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Les Annales de Tacite. Premiere Partie. Contenant le Regne de Tibere. Nouvelle e?dition (+) Les Annales de Tacite. Seconde partie contenant les regnes de Claudius & de Neron.

TACITUS, CORNELIUS. Paris, J. Camusat & P. Le Petit, 1650 & 1651. 8vo. In a nice contemporary Cambridge-style mirror binding with four raised bands and richly gilt spine. Small paper-label pasted on to upper compartment on spine. A few scratches to front board with a bit of loss of leather. Ex-libris pasted on to pasted down front end-paper. Title-page of vol. 1 with red underlignings and previous owner's name in contemporary hand and closely trimmed in lower margin with loss of print-year. A few occassional underlinings in text, but generally internally nice and clean. (40), 456, (42), (8), 448, (56) pp. Fine copy of D?Ablancourt?s translation of Tacitus? Annals, arguably the best and most popular 17th and 18th French translation of Tacitus. ?Some translators interpreted efforts to bring Tacitus?s texts into the vernacular in similarly political terms. One of those was Nicolas Perrot d?Ablancourt, who produced his innovative French version between 1640 and 1650. For him, Tacitus not only had been translated into all languages and appreciated by all peoples, he also had ?given birth to all of Spanish and Italian politics. During the 16th and 17th centuries, the works of the Latin historian Caius Cornelius Tacitus, who wrote in the irst century AD, became bestsellers in Europe1 . From Italy to France, and in England, the Netherlands, the German Empire, and the Spanish monarchy, Tacitus?s Annals, Histories, Life of Agricola, Germania, and even the Dialogue on Orators ? which in that period was not consistently attributed to him ? became privileged objects of reading. Soon, a wide array of derivative works appeared. Commentaries on the text, discourses based on selected passages, aphorisms, judgments or notes, and virtually any kind of book related to Tacitus?s texts in any possible form found a printer and readers? (Bermejo, Translating Tacitus). Not in Dibdin
  • $741
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Histoire de la conquête des isles Moluques par les Espagnols, par les Portugais, & par les Hollandais. 3 vols. – [FIRST FRENCH TRANSLATION]

ARGENSOLA, BARTOLOMÉ LEONARDO. Amsterdam, Jacques Desbordes, 1706. 12mo. Uniformly bound in three nice contemporary Cambridge-style mirror binding with four raised bands and richly gilt spines. Small paper-labels pasted on to upper compartments of spines. Boards with wear and with some loss of leather. Title-page in vol. 2 with red underlignings. Small worm-tract to first 20 ff. in vol. 1. Upper margin closely trimmed in vol. 1, occassionally touching header, otherwise internally nice and clean. (10), 405, (3) pp. (2), 402, (30) pp." (2), 388, (20) pp. + 3 frontispieces, 1 portrait, 5 maps and 26 plates. A fine copy of the first French translation of this seminal work on the Maluku and Philipine Islands: "Few narratives are written with so much judgment and elegance (?) One of the most important works for the history of the Philippine islands (?) The book also contains matter relating to Sir Francis Drake and American voyages, and to the history of Spanish and Portuguese exploration in the Indies" (Cox). This present French translation, although being comparatively late, is considered superior to the Spanish original (1609) containing much more material than the original. ?Bartolomé Leonardo de Argensola [1562-1635] had a brilliant ecclesiastic career which he complemented with valuable forays into the literary field. One of his most outstanding works was the Conquista de las Islas Malucas [.] (The Discovery and Conquest of the Molucco and Philippine Islands [?]), written at the request of the president of the Conselho de Indias de Espanha (Indian Council of Spain) and published in Madrid in 1609. In it the author describes the complicated relationship between the Moluccas [presently Maluku Islands] and Europe in a period prior to 1606, giving special attention to the geography and ethnography of the people in this archipelago. Bartolomé Leonardo thoroughly investigated the royal archives in Seville, paraphrasing even texts of several Portuguese chroniclers, mainly of João de Barros (See: Text 9 & João de Barros), António Galvão and Diogo do Couto.Conquista [.] (The Discovery and Conquest [.]) was the first work printed in Europe on the Moluccas, the distant Oriental archipelago which, from 1512, was regularly visited by Portuguese ships, and was the object of an intense dispute between the Spanish and Portuguese Crowns for many decades. This work, which was prepared with abundant recourse to sources of Portuguese origin, was little known in Spain even among those specialised in the subject, and not even the date survives of any partial of full translation. The period written about here refers to China in an artificial way, one of the oriental regions which never stopped appearing in the sights of Spanish conquistadors, especially after the colonisation of the Philippines.? (Rui Loureiro, Review of Culture, no 32) Sabin 1947
  • $2,222
  • $2,222
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Geschichte, die er selbst erlebet hat. 2 vols.

BURNET, (GILBERT, BISHOP OF SALISBURY). Hamburg &Leipzig, Philip Herteln, 1724 & 1735. 4to. Uniformly bound in two contemporary full calf bindings with richly gilt spines. Small paper-label to upper part of spine on vol. 1. Boards with a few stains and scratches, with a bit of loss of leather. Internally fine and clean, a nice set. (20), 936, (16) pp." (8), 760, 136, (8), 72, (4) pp. First German translation of Bishop Burnet?s ?History of his Own Time? covering the period from the English Civil War through the early 18th century offering Burnet's firsthand accounts and perspectives on events of his day. Burnet began writing in 1683 and continued until his death in 1715. The work was posthumously published in two volumes, the first in 1724 and the second in 1734. Although it has been criticized for its biases and occasional inaccuracies it remains an important source for the history of the era. "Ever since the appearance of Bishop Burnet's History of his Own Time it has been the subject of great controversy. It engendered much excitement and clearly sold well in England, each volume going through a number of editions. Burnet's critics often accuse him of overstating, in his History and elsewhere, his own importance in the events of his time. While it is true that Burnet was an egomaniac, and he undoubtedly expected future historians to study him, there is much truth to his assertions. His career can be evaluated by dividing it into two, sometimes overlapping, spheres: his engagement in public affairs and his vocation as an author" (Oxford Dictionary of National Biography).
  • $666
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Voyage d’Italie, de Dalmatie, de Grece, et du Levant. Fait en 1675 & 1676. 3 vols. – [“ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ACCOUNTS OF TRAVEL IN THE LEVANT”]

SPON, JACOB (+) GEORGE WHELER. Lyon, Antoine Cellier, 1678. 8vo. Uniformly bound in three contemporary full calf bindings with five raised bands and richly gilt spines. Edges of boards gilt. Small paper-labels pasted on to top of spines. Light wear to extremities, particularly to head and foot of spines, vol. 2. with some loss of leather. Vol. 1 with dampstain to upper outer margin, otherwise internally nice and clean. (24), 405 pp." 417, (13) pp. 204, 226 pp. + frontispiece and 32 plates and maps. Rare first edition of Spon?s famous travel account" ?one of the most important accounts of travels in the Levant, and the first description of Athens which was systematic, detailed and trustworthy" (Blackmer) ? it remained an important reference up until the 19th century. ?The three-volume account of Spon's voyage was first published in Lyon in 1678. It constituted a major literary event, and became a landmark in travel literature. It is the product of first-hand investigation, free of plagiarism and also touches on contemporary issues in the Greek territories which he visited. The second volume includes an important glossary of modern Greek words, for travellers' use, while the third volume is dedicated exclusively to the inscriptions and coins collected by Spon during his journey. Spon's travel account was republished in French and was translated into English. Four years later, George Wheler published his own account of their journey, which is in fact but a mediocre copy of Spon's work. In 1680, Spon published his ?History of Geneva? and in 1685 an catalogue of ancient Greek inscriptions.? (Vingopoulou, Aikaterini Laskarids Foundartion).
  • $2,666
  • $2,666
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Description du royaume de Siam (.) envoye extraordinaire du roy aupre?s du roy de Siam en 1687. et 1688. 2 vols. – [“THE FINEST WORK ON SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY THAILAND”]

Amsterdam, Theodore Boom, 1700 8vo. Uniformly bound in two contemporary full vellum bindings with title and tome number in contemporary hand. Small paper-label pasted on to both spines. Light soiling to extremities. Red underligning to title-page in vol. 1. Small worm-tracts affecting lower part of first few leaves in vol. 2. Internally generally nice and clean. (8), 436, (2) pp. + 4 maps and 21 plates." (4), 324, (1) pp. + 15 plates - A total of 40 plates, complete. Engraved headpiece and several woodcut illustrations in text. Second Amsterdam-edition, the first being from 1691, the same year as the original Paris-edition. A Third Amsterdam-edition was published in 1713. According to Graesse the only difeerence between the various Amsterdam editions are a frontispiece in the 1691-edition. "Universally regarded as the finest work on seventeenth-century Thailand" (Wyatt, from the introduction to the English translation) The present work contain Simon de la Loubère account of his famous embassy to Siam in 1687 - the "La Loubère-Céberet mission - The embassy, containing five warships, arrived in Bangkok in October 1687 and was received by Ok-khun Chamnan. La Loubère returned to France on board the Gaillard on 3 January 1688, accompanied by the Jesuit Guy Tachard, and a Siamese embassy led by Ok-khun Chamnan. Upon his return, La Loubère wrote this present description of his travels, as had been requested by Louis XIVIt provided Europeans with one of the most comprehensive and detailed accounts of Siam at that time. His observations on Siamese culture and society greatly contributed to European understanding of Southeast Asia during the 17th century. During his mission he also obtained a manuscript concerning Siamese astronomical traditions. This obscure document caught the attention of the French-Italian astronomer, Jean Dominique Cassini, to whom de la Loubère passed it. Cassini dedicated several years deciphering its cryptic contents, eventually determining its origin in India. The manuscript, now known as the Siamese Manuscript, sparked Cassini's interest to the extent that he meticulously decoded it. His efforts culminated in an explanation published in this present work. This exposition marked a crucial milestone in European scholarship which laid the first foundation of European scholarship on Indian astronomy. Graesse IV, 81. (Brunet III, 778 ? the 1691-edition)
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Mythologiae, sive explicationis fabularum. – [THE MOST POPULAR 16TH & 17TH CENTURY WORK ON MYTHOLOGY]

Frankfurt, Wechels, 1596. 8vo. In contemporary half calf with four raised bands. Light wear to extremities, a few small holes to spine. Title-page with previous owner's names in contemporary hand. Closely trimmed in upper margin, slightly affecting page-numering on a few leaves. Occassional underlinings in text, a good copy. (16), 1137, (54), 1138-1193, (1) pp. Early edition of arguably the the most popular and influential work on classical mythology in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It was first published in Venice in 1567 soon and became a standard source for classical mythology in later Renaissance Europe. It became published in numerous edition and translated into several different language. ?Conti?s Mythologiae is remarkable for its combination of intense attention to classical sources and allegorizing interpretations of those myths. Conti is not content with a bald summary of any individual myth or figure before interpreting it he labors over and scrutinizes the multiple sources and variants from antiquity. The discussion of Cerberus (3.5 = pp. 170-173), for example, employs Hesiod, Vergil, Horace, Tibullus, Sophocles, Cicero, Isaacius (= Tzetzes), Apollodorus, Pausanias, Hecataeus (apud Pausanias), Strabo, Lucretius, and Plutarch before moving into allegorical interpretations.? (ohn Mulryan, Steven Brown, Natale Conti's Mythologiae. 2 Volumes. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 316) Adams C-2437
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Norske Folke-Eventyr. Ny Samling (Med Bidrag fra Jørgen Moes Reiser og Optegnelser). – [PRESENTATION-COPY]

Christiania, 1871. In the original paper binding with printed paper boards. Renewed blank spine-strip. Inner hinges re-enforced. Large book-plate of Gereda Philipp to inside of front board. Presentation-inscription to front free end-paper. Last leaf evenly browned to verso, but otherwise internally very clean and fresh. Binding with minor wear to extremities, and paper over boards a bit bevelled. A splendid copy in the original printed boards. Housed in an exquisite orange half morocco box with marbled boards and gilt lettering to spine (Henning Jensen). The uncommon first edition of the ?New Collection? of Asbjørnsen?s ?Norwegian Folk-Tales?, being the continuation that contains the 45 Folk Tales numbered 61-105, signed and dated presentation-copy from the author for, inscribed the same year that the book appeared ?Hr. Dr. Brenner/ med Höiagtelse og Ærbødighed/ fra / P. Chr. Asbjørnsen/ Christiania Novbr. 1871? The first collection of the seminal Folk-Tales had appeared ca. 30 years previously and was finished with the second expanded edition from 1852, which increased the number of fairy tales to 60. Here, we have the seminal continuation that completes the collection with the 45 additional tales (nrs. 61-105). As Asbjørnsen states in the preface, ?There has been big appeal for the continuation of the material gathered back then, but for several years, other pursuits and chores have required so much time that there was none left to contemplate a more complete collection. My former co-publisher, Jørgen Moe, finally gave up and has given to me free disposition of his collections, which contained many valuable contributions? Only now I could begin thinking about fulfilling the work, t now presented in the present collection of Fairy Tales, on my own. Most of these Fairy Tales have? been printed in almanachs etc., but here they appear in a mostly completely rewritten and purified form. ? A few of them have not previously been printed.? (Preface pp. III-IV ? own translation from Norwegian). It was a great event in Norwegian intellectual life when Peter Chiristen Asbjørnsen (1812-1885) together with Jørgen Moe (1813-1882) began collecting and later publishing the Norwegian fairy tales in the beginning of the 1840?ies. The genre of fairy tales was centuries old and had survived through oral tradition. But the fairy tales had never been of any serious interest in intellectual circles or been of any particular influence in literature, until the dawn of national romanticism. Asbjørnsen?s pioneering efforts to collect, register, and publish the Norwegian legends and fairy tales that had otherwise only survived in oral form, constituted a revolution in Norwegian literature and language. These seminal publications are a fundamental part of Norwegian heritage and a great national treasure. The publications of the fairy tales constituted an outright revolution in not only Norwegian, but also international literature, just as those of the Brothers Grimm in Germany had done. International recognition was overwhelming, and suddenly, Norwegian fair tales were considered among the best in the world. ?Tell them like the people tell them? was the principle for the retelling of the stories. Moe was excellent at that, whereas Asbjørnsen had a superb epic talent. Asbjørnsen?s publications count as great literature in themselves and were extremely influential. The publication of the fairy tales and stories were extremely influential, not only upon literature in itself, but also more specifically upon the Norwegian language, also that of contemporary literature, directly influencing eg. Ibsen and Bjørnson. Asbjørnsen and Moe are responsible for the Norwegiazasion of the written language (which was hitherto Danish), utilizing specifically Norwegian expressions and words never before used in writing, to replace the Danish. These seminal fairy tales fundamentally effected the development of written Norwegian and founded the Norwegian softening of the Danish language. Presentation-inscriptions from Asbjørnsen are of the utmost scarcity and almost never appear on the market. Østberg: 51
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Syrie centrale. Inscriptions sémitiques. – [REVEALING ANTIQUE SYRIAN ARCHITECTURE]

Paris, J. Baudry, 1868 - 1877. Large 4to. In contemporary full blue cloth with two red title-labels to spines. Wear to extremities, corner's bumped, scratches to boards and parts of the title-label missing. Underlinings and marginal annotations in pencil. Plates brownspotted, primarily in margin, and dampstain to inner margin of plate 16-38. (8), 164 pp. + 38 plates. Second expanded edition of this landmark work on semitic inscriptions ?In which he revealed, for the first time, the great richness of late antique architecture to be found in the interior of Syria? (Kennedy, Crusader Castles) - here with the added part of the "inscriptions sabéennes", found in the region south east of Damascus in Syria, not present in the first edition. The first part is identical to first edition from 1868 but here also with the must sought after "inscriptions sabéennes". It focuses on the central region of Syria and provides a comprehensive analysis and translation of the inscriptions found in this area. The author, Charles Jean Melchior de Vogüé, was a renowned scholar and archaeologist dedicated to the study of ancient Semitic languages and scripts. Vogüé's book offers valuable insights into the historical and cultural significance of the region through its meticulous translation and commentary on the inscriptions. "De Vogüé travelled with William Waddington in 1853 and 1854, exploring the area from Aleppo to Damascus, Palmyra and Basra. It was an important expedition and much new material was uncovered. The author became ambassador to the Porte in 1871" (Blackmer). Blackmer 174
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Les differens caractères des femmes du siecle avec la description de l’amour propre. – [EARLY FEMMINIST WORK]

Paris, Medard-Michel Brunet, 1699. 8vo. In a nice contemporary Cambridge-style mirror binding with four raised bands and richly gilt spine. Small paper-label pasted on to top of spine. A nice and clean copy. (20), 278, (1) pp. Second edition of this scarce early work first published in 1693 in which the author traces and analyses the causes of womens lack of rights and proposes methods for enabling women to improve themselves. The fact that the present work was re-edited five years after its initial release indicates a certain degree of popular appeal. However, not much is known about Pringy: ?Her name appears most often in the pages of the monthly French gazette, Le Mercure galant, which announced both the text?s initial publication in 1693 and again its second edition a few months prior to publication. If nothing can defini tively be asserted regarding Pringy?s readership, we can gather, from the fact that the Mercure was instrumental in disseminating (some might say advertising) and thus determining trends and fashions, that Pringy enjoyed some attention for her works. Though we may never know the extent to which the Caracteres was given to young girls with the intent of correct ing or preventing these vices, Pringy?s treatise is unique in comparison to most contemporaneous moral analyses of women by women because of its ostensible pedagogical goal.? (LaPorta, ?The Truth about Reasoning?: Veiled Propaganda and the Manipulation of Absolutist Authority in Eustache Le Noble?s La Pierre de touche politique (1688?1691))
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An Essay on the History of Civil Society. – [PIONEERING CLASSIC OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT]

Edinburgh, 1767. Large 4to. Recased preserving the contemporary marbled leather boards with a gilt line-frame over a more recent light brown full calf binding with five raised bands and gilt ornamentations to spine. The contemporary gilt title-label also preserved in second compartment of the spine. A later leather-onlay to the lower compartment, presumably covering an earlier library-marking. All edges of boards gilt. Inner hinges re-enforced. A good, solid, and sturdy copy. Library stamp (Freie Universität Berlin) to verso of title-page, along with a deaccession-stamp, as well as to blank lower margin of p. 48. Apart from the stamps, internally extremely well preserved, clean, and fresh, with only light occasional brownspotting. A very wide-margined copy on good paper. Leaves measuring 27x21 cm. VII, (1), 430 pp. The uncommon first edition of this pioneering classic of the Enlightenment, a magnum opus in the history of political thought. The Essay became extremely influential and established Ferguson?s reputation in Britain and the rest of Europe. The work was also taught at the University of Moscow, causing Voltaire to praise Ferguson for ?civilizing the Russians? Marx was also directly influenced by the work, as were numerous of the great political and sociological theoreticians. ?Adam Ferguson's Essay on the History of Civil Society (first published in 1767) is a classic of the Scottish - and European - Enlightenment. Drawing on such diverse sources as classical authors and contemporary travel literature, Ferguson offers a complex model of historical advance which challenges both Hume's and Smith's embrace of modernity and the primitivism of Rousseau. Ferguson combines a subtle analysis of the emergence of modern commercial society with a critique of its abandonment of civic and communal virtues. Central to Ferguson's theory of citizenship are the themes of conflict, play, political participation and military valour. The Essay is a bold and novel attempt to reclaim the tradition of active, virtuous citizenship and apply it to the modern state.? (Cambridge University Press). ?A pioneering work of the Scottish Enlightenment in the field of ?philosophical history?, or what we would today call sociology. It deals with the social, political, economic, intellectual, and legal changes which accompanied societies as they made the transition to modern commercial and manufacturing society.? (OLL ? Online Library of Liberty)
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Se?jour De Paris oder Getreue Anleitung, welchergestalt Reisende von Condition sich zu verhalten haben (.). – [“TO TRAVEL PLEASANTLY, ONE MOST SPEND GENEROUSLY”]

Franckfurth, Fo?rster, 1718. 8vo. In contemporary half vellum with gilt lettering to spine. Small paper-label to spine. Light wear to extremities. Previous owner's name in contemporary hand to front free end-paper. Internally fine and clean. (16), 512 First edition of Nemeitz?s influential guide to how one should conduct oneself and make best use of one?s time and money in Paris: "To travel pleasantly, one must spend generously. This is the means to be respected by everyone, to have entry everywhere, and to benefit greatly from the journey." (Translated from the preface). It contain much interesting information on 17th and 18th century Parisian customs. Nemeitz obtained a position as a tutor in 1707 with the Swedish General Magnus Stenbock. In 1708 he accompanied the sons of the count to Lund University, where he temporarily lectured on statecraft and history. He participated in the Swedish-Danish War from 1712 onwards under Stenbock as a royal field secretary. In 1713, Stenbock sent him with his sons towards Western Europe, with their first major stop being in Utrecht, where they met several diplomats involved in the Peace of Utrecht. They also spent some time in Paris where they were introduced to Louis XIV on multiple occasions. Their journey also took them to England. After failing to secure further employment in the North, Nemeitz became a tutor for the Waldeck family, accompanying a young Count Waldeck to Strasbourg, Paris, and other European courts.A French translation was published in 1727.