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Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books

SONNETS WITH FOLK SONGS FROM THE SPANISH

SONNETS WITH FOLK SONGS FROM THE SPANISH

BINDINGS). (GOLDEN COCKEREL PRESS). ELLIS, HAVELOCK 222 x 155 mm. (9 x 6"). xiv, 81. [1] pp., [2] leaves (final blank). No. 491 OF 500 COPIES. EXCELLENT CONTEMPORARY DARK BLUE MOROCCO, LAVISHLY GILT AND INLAID, covers with frame of gilt and inlaid posies in scarlet, turquoise, and citron morocco, central panel of upper cover with large and elaborate lobed ornament filled with swirling floral branches with inlaid blossoms extending from a central "wheel" of yellow lilies encircled by tiny blue forget-me-nots, raised bands, spine compartments with vertical gilt lettering, gilt-ruled turn-ins with floral sprays at corners, handmade endpapers patterned in blue and silver, top edge gilt, other edges untrimmed. Chanticleer 24; Cave & Mason 24. AN ESPECIALLY FINE COPY, clean, fresh, and bright in a binding brilliant with gold. This is an immaculate copy of a private press edition of juvenile poems by an intellectual best known for his work on human sexuality, in a binding probably done by an extremely talented amateur. The Golden Cockerel Press was founded in 1920 By Hal Taylor, his wife Gay, and two of their friends with the intention of printing fine editions of established texts as well as new literary works of merit from young authors. After Robert Gibbings purchased the press in 1924, he turned its focus to works with wood-engraved illustrations by Eric Gill and others; however, since artists were unpredictable with deadlines, he continued to produce text-only works like the present one to keep a steady output going. Havelock Ellis (1859-1939) composed these verses between the ages of 17, when he was a schoolmaster in rural Australia, and 25, when he was studying medicine at St. Thomas' Hospital in London. Health issues had made his schooling somewhat intermittent, so he had spent much time as a boy reading the poetry of Shelley and Swinburne, and always considered poetry the medium through which he learned to write. After these youthful experiments, however, he abandoned poetry for the field that became known as sexology, producing the first serious study of homosexuality in English. Our binding is very much in the spirit of the ornate bindings produced by the great rivals Riviere and Sangorski & Sutcliffe, with numerous morocco inlays and onlays and intricate gilt tooling in an Oriental-inspired design. This is an immaculate copy of a private press edition of juvenile poems by an intellectual best known for his work on human sexuality, in a binding probably done by an extremely talented amateur. The Golden Cockerel Press was founded in 1920 By Hal Taylor, his wife Gay, and two of their friends with the intention of printing fine editions of established texts as well as new literary works of merit from young authors. After Robert Gibbings purchased the press in 1924, he turned its focus to works with wood-engraved illustrations by Eric Gill and others; however, since artists were unpredictable with deadlines, he continued to produce text-only works like the present one to keep a steady output going. Havelock Ellis (1859-1939) composed these verses between the ages of 17, when he was a schoolmaster in rural Australia, and 25, when he was studying medicine at St. Thomas' Hospital in London. Health issues had made his schooling somewhat intermittent, so he had spent much time as a boy reading the poetry of Shelley and Swinburne, and always considered poetry the medium through which he learned to write. After these youthful experiments, however, he abandoned poetry for the field that became known as sexology, producing the first serious study of homosexuality in English. Our binding is very much in the spirit of the ornate bindings produced by the great rivals Riviere and Sangorski & Sutcliffe, with numerous morocco inlays and onlays and intricate gilt tooling in an Oriental-inspired design.
FARTHEST NORTH

FARTHEST NORTH

ARCTIC EXPLORATION). NANSEN, FRIDTJOF 235 x 165 mm. (9 1/2 x 6 1/2"). Two volumes. Second Edition. Attractive contemporary marbled half calf over marbled boards, gilt-decorated raised bands flanked by plain gilt rules, spine panels with gilt botanical centerpiece. With three frontispieces, one folding map, and numerous illustrations in the text, 110 of them full-page. Front pastedown of each volume with red morocco book label of J. Kimpton. PMM 384. Front joint of first volume cracked (with a little looseness to the board), a little rubbing and a few nicks to leather, short split along one fold of map, endpapers lightly foxed, but an excellent copy, internally clean and fresh in a pleasing binding. First issued in 1897, this amply illustrated work recounts Nansen's epic pursuit of the North Pole in 1893-96, during which time he travelled closer to the top of the world (86 degrees, 14 minutes north) than had any other known person. He and a small crew set off from Norway in a specially designed boat, and some six months later purposefully embedded it in the ice in order to drift with the Arctic current, which Nansen believed would carry them from the coast of Siberia northwest to the pole. But in mid-drift, he realized the current would not carry him far enough, so he and crewmate Frederik Johansen set out across the ice with a dogsled. Nansen and Johansen were gone for more than a year before stumbling upon an exploration party from England that eventually returned them to Norway, where Nansen found himself an international sensation. Written in two months, "Farthest North," says author Andrew Nieland, "lacks literary polish, but Nansen's eye for detail and indomitable spirit shine through. Because he wrote while still thawing from his adventures, his story has an exciting immediacy, one that the passing of a century has done little to diminish. As a historical document, as an epic adventure, and as a revival of a worthy hero long forgotten, 'Farthest North' is a tale well worth remembering." Fridtjof Wedel-Jarlsberg Nansen (1861-1930) was a Norwegian explorer, scientist, and diplomat who had a doctorate in zoological and histological studies. Before his voyage toward the North Pole, he had traversed Greenland and told about his journey in "The First Crossing of Greenland" (English translation, 1890). After his Arctic exploits and the publication of "Farthest North," Nansen became a professor of oceanography. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922 for his work as a League of Nations High Commissioner. First issued in 1897, this amply illustrated work recounts Nansen's epic pursuit of the North Pole in 1893-96, during which time he travelled closer to the top of the world (86 degrees, 14 minutes north) than had any other known person. He and a small crew set off from Norway in a specially designed boat, and some six months later purposefully embedded it in the ice in order to drift with the Arctic current, which Nansen believed would carry them from the coast of Siberia northwest to the pole. But in mid-drift, he realized the current would not carry him far enough, so he and crewmate Frederik Johansen set out across the ice with a dogsled. Nansen and Johansen were gone for more than a year before stumbling upon an exploration party from England that eventually returned them to Norway, where Nansen found himself an international sensation. Written in two months, "Farthest North," says author Andrew Nieland, "lacks literary polish, but Nansen's eye for detail and indomitable spirit shine through. Because he wrote while still thawing from his adventures, his story has an exciting immediacy, one that the passing of a century has done little to diminish. As a historical document, as an epic adventure, and as a revival of a worthy hero long forgotten, 'Farthest North' is a tale well worth remembering." Fridtjof Wedel-Jarlsberg Nansen (1861-1930) was a Norwegian explorer, scientist, and diplomat who had a doctorate in zoological and histological studies. Before his voyage toward the North Pole, he had traversed Greenland and told about his journey in "The First Crossing of Greenland" (English translation, 1890). After his Arctic exploits and the publication of "Farthest North," Nansen became a professor of oceanography. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922 for his work as a League of Nations High Commissioner.
TITUS ANDRONICUS

TITUS ANDRONICUS, OR THE RAPE OF LAVINIA

SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM 208 x 152 mm. (8 1/8 x 6"). 4 p.l., 56 pp.Adapted and altered by Edward Ravenscroft. First Ravenscroft Edition, Fourth Quarto Edition. Modern brown calf, covers with gilt-rule border, raised bands, spine compartments with gilt fleuron, red morocco label. Wing S-2949; ESTC R17448; Jaggard p. 475. Leaves a little browned, margins trimmed a bit close, sometimes grazing signatures, a couple of short marginal tears, other trivial imperfections, but an excellent copy otherwise, clean and crisp, in an unworn binding. In this revised version of Shakespeare's bloodiest play, cited as the first work to question Shakespeare's authorship, Edward Ravenscroft 'improves' upon the Bard's "most incorrect and indigested piece in all his Works" boasting that if you "compare the old play with this, you'll finde that none in all that author's works ever receiv'd greater alterations or additions, the language not only refin'd but many scenes entirely new; besides most of the principal characters heighten'd, and the plot much encreas'd." Ravenscroft (fl. 1671-97) is nothing if not proud of himself for having brought Shakespeare to a new level of elegance, saying that the play in its original form "seem[ed] rather a heap of rubbish than a structure." While there are changes of many kinds--perhaps the most memorable modification has Aaron being consumed by flames at the play's end--the main storyline remains the same: it is a tale of revenge between Tamara, Queen of the Goths, and Titus, a general in the Roman army, with the central event being the brutal rape of Titus' daughter Lavinia by Tamara's two sons. Ravenscroft caused both controversy and resentment (particularly from Dryden) at the way he boldly tampered with Shakespeare and then openly admired the results; yet the adaptation proved a theatrical success and continued to be staged well into the first quarter of the 18th century. This edition is also of interest for its suggestion that "Titus" was not wholly the work of Shakespeare, believed to be the first time such a theory had been posited in print. The author states in his preface that he had "been told by some anciently conversant with the Stage, that it was not Originally [Shakespeare's], but brought by a private Author to be Acted, and he only gave some Master-touches to one or two of the Principal Parts or Characters . . . ." Jaggard says that this section is "uncommonly important because it affords one of the few extant bits of evidence bearing on the problem of original authorship." This edition is uncommon in the marketplace. In this revised version of Shakespeare's bloodiest play, cited as the first work to question Shakespeare's authorship, Edward Ravenscroft 'improves' upon the Bard's "most incorrect and indigested piece in all his Works" boasting that if you "compare the old play with this, you'll finde that none in all that author's works ever receiv'd greater alterations or additions, the language not only refin'd but many scenes entirely new; besides most of the principal characters heighten'd, and the plot much encreas'd." Ravenscroft (fl. 1671-97) is nothing if not proud of himself for having brought Shakespeare to a new level of elegance, saying that the play in its original form "seem[ed] rather a heap of rubbish than a structure." While there are changes of many kinds--perhaps the most memorable modification has Aaron being consumed by flames at the play's end--the main storyline remains the same: it is a tale of revenge between Tamara, Queen of the Goths, and Titus, a general in the Roman army, with the central event being the brutal rape of Titus' daughter Lavinia by Tamara's two sons. Ravenscroft caused both controversy and resentment (particularly from Dryden) at the way he boldly tampered with Shakespeare and then openly admired the results; yet the adaptation proved a theatrical success and continued to be staged well into the first quarter of the 18th century. This edition is also of interest for its suggestion that "Titus" was not wholly the work of Shakespeare, believed to be the first time such a theory had been posited in print. The author states in his preface that he had "been told by some anciently conversant with the Stage, that it was not Originally [Shakespeare's], but brought by a private Author to be Acted, and he only gave some Master-touches to one or two of the Principal Parts or Characters . . . ." Jaggard says that this section is "uncommonly important because it affords one of the few extant bits of evidence bearing on the problem of original authorship." This edition is uncommon in the marketplace. First Ravenscroft Edition, Fourth Quarto Edition.
SYR PERECYVELLE OF GALES

SYR PERECYVELLE OF GALES

KELMSCOTT PRESS). MORRIS, WILLIAM 213 x 150 mm. (8 1/4 x 5 7/8"). 2 p.l., 98 pp., [1] leaf (blank). Edited by F. S. Ellis after the edition by J. O. Halliwell. ONE OF 350 COPIES on paper (and eight on vellum). Original holland-backed blue paper boards, edges untrimmed and UNOPENED. Woodcut frontispiece by Edward Burne-Jones, elaborate wide border on frontispiece and first page of text, one page with half border, decorative woodcut initials, device in colophon. Printed in red and black in Chaucer type. Peterson A-33; Sparling 33; Tomkinson, p. 116. Tiny tear to tail edge of front board and small dent to its fore edge, trivial spotting to paper boards, hint of fraying to head of spine, faint mark (from printing process?) to one margin, but a very well-preserved, unread copy, quite clean, fresh, and bright internally. This 14th century verse romance telling of the childhood of one of Arthur's knights is the first book in the series of Kelmscott Medieval romances, which also included "Syr Ysambrace" and "Sire Degrevaunt." According to Cockerell, "they were all reprinted from the Camden Society's volume of 1844, which was a favorite with Morris from his Oxford days." This fragile volume is now infrequently found in condition nearly as good as seen here. This 14th century verse romance telling of the childhood of one of Arthur's knights is the first book in the series of Kelmscott Medieval romances, which also included "Syr Ysambrace" and "Sire Degrevaunt." According to Cockerell, "they were all reprinted from the Camden Society's volume of 1844, which was a favorite with Morris from his Oxford days." This fragile volume is now infrequently found in condition nearly as good as seen here. ONE OF 350 COPIES on paper (and eight on vellum).
THE LADIES DICTIONARY; BEING A GENERAL ENTERTAINMENT FOR THE FAIR-SEX: A WORK NEVER ATTEMPTED BEFORE IN ENGLISH

THE LADIES DICTIONARY; BEING A GENERAL ENTERTAINMENT FOR THE FAIR-SEX: A WORK NEVER ATTEMPTED BEFORE IN ENGLISH

WOMEN - CONDUCT LITERATURE). [N. H.] 183 x 104 mm. (7 1/4 x 4 1/2"). 4 p.l., 240, 161-352, 301-484, 401-528 pp. (i.e., 744 pp., as noted in 18th century bookseller's declaration on flyleaf). FIRST EDITION. Attractive period-style calf by Richard Smart, cover with blind-ruled borders, blind-stamped floral tools at corners, raised bands, spine gilt in compartments with intricate lozenge centerpieces and scrolling cornerpieces, red morocco label, endleaves of period paper. Recto of front flyleaf with pasted-on "Memoriae Causa" dated Friday, 15 March 1782, noting the errors in page numbering, and attesting that the work is complete and is 744 pp.; verso of flyleaf with pasted-on manuscript bookseller's description in the same hand. Wing H-99; ESTC R6632. Overall minor browning (due to paper stock), never offensive, occasional minor foxing, smudges, rust spots, or tiny burn holes, but a very good copy internally, generally clean and crisp, in a fine new replica binding. It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single woman of marriageable age must be in want of a book telling her how to get a husband, and our anonymous 17th century author is here to help, with advice on beauty, fashion, deportment, and, of course, love, courtship, and marriage. Drawing on the confidences of female friends, the advice they have shared with him, and "MY OWN EXPERIENCE IN LOVE AFFAIRS" (capitals in original), "N. H." provides, in roughly alphabetical order, everything from the meaning and etymology of females names and brief biographies of famous or infamous women from history and legend to recipes for beauty concoctions, candies and preserves, and home remedies. He addresses in depth the characteristics and duties of a good husband and wife, the problems that may arise in a marriage (the Indifference of Husbands, Jealousy, Inconstancy), the pleasures and dangers of Kissing, and the day-to-day concerns of Keeping House and managing Household Expenses. It is especially interesting that the text addresses topics of concern for women of different classes. For example, the entries on Laundresses and House-maids do not, as we might expect, offer advice to women of means on managing servants, but are addressed to young women who go into service, letting them know what to expect and how to succeed. We can scarcely improve upon the description of our 18th century colleague, whose pasted-in description observes: "After an attentive Perusal of the Work, . . . the Judgement and Opinion of the Proprietor concerning the whole is: That for the many rare Secrets, excellent Directions in Conduct & Behavior, notable Counsels in Morals, Religious & Pious Documents, remarkable Relations, & other singular matters it contains; 'tis richly worth far above its original Value, . . . as 'tis very Scarce & out of Print." Copies are not commonly seen in the marketplace, and when they do appear, they are usually in unfortunate condition. It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single woman of marriageable age must be in want of a book telling her how to get a husband, and our anonymous 17th century author is here to help, with advice on beauty, fashion, deportment, and, of course, love, courtship, and marriage. Drawing on the confidences of female friends, the advice they have shared with him, and "MY OWN EXPERIENCE IN LOVE AFFAIRS" (capitals in original), "N. H." provides, in roughly alphabetical order, everything from the meaning and etymology of females names and brief biographies of famous or infamous women from history and legend to recipes for beauty concoctions, candies and preserves, and home remedies. He addresses in depth the characteristics and duties of a good husband and wife, the problems that may arise in a marriage (the Indifference of Husbands, Jealousy, Inconstancy), the pleasures and dangers of Kissing, and the day-to-day concerns of Keeping House and managing Household Expenses. It is especially interesting that the text addresses topics of concern for women of different classes. For example, the entries on Laundresses and House-maids do not, as we might expect, offer advice to women of means on managing servants, but are addressed to young women who go into service, letting them know what to expect and how to succeed. We can scarcely improve upon the description of our 18th century colleague, whose pasted-in description observes: "After an attentive Perusal of the Work, . . . the Judgement and Opinion of the Proprietor concerning the whole is: That for the many rare Secrets, excellent Directions in Conduct & Behavior, notable Counsels in Morals, Religious & Pious Documents, remarkable Relations, & other singular matters it contains; 'tis richly worth far above its original Value, . . . as 'tis very Scarce & out of Print." Copies are not commonly seen in the marketplace, and when they do appear, they are usually in unfortunate condition.
THE PRACTICE

THE PRACTICE, PROCEEDINGS, AND LAWES OF ARMES: DESCRIBED OUT OF THE DOINGS OF MOST VALIANT AND EXPERT CAPTAINES, AND CONFIRMED BOTH BY ANCIENT, AND MODERNE EXAMPLES, AND PRÆCEDENTS

SUTCLIFFE, MATTHEW 195 x 140 mm. (7 5/8 x 5 1/2"). 12 p.l., 328, 327-342 pp. FIRST EDITION. Inoffensive 18th century calf, covers with simple blind-tooled frame, raised bands, rebacked preserving original backstrip, spine panels with blind-stamped calligraphic centerpiece, gilt titling, newer endpapers. With woodcut initials and decorations. Printed in black letter, italic, and roman type. Front pastedown with armorial bookplate of Mark Dineley; front free endpaper with bookplate of the Fox Pointe Collection. Cockle 57; STC 23468; ESTC S117986; Heuser, Beatrice, "Strategy Before Clausewitz: Linking Warfare and Statecraft, 1400-1830" (2017), chapter 5: "A National Security Strategy for England: Matthew Sutcliffe, the Earl of Essex, and the Cadiz Expedition of 1596." Spine gently faded to tan, joints and extremities a bit rubbed, a little foxing to title page, final page a bit soiled, isolated rust spots or small wax stains, but an excellent specimen, clean, fresh, and mostly rather bright, in a solid, serviceable binding. This rare treatise addressing all aspects of war has been cited by military historian Beatrice Heuser as a perhaps unique example of a case "in which a civilian, an 'armchair strategist', published a book containing a comprehensive concept for how to conduct a war with a specific enemy that was applied in practice." According to Heuser, Sutcliffe penned "a national security strategy for England," and one that Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, to whom the work is dedicated, put into practice in the country's ongoing conflicts with Spain, leading to the operation that resulted in the successful capture of Cadiz in 1596. Sutcliffe had met Essex at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he had likely served as one of the young earl's tutors. DNB observes that Sutcliffe, who studied law before becoming a doctor of divinity, applied his legal training to this work, in which he examines not only fortifications, aggressive and defensive tactics, and the practical considerations of recruiting, paying, feeding, and housing armed forces, but also discusses laws and regulations governing the military. Cockle notes that the work "was well known both at home and abroad," and that it "urge[d] the importance of military studies." Following this consequential work, Sutcliffe restricted his writings to theological subjects, and enjoyed a 40-year career as dean of Exeter Cathedral. This work is quite rare in the marketplace: ABPC and RBH find just four copies at auction the past 40 years, and no others since 1991. This rare treatise addressing all aspects of war has been cited by military historian Beatrice Heuser as a perhaps unique example of a case "in which a civilian, an 'armchair strategist', published a book containing a comprehensive concept for how to conduct a war with a specific enemy that was applied in practice." According to Heuser, Sutcliffe penned "a national security strategy for England," and one that Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, to whom the work is dedicated, put into practice in the country's ongoing conflicts with Spain, leading to the operation that resulted in the successful capture of Cadiz in 1596. Sutcliffe had met Essex at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he had likely served as one of the young earl's tutors. DNB observes that Sutcliffe, who studied law before becoming a doctor of divinity, applied his legal training to this work, in which he examines not only fortifications, aggressive and defensive tactics, and the practical considerations of recruiting, paying, feeding, and housing armed forces, but also discusses laws and regulations governing the military. Cockle notes that the work "was well known both at home and abroad," and that it "urge[d] the importance of military studies." Following this consequential work, Sutcliffe restricted his writings to theological subjects, and enjoyed a 40-year career as dean of Exeter Cathedral. This work is quite rare in the marketplace: ABPC and RBH find just four copies at auction the past 40 years, and no others since 1991.
TWO DISCOURSES. I. CONCERNING THE DIFFERENT WITS OF MEN. . . II. THE MYSTERIE OF VINTNERS

TWO DISCOURSES. I. CONCERNING THE DIFFERENT WITS OF MEN. . . II. THE MYSTERIE OF VINTNERS, OR A DISCOURSE CONCERNING THE VARIOUS SICKNESSES OF WINES, AND THEIR RESPECTIVE REMEDIES. [with] MERRET, [CHRISTOPHER]. SOME OBSERVATIONS CONCERNING THE ORDERING OF WINES

WINE). CHARLETON, WALTER 182 x 104 mm. (6 3/8 x 4"). 7 p.l., 230 pp. FIRST EDITION. Early 20th century dun-colored polished calf, smooth spine with vertical gilt titling. Front pastedown with armorial bookplate of Frederick William Cosens; front free endpaper with bookplate of the Fox Pointe Collection; verso of general title with early ink inscription of "Matt: Avant Esq. / alias Mad Tom"; title page of first work with ink inscription of Eben[eze]r. Jenkins dated 1794. Cagle 597; Gabler G16010; Simon "Gastronomica" 335; Wing C-3694; ESTC R7401. A couple of small abrasions to spine and rear board, joints and extremities lightly rubbed, but the binding sound and the leather lustrous. Mild foxing to first and last leaves, six small ink spots to first two leaves, small wormholes to tail margin, other insignificant defects, but an excellent copy internally, clean and fresh. The two discourses here reflect the wide-ranging interests of scholar and physician William Charleton (1620-1707), whose writings covered religion, philosophy, physics, physiology, zoology, and psychology. In the first essay he examines Wit, which he defines as "the natural capacity of understanding," examining the physical and psychological causes of varying degrees of cognitive ability. According to Hunter & Macalpine, he was the first English writer to formulate a concept of the brain function, clearly pointing the way to the modern concept. Noting the similarity of the anatomic structure of the brain, but the diversity of "wit" in animals and humans, Charleton foresaw that the answer lay in future research "to find the true uses of all the several parts of the Brain." The work is cited by Lowndes for its influence on John Locke. The second discourse is a paper Charleton presented to the Royal Society on ways of preventing putrefaction of wine, and techniques to remedy defects in various types of wine. The additional oenological essay contains advice on the stages of fermentation, the times to rack wines, and also provides recipes for correcting minor defects in color, clarity, and taste. It is the work of physician and scientist Christopher Merret (1614/15-95), the first person to document the addition of sugar to wine in order to provoke a second fermentation that would turn it into a sparkling wine. Appropriately, our copy was once in the collection of wine merchant Frederick William Cosens (1819-89). Clean, complete copies of this work are not easily acquired. The two discourses here reflect the wide-ranging interests of scholar and physician William Charleton (1620-1707), whose writings covered religion, philosophy, physics, physiology, zoology, and psychology. In the first essay he examines Wit, which he defines as "the natural capacity of understanding," examining the physical and psychological causes of varying degrees of cognitive ability. According to Hunter & Macalpine, he was the first English writer to formulate a concept of the brain function, clearly pointing the way to the modern concept. Noting the similarity of the anatomic structure of the brain, but the diversity of "wit" in animals and humans, Charleton foresaw that the answer lay in future research "to find the true uses of all the several parts of the Brain." The work is cited by Lowndes for its influence on John Locke. The second discourse is a paper Charleton presented to the Royal Society on ways of preventing putrefaction of wine, and techniques to remedy defects in various types of wine. The additional oenological essay contains advice on the stages of fermentation, the times to rack wines, and also provides recipes for correcting minor defects in color, clarity, and taste. It is the work of physician and scientist Christopher Merret (1614/15-95), the first person to document the addition of sugar to wine in order to provoke a second fermentation that would turn it into a sparkling wine. Appropriately, our copy was once in the collection of wine merchant Frederick William Cosens (1819-89). Clean, complete copies of this work are not easily acquired.
PHARSALIA

PHARSALIA

INCUNABULA). LUCANUS, MARCUS ANNAEUS 315 x 210 mm. (12 3/8 x 8 1/4"). [186] leaves. 25 lines surrounded by 57 lines of commentary, both in roman type. With commentary of Omnibonus Leonicenus. Contemporary Venetian blind-stamped calf, covers with multiple frames enclosing central panel with geometric design formed by small floral tools, upper cover with early vellum supralibros featuring a naïve hand-drawn melusine beneath a motto banner, the initials R. P. below it, raised bands, ink lettering to tail edge of text block, fragments of late 15th century Italian antiphonary leaves used as pastedowns. With two intricate brown ink initials. Occasional ink marginalia in a contemporary hand. Goff L-302; BMC V, 405; ISTC il00302000. Unsophisticated binding somewhat rubbed and worn, a couple of small chips to ends of joints, leather lacking from tips of upper corners, clasps and straps lacking, but the binding solid and the vellum label nicely preserved, about ten quires with minor stains along gutter, minor foxing (never offensive), occasional stains, including two- to three-inch stains on three pages touching but not obscuring text, a couple of tiny rust spots affecting a letter or two, otherwise a very good specimen with no serious defects, the leaves quite crisp, the margins comfortable. This is an excellent incunabular edition of the greatest Latin epic apart from the "Aeneid," chronicling the civil war between Caesar and Pompey; the defeat of the latter's forces at the Battle of Pharsalus marked the beginning of the end of the Roman republic. The Spanish-born Lucan (39-65 A.D.) was the nephew of Stoic philosopher Seneca, and was educated in Rome and Athens. A precocious literary talent, he attracted the favor of Nero at the age of 21, but the volatile emperor soon turned against him, and banned his poems from public performance. The oppression he faced under Nero colored the tone of "Pharsalia." Britannica notes, "As the poem proceeds, the poet?s republicanism becomes more marked, no doubt because as Nero?s tyranny grew, along with Lucan?s hatred of him, he looked back with longing to the old Roman Republic. It has been said that Cato is the real hero of the epic, and certainly the best of Lucan?s own Stoicism appears in the noble courage of his Cato in continuing the hopeless struggle after Pompey had failed." Where the "Aeneid" brims with optimism for the future glories of Rome, "Pharsalia" is far bleaker and filled with foreboding. Lucan was so provoked by the outrages of Nero that he felt compelled to take action beyond literature, and he joined Piso's conspiracy to assassinate the emperor. The plot was discovered, and Lucan was compelled to commit suicide. This is the only known imprint of Nicolaus Battibovis, printed on the same press as three classical works (Ovid, Tibullus, and Perius Flaccus) issued by his kinsman Antonius the previous year. BMC notes that Nicolaus was especially unlucky with his Lucan, as it appeared on the market just after a well-received edition printed by Jacobus Britannicus in Brescia. Our printing is scarce in the marketplace, with auction records finding just five other complete copies in the past 40 years, all in unfortunate condition. While we have been unable to identify the arms on the supralibros, Fox-Davies notes that the two-tailed mermaid is more frequent in German heraldry. This is an excellent incunabular edition of the greatest Latin epic apart from the "Aeneid," chronicling the civil war between Caesar and Pompey; the defeat of the latter's forces at the Battle of Pharsalus marked the beginning of the end of the Roman republic. The Spanish-born Lucan (39-65 A.D.) was the nephew of Stoic philosopher Seneca, and was educated in Rome and Athens. A precocious literary talent, he attracted the favor of Nero at the age of 21, but the volatile emperor soon turned against him, and banned his poems from public performance. The oppression he faced under Nero colored the tone of "Pharsalia." Britannica notes, "As the poem proceeds, the poet?s republicanism becomes more marked, no doubt because as Nero?s tyranny grew, along with Lucan?s hatred of him, he looked back with longing to the old Roman Republic. It has been said that Cato is the real hero of the epic, and certainly the best of Lucan?s own Stoicism appears in the noble courage of his Cato in continuing the hopeless struggle after Pompey had failed." Where the "Aeneid" brims with optimism for the future glories of Rome, "Pharsalia" is far bleaker and filled with foreboding. Lucan was so provoked by the outrages of Nero that he felt compelled to take action beyond literature, and he joined Piso's conspiracy to assassinate the emperor. The plot was discovered, and Lucan was compelled to commit suicide. This is the only known imprint of Nicolaus Battibovis, printed on the same press as three classical works (Ovid, Tibullus, and Perius Flaccus) issued by his kinsman Antonius the previous year. BMC notes that Nicolaus was especially unlucky with his Lucan, as it appeared on the market just after a well-received edition printed by Jacobus Britannicus in Brescia. Our printing is scarce in the marketplace, with auction records finding just five other complete copies in the past 40 years, all in unfortunate condition. While we have been unable to identify the arms on the supralibros, Fox-Davies notes that the two-tailed mermaid is more frequent in German heraldry.
TETRACHORDON: EXPOSITIONS UPON THE FOURE CHIEF PLACES IN SCRIPTURE

TETRACHORDON: EXPOSITIONS UPON THE FOURE CHIEF PLACES IN SCRIPTURE, WHICH TREAT OF MARIAGE, OR NULLITIES IN MARIAGE

MILTON, JOHN. (MARRIAGE) 185 x 138 mm. (7 1/4 x 5 3/8"). 4 p.l., 40, 37-98 pp. FIRST EDITION. Late 19th or early 20th century sympathetic sheepskin, raised bands, red morocco label. Coleridge 67; Shawcross 72; Wickenheiser 303; Wing M-2184; ESTC R212199. Some (naturally occurring?) variation in the color of the leather, lower board with short (pre-existing?) cut to leather, title page trimmed close at foot, grazing imprint, occasional corner creases or rust spots, but an excellent copy, internally clean and crisp, in an unworn binding. This is one of four tracts arguing in favor of permitting divorce, from a poet who was also a prolific polemicist. Milton (1608-74) took a very active interest in the political questions of his day and expressed his views in eloquent tracts, but perhaps no issue was as personal to him as the call to liberalize divorce laws. At the age of 34, Milton had taken a bride half his age, and young Mary Powell had left him to return to her parents just a few weeks later. Frustrated by his inability to extract himself from this alliance, Milton took on the restrictive divorce laws of England, issuing "The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce" the following year. A second, heavily revised edition of that work and a second tract, "The Judgement of Martin Bucer Concerning Divorce," came out in 1644. The following year, Milton published the present work, citing biblical justifications for ending a marriage. ("Tetrachordon" refers to four-stringed musical instruments, and is intended to describe Milton's harmonizing of the four "strings" of Scriptural arguments for divorce, from Genesis, Deuteronomy, Matthew, and 1 Corinthians.) The polemic did not get the attention Milton felt it deserved and he lamented this oversight in his Sonnet 11, "A Book was Writ of Late called Tetrachordon." The fourth divorce tract, issued at about the same time as the present work, took its name from a torture device, "Colasterion." As Milton began to take steps to seek a divorce rather than just writing tracts about it, his wife's family flew into action and successfully affected a reconciliation. Mary returned to her husband in the autumn of 1645, and the couple had three children before she died giving birth to the fourth in 1652. While this title does appear on the market from time to time, copies as pleasing as the present one are not easy to come by. This is one of four tracts arguing in favor of permitting divorce, from a poet who was also a prolific polemicist. Milton (1608-74) took a very active interest in the political questions of his day and expressed his views in eloquent tracts, but perhaps no issue was as personal to him as the call to liberalize divorce laws. At the age of 34, Milton had taken a bride half his age, and young Mary Powell had left him to return to her parents just a few weeks later. Frustrated by his inability to extract himself from this alliance, Milton took on the restrictive divorce laws of England, issuing "The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce" the following year. A second, heavily revised edition of that work and a second tract, "The Judgement of Martin Bucer Concerning Divorce," came out in 1644. The following year, Milton published the present work, citing biblical justifications for ending a marriage. ("Tetrachordon" refers to four-stringed musical instruments, and is intended to describe Milton's harmonizing of the four "strings" of Scriptural arguments for divorce, from Genesis, Deuteronomy, Matthew, and 1 Corinthians.) The polemic did not get the attention Milton felt it deserved and he lamented this oversight in his Sonnet 11, "A Book was Writ of Late called Tetrachordon." The fourth divorce tract, issued at about the same time as the present work, took its name from a torture device, "Colasterion." As Milton began to take steps to seek a divorce rather than just writing tracts about it, his wife's family flew into action and successfully affected a reconciliation. Mary returned to her husband in the autumn of 1645, and the couple had three children before she died giving birth to the fourth in 1652. While this title does appear on the market from time to time, copies as pleasing as the present one are not easy to come by.
THE WONDERFULL WOORKMANSHIP OF THE WORLD: WHERIN IS CONTEINED AN EXCELLENT DISCOURSE OF CHRISTIAN NATURALL PHILOSOPHIE . . . SPECIALLY GATHERED OUT OF THE FOUNTAINES OF HOLY SCRIPTUR

THE WONDERFULL WOORKMANSHIP OF THE WORLD: WHERIN IS CONTEINED AN EXCELLENT DISCOURSE OF CHRISTIAN NATURALL PHILOSOPHIE . . . SPECIALLY GATHERED OUT OF THE FOUNTAINES OF HOLY SCRIPTUR

DANEAU, LAMBERT 189 x 134 mm. (7 3/8 x 5 1/4"). [4], 87, [1] leaves (with foliation errors, but complete).Translated from the Latin by Thomas Twyne. First Edition in English. Retrospective half calf over marbled boards, raised bands, red morocco label. Title with woodcut ornament, head- and tail-pieces, many decorative initials. Printed in black letter. Front pastedown with Macclesfield bookplate for the South library; title with inscription in ink "Dulcius ex ipso fonte bibuntur aquae" ["Sweetly the waters have been drunk from the fountain itself']; a couple of contemporary annotations in ink (one slightly shaved); numerous marginal readers' marks in ink and pencil. STC 6231; ESTC S105155. Paper a shade or two less than bright, title somewhat soiled, a dark stain affecting the upper corner of ff. 24-28 (touching text but all is legible), but overall a very good, clean copy in a pleasing new binding. This is the first appearance in English of Daneau's 1576 "Physica Christiana," the foundational work of "Mosaic physics," which attempted to reconcile the account of creation in Genesis with scientific knowledge of the natural world in order to create a "Christian natural philosophy." Though obviously theological in origin, "Christian Physics" is nevertheless substantially a work of natural history, generally adopting the Aristotelian and Copernican worldview then prevalent. The first of two parts is a disquisition on creation, a long Socratic dialogue on the meaning of the opening chapters of Genesis. The second part, which occupies a good deal more than two-thirds of the volume, is a broader treatise on nature, including discussion of such things as light and shadow, meteors, the rainbow, thunder, precious stones, glass, gold, various trees, stars and planets, fish, birds, elephants, foxes, and many more topics. A Calvinist theologian forced into itinerancy because of his incautiously expressed opinions, Daneau (1530-95) produced a considerable number of books, mostly commentaries on the Bible and controversial works written against Lutherans and Catholics alike. Our copy has a couple of curious contemporary marginal annotations. On the verso of fo. 2, at the beginning of the second chapter, someone noted "Five / [s]peciall / [copie?]s of na- / [tu]rall phi- / [lo]sophye." And at the head of fo. 39 (mis-numbered 40] recto is the inscription "Sr. Walter Rawley Laureatus poeta May 4 anno reg. Eliz. 39 anno dom. 1598." There is nothing in Raleigh's biography that can account for his being mentioned as poet laureate in 1598; in that period, he was occupied in naval pursuits against the Spanish armada. It has been suggested that our copy was once owned by scholar and translator Andrew Hartwell (1553-1606), a bibliophile who sometimes used the Latin motto on the title page and marked passages in his books with the floret-like squiggle seen here on ff. 3-12. The book was later in the great library of the earls of Macclesfield. The present work is rare: OCLC and ESTC find 10 copies in U.S. libraries, while ABPC and RBH locate just one other copy at auction in the past 40 years. This is the first appearance in English of Daneau's 1576 "Physica Christiana," the foundational work of "Mosaic physics," which attempted to reconcile the account of creation in Genesis with scientific knowledge of the natural world in order to create a "Christian natural philosophy." Though obviously theological in origin, "Christian Physics" is nevertheless substantially a work of natural history, generally adopting the Aristotelian and Copernican worldview then prevalent. The first of two parts is a disquisition on creation, a long Socratic dialogue on the meaning of the opening chapters of Genesis. The second part, which occupies a good deal more than two-thirds of the volume, is a broader treatise on nature, including discussion of such things as light and shadow, meteors, the rainbow, thunder, precious stones, glass, gold, various trees, stars and planets, fish, birds, elephants, foxes, and many more topics. A Calvinist theologian forced into itinerancy because of his incautiously expressed opinions, Daneau (1530-95) produced a considerable number of books, mostly commentaries on the Bible and controversial works written against Lutherans and Catholics alike. Our copy has a couple of curious contemporary marginal annotations. On the verso of fo. 2, at the beginning of the second chapter, someone noted "Five / [s]peciall / [copie?]s of na- / [tu]rall phi- / [lo]sophye." And at the head of fo. 39 (mis-numbered 40] recto is the inscription "Sr. Walter Rawley Laureatus poeta May 4 anno reg. Eliz. 39 anno dom. 1598." There is nothing in Raleigh's biography that can account for his being mentioned as poet laureate in 1598; in that period, he was occupied in naval pursuits against the Spanish armada. It has been suggested that our copy was once owned by scholar and translator Andrew Hartwell (1553-1606), a bibliophile who sometimes used the Latin motto on the title page and marked passages in his books with the floret-like squiggle seen here on ff. 3-12. The book was later in the great library of the earls of Macclesfield. The present work is rare: OCLC and ESTC find 10 copies in U.S. libraries, while ABPC and RBH locate just one other copy at auction in the past 40 years.
DIARY OF A UNION SOLDIER IN THE 46TH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY REGIMENT

DIARY OF A UNION SOLDIER IN THE 46TH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY REGIMENT, COMPANY G.

CIVIL WAR). (MANUSCRIPT) 153 x 100 mm. (6 x 4"). 58 leaves, about 20 lines per page (final 17 pages are an informal ledger recording various items and prices). Original black leather wallet-style binding, front pastedown fashioned into a pouch. With one hand-drawn map and a couple small illustrations. Leather noticeably worn, head of spine with a little loss, pastedown pouch and hinges fairly worn, several leaves coming loose and a few ripped out (probably by the original owner), contents with general light soiling and staining, occasional ink smudge, but the writing entirely legible, and overall the condition very respectable for an inexpensively made item subjected to hard use. This is a first-hand account of the Civil War as experienced by a private in the Union army, describing the movements of his Regiment around Virginia and Maryland, including the First Battle of Winchester, encounters with the rebels, and his time spent in a hospital recovering from pleurisy. On the front flyleaf is the ownership signature of diarist John G. Staysa, noting his hometown of Clara in Potter County, Pennsylvania. According to genealogical records, he would have been about 21 at the time he penned this account. The diary commences on 25 January 1862 with Staysa stationed near Hancock, Maryland, a strategic location on the Potomac River bordering West Virginia. The Battle of Hancock, part of "Stonewall" Jackson's campaign to disrupt the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, had taken place only three weeks before, with the Union soldiers outlasting the Confederate artillery and their attempts to cross the river. Over the next few months, Staysa records the daily goings-on from his point of view as a common soldier, commenting on everything from the weather to the various circulating reports of rebel activity to the failing health of much of the regiment. Staysa spends the better part of March in the hospital in Frederick, Maryland, where he comments on the number of wounded and sick coming and going. (Of the approximately 620,000 soldiers who died in the Civil War, an estimated two thirds perished as the result of illness and infectious disease, prompting some historians to refer to these killers as the "Third Army.") Staysa recovered, and on April 4th writes that he has left for Winchester, Virginia, on the first leg of what would become a long march through the Shenandoah Valley, with Jackson's army close on the Union's heels. Included in this section of the diary is a roughly drawn map of the "gap in the mountain" taken by Staysa's Company near New Market, Virginia. The final major event recorded here is the First Battle of Winchester on May 25th, in which Staysa describes his involvement in the Union retreat from Strasburg, Virginia, all the way back to Williamsport, Maryland. The diary ends shortly thereafter, on 2 June 1862. Besides its obvious value as a first-hand record of this early and strategically important moment in the Civil War, this diary is also a touching personal account by a soldier of modest background and education. In between the countless marches and reports of skirmishes, we see glimpses of who this young man was and the quiet moments that gave him comfort, such as receiving a letter from home, getting a visit from a kind lady during his hospital stay, and tasting fresh pork for the first time after a prolonged period of deprivation. This is a first-hand account of the Civil War as experienced by a private in the Union army, describing the movements of his Regiment around Virginia and Maryland, including the First Battle of Winchester, encounters with the rebels, and his time spent in a hospital recovering from pleurisy. On the front flyleaf is the ownership signature of diarist John G. Staysa, noting his hometown of Clara in Potter County, Pennsylvania. According to genealogical records, he would have been about 21 at the time he penned this account. The diary commences on 25 January 1862 with Staysa stationed near Hancock, Maryland, a strategic location on the Potomac River bordering West Virginia. The Battle of Hancock, part of "Stonewall" Jackson's campaign to disrupt the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, had taken place only three weeks before, with the Union soldiers outlasting the Confederate artillery and their attempts to cross the river. Over the next few months, Staysa records the daily goings-on from his point of view as a common soldier, commenting on everything from the weather to the various circulating reports of rebel activity to the failing health of much of the regiment. Staysa spends the better part of March in the hospital in Frederick, Maryland, where he comments on the number of wounded and sick coming and going. (Of the approximately 620,000 soldiers who died in the Civil War, an estimated two thirds perished as the result of illness and infectious disease, prompting some historians to refer to these killers as the "Third Army.") Staysa recovered, and on April 4th writes that he has left for Winchester, Virginia, on the first leg of what would become a long march through the Shenandoah Valley, with Jackson's army close on the Union's heels. Included in this section of the diary is a roughly drawn map of the "gap in the mountain" taken by Staysa's Company near New Market, Virginia. The final major event recorded here is the First Battle of Winchester on May 25th, in which Staysa describes his involvement in the Union retreat from Strasburg, Virginia, all the way back to Williamsport, Maryland. The diary ends shortly thereafter, on 2 June 1862. Besides its obvious value as a first-hand record of this early and strategically important moment in the Civil War, this diary is also a touching personal account by a soldier of modest background and education. In between the countless marches and reports of skirmishes, we see glimpses of who this young man was and the quiet moments that gave him comfort, such as receiving a letter from home, getting a visit from a kind lady during his hospital stay, a
THE POLITICAL SONGSTER OR

THE POLITICAL SONGSTER OR, A TOUCH ON THE TIMES, ON VARIOUS SUBJECTS, AND ADAPTED TO COMMON TUNES

FREETH, JOHN 183 x 100 mm. (6 3/8 x 4"). xvi, 196 [i.e,.200] pp. ( a reissue with two extra leaves, paginated 37*-40*). Sixth Edition. Contemporary marbled boards, sympathetically rebacked with calf, smooth spine divided into panels with gilt rule and blind roll, gilt titling (hinges reinforced, skillfully recornered). With engraved frontispiece portrait of Freeth (trimmed a bit close at fore and tail edges, grazing background of portrait and first word of imprint). Verso of title page and tail margin of pp. xi, 11, and 111 with ink stamp of St. Peter's Priory, Hinckley. ESTC T98387; not in Sabin. Paper boards little darkened and lightly chafed, but the restored binding sound and rather pleasing. Title page and margins of portrait with minor soiling, leaves a shade less than bright (due to paper stock), isolated rust spots, trivial smudges, or corner creases, but an excellent copy, internally clean and fresh with adequate margins. This is a scarce edition of a collection of political ballads by a man DNB deems one of the best purveyors of that genre. A radical and non-conformist in politics, Freeth (1731-1808) enjoyed writing songs about current events and performing them for patrons at his Birmingham pub, the Leicester Arms. This drew custom to his establishment, and patrons encouraged him to publish his clever creations. In 1766, "Political Songster" first appeared as a 40-page pamphlet. Up to the sixth edition, Freeth added material and released updates every few years; thereafter, only annual updates were issued, until 1805. According to DNB, "Although unsophisticated, many of his patriotic songs have a stirring lilt; on politics he wrote with indignation, rough good humour, and an effective turn of phrase that earned him the reputation of being one of the best political ballad writers in the kingdom. From 1771 until 1785 Freeth used the pen-name John Free in punning allusion to his beliefs. His songs offer a significant insight into the popular politics of the late eighteenth century." In addition to matters of more local concern, Freeth's ballads addressed the revolution in the American colonies. In addition to using the pen name "Free," Freeth indirectly supported the American cause by voicing the distaste of common soldiers forced to fight former comrades-at-arms, and by expressing contempt for the British ministers' and generals' underestimation of the colonists' determination and abilities. "Prescot's Breeches" subtly applauds the Americans' daring midnight abduction of British General Richard Prescott, one of the most important "special operations" of the American Revolution. ESTC notes three versions of our sixth edition: one ending with p. 192; this one, ending with p. 196, and a third extending to 220 pages. All have extra pages paginated 37*-40*, so our copy has a total of 200 pages. Our version also seems to be especially uncommon: ESTC and OCLC find just six copies in North American libraries. This is a scarce edition of a collection of political ballads by a man DNB deems one of the best purveyors of that genre. A radical and non-conformist in politics, Freeth (1731-1808) enjoyed writing songs about current events and performing them for patrons at his Birmingham pub, the Leicester Arms. This drew custom to his establishment, and patrons encouraged him to publish his clever creations. In 1766, "Political Songster" first appeared as a 40-page pamphlet. Up to the sixth edition, Freeth added material and released updates every few years; thereafter, only annual updates were issued, until 1805. According to DNB, "Although unsophisticated, many of his patriotic songs have a stirring lilt; on politics he wrote with indignation, rough good humour, and an effective turn of phrase that earned him the reputation of being one of the best political ballad writers in the kingdom. From 1771 until 1785 Freeth used the pen-name John Free in punning allusion to his beliefs. His songs offer a significant insight into the popular politics of the late eighteenth century." In addition to matters of more local concern, Freeth's ballads addressed the revolution in the American colonies. In addition to using the pen name "Free," Freeth indirectly supported the American cause by voicing the distaste of common soldiers forced to fight former comrades-at-arms, and by expressing contempt for the British ministers' and generals' underestimation of the colonists' determination and abilities. "Prescot's Breeches" subtly applauds the Americans' daring midnight abduction of British General Richard Prescott, one of the most important "special operations" of the American Revolution. ESTC notes three versions of our sixth edition: one ending with p. 192; this one, ending with p. 196, and a third extending to 220 pages. All have extra pages paginated 37*-40*, so our copy has a total of 200 pages. Our version also seems to be especially uncommon: ESTC and OCLC find just six copies in North American libraries.
OPERA

OPERA

BINDINGS - MACÉ RUETTE). (ELZEVIER IMPRINT). OVID 123 x 75 mm. (4 7/8 x 3"). Three volumes. Edited by Daniel Heinsius. First Elzevir Edition. SUPERB CONTEMPORARY RED MOROCCO, LAVISHLY GILT, BY MACÉ RUETTE, covers in the "losange et écoinçons" style with large central lozenge composed of massed small tools and pointillé scrollwork within a 16-sided frame, corners of boards with similar filigree tooling, other corners with groups of floral tools, raised bands, spine compartments with central fleuron, scrolling cornerpieces, gilt titling, turn-ins with decorative gilt roll, marbled pastedowns, all edges gilt. Housed in fine modern maroon suede clamshell boxes backed with matching calf by Bibliophilia Bern. Title page of first volume with engraved ornate frame containing a tondo portrait of Ovid at head, woodcut printer's device, and decorative initials. A few leaves printed in red and black. Willems 317; Rahir 288; Dibdin, pp. 266-67; Brunet IV, 272 ("bonne édition"); Graesse V, 70. For the binding: Bibliothèque Raphaël Esmerian, Deuxième Partie, vol . II, no. 5 (8 Dec. 1972). Four small dark patches to leather, joints and corners faintly rubbed, text a shade less than bright, occasional small rust spots (one affecting a couple of words), other trivial imperfections, but A FINE COPY, clean and fresh internally, in tight, lustrous bindings with few signs of wear. This lovely set epitomizes early 17th century fine printing and fine binding. According to Dibdin, our first Elzevier printing of Ovid, with a new recension by Heinsius, was "highly treasured," especially by French collectors. Among these bibliophiles was the man who likely commissioned this binding from an innovative master craftsman who was one of the best binders in Paris. According to Esmerian, the courtier, scholar, and inaugural member of the Académie Française Henri-Louis Habert de Montmort (1600-79) began collecting Elzeviers in the 1620s and having them immediately bound by Macé Ruette (1584?1644), who had established his workshop in 1606, after an eight-year apprenticeship with Dominique Salis. Ruette served as administrator of the Guild of Booksellers, Printers, and Binders from 1629-34, and was appointed Relieur du Roi in 1629, succeeding Clovis Eve. Our binding has the "lozenge and corners" design and the filigree pointillé tooling introduced by Ruette and resurrected in the neo-gothic styles used by Thouvenin and others in the 19th century. It is the same design, employing many of the same tools and with minor variations, as lot no. 5 in volume II of the Esmerian sale at Palais Galleria, Paris, in December 1972, on a volume of Homer. The use of marbled paper for endpapers, as seen here, was another Ruette innovation; while he may not have invented the process, as originally claimed by La Caille, he was one of the first in France to employ it. Esmerian was of the opinion that small volumes like these displayed Ruette's artistry to better advantage than quartos and folios. This lovely set epitomizes early 17th century fine printing and fine binding. According to Dibdin, our first Elzevier printing of Ovid, with a new recension by Heinsius, was "highly treasured," especially by French collectors. Among these bibliophiles was the man who likely commissioned this binding from an innovative master craftsman who was one of the best binders in Paris. According to Esmerian, the courtier, scholar, and inaugural member of the Académie Française Henri-Louis Habert de Montmort (1600-79) began collecting Elzeviers in the 1620s and having them immediately bound by Macé Ruette (1584?1644), who had established his workshop in 1606, after an eight-year apprenticeship with Dominique Salis. Ruette served as administrator of the Guild of Booksellers, Printers, and Binders from 1629-34, and was appointed Relieur du Roi in 1629, succeeding Clovis Eve. Our binding has the "lozenge and corners" design and the filigree pointillé tooling introduced by Ruette and resurrected in the neo-gothic styles used by Thouvenin and others in the 19th century. It is the same design, employing many of the same tools and with minor variations, as lot no. 5 in volume II of the Esmerian sale at Palais Galleria, Paris, in December 1972, on a volume of Homer. The use of marbled paper for endpapers, as seen here, was another Ruette innovation; while he may not have invented the process, as originally claimed by La Caille, he was one of the first in France to employ it. Esmerian was of the opinion that small volumes like these displayed Ruette's artistry to better advantage than quartos and folios.
L?ABBÉ CONSTANTIN

L?ABBÉ CONSTANTIN

BINDINGS - KAUFFMANN). HALÉVY, LUDOVIC 317 x 267 mm. (12 1/2 x 10 1/2"). 133 pp. No. 118 OF 250 COPIES on Japon, with two additional states of the plates. ELEGANT SCARLET CRUSHED MOROCCO, GILT AND INLAID, BY J. KAUFFMANN, covers with an entrelac design of inlaid dark blue morocco strapwork outlined in gilt, accented with delicate sprays of gilt and inlaid blossoms, center compartment of upper cover with inlaid initial "D" and that of lower cover with inlaid "M," raised bands, spine compartments with inlaid frame entwined with climbing gilt and inlaid floral vines, giving the spine a lattice effect, densely gilt inner dentelles, floral silk brocade endleaves, all edges gilt. Original cream paper wrappers bound in. Housed in a leather-lined matching morocoo-backed chemise and slipcase. With 18 heliogravure plates and 18 vignettes after Madeleine Lemaire, all in three states, the additional states proofs before letters, one set printed in blue on Whatman paper, the other in bistre on Japon. Full-page plates and headpiece vignettes with lettered tissue guards. Vicaire IV, 8. IN SPARKLING CONDITION inside and out. This is a luxurious production that typifies the "bibliophile editions" popular with collectors in Belle Epoque Paris: a popular?usually light-hearted--story expertly printed on fine paper, lavishly illustrated by a fashionable artist, and opulently bound by a leading atelier. Binder J. Kauffmann was one of a family of binders working in Paris in the late 19th and early 20th century, producing sumptuous bindings for discerning bibliophiles, influenced by Octave Uzanne and the Goncourt brothers, whose enthusiasm for the books arts resulted in a brief "golden age" where publishers and binders competed to see who could produce the most extravagant works. Kauffmann's bindings appear on a number of strictly limited and splendidly produced books of the period, sometimes in collaboration with other binders, including Charles Meunier. Here, he has drawn inspiration from French bindings of the earlier "golden age" driven by Jean Grolier, but has added refreshing modern elements, notably the floral spray on the boards and the clever climbing floral vine on the spine. Bound for a collector with the initials "D M," our volume contains the charming tale of an elderly provincial priest contending with the scandalous new owner of the local castle, a "heretic" (read "Protestant") American actress. Fearing her corrupting influence on the innocent citizens of the parish and prepared to fight her wicked ways, the abbé is instead won over by the young woman, who turns out to be a gracious, benevolent addition to the community--and a Catholic to boot! The illustrations depicting the tranquil rural community, the well-appointed chateau, and the fashionable actress and her friends are the work of Madeleine Lemaire (1845-1928), known for her accomplished genre and flower paintings and for her Paris salon, where she presided over discussions with such luminaries as Guy de Maupassant, Sarah Bernhardt, and Marcel Proust, the latter using her as a model for Madame Verdurin in his "In Search of Lost Time." Author Ludovic Halévy (1834-1908) was primarily known as a playwright and a librettist for the opera, but he also wrote a couple of best-selling novels, the present work being the most popular. At a time when gritty naturalism was the order of the day in fiction, he presented a world that was realistic, but inhabited by kind and virtuous characters. Kauffmann's binding is a wonderful example of bibliopegic art, with materials, design, and craftsmanship that demonstrate the quality demanded by the discriminating collectors of the time, and that continue to be appreciated by bibliophiles today. This is a luxurious production that typifies the "bibliophile editions" popular with collectors in Belle Epoque Paris: a popular?usually light-hearted--story expertly printed on fine paper, lavishly illustrated by a fashionable artist, and opulently bound by a leading atelier. Binder J. Kauffmann was one of a family of binders working in Paris in the late 19th and early 20th century, producing sumptuous bindings for discerning bibliophiles, influenced by Octave Uzanne and the Goncourt brothers, whose enthusiasm for the books arts resulted in a brief "golden age" where publishers and binders competed to see who could produce the most extravagant works. Kauffmann's bindings appear on a number of strictly limited and splendidly produced books of the period, sometimes in collaboration with other binders, including Charles Meunier. Here, he has drawn inspiration from French bindings of the earlier "golden age" driven by Jean Grolier, but has added refreshing modern elements, notably the floral spray on the boards and the clever climbing floral vine on the spine. Bound for a collector with the initials "D M," our volume contains the charming tale of an elderly provincial priest contending with the scandalous new owner of the local castle, a "heretic" (read "Protestant") American actress. Fearing her corrupting influence on the innocent citizens of the parish and prepared to fight her wicked ways, the abbé is instead won over by the young woman, who turns out to be a gracious, benevolent addition to the community--and a Catholic to boot! The illustrations depicting the tranquil rural community, the well-appointed chateau, and the fashionable actress and her friends are the work of Madeleine Lemaire (1845-1928), known for her accomplished genre and flower paintings and for her Paris salon, where she presided over discussions with such luminaries as Guy de Maupassant, Sarah Bernhardt, and Marcel Proust, the latter using her as a model for Madame Verdurin in his "In Search of Lost Time." Author Ludovic Halévy (1834-1908) was primarily known as a playwright and a librettist for the opera, but he also wrote a couple of best-selling novels, the present work being the most popular. At a time when gritty naturalism was the order of the day in fiction, he presented a world t
THE ANCIENT HISTORY OF THE EGYPTIANS

THE ANCIENT HISTORY OF THE EGYPTIANS, CARTHAGINIANS, ASSYRIANS, BABYLONIANS, MEDES, AND PERSIANS, MACEDONIANS AND GRECIANS

ROLLIN, CHARLES 216 x 83 mm. (8 1/2 x 3 1/4"). Complete. (2 leaves of the preliminary leaves of Volume VII are bound in the middle of preliminary leaves for Volume II.) Eight volumes. Translated from the French. 13th Edition, revised, corrected and illustrated with a set of maps. Very attractive contemporary polished calf, cover bordered with gilt rule and decorative blind rolls, raised bands, spine panels with blind-stamped lozenge, two burgundy morocco labels, marbled edges and endpapers. A total of 17 engraved folding maps and views, plus two engraved plates, one a frontispiece portrait in the first volume and the other a scientific scene in the sixth volume. One leaf with neatly repaired five-inch arching tear into text (slight displacement, but no loss of letters), intermittent pale foxing (endpapers a bit more foxed, and isolated cases elsewhere of something beyond trivial), other inconsequential defects (a paper flaw, variable offsetting from engraved material), but printed on bright paper, and still very clean and generally pleasing internally. A few trivial marks on covers, but the original bindings lustrous and virtually unworn. Making a very fine appearance on the shelf, this is a handsomely bound set of Rollin's classic historical survey of ancient civilizations. A former rector of the University of Paris, where he reinstituted the study of Greek, Charles Rollin (1661-1741) was barred from teaching by his Jansenist religious beliefs, and turned to writing. His enduringly popular "Ancient History" was originally published in Paris in multiple volumes between 1730 and 1738, and was soon translated into German, Italian, and English. The maps of the region at various periods and of the known world of the ancients are here finely rendered and very well preserved. Making a very fine appearance on the shelf, this is a handsomely bound set of Rollin's classic historical survey of ancient civilizations. A former rector of the University of Paris, where he reinstituted the study of Greek, Charles Rollin (1661-1741) was barred from teaching by his Jansenist religious beliefs, and turned to writing. His enduringly popular "Ancient History" was originally published in Paris in multiple volumes between 1730 and 1738, and was soon translated into German, Italian, and English. The maps of the region at various periods and of the known world of the ancients are here finely rendered and very well preserved. 13th Edition, revised, corrected and illustrated with a set of maps.
FRENCH SCENERY

FRENCH SCENERY, FROM DRAWINGS MADE IN 1819

BATTY, CAPTAIN [ROBERT] 272 x 186 mm. (10 3/4 x 7 3/8"). [64] leaves (first leaf blank; a half title, called for in the list of plates, is not present). FIRST EDITION. Attractive contemporary dark brown straight-grain morocco, covers with densely gilt border of acanthus leaves, raised bands, spine gilt in compartments and with gilt lettering, turn-ins with multiple gilt rules and four gilt floral motifs, all edges gilt. Engraved title and 65 plates, including vignette, four plans, and 60 FINE PLATES OF VIEWS BY BATTY, engraved by Charles Heath and others. With text in English and French. Illegible ink signature on flyleaf and title. Corners a bit rubbed and two a little bumped, other minor signs of wear, but the binding entirely sound and very pleasing; title page and vignette rather foxed, light, generally marginal, foxing to many of the plates (darker foxing on a few examples), occasional offsetting from the text, but these defects mostly minor, and on the whole, the text and plates still very clean and appealing. With his usual charm, skill, and precision, Batty here illustrates scenes from the streets of Paris to the environs of Bordeaux. As usual, our artist demonstrates a special interest in architecture, with numerous engravings of churches, historic buildings, and even a few interiors rendered in impressive detail. As in his other illustrated books, the carefully drawn scenes here give a strong impression of veracity, while still catering to the prevailing British Romantic taste for picturesque views. Approximately three-quarters of the book is devoted to Paris, while the remainder visits Versailles, Lyon, Strasbourg, Amiens, Calais, Bordeaux, and a few other neighboring regions. Robert Batty (d. 1848) went to Italy at 15 to study art, returned to England to enroll at Cambridge, and served as an officer at Waterloo. He then undertook the publication of books which he himself illustrated, including records of his campaigns. His most famous works are the ones--like the present item--which illustrate the scenery of various countries or regions. Hunnisett says that he was the most celebrated of the amateur topographical artists whose work found its way into print at the time, while Redgrave says that "his industry was great" and "his works carefully and truthfully drawn." Ours is one of 11 books on European scenery he published during the years 1815-32 in conjunction with the best engravers of the time. "French Scenery" is generally available in the marketplace, but the present copy stands out because of its handsome binding and advantageous price. With his usual charm, skill, and precision, Batty here illustrates scenes from the streets of Paris to the environs of Bordeaux. As usual, our artist demonstrates a special interest in architecture, with numerous engravings of churches, historic buildings, and even a few interiors rendered in impressive detail. As in his other illustrated books, the carefully drawn scenes here give a strong impression of veracity, while still catering to the prevailing British Romantic taste for picturesque views. Approximately three-quarters of the book is devoted to Paris, while the remainder visits Versailles, Lyon, Strasbourg, Amiens, Calais, Bordeaux, and a few other neighboring regions. Robert Batty (d. 1848) went to Italy at 15 to study art, returned to England to enroll at Cambridge, and served as an officer at Waterloo. He then undertook the publication of books which he himself illustrated, including records of his campaigns. His most famous works are the ones--like the present item--which illustrate the scenery of various countries or regions. Hunnisett says that he was the most celebrated of the amateur topographical artists whose work found its way into print at the time, while Redgrave says that "his industry was great" and "his works carefully and truthfully drawn." Ours is one of 11 books on European scenery he published during the years 1815-32 in conjunction with the best engravers of the time. "French Scenery" is generally available in the marketplace, but the present copy stands out because of its handsome binding and advantageous price.
method-draw-image (23)

PACKETS CONTAINING 10 LEAVES THAT DEMONSTRATE THE RANGE AND DEVELOPMENT OF MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE PALEOGRAPHY Level of decoration varies, but most leaves with at least some rubrication and decorative penwork initials, the Book of Hours leaves more elaborate, with at least one burnished gold and one painted gold initial. Condition varies, but generally quite clean and completely legible, though some with general toning, light staining, and/or the occasional smudge or other blemish; one leaf in each packet recovered from a binding, and therefore this leaf with more considerable damage illustrating its use as a recyclable. Each packet contains 10 hand-picked manuscript leaves on vellum, chosen to represent a range of styles, time periods, purposes, and uses. Prepared with an academic audience in mind, these packets are advantageously priced and present an excellent opportunity for libraries, teachers, and students to develop or expand their teaching or personal collections. The following is a sample inventory of what one may expect to find in each packet: 1) A large format leaf; 2) A leaf or fragment of a leaf with musical notation; 3)A leaf recovered from a binding; 4) A 13th century Bible leaf; 5) A Breviary leaf; 6) A leaf with painted gold initials and/or decoration 7)A leaf with burnished gold initials and/or decoration; 8)A calendar leaf from a Book of Hours or Breviary; 9) A vernacular Book of Hours leaf; 10) A miniature-size leaf. A limited number of these packets are available; contents will vary between packets. Each packet contains 10 hand-picked manuscript leaves on vellum, chosen to represent a range of styles, time periods, purposes, and uses. Prepared with an academic audience in mind, these packets are advantageously priced and present an excellent opportunity for libraries, teachers, and students to develop or expand their teaching or personal collections. The following is a sample inventory of what one may expect to find in each packet: 1) A large format leaf; 2) A leaf or fragment of a leaf with musical notation; 3)A leaf recovered from a binding; 4) A 13th century Bible leaf; 5) A Breviary leaf; 6) A leaf with painted gold initials and/or decoration 7)A leaf with burnished gold initials and/or decoration; 8)A calendar leaf from a Book of Hours or Breviary; 9) A vernacular Book of Hours leaf; 10) A miniature-size leaf. A limited number of these packets are available; contents will vary between packets.
A TREATISE ON FOREST-TREES

A TREATISE ON FOREST-TREES

BOUTCHER, WILLIAM 292 x 235 mm. (11 1/2 x 9 1/4"). 4, xlviii, 259, [1] pp., [2] leaves. Second Edition. Pleasant recent dark brown half calf, marbled boards, raised bands, spine panels with simple gilt floral ornament, red morocco label, borders of spine and corners decorated in blind, edges untrimmed. Henrey 478. Short repaired tear on title, another leaf with closed tear just extending into text (no loss), leaves with general faint browning and very minor foxing, other trivial defects, but still a rather fresh and attractive copy, with very comfortable margins, in an unworn sympathetic binding. This work contains not only the best methods for cultivating trees, but also "plain directions for removing most of the valuable kinds of forest-trees, to the height of thirty feet and upwards," as well as for "transplanting hedges of sundry kinds, which will at once resist cattle," and for the "disposition, planting, and culture of hedges, by observing which, they will be handsomer and stronger fences in five years, than they now usually are in ten." In response to the practice of growing large numbers of trees on crowded plots for maximum profit, Boutcher, a nurseryman from Comely-Garden in Edinburgh, encouraged the growth of strong, healthy trees and a general scientific approach to arboriculture. Henrey says that this is the best 18th century work on its subject, and quotes H. L. Edlin as saying that it contains, even now, "much of interest and practical application in present-day forest nurseries." The book was first published in Edinburgh in 1775; ours is the second appearance of the text. This work contains not only the best methods for cultivating trees, but also "plain directions for removing most of the valuable kinds of forest-trees, to the height of thirty feet and upwards," as well as for "transplanting hedges of sundry kinds, which will at once resist cattle," and for the "disposition, planting, and culture of hedges, by observing which, they will be handsomer and stronger fences in five years, than they now usually are in ten." In response to the practice of growing large numbers of trees on crowded plots for maximum profit, Boutcher, a nurseryman from Comely-Garden in Edinburgh, encouraged the growth of strong, healthy trees and a general scientific approach to arboriculture. Henrey says that this is the best 18th century work on its subject, and quotes H. L. Edlin as saying that it contains, even now, "much of interest and practical application in present-day forest nurseries." The book was first published in Edinburgh in 1775; ours is the second appearance of the text.
A LAPIDARY OR

A LAPIDARY OR, THE HISTORY OF PRECIOUS STONES: WITH CAUTIONS FOR THE UNDECEIVING OF ALL THOSE THAT DEAL WITH PRECIOUS STONES

GEMOLOGY). NICOLS, THOMAS 185 x 145 mm. (7 1/4 x 5 5/8"). 6 p.l., 239, [1] pp. FIRST EDITION. Inoffensive contemporary calf, neatly rebacked, covers with simple blind-ruled frame with thistle cornerpieces, smooth spine with blind-stamped floral sprig at head and tail. With one folding leaf containing a table of gems and their attributes. Wing N-1145; ESTC R483403. Corners somewhat bumped, extremities a little rubbed, one-inch loss of leather to tail edge of front board, boards with a half dozen small scratches and minor chafing, but the restored binding entirely sound. A few corners with a faint dampstain, occasional very small stains (mostly marginal, but a few touching the text) or smudges, but these imperfections very minor, and on the whole a very good copy, clean, fresh, and rather bright throughout. This is the first printing of the first book written in English on gemstones. Nicols (fl. 1652) prefaces his work with a warning to the reader against attempting to use gems for supernatural purposes, lest one be ensnared by the devil, and then provides a table classifying stones by size, rarity, hardness, color, and clarity. The first section of the text is devoted to a general history of origins of gems, relying on material from the works of Boethius de Boot and Pliny. Nicols then discusses ways to polish, refine, and present stones, and warns of tricks the unscrupulous may use to fool the unwary buyer. The section ends with an examination of the supernatural effects of stones, and how to tell if this is divinely or diabolically inspired. The second part of the work details the properties, uses, and value of various stones, beginning with transparent gems like diamonds, sapphires, and emeralds, and proceeding through opaque specimens like lapis lazuli and marble, then ending with common but useful stones, including flints and whetstones. There were two further English editions of the work, in 1653 and 1659, and German editions in 1675 and 1734. This is the only work by Nicols, of whom little is known apart from his association with Jesus College, Cambridge, proclaimed on the title page here. This is not an excessively rare work, but copies with contents this fine are hard to find. This is the first printing of the first book written in English on gemstones. Nicols (fl. 1652) prefaces his work with a warning to the reader against attempting to use gems for supernatural purposes, lest one be ensnared by the devil, and then provides a table classifying stones by size, rarity, hardness, color, and clarity. The first section of the text is devoted to a general history of origins of gems, relying on material from the works of Boethius de Boot and Pliny. Nicols then discusses ways to polish, refine, and present stones, and warns of tricks the unscrupulous may use to fool the unwary buyer. The section ends with an examination of the supernatural effects of stones, and how to tell if this is divinely or diabolically inspired. The second part of the work details the properties, uses, and value of various stones, beginning with transparent gems like diamonds, sapphires, and emeralds, and proceeding through opaque specimens like lapis lazuli and marble, then ending with common but useful stones, including flints and whetstones. There were two further English editions of the work, in 1653 and 1659, and German editions in 1675 and 1734. This is the only work by Nicols, of whom little is known apart from his association with Jesus College, Cambridge, proclaimed on the title page here. This is not an excessively rare work, but copies with contents this fine are hard to find.
ALLGEMEINES EVANGELISCHES GESANGBUCH FUR DAS GROSSHERZOGTHUM HESSEN

ALLGEMEINES EVANGELISCHES GESANGBUCH FUR DAS GROSSHERZOGTHUM HESSEN

BINDINGS - EMBROIDERED). (HYMNAL IN GERMAN) 155 x 93 mm. (6 1/8 x 3 3/4"). VIII, 532, [9] pp. VERY PRETTY GREEN MOROCCO BY S. STIEBEL (ticket on recto of free endpaper) WITH INSET CANVAS PANELS on covers EMBROIDERED IN PETIT POINT with a flower at center enclosed by a leafy lozenge, with an umbrella-like bloom above and below, all worked in shades of green, yellow, and pink, raised bands with gilt rules, spine panels with blind-stamped floral ornament, gilt titling, gilt-rolled turn-ins, green endpapers, all edges gilt. Corners and ends of spine a little rubbed, occasional offsetting in text bed, but A FINE SPECIMEN, the embroidered panels clean and well preserved, the binding sound, and the text clean and fresh. This pocket-sized German hymnal comes in a charming binding that at one time made a fetching accessory to a fortunate lady's Sunday best. The ticket here states that the book was bound by S. Stiebel in Marburg, but we have been unable to trace an artisan by that name in the usual sources. The petit point panels, though appealing, were not produced by an expert needle-worker; it seems possible that this binder took panels furnished by the person who ordered the binding (perhaps as a gift?) and incorporated them into the covers. However it came about, the binding is usual and quite pleasing. This pocket-sized German hymnal comes in a charming binding that at one time made a fetching accessory to a fortunate lady's Sunday best. The ticket here states that the book was bound by S. Stiebel in Marburg, but we have been unable to trace an artisan by that name in the usual sources. The petit point panels, though appealing, were not produced by an expert needle-worker; it seems possible that this binder took panels furnished by the person who ordered the binding (perhaps as a gift?) and incorporated them into the covers. However it came about, the binding is usual and quite pleasing.
SONGS FROM BOOKS

SONGS FROM BOOKS

BINDINGS). KIPLING, RUDYARD 188 x 115 mm. (7 3/8 x 4 1/2"). xix, [1], 302 pp., [1] leaf. First English Edition, Second Printing. UNUSUAL CONTEMPORARY EMERALD GREEN CRUSHED MOROCCO, GILT, covers with sprays of gilt and onlaid daisies emanating from the gilt rules that flank the spine's raised bands, gilt titling, gilt-ruled turn-ins, patterned endpapers, all edges gilt on the rough. Stewart, p. 284-84. A breath of foxing to table of contents, but A VERY FINE COPY, internally quite clean and fresh, in an unworn binding. In this compilation, the author has brought together all of the songs and poems that appear in his prose work--more than 100 titles. Kipling usually began chapters in his books with a few lines of verse, and here we find the complete poems from which these were taken. Though better known for his stories of adventure, Kipling (1865-1936) was a most accomplished poet. After praising the brilliance of his fiction, DNB concludes, "what may be said of his prose work may apply even more strongly to his poetry, whose extraordinary variety of form and content is only now beginning to be appreciated. Among modern writers in English, only Thomas Hardy can be compared to Kipling for high achievement in both poetry and prose." Our charming binding is unsigned, but was likely done by a talented amateur around the time the book was published. The design is inventive and the work is careful. Neither the binding nor the contents show any evidence of use. In this compilation, the author has brought together all of the songs and poems that appear in his prose work--more than 100 titles. Kipling usually began chapters in his books with a few lines of verse, and here we find the complete poems from which these were taken. Though better known for his stories of adventure, Kipling (1865-1936) was a most accomplished poet. After praising the brilliance of his fiction, DNB concludes, "what may be said of his prose work may apply even more strongly to his poetry, whose extraordinary variety of form and content is only now beginning to be appreciated. Among modern writers in English, only Thomas Hardy can be compared to Kipling for high achievement in both poetry and prose." Our charming binding is unsigned, but was likely done by a talented amateur around the time the book was published. The design is inventive and the work is careful. Neither the binding nor the contents show any evidence of use.
ARTIST

ARTIST, WRITER, SOCIALIST

MORRIS, WILLIAM). MORRIS, MAY 235 x 160 mm. (9 1/4 x 6 1/4"). Two volumes. With an introduction by Bernard Shaw. FIRST EDITION. ONE OF 750 COPIES. Publisher's linen backed blue paper boards, spines with printed paper label, upper edge smooth, others untrimmed and MOSTLY UNOPENED. With frontispiece in each volume and a total of three plates and one in-text illustration after Charles Fairfax Murray, F. L. Griggs, and Edward Burne-Jones. With several inserted tissue guards, volume II with additional spine label tipped-in on rear flyleaf. Spine and label a bit browned, top of upper board slightly faded, a touch of soiling, edges a little dust-soiled, but still a very good copy, and the contents in near perfect condition. This is an indispensable resource for anyone interested in William Morris and the Kelmscott Press, containing a collection of his prose, lectures, and letters selected and edited by his daughter, much of it previously unpublished or difficult to find in print. Volume I is devoted to William Morris as an artist and writer, with a number of his papers on the Arts & Crafts movement, as well as selections of his poetry and translations of Icelandic verse. Volume II is devoted to Morris' involvement in socialism, including an account of "William Morris as I knew him" by his good friend George Bernard Shaw, as well as various letters, lectures, and articles on the subject. Both volumes include rich commentary on his life and works written by daughter May Morris (1862-1938), herself an accomplished embroiderer and a co-founder of the Women's Guild of Arts. Although intended as a supplement to the 24-volume Collected Works of William Morris (1910-15), the set is considered complete on its own and the present two volumes have always been sold separately. This is an indispensable resource for anyone interested in William Morris and the Kelmscott Press, containing a collection of his prose, lectures, and letters selected and edited by his daughter, much of it previously unpublished or difficult to find in print. Volume I is devoted to William Morris as an artist and writer, with a number of his papers on the Arts & Crafts movement, as well as selections of his poetry and translations of Icelandic verse. Volume II is devoted to Morris' involvement in socialism, including an account of "William Morris as I knew him" by his good friend George Bernard Shaw, as well as various letters, lectures, and articles on the subject. Both volumes include rich commentary on his life and works written by daughter May Morris (1862-1938), herself an accomplished embroiderer and a co-founder of the Women's Guild of Arts. Although intended as a supplement to the 24-volume Collected Works of William Morris (1910-15), the set is considered complete on its own and the present two volumes have always been sold separately.
THE VOYAGE OF THE FOX IN THE ARCTIC SEAS: A NARRATIVE OF THE DISCOVERY OF THE FATE OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN AND HIS COMPANIONS

THE VOYAGE OF THE FOX IN THE ARCTIC SEAS: A NARRATIVE OF THE DISCOVERY OF THE FATE OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN AND HIS COMPANIONS

ARCTIC EXPLORATION - FRANKLIN, SIR JOHN). M'CLINTOCK, FRANCIS LEOPOLD 225 x 155 mm. (9 x 6"). xxvii, [i], 403, [1] pp. FIRST EDITION. Pleasing contemporary red half calf over marbled boards, raised bands, spine attractively gilt in compartments featuring scrolling cornerpieces and lozenge centerpiece, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt. With frontispiece, engraved title page, 13 plates, two folding maps, one folding document, and five small illustrations in the text. A little rubbing to joints and extremities, a three-inch tear to fold-out plate (no loss), other trivial defects, but still a nearly fine copy, the attractive binding solid and very bright, and the text fresh and smooth. This is a well-illustrated and well-documented account of the final search for Sir John Franklin, the Arctic explorer who mapped nearly two thirds of the northern coastline of North America and whose expedition disappeared during an 1845 attempt to chart and navigate a section of the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic. Franklin was a hero in Britain for his earlier Arctic explorations, so when his well-equipped expedition staffed with the Royal Navy's best men failed to return or contact authorities by 1847, search efforts were mounted. Over the next decade, 30 operations were organized, some by the British government, others by private parties with funds raised by Lady Franklin. The crew that finally found some answers was led by Sir Francis Leopold M'Clintock (1819-1907), who helmed the "Fox," a sailing ship of 26 men that set off in 1859. Though hope of finding Franklin (1786-1847) alive had passed, M'Clintock succeeded in discovering numerous skeletons and relics from the ships, as well as an official form, completed by the crew, noting Franklin's death in 1847 and the loss of the ships. None of the 129 men who had departed with Franklin made it home alive. Still, DNB recognizes his place in the history of exploration: "he was not the most innovative or successful of Arctic explorers, but his charting of the North American coast was accurate and extensive." This is a well-illustrated and well-documented account of the final search for Sir John Franklin, the Arctic explorer who mapped nearly two thirds of the northern coastline of North America and whose expedition disappeared during an 1845 attempt to chart and navigate a section of the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic. Franklin was a hero in Britain for his earlier Arctic explorations, so when his well-equipped expedition staffed with the Royal Navy's best men failed to return or contact authorities by 1847, search efforts were mounted. Over the next decade, 30 operations were organized, some by the British government, others by private parties with funds raised by Lady Franklin. The crew that finally found some answers was led by Sir Francis Leopold M'Clintock (1819-1907), who helmed the "Fox," a sailing ship of 26 men that set off in 1859. Though hope of finding Franklin (1786-1847) alive had passed, M'Clintock succeeded in discovering numerous skeletons and relics from the ships, as well as an official form, completed by the crew, noting Franklin's death in 1847 and the loss of the ships. None of the 129 men who had departed with Franklin made it home alive. Still, DNB recognizes his place in the history of exploration: "he was not the most innovative or successful of Arctic explorers, but his charting of the North American coast was accurate and extensive."
DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY

DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY

SHEA, JOHN GILMARY 233 x 150 mm. (9 1/8 x 5 7/8"). lxxx, 268 pp. FIRST EDITION. Handsome red morocco by Zaehnsdorf (stamp-signed on front turn-in), covers with three straight gilt frames and a wavy frame with floral cornerpieces, raised bands, spine compartments with gilt scrolls and gilt lettering, all edges gilt. Frontispiece facsimile letter, fold-out facsimile of the original hand-drawn map of the Mississippi or Conception River by Father Marquette tipped in at rear. Howes S-357; Sabin 80002. Light one-inch abrasion on lower board, contents with a handful of small rust spots and negligible blemishes, but in excellent condition inside and out. Notable for its attention to detail and accuracy, the present work contains several accounts of early North American expeditions taken directly from primary sources, including the narratives of Marquette, Allouez, Membré, Hennepin, and Anastase Douay. John Gilmary Shea (1824-92) is best remembered as a historian of Roman Catholicism in America--the Catholic Encyclopedia lauds him as "practically a pioneer in this field"--but he was also very interested in Native American missions and the early exploration of America, as the present volume attests. Sabin (quoting Field) notes that "Beside the valuable relations, which afford us the first accounts of the Indian tribes which inhabited the vast tract of territory, from the St. Lawrence to the Mississippi, Mr. Shea has added notes, biographical sketches, and bibliographical accounts of works upon aboriginal history, which are scarcely to be overestimated." Of special interest is the delicate facsimile of the "newly-discovered map of Marquette," found here in an excellent state of preservation. Though this work is not terribly uncommon on the market, it is unusual to find a copy in such good condition and so finely bound. Notable for its attention to detail and accuracy, the present work contains several accounts of early North American expeditions taken directly from primary sources, including the narratives of Marquette, Allouez, Membré, Hennepin, and Anastase Douay. John Gilmary Shea (1824-92) is best remembered as a historian of Roman Catholicism in America--the Catholic Encyclopedia lauds him as "practically a pioneer in this field"--but he was also very interested in Native American missions and the early exploration of America, as the present volume attests. Sabin (quoting Field) notes that "Beside the valuable relations, which afford us the first accounts of the Indian tribes which inhabited the vast tract of territory, from the St. Lawrence to the Mississippi, Mr. Shea has added notes, biographical sketches, and bibliographical accounts of works upon aboriginal history, which are scarcely to be overestimated." Of special interest is the delicate facsimile of the "newly-discovered map of Marquette," found here in an excellent state of preservation. Though this work is not terribly uncommon on the market, it is unusual to find a copy in such good condition and so finely bound.