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Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books

A TREATISE ON FOREST-TREES

A TREATISE ON FOREST-TREES

BOUTCHER, WILLIAM 292 x 235 mm. (11 1/2 x 9 1/4"). 4, xlviii, 259, [1] pp., [2] leaves. Second Edition. Pleasant recent dark brown half calf, marbled boards, raised bands, spine panels with simple gilt floral ornament, red morocco label, borders of spine and corners decorated in blind, edges untrimmed. Henrey 478. Short repaired tear on title, another leaf with closed tear just extending into text (no loss), leaves with general faint browning and very minor foxing, other trivial defects, but still a rather fresh and attractive copy, with very comfortable margins, in an unworn sympathetic binding. This work contains not only the best methods for cultivating trees, but also "plain directions for removing most of the valuable kinds of forest-trees, to the height of thirty feet and upwards," as well as for "transplanting hedges of sundry kinds, which will at once resist cattle," and for the "disposition, planting, and culture of hedges, by observing which, they will be handsomer and stronger fences in five years, than they now usually are in ten." In response to the practice of growing large numbers of trees on crowded plots for maximum profit, Boutcher, a nurseryman from Comely-Garden in Edinburgh, encouraged the growth of strong, healthy trees and a general scientific approach to arboriculture. Henrey says that this is the best 18th century work on its subject, and quotes H. L. Edlin as saying that it contains, even now, "much of interest and practical application in present-day forest nurseries." The book was first published in Edinburgh in 1775; ours is the second appearance of the text. This work contains not only the best methods for cultivating trees, but also "plain directions for removing most of the valuable kinds of forest-trees, to the height of thirty feet and upwards," as well as for "transplanting hedges of sundry kinds, which will at once resist cattle," and for the "disposition, planting, and culture of hedges, by observing which, they will be handsomer and stronger fences in five years, than they now usually are in ten." In response to the practice of growing large numbers of trees on crowded plots for maximum profit, Boutcher, a nurseryman from Comely-Garden in Edinburgh, encouraged the growth of strong, healthy trees and a general scientific approach to arboriculture. Henrey says that this is the best 18th century work on its subject, and quotes H. L. Edlin as saying that it contains, even now, "much of interest and practical application in present-day forest nurseries." The book was first published in Edinburgh in 1775; ours is the second appearance of the text.
FARTHEST NORTH

FARTHEST NORTH

ARCTIC EXPLORATION). NANSEN, FRIDTJOF 235 x 165 mm. (9 1/2 x 6 1/2"). Two volumes. Second Edition. Attractive contemporary marbled half calf over marbled boards, gilt-decorated raised bands flanked by plain gilt rules, spine panels with gilt botanical centerpiece. With three frontispieces, one folding map, and numerous illustrations in the text, 110 of them full-page. Front pastedown of each volume with red morocco book label of J. Kimpton. PMM 384. Front joint of first volume cracked (with a little looseness to the board), a little rubbing and a few nicks to leather, short split along one fold of map, endpapers lightly foxed, but an excellent copy, internally clean and fresh in a pleasing binding. First issued in 1897, this amply illustrated work recounts Nansen's epic pursuit of the North Pole in 1893-96, during which time he travelled closer to the top of the world (86 degrees, 14 minutes north) than had any other known person. He and a small crew set off from Norway in a specially designed boat, and some six months later purposefully embedded it in the ice in order to drift with the Arctic current, which Nansen believed would carry them from the coast of Siberia northwest to the pole. But in mid-drift, he realized the current would not carry him far enough, so he and crewmate Frederik Johansen set out across the ice with a dogsled. Nansen and Johansen were gone for more than a year before stumbling upon an exploration party from England that eventually returned them to Norway, where Nansen found himself an international sensation. Written in two months, "Farthest North," says author Andrew Nieland, "lacks literary polish, but Nansen's eye for detail and indomitable spirit shine through. Because he wrote while still thawing from his adventures, his story has an exciting immediacy, one that the passing of a century has done little to diminish. As a historical document, as an epic adventure, and as a revival of a worthy hero long forgotten, 'Farthest North' is a tale well worth remembering." Fridtjof Wedel-Jarlsberg Nansen (1861-1930) was a Norwegian explorer, scientist, and diplomat who had a doctorate in zoological and histological studies. Before his voyage toward the North Pole, he had traversed Greenland and told about his journey in "The First Crossing of Greenland" (English translation, 1890). After his Arctic exploits and the publication of "Farthest North," Nansen became a professor of oceanography. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922 for his work as a League of Nations High Commissioner. First issued in 1897, this amply illustrated work recounts Nansen's epic pursuit of the North Pole in 1893-96, during which time he travelled closer to the top of the world (86 degrees, 14 minutes north) than had any other known person. He and a small crew set off from Norway in a specially designed boat, and some six months later purposefully embedded it in the ice in order to drift with the Arctic current, which Nansen believed would carry them from the coast of Siberia northwest to the pole. But in mid-drift, he realized the current would not carry him far enough, so he and crewmate Frederik Johansen set out across the ice with a dogsled. Nansen and Johansen were gone for more than a year before stumbling upon an exploration party from England that eventually returned them to Norway, where Nansen found himself an international sensation. Written in two months, "Farthest North," says author Andrew Nieland, "lacks literary polish, but Nansen's eye for detail and indomitable spirit shine through. Because he wrote while still thawing from his adventures, his story has an exciting immediacy, one that the passing of a century has done little to diminish. As a historical document, as an epic adventure, and as a revival of a worthy hero long forgotten, 'Farthest North' is a tale well worth remembering." Fridtjof Wedel-Jarlsberg Nansen (1861-1930) was a Norwegian explorer, scientist, and diplomat who had a doctorate in zoological and histological studies. Before his voyage toward the North Pole, he had traversed Greenland and told about his journey in "The First Crossing of Greenland" (English translation, 1890). After his Arctic exploits and the publication of "Farthest North," Nansen became a professor of oceanography. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922 for his work as a League of Nations High Commissioner.
SONNETS WITH FOLK SONGS FROM THE SPANISH

SONNETS WITH FOLK SONGS FROM THE SPANISH

GOLDEN COCKEREL PRESS). (BINDINGS). ELLIS, HAVELOCK 222 x 155 mm. (9 x 6"). xiv, 81. [1] pp., [2] leaves (final blank). No. 491 OF 500 COPIES. EXCELLENT CONTEMPORARY DARK BLUE MOROCCO, LAVISHLY GILT AND INLAID, covers with frame of gilt and inlaid posies in scarlet, turquoise, and citron morocco, central panel of upper cover with large and elaborate lobed ornament filled with swirling floral branches with inlaid blossoms extending from a central "wheel" of yellow lilies encircled by tiny blue forget-me-nots, raised bands, spine compartments with vertical gilt lettering, gilt-ruled turn-ins with floral sprays at corners, handmade endpapers patterned in blue and silver, top edge gilt, other edges untrimmed. Chanticleer 24; Cave & Mason 24. AN ESPECIALLY FINE COPY, clean, fresh, and bright in a binding brilliant with gold. This is an immaculate copy of a private press edition of juvenile poems by an intellectual best known for his work on human sexuality, in a binding probably done by an extremely talented amateur. The Golden Cockerel Press was founded in 1920 By Hal Taylor, his wife Gay, and two of their friends with the intention of printing fine editions of established texts as well as new literary works of merit from young authors. After Robert Gibbings purchased the press in 1924, he turned its focus to works with wood-engraved illustrations by Eric Gill and others; however, since artists were unpredictable with deadlines, he continued to produce text-only works like the present one to keep a steady output going. Havelock Ellis (1859-1939) composed these verses between the ages of 17, when he was a schoolmaster in rural Australia, and 25, when he was studying medicine at St. Thomas' Hospital in London. Health issues had made his schooling somewhat intermittent, so he had spent much time as a boy reading the poetry of Shelley and Swinburne, and always considered poetry the medium through which he learned to write. After these youthful experiments, however, he abandoned poetry for the field that became known as sexology, producing the first serious study of homosexuality in English. Our binding is very much in the spirit of the ornate bindings produced by the great rivals Riviere and Sangorski & Sutcliffe, with numerous morocco inlays and onlays and intricate gilt tooling in an Oriental-inspired design. This is an immaculate copy of a private press edition of juvenile poems by an intellectual best known for his work on human sexuality, in a binding probably done by an extremely talented amateur. The Golden Cockerel Press was founded in 1920 By Hal Taylor, his wife Gay, and two of their friends with the intention of printing fine editions of established texts as well as new literary works of merit from young authors. After Robert Gibbings purchased the press in 1924, he turned its focus to works with wood-engraved illustrations by Eric Gill and others; however, since artists were unpredictable with deadlines, he continued to produce text-only works like the present one to keep a steady output going. Havelock Ellis (1859-1939) composed these verses between the ages of 17, when he was a schoolmaster in rural Australia, and 25, when he was studying medicine at St. Thomas' Hospital in London. Health issues had made his schooling somewhat intermittent, so he had spent much time as a boy reading the poetry of Shelley and Swinburne, and always considered poetry the medium through which he learned to write. After these youthful experiments, however, he abandoned poetry for the field that became known as sexology, producing the first serious study of homosexuality in English. Our binding is very much in the spirit of the ornate bindings produced by the great rivals Riviere and Sangorski & Sutcliffe, with numerous morocco inlays and onlays and intricate gilt tooling in an Oriental-inspired design.
A LAPIDARY OR

A LAPIDARY OR, THE HISTORY OF PRECIOUS STONES: WITH CAUTIONS FOR THE UNDECEIVING OF ALL THOSE THAT DEAL WITH PRECIOUS STONES

GEMOLOGY). NICOLS, THOMAS 185 x 145 mm. (7 1/4 x 5 5/8"). 6 p.l., 239, [1] pp. FIRST EDITION. Inoffensive contemporary calf, neatly rebacked, covers with simple blind-ruled frame with thistle cornerpieces, smooth spine with blind-stamped floral sprig at head and tail. With one folding leaf containing a table of gems and their attributes. Wing N-1145; ESTC R483403. Corners somewhat bumped, extremities a little rubbed, one-inch loss of leather to tail edge of front board, boards with a half dozen small scratches and minor chafing, but the restored binding entirely sound. A few corners with a faint dampstain, occasional very small stains (mostly marginal, but a few touching the text) or smudges, but these imperfections very minor, and on the whole a very good copy, clean, fresh, and rather bright throughout. This is the first printing of the first book written in English on gemstones. Nicols (fl. 1652) prefaces his work with a warning to the reader against attempting to use gems for supernatural purposes, lest one be ensnared by the devil, and then provides a table classifying stones by size, rarity, hardness, color, and clarity. The first section of the text is devoted to a general history of origins of gems, relying on material from the works of Boethius de Boot and Pliny. Nicols then discusses ways to polish, refine, and present stones, and warns of tricks the unscrupulous may use to fool the unwary buyer. The section ends with an examination of the supernatural effects of stones, and how to tell if this is divinely or diabolically inspired. The second part of the work details the properties, uses, and value of various stones, beginning with transparent gems like diamonds, sapphires, and emeralds, and proceeding through opaque specimens like lapis lazuli and marble, then ending with common but useful stones, including flints and whetstones. There were two further English editions of the work, in 1653 and 1659, and German editions in 1675 and 1734. This is the only work by Nicols, of whom little is known apart from his association with Jesus College, Cambridge, proclaimed on the title page here. This is not an excessively rare work, but copies with contents this fine are hard to find. This is the first printing of the first book written in English on gemstones. Nicols (fl. 1652) prefaces his work with a warning to the reader against attempting to use gems for supernatural purposes, lest one be ensnared by the devil, and then provides a table classifying stones by size, rarity, hardness, color, and clarity. The first section of the text is devoted to a general history of origins of gems, relying on material from the works of Boethius de Boot and Pliny. Nicols then discusses ways to polish, refine, and present stones, and warns of tricks the unscrupulous may use to fool the unwary buyer. The section ends with an examination of the supernatural effects of stones, and how to tell if this is divinely or diabolically inspired. The second part of the work details the properties, uses, and value of various stones, beginning with transparent gems like diamonds, sapphires, and emeralds, and proceeding through opaque specimens like lapis lazuli and marble, then ending with common but useful stones, including flints and whetstones. There were two further English editions of the work, in 1653 and 1659, and German editions in 1675 and 1734. This is the only work by Nicols, of whom little is known apart from his association with Jesus College, Cambridge, proclaimed on the title page here. This is not an excessively rare work, but copies with contents this fine are hard to find.
ALLGEMEINES EVANGELISCHES GESANGBUCH FUR DAS GROSSHERZOGTHUM HESSEN

ALLGEMEINES EVANGELISCHES GESANGBUCH FUR DAS GROSSHERZOGTHUM HESSEN

BINDINGS - EMBROIDERED). (HYMNAL IN GERMAN) 155 x 93 mm. (6 1/8 x 3 3/4"). VIII, 532, [9] pp. VERY PRETTY GREEN MOROCCO BY S. STIEBEL (ticket on recto of free endpaper) WITH INSET CANVAS PANELS on covers EMBROIDERED IN PETIT POINT with a flower at center enclosed by a leafy lozenge, with an umbrella-like bloom above and below, all worked in shades of green, yellow, and pink, raised bands with gilt rules, spine panels with blind-stamped floral ornament, gilt titling, gilt-rolled turn-ins, green endpapers, all edges gilt. Corners and ends of spine a little rubbed, occasional offsetting in text bed, but A FINE SPECIMEN, the embroidered panels clean and well preserved, the binding sound, and the text clean and fresh. This pocket-sized German hymnal comes in a charming binding that at one time made a fetching accessory to a fortunate lady's Sunday best. The ticket here states that the book was bound by S. Stiebel in Marburg, but we have been unable to trace an artisan by that name in the usual sources. The petit point panels, though appealing, were not produced by an expert needle-worker; it seems possible that this binder took panels furnished by the person who ordered the binding (perhaps as a gift?) and incorporated them into the covers. However it came about, the binding is usual and quite pleasing. This pocket-sized German hymnal comes in a charming binding that at one time made a fetching accessory to a fortunate lady's Sunday best. The ticket here states that the book was bound by S. Stiebel in Marburg, but we have been unable to trace an artisan by that name in the usual sources. The petit point panels, though appealing, were not produced by an expert needle-worker; it seems possible that this binder took panels furnished by the person who ordered the binding (perhaps as a gift?) and incorporated them into the covers. However it came about, the binding is usual and quite pleasing.
ONE HUNDRED POEMS OF KABIR

ONE HUNDRED POEMS OF KABIR

BINDINGS). KABIR 215 x 140 mm. (8 3/8 x 5 1/2"). xxvii, [1], 67, [1] pp. Translated by Rabindranath Tagore. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. ONE OF 750 COPIES, 400 of which were for sale to the public. VERY PRETTY CONTEMPORARY OLIVE GREEN MOROCCO, EXUBERANTLY GILT AND INLAID, upper cover with frame of botanical rolls enclosing central panel with spray of inlaid ivory morocco lilies at corners, and large central medallion of inlaid lilies, lily buds, and small blooms with much gilt foliage, lower cover with plain and dotted gilt-rule frame, raised bands, spine gilt in compartments with central daisy and leafy cornerpieces, gilt titling, turn-ins with multiple gilt rules and sprays of inlaid flowers at corners, Japanese vellum endpapers, all edges gilt. Naturally occurring(?) variations in the grain and hue of the leather, half title with small finger smudge, but A VERY FINE COPY, internally clean and bright, in a sparkling binding. This is the first appearance in English of the influential verse of Medieval Indian poet and mystic Kabir, translated by the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, and in a handsomely decorated binding. Kabir (1440-1518) grew up in the Islamic faith, but later became a disciple of the Hindu ascetic Ramananda. He came to reject aspects of both faiths, scorning mindless recitation of scriptures, meaningless rituals, and hypocrisy. In his poems, he advises seeking the divine within oneself and in all beings, and emphasizes devotion and mysticism rather than strict adherence to any creed. His work was an inspiration to Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism, and some of his poetry made its way into Sikh scriptures. Kabir's poems were translated to English by poet, playwright, composer, and polymath Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), described by Britannica as "the outstanding creative artist of early 20th-century India." He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, and his biography in "Nobel Lectures" notes, "For the world he became the voice of India's spiritual heritage; and for India, especially for Bengal, he became a great living institution." The unsigned binding here incorporates motifs familiar from Indian and Islamic art, and its design also suggests someone who had trained either in one of the great London workshops or in one of the bookbinding programs that grew out of the Arts & Crafts movement. The binding and its contents show no signs of wear or use. This is the first appearance in English of the influential verse of Medieval Indian poet and mystic Kabir, translated by the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, and in a handsomely decorated binding. Kabir (1440-1518) grew up in the Islamic faith, but later became a disciple of the Hindu ascetic Ramananda. He came to reject aspects of both faiths, scorning mindless recitation of scriptures, meaningless rituals, and hypocrisy. In his poems, he advises seeking the divine within oneself and in all beings, and emphasizes devotion and mysticism rather than strict adherence to any creed. His work was an inspiration to Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism, and some of his poetry made its way into Sikh scriptures. Kabir's poems were translated to English by poet, playwright, composer, and polymath Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), described by Britannica as "the outstanding creative artist of early 20th-century India." He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, and his biography in "Nobel Lectures" notes, "For the world he became the voice of India's spiritual heritage; and for India, especially for Bengal, he became a great living institution." The unsigned binding here incorporates motifs familiar from Indian and Islamic art, and its design also suggests someone who had trained either in one of the great London workshops or in one of the bookbinding programs that grew out of the Arts & Crafts movement. The binding and its contents show no signs of wear or use. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. ONE OF 750 COPIES, 400 of which were for sale to the public.
SONGS FROM BOOKS

SONGS FROM BOOKS

BINDINGS). KIPLING, RUDYARD 188 x 115 mm. (7 3/8 x 4 1/2"). xix, [1], 302 pp., [1] leaf. First English Edition, Second Printing. UNUSUAL CONTEMPORARY EMERALD GREEN CRUSHED MOROCCO, GILT, covers with sprays of gilt and onlaid daisies emanating from the gilt rules that flank the spine's raised bands, gilt titling, gilt-ruled turn-ins, patterned endpapers, all edges gilt on the rough. Stewart, p. 284-84. A breath of foxing to table of contents, but A VERY FINE COPY, internally quite clean and fresh, in an unworn binding. In this compilation, the author has brought together all of the songs and poems that appear in his prose work--more than 100 titles. Kipling usually began chapters in his books with a few lines of verse, and here we find the complete poems from which these were taken. Though better known for his stories of adventure, Kipling (1865-1936) was a most accomplished poet. After praising the brilliance of his fiction, DNB concludes, "what may be said of his prose work may apply even more strongly to his poetry, whose extraordinary variety of form and content is only now beginning to be appreciated. Among modern writers in English, only Thomas Hardy can be compared to Kipling for high achievement in both poetry and prose." Our charming binding is unsigned, but was likely done by a talented amateur around the time the book was published. The design is inventive and the work is careful. Neither the binding nor the contents show any evidence of use. In this compilation, the author has brought together all of the songs and poems that appear in his prose work--more than 100 titles. Kipling usually began chapters in his books with a few lines of verse, and here we find the complete poems from which these were taken. Though better known for his stories of adventure, Kipling (1865-1936) was a most accomplished poet. After praising the brilliance of his fiction, DNB concludes, "what may be said of his prose work may apply even more strongly to his poetry, whose extraordinary variety of form and content is only now beginning to be appreciated. Among modern writers in English, only Thomas Hardy can be compared to Kipling for high achievement in both poetry and prose." Our charming binding is unsigned, but was likely done by a talented amateur around the time the book was published. The design is inventive and the work is careful. Neither the binding nor the contents show any evidence of use.
ARTIST

ARTIST, WRITER, SOCIALIST

MORRIS, WILLIAM). MORRIS, MAY 235 x 160 mm. (9 1/4 x 6 1/4"). Two volumes. With an introduction by Bernard Shaw. FIRST EDITION. ONE OF 750 COPIES. Publisher's linen backed blue paper boards, spines with printed paper label, upper edge smooth, others untrimmed and MOSTLY UNOPENED. With frontispiece in each volume and a total of three plates and one in-text illustration after Charles Fairfax Murray, F. L. Griggs, and Edward Burne-Jones. With several inserted tissue guards, volume II with additional spine label tipped-in on rear flyleaf. Spine and label a bit browned, top of upper board slightly faded, a touch of soiling, edges a little dust-soiled, but still a very good copy, and the contents in near perfect condition. This is an indispensable resource for anyone interested in William Morris and the Kelmscott Press, containing a collection of his prose, lectures, and letters selected and edited by his daughter, much of it previously unpublished or difficult to find in print. Volume I is devoted to William Morris as an artist and writer, with a number of his papers on the Arts & Crafts movement, as well as selections of his poetry and translations of Icelandic verse. Volume II is devoted to Morris' involvement in socialism, including an account of "William Morris as I knew him" by his good friend George Bernard Shaw, as well as various letters, lectures, and articles on the subject. Both volumes include rich commentary on his life and works written by daughter May Morris (1862-1938), herself an accomplished embroiderer and a co-founder of the Women's Guild of Arts. Although intended as a supplement to the 24-volume Collected Works of William Morris (1910-15), the set is considered complete on its own and the present two volumes have always been sold separately. This is an indispensable resource for anyone interested in William Morris and the Kelmscott Press, containing a collection of his prose, lectures, and letters selected and edited by his daughter, much of it previously unpublished or difficult to find in print. Volume I is devoted to William Morris as an artist and writer, with a number of his papers on the Arts & Crafts movement, as well as selections of his poetry and translations of Icelandic verse. Volume II is devoted to Morris' involvement in socialism, including an account of "William Morris as I knew him" by his good friend George Bernard Shaw, as well as various letters, lectures, and articles on the subject. Both volumes include rich commentary on his life and works written by daughter May Morris (1862-1938), herself an accomplished embroiderer and a co-founder of the Women's Guild of Arts. Although intended as a supplement to the 24-volume Collected Works of William Morris (1910-15), the set is considered complete on its own and the present two volumes have always been sold separately.
THE VOYAGE OF THE FOX IN THE ARCTIC SEAS: A NARRATIVE OF THE DISCOVERY OF THE FATE OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN AND HIS COMPANIONS

THE VOYAGE OF THE FOX IN THE ARCTIC SEAS: A NARRATIVE OF THE DISCOVERY OF THE FATE OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN AND HIS COMPANIONS

ARCTIC EXPLORATION - FRANKLIN, SIR JOHN). M'CLINTOCK, FRANCIS LEOPOLD 225 x 155 mm. (9 x 6"). xxvii, [i], 403, [1] pp. FIRST EDITION. Pleasing contemporary red half calf over marbled boards, raised bands, spine attractively gilt in compartments featuring scrolling cornerpieces and lozenge centerpiece, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt. With frontispiece, engraved title page, 13 plates, two folding maps, one folding document, and five small illustrations in the text. A little rubbing to joints and extremities, a three-inch tear to fold-out plate (no loss), other trivial defects, but still a nearly fine copy, the attractive binding solid and very bright, and the text fresh and smooth. This is a well-illustrated and well-documented account of the final search for Sir John Franklin, the Arctic explorer who mapped nearly two thirds of the northern coastline of North America and whose expedition disappeared during an 1845 attempt to chart and navigate a section of the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic. Franklin was a hero in Britain for his earlier Arctic explorations, so when his well-equipped expedition staffed with the Royal Navy's best men failed to return or contact authorities by 1847, search efforts were mounted. Over the next decade, 30 operations were organized, some by the British government, others by private parties with funds raised by Lady Franklin. The crew that finally found some answers was led by Sir Francis Leopold M'Clintock (1819-1907), who helmed the "Fox," a sailing ship of 26 men that set off in 1859. Though hope of finding Franklin (1786-1847) alive had passed, M'Clintock succeeded in discovering numerous skeletons and relics from the ships, as well as an official form, completed by the crew, noting Franklin's death in 1847 and the loss of the ships. None of the 129 men who had departed with Franklin made it home alive. Still, DNB recognizes his place in the history of exploration: "he was not the most innovative or successful of Arctic explorers, but his charting of the North American coast was accurate and extensive." This is a well-illustrated and well-documented account of the final search for Sir John Franklin, the Arctic explorer who mapped nearly two thirds of the northern coastline of North America and whose expedition disappeared during an 1845 attempt to chart and navigate a section of the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic. Franklin was a hero in Britain for his earlier Arctic explorations, so when his well-equipped expedition staffed with the Royal Navy's best men failed to return or contact authorities by 1847, search efforts were mounted. Over the next decade, 30 operations were organized, some by the British government, others by private parties with funds raised by Lady Franklin. The crew that finally found some answers was led by Sir Francis Leopold M'Clintock (1819-1907), who helmed the "Fox," a sailing ship of 26 men that set off in 1859. Though hope of finding Franklin (1786-1847) alive had passed, M'Clintock succeeded in discovering numerous skeletons and relics from the ships, as well as an official form, completed by the crew, noting Franklin's death in 1847 and the loss of the ships. None of the 129 men who had departed with Franklin made it home alive. Still, DNB recognizes his place in the history of exploration: "he was not the most innovative or successful of Arctic explorers, but his charting of the North American coast was accurate and extensive."
DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY

DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY

SHEA, JOHN GILMARY 233 x 150 mm. (9 1/8 x 5 7/8"). lxxx, 268 pp. FIRST EDITION. Handsome red morocco by Zaehnsdorf (stamp-signed on front turn-in), covers with three straight gilt frames and a wavy frame with floral cornerpieces, raised bands, spine compartments with gilt scrolls and gilt lettering, all edges gilt. Frontispiece facsimile letter, fold-out facsimile of the original hand-drawn map of the Mississippi or Conception River by Father Marquette tipped in at rear. Howes S-357; Sabin 80002. Light one-inch abrasion on lower board, contents with a handful of small rust spots and negligible blemishes, but in excellent condition inside and out. Notable for its attention to detail and accuracy, the present work contains several accounts of early North American expeditions taken directly from primary sources, including the narratives of Marquette, Allouez, Membré, Hennepin, and Anastase Douay. John Gilmary Shea (1824-92) is best remembered as a historian of Roman Catholicism in America--the Catholic Encyclopedia lauds him as "practically a pioneer in this field"--but he was also very interested in Native American missions and the early exploration of America, as the present volume attests. Sabin (quoting Field) notes that "Beside the valuable relations, which afford us the first accounts of the Indian tribes which inhabited the vast tract of territory, from the St. Lawrence to the Mississippi, Mr. Shea has added notes, biographical sketches, and bibliographical accounts of works upon aboriginal history, which are scarcely to be overestimated." Of special interest is the delicate facsimile of the "newly-discovered map of Marquette," found here in an excellent state of preservation. Though this work is not terribly uncommon on the market, it is unusual to find a copy in such good condition and so finely bound. Notable for its attention to detail and accuracy, the present work contains several accounts of early North American expeditions taken directly from primary sources, including the narratives of Marquette, Allouez, Membré, Hennepin, and Anastase Douay. John Gilmary Shea (1824-92) is best remembered as a historian of Roman Catholicism in America--the Catholic Encyclopedia lauds him as "practically a pioneer in this field"--but he was also very interested in Native American missions and the early exploration of America, as the present volume attests. Sabin (quoting Field) notes that "Beside the valuable relations, which afford us the first accounts of the Indian tribes which inhabited the vast tract of territory, from the St. Lawrence to the Mississippi, Mr. Shea has added notes, biographical sketches, and bibliographical accounts of works upon aboriginal history, which are scarcely to be overestimated." Of special interest is the delicate facsimile of the "newly-discovered map of Marquette," found here in an excellent state of preservation. Though this work is not terribly uncommon on the market, it is unusual to find a copy in such good condition and so finely bound.
ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND with THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND with THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS

LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB). [DODGSON, CHARLES]. "LEWIS CARROLL," Pseudonym 229 x 152 mm. (9 x 6"). Two volumes. Wonderland with an introduction by Henry Seidel Canby; "Looking-Glass" with an introduction by Carl Van Doren. ONE OF 1,500 COPIES, BOTH VOLUMES SIGNED BY ALICE HARGREAVES, "the original Alice." Publisher's elaborately gilt red morocco (for "Wonderland") and matching blue calf (for "Looking-Glass"), both bindings designed by Frederic Warde, each with publisher's (somewhat worn) slipcase that repeats the spine decoration from the volume, and both housed in a modern slipcase. With 94 original illustrations by John Tenniel, the 43 illustrations for "Wonderland" re-engraved on wood by Bruno Rollitz, the 51 illustrations in "Looking-Glass" re-engraved by Frederic Warde. Wonderland: Quarto-Millenary 36; Newman & Wiche 36a. "Looking-Glass": Quarto-Millenary 65; Newman & Wiche 65a. Wonderland with extremities a little rubbed, "Looking-Glass" with chipping and a neat repair to head of spine, tail of spine rather rubbed, short crack to tail of rear joint, boards a little chafed, but a very good set overall, and fine internally, clean and fresh throughout. These attractively-produced private press copies of two of the best-loved works of children's literature represent the only editions to be signed by the girl for whom they were written, Alice Liddell Hargreaves (1852-1934). Alice was the daughter of Henry Liddell, dean of Christ Church, Oxford, where Charles Dodgson was a lecturer in mathematics. Dodgson, whose hobby was photography, frequently photographed Alice and her sisters and became a close family friend, playing games with, and making up stories for, the children. According to DNB, it was on a picnic on 4 July 1862 that "he invented the story of Alice in Wonderland. The real Alice was then aged ten and pleaded with him to write Alice's adventures down for her, which he carefully did, supplying his own illustrations, in a green notebook that has become one of the most cherished literary manuscripts in the British Library." Over the years, Alice steadfastly refused requests to sign copies of other editions of the two works. But, late in her life, and prompted by a significant monetary inducement ($1.50 per signature), she was prevailed upon to sign volumes from both of the present editions. She did not, in fact, sign all of the copies of these printings (subscribers not willing to pay a surcharge did not get an autographed copy). "Quarto Millenary" estimates that Hargreaves signed about 1,200 copies of "Wonderland," and Newman & Wiches says that only about 500 of "Looking-Glass" were signed. Our volumes owe their appeal in large measure to the taste and skill of typographer and designer Frederic Warde (1894-1939), whose lovely italic hand graces the colophon here. Perhaps best known for developing the elegant italic font Arrighi, Warde began his career as a printer with the house of William Edwin Rudge, later supervised the legendary Officina Bodoni, and later still did work for several American private presses, including Crosby Gaige and, of course, the Limited Editions Club. These attractively-produced private press copies of two of the best-loved works of children's literature represent the only editions to be signed by the girl for whom they were written, Alice Liddell Hargreaves (1852-1934). Alice was the daughter of Henry Liddell, dean of Christ Church, Oxford, where Charles Dodgson was a lecturer in mathematics. Dodgson, whose hobby was photography, frequently photographed Alice and her sisters and became a close family friend, playing games with, and making up stories for, the children. According to DNB, it was on a picnic on 4 July 1862 that "he invented the story of Alice in Wonderland. The real Alice was then aged ten and pleaded with him to write Alice's adventures down for her, which he carefully did, supplying his own illustrations, in a green notebook that has become one of the most cherished literary manuscripts in the British Library." Over the years, Alice steadfastly refused requests to sign copies of other editions of the two works. But, late in her life, and prompted by a significant monetary inducement ($1.50 per signature), she was prevailed upon to sign volumes from both of the present editions. She did not, in fact, sign all of the copies of these printings (subscribers not willing to pay a surcharge did not get an autographed copy). "Quarto Millenary" estimates that Hargreaves signed about 1,200 copies of "Wonderland," and Newman & Wiches says that only about 500 of "Looking-Glass" were signed. Our volumes owe their appeal in large measure to the taste and skill of typographer and designer Frederic Warde (1894-1939), whose lovely italic hand graces the colophon here. Perhaps best known for developing the elegant italic font Arrighi, Warde began his career as a printer with the house of William Edwin Rudge, later supervised the legendary Officina Bodoni, and later still did work for several American private presses, including Crosby Gaige and, of course, the Limited Editions Club. ONE OF 1,500 COPIES, BOTH VOLUMES SIGNED BY ALICE HARGREAVES, "the original Alice.".
THE BOOK OF KELLS

THE BOOK OF KELLS

BINDINGS). SULLIVAN , SIR EDWARD 335 x 248 mm. (13 1/8 x 9 3/4"). v, [1], 34 pp. FIRST EDITION. STATELY CONTEMPORARY DARK GREEN MOROCCO, GILT, covers framed by multiple gilt rules, upper cover with rectangular gilt rectangle divided into six diapered compartments with Celtic knotwork, gilt titling below this, raised bands, spine gilt in compartments with Celtic knotwork, pastedown framed by multiple gilt rules, triangles of dots at corners, green and orange-painted endpapers, all edges gilt. With 24 color plates of illuminations from the Book of Kells, all with lettered tissue guards. A CHOICE COPY with no signs of use inside or out. This is a handsomely produced and bound descriptive account of the great ninth century Irish manuscript of the Gospels, praised by the author for "its weird and commanding beauty; . . . the baffling intricacy of its fearless designs; . . . the creeping undulations of serpentine forms, that writhe in artistic profusion throughout the mazes of its decorations; [and] the strong and legible minuscule of its text." A founding member of the Arts and Crafts Society of Ireland, Sir Edward Sullivan (1852-1928) devoted himself to the promotion of book arts after his attempts at a political career fell flat. With the help of librarians at Trinity College Dublin, he presented here the first color reproductions made from this masterpiece of Insular illumination. The plates include the miniatures of the four Evangelists and the Madonna and Child, along with examples of the incredibly complex designs of the opening text of each Gospel, as well as reproductions of text pages with inventive initials and whimsical animal hybrids. Our unsigned binding is the perfect cover, with ornate knotwork designs inspired by the illuminations. No doubt it would have been appreciated by Sullivan, an expert on bookbindings and a talented bookbinder in his own right, who signed his work "Aurifex" [gold-worker"]. This is a handsomely produced and bound descriptive account of the great ninth century Irish manuscript of the Gospels, praised by the author for "its weird and commanding beauty; . . . the baffling intricacy of its fearless designs; . . . the creeping undulations of serpentine forms, that writhe in artistic profusion throughout the mazes of its decorations; [and] the strong and legible minuscule of its text." A founding member of the Arts and Crafts Society of Ireland, Sir Edward Sullivan (1852-1928) devoted himself to the promotion of book arts after his attempts at a political career fell flat. With the help of librarians at Trinity College Dublin, he presented here the first color reproductions made from this masterpiece of Insular illumination. The plates include the miniatures of the four Evangelists and the Madonna and Child, along with examples of the incredibly complex designs of the opening text of each Gospel, as well as reproductions of text pages with inventive initials and whimsical animal hybrids. Our unsigned binding is the perfect cover, with ornate knotwork designs inspired by the illuminations. No doubt it would have been appreciated by Sullivan, an expert on bookbindings and a talented bookbinder in his own right, who signed his work "Aurifex" [gold-worker"].
GENESIS PRINTED IN COLORS. SHOWING THE ORIGINAL SOURCES FROM WHICH IT IS SUPPOSED TO HAVE BEEN COMPILED

GENESIS PRINTED IN COLORS. SHOWING THE ORIGINAL SOURCES FROM WHICH IT IS SUPPOSED TO HAVE BEEN COMPILED

COLOR PRINTING). BIBLE IN ENGLISH. BISSELL, EDWIN CONE 248 x 168 mm. (9 3/4 x 6 1/2"). xv, [1], 59 pp. FIRST EDITION. Publisher's brown cloth, covers with blind-stamped borders, gilt titling, smooth spine. Text printed in black, blue, green, orange, yellow, brown, and red. Extremities lightly rubbed, two small stains to lower cover, a touch of browning to edges of leaves, isolated faint foxing, but a fine copy, clean and fresh internally with colors undimmed by time, in a well-preserved binding. This curious volume represents an effort by Congregational minister and biblical scholar Edwin Bissell (1832-94) to make the multiple sources of the Book of Genesis clear to readers at a glance. In the introduction, he explains the various documents from which the text was compiled, and assigns them colors. For example, the two sources that used the name "Jehovah" for God are in black and orange, while the one that used the name "Elohim" is in red. Chapter 14 of Genesis, which appears in only one source, is in yellow, editorial additions are in green, and materials from the laws of Moses known as the Priests' Code are in blue. The text of the volume is limited to Genesis due to cost considerations; color printing was not a cheap undertaking at this time. This curious volume represents an effort by Congregational minister and biblical scholar Edwin Bissell (1832-94) to make the multiple sources of the Book of Genesis clear to readers at a glance. In the introduction, he explains the various documents from which the text was compiled, and assigns them colors. For example, the two sources that used the name "Jehovah" for God are in black and orange, while the one that used the name "Elohim" is in red. Chapter 14 of Genesis, which appears in only one source, is in yellow, editorial additions are in green, and materials from the laws of Moses known as the Priests' Code are in blue. The text of the volume is limited to Genesis due to cost considerations; color printing was not a cheap undertaking at this time.
SERMONES DE TEMPORE ET DE SANCTIS

SERMONES DE TEMPORE ET DE SANCTIS

INCUNABULA). HENRICUS DE HERPF 300 x 215 mm. (11 3/4 x 8 1/2"). [428] leaves. Double column, 48 lines, gothic type. FIRST (and only incunabular) EDITION. IMPOSING CONTEMPORARY BLIND-STAMPED CALF over bevelled wooden boards, covers with repeating griffin, eagle, and lion tools attributed to an Uelzen workshop [EBDB w000321], original brass cornerpieces and centerpieces, clasps expertly renewed, upper cover with manuscript titling on vellum preserved under modern metal frame and plastic overlay, raised bands, pastedowns from an early printed Bible in Latin (in a typeface associated with George Stuchs at Nuremberg), fore edges with remnants of vellum tabs marking sections of text. Rubricated in red, paragraph marks in red or blue, numerous three-line initials in red or blue, three large opening initials in red or red and blue (one with penwork decoration), printer's device at end. Several brief contemporary annotations in margins; two descriptive cut-outs laid down on front free endpaper and one loosely laid in; first (blank) page with manuscript notation and blue stamp of the Ministerial Bibliothek, Uelzen. Goff H-38; BMC II, 493; ISTC ih00038000. Spine a bit rubbed and with minor loss, covers showing a little general wear, lower cover with water stain in one corner, but the impressive contemporary binding quite pleasing, sturdy, and with nice impressions of the stamps on the lower board; intermittent light marginal dampstaining, a little scattered thumbing and minor stains in margins, a few short marginal repairs (tear on I8 torn just into text), but overall a very good specimen, the substantial text block quite clean throughout and with comfortable margins. This is a handsomely bound copy of the first printing of this collection of 222 sermons by Flemish Franciscan Hendrik Herp (ca. 1410-77), known for his mystical works of devotion. He began his religious career with the Brethren of the Common Life in Delft, where he was greatly influenced by "Devotio Moderna," the undogmatic practice of simple piety. His best known work, "The Mirror of Perfection," was widely read and translated into many languages. On a 1450 pilgrimage to Rome, Herp joined the Franciscan order, and returned to the Low Countries to serve as the superior at several convents. The present series of sermons for the seasons of the Church year draw heavily on the works of Doctors of the Church, especially Thomas Aquinas and Bernard of Clairvaux. Printer Peter Drach and his namesake son operated a press in Speyer, Germany from 1477 until the end of the century. Our volume long resided in the library of Uelzen, the city where it was bound, as indicated by the early ink inscription and the more modern ink stamp on the flyleaf. The pastedowns, from another early printed book, contain passages from the Gospels of Matthew (26:18-36) and Mark (14:5-21). This is a handsomely bound copy of the first printing of this collection of 222 sermons by Flemish Franciscan Hendrik Herp (ca. 1410-77), known for his mystical works of devotion. He began his religious career with the Brethren of the Common Life in Delft, where he was greatly influenced by "Devotio Moderna," the undogmatic practice of simple piety. His best known work, "The Mirror of Perfection," was widely read and translated into many languages. On a 1450 pilgrimage to Rome, Herp joined the Franciscan order, and returned to the Low Countries to serve as the superior at several convents. The present series of sermons for the seasons of the Church year draw heavily on the works of Doctors of the Church, especially Thomas Aquinas and Bernard of Clairvaux. Printer Peter Drach and his namesake son operated a press in Speyer, Germany from 1477 until the end of the century. Our volume long resided in the library of Uelzen, the city where it was bound, as indicated by the early ink inscription and the more modern ink stamp on the flyleaf. The pastedowns, from another early printed book, contain passages from the Gospels of Matthew (26:18-36) and Mark (14:5-21).
LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

CLEMENS, SAMUEL L]. "MARK TWAIN" (Pseudonym) 230 x 156 mm. (9 x 6 1/8"). FIRST EDITION, Second State (without the tailpiece showing Mark Twain in flames on page 441, and with the caption, "The St. Charles Hotel," page 443). Original brown publisher's cloth blocked in black and gilt. With more than 300 illustrations in the text, 14 full-page (blank on verso, but counted in the pagination). BAL 3411. Slight rubbing to corners and to ends of spine, one corner somewhat bumped, leaves a little browned at edges, a couple of faint marginal spots, but an excellent copy, the binding entirely solid, the gilt very lustrous, and the clean, smooth text showing only the most trivial signs of use. According to Day, Clemens' nostalgic evocation of the lost steamboat era contrasts the "remembered glory of the river before the Civil War" with "the sleazy debasement of the river in the 1880's." Clemens trained as a riverboat pilot's apprentice, and he uses the Mississippi River itself and the pilot navigating its treacherous and ever-changing waters as symbols of the uncertain nature of existence and of "the disciplined will imposing meaning on this chaotic flood." (Day) While it is not difficult to obtain copies of this work, the present item stands out for its fine internal condition--it seems unlikely it was ever read and its original cloth binding, which is insubtantial for a book of this size, is unusually well preserved. According to Day, Clemens' nostalgic evocation of the lost steamboat era contrasts the "remembered glory of the river before the Civil War" with "the sleazy debasement of the river in the 1880's." Clemens trained as a riverboat pilot's apprentice, and he uses the Mississippi River itself and the pilot navigating its treacherous and ever-changing waters as symbols of the uncertain nature of existence and of "the disciplined will imposing meaning on this chaotic flood." (Day) While it is not difficult to obtain copies of this work, the present item stands out for its fine internal condition--it seems unlikely it was ever read and its original cloth binding, which is insubtantial for a book of this size, is unusually well preserved. FIRST EDITION, Second State (without the tailpiece showing Mark Twain in flames on page 441, and with the caption, "The St. Charles Hotel," page 443).
UNDER THE HILL

UNDER THE HILL

BEARDSLEY, AUBREY 260 x 193 mm. (10 1/4 x 7 1/2"). xi, [v], 80 pp., 3 leaves (captioned tissue guard and ads). FIRST EDITION. Publisher's ocean blue cloth, upper cover with stylized gilt peacock feathers designed by Aubrey Beardsley, smooth spine with gilt lettering, top edge gilt. With photographic frontispiece portrait and 16 illustrations by Beardsley (two in-text and 14 plates, including one colored mezzotint). Extremities slightly scuffed, lower boards with corners and one edge a little bumped and a few small bubbles under the cloth, but these faults quite minor, and on the whole a fine, very bright copy with contents in excellent condition. Attractively presented in a binding designed by the artist himself, and containing three hitherto unpublished illustrations, this posthumously published collection of Aubrey Beardsley's prose and poetry includes a section of his unfinished and highly controversial erotic novel written in the last few years of his life. Although Beardsley (1872-98) was only 25 when he succumbed to tuberculosis, his brief but glittering career left an indelible mark on the world of illustration and graphic design. In his preface, publisher John Lane says that "During his short life, he carried the art of Black and White further than any man since Albert Dürer." The present work contains a few letters, poems, and other short writings by Beardsley, as well as a section of "Under the Hill," an experimental, bizarre, and sexually charged novel that became something of an obsession for the artist, particularly as his health continued to decline. Originally published in "The Savoy," these pieces are published here for the first time alongside numerous examples of Beardsley's artwork (the Portrait Sketch of Fred Brown and A Sketch of Seven Heads on one plate, and L'Abbé Mouret on another, make their debut here). The design for the binding was originally intended for Oscar Wilde's "Salomé" (1894), but never came to fruition. It appears as a binding here for the first time and was only later used for the 1912 edition of Salomé. From cover to cover, this is an excellent representation of Beardsley's artistic output and literary ambitions. Attractively presented in a binding designed by the artist himself, and containing three hitherto unpublished illustrations, this posthumously published collection of Aubrey Beardsley's prose and poetry includes a section of his unfinished and highly controversial erotic novel written in the last few years of his life. Although Beardsley (1872-98) was only 25 when he succumbed to tuberculosis, his brief but glittering career left an indelible mark on the world of illustration and graphic design. In his preface, publisher John Lane says that "During his short life, he carried the art of Black and White further than any man since Albert Dürer." The present work contains a few letters, poems, and other short writings by Beardsley, as well as a section of "Under the Hill," an experimental, bizarre, and sexually charged novel that became something of an obsession for the artist, particularly as his health continued to decline. Originally published in "The Savoy," these pieces are published here for the first time alongside numerous examples of Beardsley's artwork (the Portrait Sketch of Fred Brown and A Sketch of Seven Heads on one plate, and L'Abbé Mouret on another, make their debut here). The design for the binding was originally intended for Oscar Wilde's "Salomé" (1894), but never came to fruition. It appears as a binding here for the first time and was only later used for the 1912 edition of Salomé. From cover to cover, this is an excellent representation of Beardsley's artistic output and literary ambitions.
GEESTELYKE NATUURKUNDE

GEESTELYKE NATUURKUNDE

BIBLE - NATURAL HISTORY OF). SCHEUCHZER, JOHANN JAKOB 415 x 264 mm. (16 3/8 x 10 3/8"). Entirely complete (with continuous pagination, but with a jump in page numbering from the end of book XIII to the beginning of XIV, as usual). 15 parts in eight volumes. Translated by Florentius H. J. van Halen. First Edition in Dutch. HANDSOME CONTEMPORARY VELLUM, covers with large gilt entrelac centerpiece framed with gilt floral rule with bouquet-like cornerpieces, gilt floral border, raised bands, compartments richly gilt, titles and volume numbers handwritten in ink on spines, all edges gilt. With head- and tail-pieces, 15 engraved titles printed in red and black with engraved vignettes, and complete with frontispiece, two engraved portraits of the author and the engraver (the latter with shorter margins, probably tipped-in), and 760 OFTEN STRIKING COPPER ENGRAVINGS (on 758 plates), one with partial hand coloring, a few double-page. Front pastedown of first volume with handwritten note in French on lined paper; with additional black & white title to first work erroneously dated 1728. Nissen ZBI 3661; see also: Faber du Faur, "German Baroque Literature," p. 472. Trivial soiling to the vellum, the seventh volume with a faint marginal dampstain affecting a few quires (but not touching engravings), the odd negligible blemish, but AN OUTSTANDING SET, the very attractive original bindings showing only insignificant wear, and THE CONTENTS ESPECIALLY FRESH AND CLEAN THROUGHOUT, WITH VERY FINE IMPRESSIONS OF THE PLATES. This is the first Dutch translation of Scheuchzer's "Sacred Nature," one of the most splendid German illustrated books of the 18th century, presenting what surely is the most impressive combination of Biblical exegesis and scientific illustration to be found in any printed book. First published in 1731-35 as the "Physica Sacra" in Latin, and as the "Kupfer-Bibel" in German (so-named for the amazing array of copperplate engravings), this work is arranged according to the progression of books in the Bible, citing passages from those chapters where phenomena from the natural world are mentioned. The typical pattern here includes a textual citation followed by the author's often lengthy remarks on the passage and, in many cases, a dramatic engraving to illustrate what is said. The plates here are identical to the earlier editions (retaining the inscriptions in Latin and German) and are the work of Johann-Melchior Fuseli, of the well-known Zurich family of 18th and 19th century artists. The engraved scenes are always executed with great skill, are generally very animated, and are often fascinating. Of the 760 images meant to illustrate the text, many are strictly or primarily depictions of biblical scenes; several are simply illustrations of specimens of nature; and a large number, perhaps half, offer a kind of combination. An example of this last type includes a wonderful scene showing the birth of Man (as related in Genesis 1:26-27) depicting not only a startled Adam in his fecund paradise, but also 10 images of fetuses, placentas, and the skeletons of children, attached like mounted specimens to the architectural frame of the illustration. According to Faber du Faur, it is in this work that "the Baroque attains, philosophically as well as artistically, its high point and its conclusion. It is the last of those elegant works which do not really contain illustrations to a text but which are, in effect, composed of splendid plates with a text to accompany them." Scheuchzer (1672-1733) was a prolific naturalist who promoted at every opportunity the most modern scientific ideas, though without wanting to risk the accusation of being irreverent. He says that the present work represents an attempt at finding a harmony between reason and revelation, though it can also be seen as an effort to promulgate progressive theories under the venerable cloak of biblical commentary. The bibliographies disagree about the number of plates that ought to be present in this work and in other editions, but ours corresponds to copies previously sold at auction as complete. Copies of the "Physica Sacra" and its translations show up regularly for sale, but almost never does one see the work both complete and, as here, with a clean and fresh text in remarkably well-preserved and attractive contemporary bindings. This is the first Dutch translation of Scheuchzer's "Sacred Nature," one of the most splendid German illustrated books of the 18th century, presenting what surely is the most impressive combination of Biblical exegesis and scientific illustration to be found in any printed book. First published in 1731-35 as the "Physica Sacra" in Latin, and as the "Kupfer-Bibel" in German (so-named for the amazing array of copperplate engravings), this work is arranged according to the progression of books in the Bible, citing passages from those chapters where phenomena from the natural world are mentioned. The typical pattern here includes a textual citation followed by the author's often lengthy remarks on the passage and, in many cases, a dramatic engraving to illustrate what is said. The plates here are identical to the earlier editions (retaining the inscriptions in Latin and German) and are the work of Johann-Melchior Fuseli, of the well-known Zurich family of 18th and 19th century artists. The engraved scenes are always executed with great skill, are generally very animated, and are often fascinating. Of the 760 images meant to illustrate the text, many are strictly or primarily depictions of biblical scenes; several are simply illustrations of specimens of nature; and a large number, perhaps half, offer a kind of combination. An example of this last type includes a wonderful scene showing the birth of Man (as related in Genesis 1:26-27) depicting not only a startled Adam in his fecund paradise, but also 10 images of fetuses, placentas, and the skeletons of children, attached like mounted specimens to the architectural frame of the illustration. According to Faber du Faur,
SUNDRIE PIECES

SUNDRIE PIECES

BINDINGS - JULIAN THOMAS FOR GWASG GREGYNOG). HERBERT, GEORGE 307 x 185 mm. (12 1/8 x 7 1/4"). xvi, [2], 99, [1] pp., [1] leaf (colophon).Edited by the Earl of Powis. No. III OF 15 SPECIALLY BOUND COPIES (of 200 total). LOVELY MULTI-COLORED CALF AND PURPLE GOATSKIN BY JULIAN THOMAS (signed in pencil in the colophon), the calf dyed various shades of green, blue, purple, pink, and yellow, the pattern suggestive of a landscape with a small house in the foreground, spine and covers with goatskin inlay forming the shape of a cross when completely open, gilt halo radiating from behind the cross, smooth spine with gilt lettering, top edge dyed yellow. Suite of plates in a mustard yellow cloth box, housed together in a matching clamshell box lined with velvet, the box spine with dark purple goatskin label and gilt lettering. Printed in purple and black, with 24 wood-engraved illustrations by Sarah van Niekerk, and WITH AN ADDITIONAL SUITE OF ENGRAVINGS SIGNED AND NUMBERED BY THE ARTIST. With prospectus, two photocopied articles, and correspondence between Julian Thomas and Anthony Dowd loosely laid in. In mint condition. In celebration of the 80th anniversary of the first book issued by the Gregynog Press in 1923, this limited edition again features the writing of Welsh-born poet George Herbert, in a very pleasing conjunction of fine printing, exquisite woodcut illustration, and sumptuous binding. The religious poetry of orator and theologian George Herbert (1593-1633), featured in the Press' first publication, is here expanded to include excerpts from his prose work, "The County Parson," as well as many amusing proverbs and aphorisms collected by Herbert. These little sayings, originally published as "Outlandish Proverbs" after Herbert's death, are cleverly sprinkled throughout the book in purple ink, adding unexpected dashes of levity. Accompanying the text are a series of excellent woodcut illustrations by Sarah van Niekerk, whose work bears a striking resemblance to that of her mentor and frequent Gregynog collaborator, Gertrude Hermes. Both precise and whimsical, Niekerk's illustrations are an elegant match for the poetry at hand. A highly favorable review in the Society of Wood Engravers Magazine (here loosely laid in) notes that her "technical skill matches Herbert's command of metre and rhyme: craft for each is bent to a divine and not a worldly purpose, baptised to a new and better use and life." Our copy is one of 15 specially bound by Julian Thomas, Head Binder at the National Library of Wales from 1969 until his retirement in 2011, and a Fellow of Designer Bookbinders since 1996. He trained with John Ewart Bowen, who apprenticed at the original Gregynog Press under George Fisher. The binding seems to play off a memorable poem by Herbert called "The Windows," reproduced here on p. 22, in which he compares a preacher to a pane of glass through which God's light may shine. When our binding is open, we may read the central shape as both a cross and a window, with brilliant gilt rays streaming through and amplifying the world around it with joyful color. Founded in 1922 by two spinster sisters, Gwendoline (1882-1951) and Margaret (1884-1963) Davies, the original Gregynog Press produced 42 works between 1923 and 1942. Cave says that the books printed by the Gregynog Press "more than bear comparison with the work of any other private press," and "in the design and execution of bindings, the Gregynog Press was far superior to any, the Doves Press included." It was revived in 1978 by the University of Wales under the name Gwasg Gregynog and continues to produce fine quality work to this day. In celebration of the 80th anniversary of the first book issued by the Gregynog Press in 1923, this limited edition again features the writing of Welsh-born poet George Herbert, in a very pleasing conjunction of fine printing, exquisite woodcut illustration, and sumptuous binding. The religious poetry of orator and theologian George Herbert (1593-1633), featured in the Press' first publication, is here expanded to include excerpts from his prose work, "The County Parson," as well as many amusing proverbs and aphorisms collected by Herbert. These little sayings, originally published as "Outlandish Proverbs" after Herbert's death, are cleverly sprinkled throughout the book in purple ink, adding unexpected dashes of levity. Accompanying the text are a series of excellent woodcut illustrations by Sarah van Niekerk, whose work bears a striking resemblance to that of her mentor and frequent Gregynog collaborator, Gertrude Hermes. Both precise and whimsical, Niekerk's illustrations are an elegant match for the poetry at hand. A highly favorable review in the Society of Wood Engravers Magazine (here loosely laid in) notes that her "technical skill matches Herbert's command of metre and rhyme: craft for each is bent to a divine and not a worldly purpose, baptised to a new and better use and life." Our copy is one of 15 specially bound by Julian Thomas, Head Binder at the National Library of Wales from 1969 until his retirement in 2011, and a Fellow of Designer Bookbinders since 1996. He trained with John Ewart Bowen, who apprenticed at the original Gregynog Press under George Fisher. The binding seems to play off a memorable poem by Herbert called "The Windows," reproduced here on p. 22, in which he compares a preacher to a pane of glass through which God's light may shine. When our binding is open, we may read the central shape as both a cross and a window, with brilliant gilt rays streaming through and amplifying the world around it with joyful color. Founded in 1922 by two spinster sisters, Gwendoline (1882-1951) and Margaret (1884-1963) Davies, the original Gregynog Press produced 42 works between 1923 and 1942. Cave says that the books printed by the Gregynog Press "more than bear comparison with the work of any other private press," and "in the design and execution of bindings, the Gregynog Press was far superior to any, the Doves Press included." It was revived in 197
NOTITIA UTRAQUE CUM ORIENTIS TUM OCCIDENTIS ULTRA ARCADII HONORIIQUE CAESARUM TEMPORA. [bound with] PANVINIO

NOTITIA UTRAQUE CUM ORIENTIS TUM OCCIDENTIS ULTRA ARCADII HONORIIQUE CAESARUM TEMPORA. [bound with] PANVINIO, ONOFRIO. FASTI ET TRIUMPHO ROM. A ROMULO REGE USQUE AD CAROLUM V. CAES. AUG

ROME, GOVERNMENT AND SOCIETY) 330 x 215 mm. (13 x 8 1/4"). [108] leaves; 8 p.l., 192, 181-228 pp., [99] leaves (index). Two works in one volume. FIRST COMPLETE AND FIRST ILLUSTRATED EDITION of the first work; FIRST EDITION (Second Issue) of the second work. 18th century marbled calf, rebacked, original backstrip laid down, flat spine in compartments formed by decorative leafy rules and featuring large floral ornaments at center, two morocco labels, marbled end papers. Printer's device on titles and on final leaf of first work, fine large and small (mostly historiated) woodcut initials, and MORE THAN 100 FINE WOODCUTS (mostly large or full-page) IN FIRST WORK, several signed by "C S" (perhaps Conrad Schnitt or Christoph Schweizer), ILLUSTRATING BUILDINGS, OCCUPATIONS, MILITARY MACHINES, COSTUMES, etc. (some cuts repeated, one cut printed upside down); 369 numismatic woodcuts in text of second work (262 of these, including repetitions, with medallion portraits and 107 with names only). Front flyleaf with early ink inscription of a library number; third leaf of first work and 10th leaf of second work with the crowned "L" library stamp of the Lamoignon Library. VD 16 N 1884; Schweiger II, 618; Brunet IV, 111; Graesse IV, 691 (all for first work); Mortimer (Italian) 322 (a later edition, with copies of these cuts), 355; Adams N-354, P-195. Original spine leather somewhat dried and eroded, covers slightly pitted and marked, but the binding entirely firm, with only superficial wear to joints, and certainly agreeable. First title a little smudged and foxed, a few other trivial imperfections, but A REMARKABLY FRESH, CLEAN, AND SMOOTH COPY INTERNALLY, AND WITH FINE IMPRESSIONS OF THE CUTS. This is a very attractive copy, with distinguished provenance, of two works with considerable data relating to, and shedding substantial light on, the politics, government, provincial administration, and military establishment of Rome, as well as other aspects of Roman life. The first work here is an anonymous early fifth century Roman state handbook (more commonly known as the "Notitia Dignitatum") edited by Siegmund Ghelen (Gelenius, ca. 1477-ca. 1554) and Beatus Rhenanus (1485-1547) from a lost Medieval manuscript. It is arranged according to the provinces of the Roman Empire and their cities. The second work is a synopsis of Roman history from Romulus through the reign of Habsburg emperor Charles V in the 15th century. Its first section is based on the "fasti consulares," inscriptions from the Arch of Augustus in the Roman forum listing all Roman consuls from 483 B.C. to 19 A.D. These relics were discovered in the 1540s, when the forum was being quarried for building materials. The compiler of this work, Panvinio (1529-68) was an Augustinian monk devoted to antiquarian studies who spent considerable time in Italy recording inscriptions on ancient monuments, medals, and other surfaces. He recognized the "fasti consulares" fragments recovered from the ruins and worked frantically to save them. They were restored by Michelangelo and added to the collection of what became the Capitoline Museum. Panvinio also used the coins and medals collected by Strada, the publisher, as a source for this compilation. A considerable portion of the interest and value in this volume today resides in the woodcuts. Copied from the original illustrations in an early manuscript of the work (now lost); the cuts in the first work include many depictions of books, showing several different kinds of decorated bindings. The illustrations also provide many details of Roman dwellings, costumes, and objects used in private, religious, and military life. Excepting the fact that they have produced books on basically the same subject, our two printers could hardly be more different. Whereas the Swiss Froben was one of the giants of Renaissance printing and a great promoter of learning, the Venetian Strada apparently spent much of his time speculating in the antiques market, being one of the first merchants to make a business of selling Italian antiques to foreigners. Our copy comes from the collection of the great bibliophile Antoine Moriau (1699-1759), who leased the stately Hôtel d'Angoulême Lamoignon in Paris to house his library of 14,000 books and more than 2,000 manuscripts. The second work here is rare. This is a very attractive copy, with distinguished provenance, of two works with considerable data relating to, and shedding substantial light on, the politics, government, provincial administration, and military establishment of Rome, as well as other aspects of Roman life. The first work here is an anonymous early fifth century Roman state handbook (more commonly known as the "Notitia Dignitatum") edited by Siegmund Ghelen (Gelenius, ca. 1477-ca. 1554) and Beatus Rhenanus (1485-1547) from a lost Medieval manuscript. It is arranged according to the provinces of the Roman Empire and their cities. The second work is a synopsis of Roman history from Romulus through the reign of Habsburg emperor Charles V in the 15th century. Its first section is based on the "fasti consulares," inscriptions from the Arch of Augustus in the Roman forum listing all Roman consuls from 483 B.C. to 19 A.D. These relics were discovered in the 1540s, when the forum was being quarried for building materials. The compiler of this work, Panvinio (1529-68) was an Augustinian monk devoted to antiquarian studies who spent considerable time in Italy recording inscriptions on ancient monuments, medals, and other surfaces. He recognized the "fasti consulares" fragments recovered from the ruins and worked frantically to save them. They were restored by Michelangelo and added to the collection of what became the Capitoline Museum. Panvinio also used the coins and medals collected by Strada, the publisher, as a source for this compilation. A considerable portion of the interest and value in this volume today resides in the woodcuts. Copied from the original illustrations in an early manuscript of the work
FAUST: A DRAMATIC POEM

FAUST: A DRAMATIC POEM

GOETHE, [JOHANN WOLFGANG VON] 220 x 130 mm. (8 5/8 x 5 1/4"). lxxxvii, [1], 279, [1] pp.Translated and with notes by Abraham Hayward. FIRST EDITION of the First English Prose Translation. Excellent contemporary navy blue straight-grain morocco, covers framed by blind floral roll and gilt fillets, with curling cornerpieces, smooth spine tooled in gilt into geometric compartments, gilt titling, turn-ins with gilt roll, all edges gilt. A Large Paper Copy. Front flyleaf inscribed by the translator to Benjamin Willoughby. Lower corners a bit rubbed, a couple of faint abrasions to covers, but A FINE COPY--the wide-margined text extraordinarily clean, fresh, and bright, and in a scarcely worn, lustrous binding. This is a handsome copy of a highly acclaimed translation of "Faust," in a binding probably commissioned for presentation by the translator. An attorney with an abiding interest in literature, Hayward (1801-84) is described by DNB as "a self-made man of letters." He became interested in German literature while travelling in Germany, where he met associates of Goethe. Wishing to share with his friends the beauty of Goethe's masterpiece retelling the legend of a man who sells his immortal soul to the devil for temporary worldly gratification, he produced this prose translation, but only for private circulation; he was convinced by impressed recipients to publish it for sale. It was a great success, bringing him praise at home and abroad, taking him from the practice of law to a career as a respected critic and translator, and fulfilling his ambition of popularizing German works. The printer selected by the author used a high quality of paper for this first edition (or at least for this special copy), and the contents are remarkably free of the browning and foxing found in so many 19th century books. The binding here is not signed, but the style and the quality of the workmanship suggest a first-rate London atelier. This is a handsome copy of a highly acclaimed translation of "Faust," in a binding probably commissioned for presentation by the translator. An attorney with an abiding interest in literature, Hayward (1801-84) is described by DNB as "a self-made man of letters." He became interested in German literature while travelling in Germany, where he met associates of Goethe. Wishing to share with his friends the beauty of Goethe's masterpiece retelling the legend of a man who sells his immortal soul to the devil for temporary worldly gratification, he produced this prose translation, but only for private circulation; he was convinced by impressed recipients to publish it for sale. It was a great success, bringing him praise at home and abroad, taking him from the practice of law to a career as a respected critic and translator, and fulfilling his ambition of popularizing German works. The printer selected by the author used a high quality of paper for this first edition (or at least for this special copy), and the contents are remarkably free of the browning and foxing found in so many 19th century books. The binding here is not signed, but the style and the quality of the workmanship suggest a first-rate London atelier. FIRST EDITION of the First English Prose Translation.
CENTONIS CLARISSIMAE FOEMINAE EXCERPTUM E MARONIS CARMINIBUS AD TESTIMONIUM VETERIS NOVIQUE TESTAMENTI OPUSCULUM A DIVO HIERONYMO COMPROBATUM

CENTONIS CLARISSIMAE FOEMINAE EXCERPTUM E MARONIS CARMINIBUS AD TESTIMONIUM VETERIS NOVIQUE TESTAMENTI OPUSCULUM A DIVO HIERONYMO COMPROBATUM

WOMEN, EARLY POETRY BY). PROBA, FALCONIA [FALTONIA] 152 x 99 mm. (6 x 3 7/8"). [15] leaves (without final blank). Early 20th century stiff vellum, covers with double gilt rule border, smooth spine in panels with central gilt turnip tool, gilt titling, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Title page with woodcut showing the author at her desk. Title page with partially effaced early ink signature of "Petri Francisci Creus[?]." EDIT16 34820; USTC 851397; not in Adams. Boards tending to splay just slightly, a hint of browning to title page, otherwise fine, the text clean and fresh, and the sympathetic binding well preserved. This is an attractive edition of one of the earliest examples of Christian poetry by a woman, composed in the fourth century and first printed ca. 1472. Born into an influential Roman family (her father, her husband, and her son all served as consuls), Faltonia Betitia Proba (ca. 322-70) was raised a pagan, but converted to Christianity after her marriage. In the present "cento" (a "patchwork" form of poetry comprised of excerpts from the work of another arranged to create a new work), she uses passages from Virgil's "Eclogues," "Georgics," and "Aeneid" to tell the Old Testament stories of Creation, the Fall, the Flood, and the Exodus as well as New Testament episodes from the life of Jesus. According to the Oxford Classical Dictionary, "The declared intention of the poet [here] is to relate the 'mysteries of Virgil' and to show that Virgil 'sang about the pious feats of Christ.' This makes Proba one of the first Roman poets to have actively appropriated Virgil as a Christian prophet." Proba's "Cento" was quite popular in the 15th and 16th centuries, perhaps for its suitability as an introductory text for Latin students. Consequently, it seems safe to say that Proba was both the first female author to have her work printed and the first female "best seller." (But despite the number of early printings, the book is now scarce in any edition.) The work has been attracting increased scholarly interest in recent years, particularly with the popularity of women's studies. This is an attractive edition of one of the earliest examples of Christian poetry by a woman, composed in the fourth century and first printed ca. 1472. Born into an influential Roman family (her father, her husband, and her son all served as consuls), Faltonia Betitia Proba (ca. 322-70) was raised a pagan, but converted to Christianity after her marriage. In the present "cento" (a "patchwork" form of poetry comprised of excerpts from the work of another arranged to create a new work), she uses passages from Virgil's "Eclogues," "Georgics," and "Aeneid" to tell the Old Testament stories of Creation, the Fall, the Flood, and the Exodus as well as New Testament episodes from the life of Jesus. According to the Oxford Classical Dictionary, "The declared intention of the poet [here] is to relate the 'mysteries of Virgil' and to show that Virgil 'sang about the pious feats of Christ.' This makes Proba one of the first Roman poets to have actively appropriated Virgil as a Christian prophet." Proba's "Cento" was quite popular in the 15th and 16th centuries, perhaps for its suitability as an introductory text for Latin students. Consequently, it seems safe to say that Proba was both the first female author to have her work printed and the first female "best seller." (But despite the number of early printings, the book is now scarce in any edition.) The work has been attracting increased scholarly interest in recent years, particularly with the popularity of women's studies.
THE RUBAIYAT

THE RUBAIYAT

VELLUM PRINTING). (MOSHER PRESS). OMAR KHAYYAM 232 x 198 mm. (9 1/8 x 7 1/2"). [19] leaves. No. 8 OF 10 COPIES PRINTED ON VELLUM. Original limp vellum, yapp edges, (renewed) ties, flat spine with vertical gilt titling. Housed in a green linen chemise and matching morocco-backed slipcase. FRONT FREE ENDPAPER WITH THE ENGRAVED BOOKPLATE OF THOMAS B. MOSHER; front pastedown with morocco bookplate of Henry W. Poor and engraved bookplate of "Omariana" collector Herman M. Schroeter. Limitations page unsigned, no doubt because this was the copy Mosher intended to keep. Bishop 337. Naturally occurring variations in the color and grain of the vellum, mild offsetting to endleaves from ties, otherwise A CHOICE COPY with no signs of use. From the publisher's personal library and one of just 10 printed on vellum, this copy of the limited deluxe edition of the classic Persian poem is surely one of the most desirable copies of a Mosher Press book in existence. "The Rubaiyat" was one of Mosher's favorite titles; Bishop lists 26 separate printings done by the press, of which the present version is far and away the most luxurious and desirable: of the Mosher "Rubaiyat" issues, just 20 copies (out of several thousand books total) were printed on vellum, and only our edition was set by hand (the other vellum printing, Bishop 336, was a photo-lithographic facsimile). One of just three persons whose collaboration with Mosher is noted in a colophon or title page, Grigsby (1879-1964) is described by Bishop as "one of the most beautiful and mysterious women in the world." The shrewd "ward" (read "mistress") of street-car baron and art collector Charles Yerkes, she used this intimate connection to build up an impressive portfolio of investments and real estate--all in her own name--as well as collections of art, jewelry, and books, including many private press and finely bound volumes. When her benefactor died, Grigsby sold her New York mansion and moved to London, where she rapidly rose to a notable elevation as a glittering hostess. This copy was later in the library of Henry W. Poor (1844-1915), a financier and publisher whose firm was a forerunner of Standard and Poor's. The website of the Mosher Press notes that "Poor owned many Mosher books, most of them copies from very limited editions, printed on pure Roman vellum." When his impressive library sold at auction in 1908-09, it brought in more than $200,000, a record at the time for an American collection. From the publisher's personal library and one of just 10 printed on vellum, this copy of the limited deluxe edition of the classic Persian poem is surely one of the most desirable copies of a Mosher Press book in existence. "The Rubaiyat" was one of Mosher's favorite titles; Bishop lists 26 separate printings done by the press, of which the present version is far and away the most luxurious and desirable: of the Mosher "Rubaiyat" issues, just 20 copies (out of several thousand books total) were printed on vellum, and only our edition was set by hand (the other vellum printing, Bishop 336, was a photo-lithographic facsimile). One of just three persons whose collaboration with Mosher is noted in a colophon or title page, Grigsby (1879-1964) is described by Bishop as "one of the most beautiful and mysterious women in the world." The shrewd "ward" (read "mistress") of street-car baron and art collector Charles Yerkes, she used this intimate connection to build up an impressive portfolio of investments and real estate--all in her own name--as well as collections of art, jewelry, and books, including many private press and finely bound volumes. When her benefactor died, Grigsby sold her New York mansion and moved to London, where she rapidly rose to a notable elevation as a glittering hostess. This copy was later in the library of Henry W. Poor (1844-1915), a financier and publisher whose firm was a forerunner of Standard and Poor's. The website of the Mosher Press notes that "Poor owned many Mosher books, most of them copies from very limited editions, printed on pure Roman vellum." When his impressive library sold at auction in 1908-09, it brought in more than $200,000, a record at the time for an American collection.
SERMONES [DE TEMPORE ET] DE SANCTIS

SERMONES [DE TEMPORE ET] DE SANCTIS

HENRICUS DE HERPF 310 x 220 mm. (12 1/8 x 8 1/2"). [214] leaves (final blank). Double column, 48 lines to the page, gothic type. (Six consecutive leaves supplied from another copy, including two leaves in manuscript, in an expert contemporaneous hand). The second part, only, of two parts (containing the complete "Sermones de Sanctis"). FIRST PRINTING. Modern binding of early (17th century?) printed antiphonary leaf, smooth spine with printed paper label. Printer's device below colophon. Capitals struck in red, initials attractively rubricated in red and sometimes silver, occasionally with calligraphic flourishes (including one with a face), one of the manuscript leaves with initial in blue. Top margin of first page with early ink ownership inscription of the Carmelites of Bamburg; occasional contemporary marginalia in a fine hand. Goff H-38; BMC II, 493; ISTC ih00038000. A couple of tiny wormholes affecting letters on first few leaves, neatly repaired marginal wormholes to same, final quire with minor stains to margin, a few other trivial defects internally, but A VERY FINE COPY, THE TEXT FRESH, BRIGHT, AND CLEAN, the margins very spacious, and the binding unworn. This is a monastic copy, with considerable bibliographic interest, of the only incunabular printing of the second part of Franciscan theologian Henricus de Herpf's series of sermons for the Church year, containing homilies for saints' feast days. Named for his birthplace in Brabant, Herpf, or Harpf (ca. 1410-77) is best known for his three books of mystical theology, dealing with the joys of contemplation. The "Sermones de Sanctis" here celebrate the virtues and deeds of principal saints, beginning with St. Andrew (November 30, the beginning of Advent) and ending with St. Catherine of Alexandria (November 25). Our author then appends 12 sermons in honor of the founder of his order, St. Francis, 48 sermons on penitence, and 20 Advent sermons, ending with a poem asking the reader's gracious acceptance of his work. The supplied leaves here make this an intriguing volume bibliographically. In Catalog 32 (1991), Bernard Rosenthal noted that contemporary manuscript leaves with text, as here, perfectly replicating that of the printed versions, were likely executed in the printer's shop. He said that "replacing leaves in manuscript when a printer found himself short a few leaves was a fairly common practice." It also seems likely that printers occasionally used paper that was a bit shorter than other leaves in the volume, simply because they'd run out of leaves in the proper size but had some available that would work (see, e.g., another copy of this work, Reiss & Sohn lot 4429, 1 Nov. 2011). This would account for the kind of incunabular volumes that, because of vagaries in the early process of printing, often survive in a combination of printed and manuscript form, or with leaves that vary in size. One of the first printers in Speyer, Drach produced a substantial corpus of books between 1476 and 1502, though there is some question about whether the Peter Drach at work all this time was one person or a father and son. This is a monastic copy, with considerable bibliographic interest, of the only incunabular printing of the second part of Franciscan theologian Henricus de Herpf's series of sermons for the Church year, containing homilies for saints' feast days. Named for his birthplace in Brabant, Herpf, or Harpf (ca. 1410-77) is best known for his three books of mystical theology, dealing with the joys of contemplation. The "Sermones de Sanctis" here celebrate the virtues and deeds of principal saints, beginning with St. Andrew (November 30, the beginning of Advent) and ending with St. Catherine of Alexandria (November 25). Our author then appends 12 sermons in honor of the founder of his order, St. Francis, 48 sermons on penitence, and 20 Advent sermons, ending with a poem asking the reader's gracious acceptance of his work. The supplied leaves here make this an intriguing volume bibliographically. In Catalog 32 (1991), Bernard Rosenthal noted that contemporary manuscript leaves with text, as here, perfectly replicating that of the printed versions, were likely executed in the printer's shop. He said that "replacing leaves in manuscript when a printer found himself short a few leaves was a fairly common practice." It also seems likely that printers occasionally used paper that was a bit shorter than other leaves in the volume, simply because they'd run out of leaves in the proper size but had some available that would work (see, e.g., another copy of this work, Reiss & Sohn lot 4429, 1 Nov. 2011). This would account for the kind of incunabular volumes that, because of vagaries in the early process of printing, often survive in a combination of printed and manuscript form, or with leaves that vary in size. One of the first printers in Speyer, Drach produced a substantial corpus of books between 1476 and 1502, though there is some question about whether the Peter Drach at work all this time was one person or a father and son.