x 168 mm.). [viii], [1]-24, 33-40, 43-170 pp. Additional engraved allegorical frontispiece by F. Rousseuille, seven engraved plates (comprising nine figures), one folding, and 24 engravings (on 22 pages) in the text (two repeated from one plate); occasional light marginal dampstaining and a few spots. Contemporary vellum, with contemporary hand-written list, on paper, of 11 books (this being the first) pasted to upper cover. A wonderful example in it's original contemporary vellum binding. Presentation copy of the first edition of this rare and richly illustrated Jesuit anti-Copernican tract by Jacques Grandami (1588-1672), rector of the Jesuit college of La Flèche, which was attended by both Descartes and Mersenne. "Although Kircher's work on magnetism antedated that of Jacques Grandami, the two Jesuits had corresponded about the matter before the publication of either work. Grandami, a French Jesuit who taught philosophy and theology at Bourges, Rennes, Tours, La Flèche, Rouen and Paris, published what he considered to be the definitive work on magnetic astronomy, his Nova demonstratio immobilitatis terrae petita ex virtut magnetica. Prior to its publication he had indicated in a letter his debt to Cabeo for his theoretical thinking: "Although gravity causes the Earth to stand in the centre of the world, it is not able to impede its circular motion around the centre, especially against the daily agitation of all the sea waters in the changing tides and in violent storms. Thus it is that another quality is added and assigned to immobility . This quality is sufficient for effecting this immobility and for restoring the Earth's situation with the poles of the sky if by chance it should be disturbed. I call this quality the magnetic quality since in magnetic bodies the rest and constant immobility on the meridian line (or near it) are seen everywhere." In this work Grandami employs the 'magnetic philosophy' initiated by William Gilbert to refute the heliocentrist position. He also claims to have solved the problem of determining longitude at sea. In the first decades of the seventeenth century 'magnetic philosophy' was used both by heliocentrists and their opponents to support their positions, and Grandami had discussed his views with Descartes and Mersenne, as well as with Huygens, before the publication of this work. "In the seventeenth century debates over the Copernican hypothesis numerous astronomers used magnetism and magnetic theories of attraction to substantiate their theoretical arguments and experimental proofs. William Gilbert initiated the introduction of magnetism into astronomical debate and the analogy between magnets and celestial bodies was subsequently employed in various ways by the heliocentrists, including Kepler and Galileo. By calling up Gilbert's magnetic philosophy in support of Copernican astronomy, Kepler and Galileo influenced the course of astronomical debate by strengthening the analogy and by cementing together the two sciences of magnetism and celestial physics. Yet magnetic arguments and magnetic analogies did not remain the province of heliocentrists alone. Opponents of Copernican theory likewise turned to magnetism, this time to refute the astronomy which common sense and Scriptural authority opposed. The hope of disproving the Copernican hypothesis by means of magnetic studies provided a strong stimulus to such studies in the scientific community" (Baldwin, p. 155). Grandami considered the present work to be a major contribution, continuing to discuss it with Huygens as late as 1669. Very Scarce. According to OCLC there are only five complete copies located in institutions and libraries worldwide: New York Public Library; New York Society Library; Yale University Library (CT, USA); Sachsische Landesbibliothek (Germany); University of Oxford (UK). ABPC/RBH list only two copies sold since 1942 (neither of them presentation copies): Sotheby's, Honeyman Sale November 1979, £700 (cont. calf worn, one plate torn and repaired), this subsequently offered by Howell in 1981 for $3250; Christie's, Beltrame Sale November 2016, £7500 (engraved title torn with loss, modern binding, soiled). The remarkable frontispiece "reflects the Jesuits' preoccupation with magnetic cosmology. At the top two angels symbolize God's providence in imbuing the Earth with a magnetic quality to prevent it moving. The quotation from Ecclesiastes I, 4 emphasizes the unique conformity of Jesuit magnetics with scripture. The central image is of a cherub conducting Grandami's basic experiment to prove magnetic immobility . Navigational interests are again represented. The cherub on the right carries Grandami's allegedly non-declining compass needle, with which he claimed to have solved the problem of longitude at sea" (Pumfrey, p. 52). Provenance: presented by the author to an unidentified recipient 'I. B.' (frontispiece inscribed at foot 'I. B. Auctor D[ono] D[edit]' in contemporary hand); subsequently given to the library of the Jesuit domus professae in Antwerp by Daniel Papebroch in 1682 (printed title inscribed at head 'Domûs Professae Soc: Jesu Antuerpiae', front free endp
Strahlungs-Emission und -Absorption nach der Quantentheorie [Emission and Absorption of Radiation in Quantum Theory]

Strahlungs-Emission und -Absorption nach der Quantentheorie [Emission and Absorption of Radiation in Quantum Theory]

EINSTEIN, ALBERT FIRST PRINTING IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS OF ONE OF EINSTEIN'S MAJOR WORKS: HIS FIRST PAPER ON THE DERIVATION OF PLANK'S LAW AND PROVIDING THE THEORETICAL BASIS FOR THE LASER. "Einstein commended the 'unparalleled boldness' of Planck's derivation of 1900, meaning not only the problem itself but also the fact that it was based on assumptions that were not entirely free of contradictions. Einstein now succeeded in the first of two papers in eliminating that flaw. More interesting than the derivation itself was the general character of his methods. Einstein proceeded from Niels Bohr's basic--and by then well tested--assumption that the electrons within an atom occupy a number of discrete energy states, and are able, through emission or absorption of radiation, to pass from one of those states to another. Added to this was an assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium between radiation field and atom, as well as a consideration of the 'classical' limiting case at high temperatures--and there was Planck's formula. This brief argument. also covers emission stimulated by the radiation field; thus the formulas already, by implication, contain the theory of the laser, though it was to take nearly half a century to be realized" (Folsing, Albert Einstein, 389). Weil *85. The "implication" containing the theory of the laser was more fully developed in his companion paper "On the Quantum Theory of Radiation" published a few weeks later. In the first paper, Einstein wrestled with the concept that the atomic emission of radiation could be a directed process; in the second paper he convincingly demonstrates that this is indeed the case. IN: Verhandl. D. Deutch. Phys. Ges., Vol 18, pp. 318-323. Braunschweig: Druck und Verlag von Friedr. Vieweg and Son, 1916. Octavo, original wrappers; housed in custom half leather chemise. One thread (literally) resewn on wrappers, a little creasing and soiling. A beautiful copy. RARE IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS.
New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ Newly Translated out of the Originall Greeke: and with the former Translations diligently compared and reuised

New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ Newly Translated out of the Originall Greeke: and with the former Translations diligently compared and reuised, by his Maiesties Special Commandement.

EMBROIDERED BINDING A Beautiful Embroidered Dos-A-Dos Binding in Fortuny Silk Pouch [EMBROIDERED DOS-À-DOS BINDING]. [BIBLE IN ENGLISH]. The New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. Newly Translated out of the Originall Greeke: and with the former Translations diligently compared and reuised, by his Maiesties Special Commandement. London: Imprinted by Robert Barker printer to the Kings most excellent Maiestie: and by the assignes of John Bill.and by the Assignes of John Bill, 1633. [Bound together with:] [BIBLE IN ENGLISH]. The Whole Book of Psalmes, collected into English meeter by Th. Sternhold, J. Hopkins, W. Whittingham, and others; conferred with the Hebrew, with apt notes to sing them withall. Newly set foorth, and allowed to be sung in all Churches of all the people together, before and after Morning and Euening prayer, and also before and after Sermons. Moreouer, in priuate houses, for their godly solace and comfort: laying apart all vngodly songs and ballads, which may tend only to the nourishing of vice, and corrupting of youth. London: Imprinted for the Company of Stationers, 1635. Two twenty-fourmo volumes bound dos-à-dos (back-to-back) in one (4 1/4 x 2 inches; 108 x 52 mm). New Testament: 264 leaves; Psalms: 330, [6] pages. In this edition of the New Testament, sig. A2r has 15 verses. New Testament with engraved title-page, headpiece and initial. Psalms with engraved vignette on title-page and engraved head-piece, initial and musical staffs. Contemporary London embroidered binding. Covers and spines uniformly embroidered with colored and golden/silver thread. Both covers and spines with ornamental rosettes in pink and green thread. All edges gilt and gauffered. Previous owner's old ink signatures on front endpapers of both books. A few threads loose, and cloth mildly rubbed, but still an excellent example, and better than most. Housed in a custom black morocco clamshell. This comes with a blue Fortuny silk carrying pouch which is a bit frayed. A characteristic London embroidered binding of the second quarter of the seventeenth century, rare in a dos-à-dos format. Although textile bindings of canvas and velvet were popular during the Elizabethan period as coverings for devotional books, the style reached its height during the stuart period. "During the seventeenth century little ›double‹ books were rather favourite forms for Common Prayer and Psalms especially. These curious bindings open opposite ways and have two backs, two ornamental boards, and one unornamented board enclosed between the two books, which are always of the same size" (Davenport, English Embroidered Bindings, 38) ESTC S124408 (STC 2943); ESTC S1805 (STC 2661.5) HBS 68342. $12,500
Principes de Paysage

Principes de Paysage, pour apprendre à dessiner et colorer à l’aquarelle. Premier [-Quatrième] cahier

LORY, Gabriel Ludwig and Mathias Gabriel Four parts, folio, in original printed wrappers with explanatory text on the inner front wrapper and containing 37 aquatint plates, 27 of which are coloured; in very fine condition as issued. Extremely rare first edition of this series of studies composed by father and son, Gabriel Ludwig Lory (1763-1840) and Mathias Gabriel Lory (1784-1846), both artists, engravers and above all painters of Swiss landscapes, the genre in which they made their reputation. Originally from Berne, they worked for some years in Neuchâtel. This splendid series of four wrappered folios, containing nine or ten aquatinted plates each, sets out to show how landscape depiction in watercolour should proceed from outline to finished work, demonstrating the colour effects by aquatint printing. Its 37 plates show the progression through four or five stages of colouring from outline and subsequent stages to a fully coloured version. Conceived as an instructional series for advanced watercolourists this also succeeds as a bravura demonstration of aquatint printing. Each section has a long printed discussion piece on the inner front wrapper while the inner rear wrapper contains instructions, particularly relating to colour effects, specific to the images in that part. We have not traced a record of this work in any institutional library. Although by Swiss artists, the work was published in Paris and appeared at a time of great interest for the colour depiction of landscape: in terms of voyage history this was the early period of the grands voyages, appearing during the publication period of the Baudin voyage (1807-1816), the start of an era of magnificently and copiously illustrated such publications, and at a time when European topographical works were reaching a high point. --- The Lorys themselves achieved great results in this area: during their time in Neuchâtel they worked with the publisher Ostervald between 1805 and about 1812. Their very well-known Voyage pittoresque de Genève à Milan par le Simplon dates from this period, and the Voyage pittoresque dans la vallée de Chamouni et autour du Montblanc from a few years later. F.C. Lonchamp wrote about their work (in Bibliographie générale des ouvrages publiés ou illustrés en Suisse et à l'étranger de 1475 à 1914, Paris, 1922, pp. 157-58) that "To Gabriel-Ludwig Lory. and to his son Mathias Lory. belongs the honour of having published the best collections of views - with which only those of J.-J. Wetzel bear comparison - which have ever been published by Swiss artists". Listing four works illustrated by them he concluded that "The views of these Voyages are all interesting and of a superb and pleasant quality. Their interpretation, through aquatint and coloring, indicates such refinement of thoroughness and such a keen understanding of values, that it would be foolhardy to desire anything of more careful and perfect execution". Published in Paris, the four parts were also available directly from the Lorys in Switzerland: their addition to the imprint reads"Dessinées et Gravés par LORY, Père et Fils, à Neuchâtel, en Suisse" Provenance: Private collection (Europe).
Tale of Lohengrin

Tale of Lohengrin, The

BAYNTUN, binder]; POGANY, Willy; WAGNER, Richard; ROLLESTON, T.W. A Superb Early Bayntun Inlaid Binding On One of Willy Pogany's Masterpieces BAYNTUN, binder. POGANY, Willy (illustrator). WAGNER, Richard. ROLLESTON, T.W. The Tale of Lohengrin, Knight of the Swan after the Drama of Richard Wagner by T.W. Rolleston. Presented by Willy Pogany. London: G.G. Harrap, n .d. [1913]. First trade edition. Quarto (10 x 7 1/4 inches; 254 x 184 mm.). 192 unnumbered pages. Eight tipped-in color plates including frontispiece with original tissue guard, numerous full page color illustrations, calligraphic text, head- tailpieces; an image on every page. Printed on heavy gray stock. Some minor discoloration to first three and last three leaves, otherwise fine. Bound ca. 1930 by Bayntun of Bath (stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-in). Full black morocco, covers with single gilt rule, front cover with multi color morocco inlays reproducing the illustration on page [53]. Spine with five raised bands, decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments. Decorative gilt board edges, gilt ruled turn-ins, blue cockerel endpapers, all edges gilt. Housed in the original blue cloth over boards clamshell case. The design on the front cover is taken from the illustration on p. [53]. "And then aloud spake she- "O King, a champion waits the hoar To take my part with godlike power, And my Deliverer be. "In dreams I saw him; silver-bright His jewell'd armour shone. His sword was as a beam of light, His crest a silver swan. "He is my Lord, he is my King. And his till death am I. Come, Victor, Lord, the hoar is near- Oh hear thy poor maid's cry!" William Andrew ("Willy") Pogany (born Vilmos Andreas Pogány) (August 1882 - 30 July 1955) was a prolific Hungarian illustrator of children's and other books. Pogany's best known works consist of illustrations of classic myths and legends done in the Art Nouveau style. He also worked as an art director on several Hollywood films, including Fashions of 1934 and Dames. The publication of Pogány's Lohengrin was the final act in his trilogy of masterworks focused on Wagner's Germanic tales, and one of the quintet that is considered his finest work. Pogány clearly approached the commission to illustrate Lohengrin as an opportunity to improve and extend techniques that he had developed through his preceding work, particularly The Rubáiyat of Omar Khayyám, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Tannhäuser and Parsifal, the other four books that immortalized his career as an illustrator. That commitment to ongoing innovation resulted in an incredible suite of illustrations, including color lithographs, monotone and marginal illustrations and the delightful tipped-in color plates (produced with a four-color process) included in Lohengrin. Themes of medieval chivalry, erotic love and moral tests are illustrated in a lavish fashion by Pogány with an outstanding use of iconography, form and color.'.
Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám

Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám

RIVIÈRE & SON binder; POGANY, Willy, illustrator; FITZGERALD, Edward, Translator; OMAR KHAYYAM An Exceptionally Fine Riviére Rubáiyát Illustrated by Willy Pogany [RIVIÉRE & Son, binders]. Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám. Presented by Willy Pogany. [The illustrations and decorations in this edition of Fitzgerald's translation of the "Rubáiyát" are by Willy Pogany]. London: George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd., [ca. 1916]. Octavo (8 1/8 x 5 1/2 inches; 207 x 140 mm.). Text printed in blue and black. 112 unnumbered pp.With sixteen tipped-in color plates within decorative borders by Willy Pogany, and numerous text illustrations printed in blue. Bound ca. 1916 by Riviére & Son, stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-in. Full vermillion crushed levant morocco. Front cover with a central oval panel of green morocco with Eve, the serpent and the tree of life inlaid in various color morocco's. This central panel is surrounded by a gilt floral border of flowers and bunches of grapes, which in turn is surrounded by a border lettered "Oh, Thou, Who Man of Baser Earth Didst Make, / And Who With Eden Didst Devise The Snake, / For All The Sin Wherewith The Face Of Man / is Blacken'd. Man's Forgiveness Give - And Take". Rear cover with an oval panel featuring the snake twined around a large chalice, also surroundedby a gilt floral border of flowers and bunches of grapes, which in turn is surrounded by a border lettered "Oh, Thou, Who Man of Baser Earth Didst Make, / And Who With Eden Didst Devise The Snake, / For All The Sin Wherewith The Face Of Man / is Blacken'd. Man's Forgiveness Give - And Take". Spine with five raised bands decoratively paneled, tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt board edges, decorative gilt turn-ins, decorative floral endpapers, all edges gilt. Housed in the original, felt-lined, red cloth over boards slipcase. A very fine example. Willy Pogany had previously illustrated the Rubaiyat in 1909, but these later illustrations are quite a different interpretation, more westernized and modernized than the earlier ones. "Had Omar Khayyam, the old tentmaker, visioned the beauty of his verses centuries later in Western dress, as embroidered by a Hungarian artist, he might have had a new conception of the meaning of immortality. For Pogany, the Hungarian, had made Omar, the Persian, live again." (Willy Pogany and his Work. eight-page leaflet). Willy Pogány, born in Szeged, Hungary, in 1882, studied at Budapest Technical University and in Munich and Paris. His reputation as a muralist, painter and illustrator was well established in Paris, London and Munich before arriving in the United States in 1915, at the age of thirty-three. Skilled in an unusually wide range of media, he had won gold medals at exhibitions in Budapest, Leipzig, and at the Panama Pacific International Exhibition. "Among Pogány's many murals are those for the Heckscher Children's Theatre in New York City and the Niagara Falls Power Station. As a painter he did portraits of famous people in all walks of life. An expert on scenery design and lighting effects, Pogány also designed sets for ballets and operas, including "Le Coq d'Or," and for many films, such as Modern Times for Charlie Chaplin as well as animated cartoons based on his children's books. "Among his other artistic endeavors Pogány was an accomplished book illustrator. It was this phase of his career, especially as an illustrator of children's books, which gives this collection special relevance for Special Collections & University Archives at the University of Oregon Libraries. Pogány designed and illustrated more than 150 books. His illustrations include those for the Rubaiyat and the Sonnets from the Portuguese, The Song Celestial, The Adventures of Odysseus, Gulliver's Travels, and many others, both classic and original. "Working tirelessly right up until the end, Willy Pogány died in 1955" (University of Oregon, Guide to the Willy A. Pogány Papers 1910-1967).
Stockholmska Scener Tecknade och lithografierade. [Caricature Scenes of Stockholm in Lithograph]

Stockholmska Scener Tecknade och lithografierade. [Caricature Scenes of Stockholm in Lithograph]

MÖRNER, Carl Gustav Hjalmar A Remarkable Suite of Sixteen Lithograph Plates - Including Four with Hand-coloring A Wonderful Caricaturists View of Stockholm MÖRNER, Carl Gustav Hjalmar. Stockholmska Scener Tecknade och lithografierade. [Caricature Scenes of Stockholm in Lithograph] Stockholm: Gjöthström & Magnusson, [1830]. First Edition in Book Form. Oblong folio (10 1/8 x 13 5/8 inches; 257 x 345 mm.). Sixteen superb, large lithographed plates including four that are hand colored, all by Gjöthström and Magnusson after Mörner. Contemporary quarter dark brown calf over mottles paper boards, pale gray endpapers. Extremities a little rubbed, otherwise an excellent copy. Originally published in four parts, each with three uncolored and one colored plate. Excessively rare with only two copies listed in institutions worldwide: Kunstbiblio Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin (Germany); National Library of Sweden. (both with just four hand colored plates). Not in any of the standard bibliographies although Colas 2141 & 2142 does make mention of the two editions of one of Mörner's other works Scènes populaires de Naples. (1828 edition & 1829 edition). The plates (translated from the Swedish) 1. Kállare - The Cellar 2. Hyrvagn - Slå bak! - A rental carriage with two stowaways 3. Roddare Båt - Rowers Boat 4. Restauration - Jungfru! Ska bli - Restoration - Oh, my God! To be young. 5. Musikaliskt Sállskap - Musical Society 6. [Untitled] - [Two Police Officers escorting a criminal?] (Colored) 7. Si opp! - Get up! 8. Division hallt - Division kept 9. Får jag den áran att proponera - May I propose that year (Colored) 10. Vira - The card game 11. Upphålls váder - Staying wet (Colored) 12. Kládstånd - Clothes Shop 13. Brunns Bal - Wells Ball 14. Thé Visit - The Visit 15. [Untitled] - [A country picnic in the rain] 16. Á ju full? Sa du - Did you say you are full? (Colored) Carl Gustav Hjalmar Mörner, born May 7, 1794 in Stockholm, died September 15, 1837 in Paris, was a Swedish artist. He devoted himself first to the military court and participated in the battles of Grossbeeren, Dennewitz, Leipzig and Bornhöved. As with many other officers at the same time he devoted himself to amateur painting, which is testified by many of his sketches from youth, conviviality and the campaign in Germany. Later he turned seriously to art and traveled in 1816 over Germany and France to Italy, where he stayed until 1828. Mörner tried to paint larger compositions with historical or folklore motifs in oil, but had little success with them. One of the more famous paintings in this genre include Odin's arrival to Sweden's Rosendal Palace. His greatest contribution was made as a draftsman and lithographer. In 1820 he published a series of Roman carnival images in outline etching Il Carnevale di Roma, but these was later transformed into lithographs, which suited his drawing much better, as shown in Italian costume pictures (1825), Scenes populaires de Naples (printed in Naples in 1826, French edition 1828), Travel Memories France, Germany and Italy (1829) and Stockholmska Scenes (1830). During a stay in London from 1830-36, Mörner published a lithographic album, Miscellaneous Sketches of Contrasts (1831). A scheduled work on physiognomy was not completes due to the artist's death in Paris in 1837. Hjalmar Mörner's work is represented in the Gothenburg Museum of Art, Östergötland County Museum, Orebro County Museum, and the University Library in Uppsala.
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In the Wake of the First Loss of a Nuclear Submarine, President John F. Kennedy Writes a Grieving Widow That the Price of Freedom Is Sacrifice

Kennedy, John F. Kennedy, whose own family knew all too well the meaning of sacrifice for one's country, consoles a woman whose husband went down on the USS Thresher"It is a sad fact of history that this price of freedom must be paid again and again, by our best men in each generation. Yours husband has joined the other defenders of this Nation who have given their lives for their country."At the time of the Manhattan Project (before the Cold War really began), there was some talk about the possibility of using nuclear power to propel submarines. The idea of arming submarines with nuclear missiles didn't come up until the 1960 launching of the George Washington. When nuclear energy was conceived of as a power source for submarines, that was a jaw-dropper in itself. But when navies gained the ability to launch a nuclear warhead from a nuclear-powered submarine, the world had touched on what was quite arguably the most powerful ? in terms of strength and mobility ? weapons system ever.Creating a modern nuclear Navy to counter the USSR during the Cold War involved not merely outfitting submarines, but aircraft carriers and other ships as well, and increasing the firepower of the fleet with Polaris missiles. Using submarines and missiles, American might could now be delivered to any point in the world; and American submarines could cruise, silently and never surfacing, beneath the waves shadowing Soviet naval movements, collecting Soviet missile telemetry and eavesdropping on Soviet communications. This would, it was believed, give the US an advantage in the Cold War.On January 20, 1961, John Kennedy ushered in a new era in the United States (and indeed the world) with his historic, visionary, and inspirational Inaugural Address. which is widely considered one of the greatest ever, with the new President saying that the inaugural was "not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom", and called for idealistic sacrifice, saying Americans should "ask not what your country can do for you?ask what you can do for your country". Spellbinding to hear, it seemed to leave behind existing attitudes and limitations, while acting as a clarion call to young and old alike to realize their personal potential while helping build a better nation and world. The speech immediately infused energy and excitement, Washington was almost bristling with it, which led to such programs as the Peace Corps, and such major Kennedy policies and achievements as the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. The Sixties, which followed from that moment would hardly have been possible without it.The USS Thresher, a nuclear submarine, was commissioned on August 3, 1961. At the time it was built, Thresher was the fastest and quietest submarine in the world. SSN 593 was considered the most advanced weapons system of its day, created specifically to seek out and destroy Soviet submarines.In company with USS Skylark, Thresher put to sea on April 10, 1963, for deep-diving exercises. In addition to her 16 officers and 96 enlisted men, the submarine carried 17 civilian technicians to observe her performance during the deep-diving tests. Fifteen minutes after reaching her assigned test depth, the submarine communicated with Skylark by underwater telephone, apprising the submarine rescue ship of difficulties. Garbled transmissions indicated that far below the surface things were going wrong. Suddenly, listeners in Skylark heard a noise "like air rushing into an air tank"?then, silence. Efforts to reestablish contact with Thresher failed, and a search group was formed in an attempt to locate the submarine. Rescue ship Recovery recovered bits of debris, including gloves and internal insulation. Photographs taken by bathyscaph Trieste proved that the submarine had broken up, taking all hands on board to their deaths. This was the first major setback for the US nuclear reactors program and devastated President Kennedy. This was a crucial element of his deterrence campaign.Raymond Peter Foti had taken up Kennedy's call and joined the Navy. He completed his basic training, and attended the Navy's Electronics Technician School at the U.S. Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill. He volunteered for submarine duty and upon being accepted he was enrolled in the Submarine School at the U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London, Conn. He successfully completed the course of instruction and was assigned to his first submarine, the U.S.S. Medregal (SS 480). He was selected for advance training in nuclear power, and attended the school at the Nuclear Power Training Unit at Windsor Locks, and at the submarine base, New London, Conn. On November 29, 1961, Raymond was assigned to the Thresher, as a member of her crew. He had gone down with the ship.John F. Kennedy was a young commander of a Navy vessel in World War II, the legendary PT-109. His boat was sliced in two by a Japanese destroyer, and some men were killed in the collision. Kennedy then, according to his citation, "unmindful of personal danger?unhesitatingly braved the difficulties and hazards of darkness to direct rescue operations, swimming many hours to secure aid and food after he had succeeded in getting his crew ashore." For his heroism he was awarded the Navy and Marine Medal. His elder brother, Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., was killed in action in 1944 and received the Navy Cross. The Kennedy family knew firsthand what sacrifice meant.The sacrifices of Foti and others touched Kennedy, and caused him to think deeply on its meaning.Typed letter signed, on White House letterhead, April 19, 1963, to Mrs. Foti. "Dear Mrs. Foti, Mrs. Kennedy and I want to express our very deepest sympathy to you in the loss of your husband aboard the USS Thresher. The loss of Thresher was a great shock to freedom-loving people around the world. The American people feel deeply this tragic loss."It is a sad fact of history that this price of freedom must be paid again and again, by our best men in each generation. Yours husband has joined the other
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Treaty of Ghent Negotiators John Quincy Adams and Albert Gallatin Issue Instructions to the US Ambassador in Paris Regarding Loans to Help Finance the War of 1812

Adams, John Quincy and Gallatin, Albert Crawford was given the delicate task of proceeding with discussions for loans with European investors, while being informed the loans might not be wanted in the endIn 1812, the nation went to war without a wide-ranging financial strategy. The federal government's revenue largely came from customs duties and land sales, but war meant that revenue from these sources nosedived. There was no federal taxation of incomes and the Bank of the United States' charter had been allowed to run out in 1811, depriving the government of a major source of loans and credit. The government now had to use state banks and wealthy individuals as the basis for capital for its loans. In July 1813 Congress consented to a series of direct taxes on land and property, and on transactions and products including auction sales, carriages, liquor distilleries, retail wine licenses and refined sugar.All this proved hardly sufficient. By the spring of 1814 Congress authorized Madison to borrow $32.5 million to pay for the war, but by summer the domestic investment climate for U.S. Treasury bonds was weak, and the government's inability to borrow money hampered its ability to pay for the defense of Washington. This money might, however, be found in Europe with those that sympathized with the American cause. American negotiators were already in Europe hoping to negotiate the end of the war. These included John Quincy Adams, the chief US diplomat in Europe, Henry Clay, Albert Gallatin, Jonathan Russell, and James Bayard. The Ghent negotiators were charged with finding the funds, and they hoped that William Crawford, American ambassador In Paris, would assist and succeed. After all, France and Britain had been art war for over a decade.Meanwhile, in April 1814, President James Madison, who had opposed the creation of the first Bank of the United States in 1791, reluctantly admitted to the need for another national bank to finance the war. Some politicians and diplomats placed their hopes on the building of this Bank and other national measures rather than foreign loans.In early December 1814, shortly before the Treaty of Ghent was signed but at a time when an agreement was not at all certain, the Ghent negotiators issued these instructions to Crawford regarding the loans. European lenders were to be assured that the U.S. government was pledged to repay the loans, and the lines to them were to be kept open and flowing, but because of a potential treaty to end the war, and the fact that the investors buying stock in the new Bank of the United States would be a possible alternative source of funds, the foreign loans might not be needed.Autograph letter signed by both Gallatin and Adams, Ghent, December 2, 1814, to Ambassador Crawford, asking him to handle this delicate assignment. "We have received your letter of the 23rd let. We think that our instructions respecting the proposed loan will warrant our pledging the United States for the reimbursement of the principal in Europe. It is however probable that the Secretary of the Treasury hopes to succeed in raising the price of stock in America. There can be no doubt that will happen if his plan for a Bank, which will absorb 24 millions of the new stock, is adopted by Congress. And we may presume that to have been his motive for not sending by the [ship] Fingal the other three millions of stock, as had been intended by his predecessor. Considering also the present state of negotiations at this place, we think it advisable not to make at this moment a definitive arrangement with any house for the sale of the stock in our hands. The rate of 85% is as much as could be expected at this time, and we do not suppose that a short delay will affect that price in any considerable degree. But it is extremely desirable that in the meanwhile the enquiries on the subject should be pursued and the negotiation with the several banking houses of Paris should be kept alive."Of the result of our mission you will of course be immediately informed, and if it proves unsuccessful Mr. Gallatin will proceed to Paris, and take in consent with you the necessary measures on the subject of the loans."The Treaty of Ghent was signed December 24, 1814, thus ending the war. But by then the United States government was essentially bankrupt and loans were hard to come by. The financial difficulties continued, and in 1815 domestic taxes were raised. Hopes for the Bank of the United States were premature, as it was not chartered until 1816. The debt incurred in the war was not paid off until 1837.
Declaration Signer Francis Hopkinson Gives Address at Academy of Philadelphia

Declaration Signer Francis Hopkinson Gives Address at Academy of Philadelphia

FRANCIS HOPKINSON Pennsylvania Gazette, November 21, 1754. Newspaper. Philadelphia: Benjamin Franklin and David Hall. 6 pp., 9 1/4 x 14 1/2 in. This issue of Franklin's Pennsylvania Gazette reports addresses by two students at the Academy of Philadelphia, including seventeen-year-old Francis Hopkinson, who went on to write music and poetry, sign the Declaration of Independence, and design the American flag. Founded in 1751, the Academy provided classical education and instruction in practical skills. Most of the trustees had received a classical education and favored a similar curriculum for the academy, but trustee Benjamin Franklin favored an education that stressed practical skills. He advocated teaching all classes in English and emphasizing mathematics and science. ExcerptsFrancis Hopkinson, "On Education in General," November 12, 1754"The right Education of Youth has ever been esteemed, by wise Men, one of the chief Cares of the best constituted States; and it is a Truth, confirmed both by Reason and Experience, that Societies have more or less flourished, in all that exalts or embellishes human Nature, in Proportion as they have taken more or less Care in this important Matter." (p1/c1)"Upon the whole then, it appears, that whether the Design be to preserve a good Constitution civil and religious, and transmit its Spirit, uncorrupted, down thro' Ages; or whether the Design be to mend a bad One, and secure it against all Dangers from without, it is only to be done effectually by the slow, but sure Means of a proper Education of Youth." (p1/c2)Francis Hopkinson (1737-1791) was a Renaissance man. He was a representative of New Jersey in the Continental Congress and signed the Declaration of Independence. He was also a lawyer, a musician, and a poet. He was the first American-born composer to publish a song, he contributed to the design of the Great Seal of the United States, and he designed the first official American flag-with thirteen red and white stripes and thirteen white six-pointed stars on a field of blue. Born in Philadelphia, Hopkinson attended the Academy there and became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia, graduating in 1757. He received a master's degree in 1760. Samuel Magaw, "An Enquiry into the Several Branches of Education, in order to ascertain the just Value or Moment of each," November 12, 1754"it may not be amiss to enquire more particularly, which of the Branches of Science we are more immediately concerned to be acquainted with; for all cannot be equally important; and as, in this Life, we have many Things to do, and but little Time to do them in, it highly concerns us not to misspend that little, either in useless, or idly curious Researches." (p1/c2)Latin and Greek: "To be unacquainted with these universal Languages must therefore be a great Loss to every Person, who has Leisure and Abilities to pursue a liberal Education, especially as they are to be acquired at a Time of Life, when the mind is not ripe enough for higher Studies." (p1/c2)"we can never say enough concerning the Usefulness of mathematics, and those Sciences which lead us to investigate the physical Properties of Bodies." (p1/c3)"By these Sciences we also extend the Sphere of Sight, search Nature out in her most distant as well as secret Retreats. We not only pry into the minutest Things, and her darkest Mysteries here on Earth, but we scale the etherial Towers, and freely range the celestial Fields, measure the Magnitudes of the Worlds above, determine their Distances, prescribe Laws to the most irregular of them, and confine even the blazing Comet itself to its stated Course." (p1/c3)Samuel Magaw (1735-1812) was a member of the College of Philadelphia's first class and graduated in 1757. He received a scholarship for instructing German immigrants in the area in exchange for lodging and board. He was ordained in England as an Episcopal priest and served as rector of Philadelphia's St. Paul. (See website for full description)
Pennsylvania Prepares to Meet French Encroachments at Start of French and Indian War

Pennsylvania Prepares to Meet French Encroachments at Start of French and Indian War

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR Pennsylvania Gazette, December 19, 1754. Newspaper. Philadelphia: Benjamin Franklin and David Hall. 6 pp., 9 1/4 x 14 1/2 in. This issue of Franklin's Pennsylvania Gazette includes communications between Lieutenant Governor Robert Hunter Morris and the Pennsylvania General Assembly regarding responses to the French threat on the western border of the colony. Conflict between French and English forces there erupted into the French and Indian War, and globally into the Seven Years' War.It also includes details of a lecture by Ebenezer Kinnersley, a partner of Benjamin Franklin in experiments on electricity, and a brief notice of George Whitefield's sermons in New York City. ExcerptsLieutenant Governor Robert Hunter Morris to the Pennsylvania General Assembly, December 3, 1754"I think it my Duty.to lay before you a Letter I have since received from Sir Thomas Robinson, one of His Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State, signifying to me, 'His Majesty's express Commands, that I should not only act vigorously in Defence of the Government under my Care; but that I should likewise be aiding and assisting His Majesty's other Colonies, to repel any hostile Attempts made against them.'" (p1/c1)"many Things have happened since the Retreat from the Forks of Mohongialo [Monangahela], that have put our Affairs upon the Frontiers in a very bad Situation, much worse than His Majesty and His Ministers have any Knowledge of, or than they can possibly imagine. From the Letters and Intelligence I have ordered to be laid before you, it will appear that the French have now, at their Fort at Mohongialo, above a Thousand regular Troops, besides Indians; that they are well supply'd with Provisions, and that they have lately received an additional Number of Cannon." (p1/c1)"These Encroachments of the French upon the Territories of the Crown of Britain in America, have turned the Eyes of Europe to this Quarter of the World, as it is uncertain what Effects they may produce." (p1/c1)"I cannot therefore admit myself to doubt but you will enter seriously upon the Consideration of this important Affair, and, by enabling me to carry the King's Commands into full Execution, convince His Majesty of your Readiness to pay Obedience to His Royal Orders, set a seasonable and noble Example to the other Colonies, and shew your Constituents, that you have nothing more at Heart than to secure to them, and their Posterity, the Continuance of the many invaluable Blessings they enjoy." (p1/c1-2)Robert Hunter Morris (1700-1764) served as "lieutenant governor" (Thomas Penn in England was technically "governor") of Pennsylvania from 1754 to 1756 and as Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court from 1739 to 1764, appointed by his father Lewis Morris, governor of New Jersey. He often clashed with Benjamin Franklin over the right of the General Assembly to tax the Penns' lands in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania General Assembly to Lieutenant Governor Morris, December 12, 1754"as we account it our indispensable Duty to do every Thing in our Power to comply with His Majesty's Royal Orders, or that may contribute to the Welfare of the People we represent, we have chearfully, and almost unanimously, resolved to grant Twenty Thousand Pounds for the King's Use." (p1/c2) London, October 15, 1754"By an Account brought from France we are informed, that they seem quite unconcerned at the Succour we are going to afford our Colonies, and that the Report of their being upon the Point of embarking 4000 Forces is entirely groundless; and we may presume our Ministry would naturally take the Alarm, and require a categorical Answer from that Court, with regard to the Destination of so formidable a Body of Forces; nevertheless, we are assured, they are continually sending single Ships only with two or three Hundred Soldiers in each, which prevents any Enquiry being made." (p2/c3) New York, December 16, 1754"Friday last the Reverend Mr. WHITEFIEL. (See website for full description)
Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor and General Assembly Disagree over Military Funding at Beginning of French and Indian War

Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor and General Assembly Disagree over Military Funding at Beginning of French and Indian War

FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR Pennsylvania Gazette, December 26, 1754. Newspaper. Philadelphia: Benjamin Franklin and David Hall. 4 pp., lacking the advertising half-sheet, 9 1/4 x 14 1/2 in. This issue of Franklin's Pennsylvania Gazette includes communications between Lieutenant Governor Robert Hunter Morris and the Pennsylvania General Assembly regarding the proper mode of funding military forces to resist the French threat on the western border of the colony. Conflict between French and English forces there erupted into the French and Indian War, and globally into the Seven Years' War.It also includes details of a lecture by Ebenezer Kinnersley, a partner of Benjamin Franklin in experiments on electricity, and a brief notice of George Whitefield's sermons in Philadelphia. ExcerptsLieutenant Governor Robert Hunter Morris to the Pennsylvania General Assembly, December 18, 1754"I have taken your Bill into Consideration, which, among other Things, proposes the Emitting of Twenty Thousand Pounds for the King's Use, in Paper Bills, to be current for twelve Years; to which I cannot by any Means agree, as I am forbid, by a Royal Instruction, to pass any Law for creating Money in Paper Bills, without a suspending Clause, that it shall not take Effect till his Majesty's Pleasure be known." (p1/c1)"the French and Indians upon the Ohio, are much more numerous than we apprehended, making in the whole Two Thousand Men, besides what they have already on Lake Erie; and as they have got together such a considerable Force at this inhospitable Season, we cannot make a Doubt but they will be much stronger in the Spring." (p1/c1)"Be pleased therefore, Gentlemen, when you frame another Bill, to consider whether it would not be better on all Accounts, to augment the Sum proposed to be given, since this will go but a very little Way towards expelling the French from our Borders, and defending our Frontiers from the Incursions of their Indians." (p1/c1)Robert Hunter Morris (1700-1764) served as "lieutenant governor" (Thomas Penn in England was technically "governor") of Pennsylvania from 1754 to 1756 and as Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court from 1739 to 1764, appointed by his father Lewis Morris, governor of New Jersey. He often clashed with Benjamin Franklin over the right of the General Assembly to tax the Penns' lands in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania General Assembly to Lieutenant Governor Morris, December 20, 1754"Such a suspending Clause, we apprehend, would render that Grant entirely ineffectual as we are now circumstanced, if we had no other Objection to it, and therefore can by no Means agree to insert it in our Bill." (p1/c1)"we know, that notwithstanding two Bills extending the Royal Instructions over Councils and Assemblies in America had been attempted in Parliament without Success, and a third Bill was brought in with the same Clause, yet it could not obtain a Passage there. And we are informed, that a noble Friend to Liberty and the Rights of the British Subject, a Member of that House, exposed this third Attempt so fully, upon the second Reading of the Bill, that the Clauses on this Head objected to were dropt without Division in the Committee. And, until such Acts of Parliament shall be obtained, which we have good Reason to hope will never be imposed upon us, the Governor must agree with us, that it is our Duty to defend the Rights and Privileges we enjoy under the Royal Charter." (p1/c3) Lieutenant Governor Robert Hunter Morris to the Pennsylvania General Assembly, December 19, 1754"His Majesty will appoint a General Officer of Rank and Capacity to take upon him the Command in Chief of all his Forces in North-America, who will soon be here with a Deputy Quarter-Master General, and a Commissary of the Musters, in order to prepare every Thing for the Arrival of the Forces. His Majesty has been also graciously pleased to order Arms, Cloathing, and other Necessaries, to be sent hither upon the present important Occasi. (See website for full description)
Autograph Letter

Autograph Letter, Signed, on National Woman Suffrage Association Stationery

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady (1815-1902) Handwritten letter by pioneering suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton, mentioning fellow activists Lucy Stone and Lucretia Mott. Mrs. Stanton is responding to a gentleman named Greene who apparently had requested contacts from her. The letter is penned in a dark blue or purple ink on letterhead of the National Woman Suffrage Association (printed with the names of Susan B. Anthony and other officers from around the country), and we transcribe it as follows: "[indecipherable] Greene / Dear Sir / I think you could [omitted word] most of the New England names by writing to Lucy Stone Ed The Woman's Journal 5 Park Street Boston. Lucretia Mott's son in law lives at 205 Walnut Street Philadelphia where you can no doubt [omitted word] the other names you mention. / respt yours / Elizabeth Cady Stanton" Pencilled in another hand--possibly the recipient's--are "Tenafly, NJ" and "Recd 12mo4.1885[?]" at beginning and conclusion of the letter, respectively. Interestingly, Lucy Stone had split with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony in 1869 over passage of Constitutional Amendments to grant votes to Blacks but not to women. Stone and Julia Ward Howe then formed the more moderate American Woman Suffrage Association, which published "The Woman's Journal" referenced here by Mrs. Stanton. The rift was mended when the two rival suffrage associations merged in 1890 to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Fine. Three old fold creases with a .25" tear following one of them at top edge. Writing is clear and bold.

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