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Michael Brown

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World War One Correspondence of Laurence H. Adams, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, bugler for Co. F, 103rd PA Engineers, 28th Division, written to his girlfriend Hazel Schramm, 1917-1919

Adams, Laurence H., 141 letters, 467 manuscript pages, all but 4 with their retained mailing envelopes, dated 15 August 1917 to 14 December 1919. Of the 141 letters, 139 of the letters were written by Laurence H. Adams to his future wife Hazel Schramm. Of these 139 letters, 91 of them were written by him while in military service during WWI, both state side as well as in France, with the remaining 48 letters written by him after his release from military service and while he lived and worked in the Scranton, Pennsylvania area. Within the collection are also 2 letters not written by Adams; one written by Hazel Schramm to Adams, the other a printed form letter from the King of England sent to Hazel Schramm. This printed form letter was apparently sent to all the American soldiers thanking them for their service. The collection also includes 14 pieces of related ephemera: 8 postcards dated 1917-1918, 2 newspaper clippings dated circa 1918, 1 greeting card, 1 war risk insurance form (1919), 1 YMCA Dedicatory Program (1917), and 1 used envelope. One of the newspaper clippings is an Adams letter written to his father at Christmas 1918 and printed by the local Scranton newspaper. It details Adams WWI experiences and his getting wounded and winding up in the hospital. Laurence "Laudy" H. Adams (1899-1960) Laurence H. "Laudy" Adams was born 3 Sept 1899, the son of Oscar F. Adams and his wife Lurline Hopewell. His mother died when he was young, his father remarried. He had siblings and the family lived in Scranton, his father working various white-collar jobs in shops, or companies. Adams enlisted with the Army on 19 July 1917 and by the 15th of August he had arrived at Camp Mount, Georgia for assignment. This is when the correspondence starts; the first letter is dated August 15th, 1917. Adams appears to have already been in a relationship with Hazel "Dutch" Schramm before his military service started. After a week at Camp Mount, he moves on to Camp Hancock, also in Georgia, presumably for basic training. In Oct of 1917 he was appointed bugler, having been a private. By 16 May 1918, Adams is ready to ship overseas and moves to the embarkation point at Camp Merritt, New Jersey and by May 30th he is at sea. In June of 1918 they land in England and are issued English rifles. By June 9th he is "somewhere in France." On 4 July 1918 he is appointed as a motorcycle dispatch rider when he is not needed as a bugler. By August he is in war and is constantly being shelled by the Germans as he moves to the front. He observes Germans from a hill with his Colonel, Colonel Duffy, who later would be killed. Adams is sleeping in the woods, in the rain, and has not bathed in six weeks. He fights in various battles: Chateau-Thierry Sector (29 June – 13 July 1918); 5th German Offensive (14-27 July, 1918); Advance on Ourco and Vesle (29 July – 9 Sept, 1918) and Meuse-Argonne Offensive (26 Sept – 2 Oct, 1918). Adams was wounded in the right shoulder by German machine gun fire on October 2 1918, at Varennes during the During the Battle of Meuse-Argonne Offence, the largest battle in World War One for the Americans. Two days later he is in Hospital #17, having the bullet surgically removed, and a week later he was sitting up, being spoon fed by an American nurse. Adams spent October to December of 1918 recuperating in the hospital, it was a slow recovery. While in the hospital, on 11 November 1918, the "Armistice" took effect; the war was over. On 12 January 1919 he is sent back to his unit, which is at Uruffe, France, as bugler. By 9 April 1919 he is on the coast at Le Mans waiting to be shipped back home to the United States. He arrives in Philadelphia on 7 May 1919 and moves on to Camp Dix, New Jersey where he is discharged from military service on 19 May 1919. By August 1919 he is working for the Gaylord International Engineering and Construction Company, at Hopbottom, Pennsylvania, but the next year (1920 Census) finds him working as a bo
  • $400
Map of Mexico

Map of Mexico, Including Yucatan, & Upper California, exhibiting the Chief Cities and Towns, the Principal Travelling Routes &c.

Mitchell, S. A., Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1847, folding lithographed pocket map, original full coloring of Mexico and vivid rose outline coloring of Texas. Measures 46 x 66.8 cm. Inset street map and environs of Monterrey at top right on tinted pink ground: The Late Battlefield. Folds into the original embossed green roan case, stamped in gilt Mexico, with printed statistical broadside: Extent and Population of Mexico, affixed to front pastedown. Some archival tissue reinforcements along folds, small separations at several fold joints, small piece missing near the second "I" in Pacific Ocean, some rubbing to covers, else very good, with strong coloring. An early issue of this oft-reworked Mexican-American War map. The earliest issue is thought to have the inset battle plan at the top uncolored, and identified only as the Late Battlefield, this issue has the battlefield of Buena Vista noted which means that it was issued sometime after late February when news of the United States victory at Buena Vista would have been known. This map was part of the series of popular maps published by Mitchell to provide constantly evolving news to satisfy the public's riveted focus on the course of the Mexican War and "Manifest Destiny." What began as a rather modest affair changed over the course of the war, with Mitchell revising his original map until it had grown far larger than this early issue. Later in 1847 he added a large inset Map of the Principal Roads, but with the same title to the upper inset. In yet another version of the larger map, the inset at upper right is renamed The Battlefield of Monterey. See Streeter Sale 3868, Taliaferro 284, and Wheat, 548, Maps of the California Gold Region, 35. In this map Texas is outlined in bright rose in the Emory configuration, with its extended Panhandle extending north into Wyoming. This map is an example of Manifest Destiny expressed cartographically. As the Mexican-American War progressed, Mitchell reissued this map, each time slightly altering the plate to reflect American progress towards Mexico City and marking battle grounds with a flag. Older battles shown include the Alamo, and San Jacinto. Battles in the present war include Resaca de la Palma, Palo Alto, Monterrey, which is shown in the inset, and Buena Vista. Texas is shown as an independent entity with its border at the Rio Grande River and its Panhandle extending all the way to the 42nd parallel. If the map itself is not blunt enough, the text of the "Extent and Population of Mexico" makes the point of view clear: "in the above statement Mexico is represented as entire, with the exception of Texas; but at the present time (1846) New California, New Mexico, and Yucatan, comprising about two-fifths of her territory, can hardly be considered as belonging to her. New California was taken possession of by Commodore Sloat, July 7th, 1846, and New Mexico by General Kearney, August, 1846. Yucatan has declared her independence, yet it is not positively hostile to the Mexican government: and but a little reliance can be placed on the permanency of her present position."
  • $2,500
  • $2,500
book (2)

, Autograph Letter Signed, on Stationery of the Legal Intelligencer, Philadelphia, August 25, 1857, to J. B. Townsend

Wallace, Henry E., Attorney at Law octavo, 2 pages, formerly folded, in very good, clean, and legible condition. "After reading the Statement of Mr. Ware and Mr. Leaming with care I do not find any thing to satisfy me in legal point of view, that Mr. Townsend Sharpless is not the party against whom Mr. Budd's action must be brought. The Mayor has furnished a copy of his Record upon which Mr. Sharpless's liability is clear. If he can explain that away on the trial, we may be compelled to proceed against all the parties for a Conspiracy. But the injury done to Mr. Budd must be vindicated in some way. The conduct of Mess Ware & Leaming appears to me exceedingly reprehensible and I shall take great pleasure in exposing to the world their tergiversations in this matter. I am sorry for Mr. Sharpless but the gross wrong done my client was certainly done in his name and under the sanctions of this affirmation. Indeed the explanation of the Mayor, seem to add insult to injury as he gives it as his opinion that there was cause to suspect the goods would be found in Budd's possession." Established in 1843, the Legal Intelligencer was the oldest law journal in the United States. Wallce, its founder, and editor for nearly fifty years, was also a practicing attorney. Townsend Sharpless was a prominent Quaker merchant who was accused by Maryland slave-owners of "enticing" their slaves to escape to freedom in Pennsylvania.
  • $125
book (2)

Letter Signed (by a secretary?), Philadelphia, June 18, 1841, to Elie Beatty, Bank Cashier, Hagerstown, Maryland

Gratz, Edw.[ard] and D.[avid], quarto, one page, plus stamp less address leaf, in very good, clean, and legible condition. 1841 Young Lincoln's Law Clients and the Jewish Gratz Family of Philadelphia. "… We received a letter from S. M. Tinsley & Co. of Springfield, Ill. In the early part of the month, advising us of a Deposit having been made at your Bank with instructions that the same shall be forthwith remitted to our address. As we have not had the pleasure of hearing from you relative thereto and fearing that this remittance might have been made, without having reached us, shall we ask the favor of you to inform us what has been done in this matter …" [With handwritten note by recipient at bottom]: "No deposit made yet. So soon as a certain deed from Kiedy of Illinois to Lohman of this State is executed the deposit will be made and forwarded to you." An interesting association between Illinois legal clients of 32-year-old Abraham Lincoln and the famous Jewish Gratz family of Philadelphia. Edward Gratz and his son David had offices in Philadelphia but most of their business was conducted in the Lykens Valley, where they owned and operated Anthracite Coal mines, Edward was the son of Simon Gratz and the grandson of Michael Gratz. The revered Rebecca Gratz, who founded the Jewish Sunday School movement and was an inspiration of Sir. Walter Scott's novel Ivanhoe was Edward's aunt. Edward and David had a falling out with their relatives and were parties, from 1839 onward, to an acrimonious inheritance lawsuit which eventually made its way to the US Supreme Court in 1850. Seth M. Tinsley (1808-1868) a Virginian who had settled in Illinois in 1830, was one of the wealthiest merchants in Springfield – and the landlord of Lincoln's law offices, located in the same building as Tinsley's dry-goods store, (now a National Historical Monument.) Before purchasing his own home, Lincoln also rented a house from Tinsley. Apart from his store, Tinsley also owned a mill and a distillery and over $ 40,000 in real estate, plus being a director of the Turnpike Company and a local bank and a Springfield city Alderman. This letter was written weeks before Tinsley first retained Lincoln as his lawyer in July 1841. Lincoln continued to represent Tinsley in various matters until 1846. "Kiedy" probably refers to John A. Keedy, one of Tinsley's business partners and another Lincoln client. (His name is also misspelled "Keidy" and "Kidey" in different historical documents). Keedy retained Lincoln on various legal matters from 1840 to 1851. All the historical accounts of Abraham Lincoln's sympathy for the Jewish people date from the early years of his Presidency. While there is no evidence that Lincoln ever had direct contact with the Gratz family while they were doing business with Tinsley and Keedy in Springfield, this letter may represent the very first association between significant figures in Lincoln's early life and the most celebrated Jewish family of Philadelphia.
  • $125
book (2)

Autograph Letter Signed, Montreal, August 3, 1816, to Mrs. E. Coolidge, Boston, Massachusetts

C., J., Jr. quarto, three pages, plus stamp less address leaf, formerly folded, some light damp staining, else in good, legible condition. The letter describes a journey from Burlington, Vermont to Montreal via Lake Champlain on an early steamboat. The letter writer then gives his impressions of Montreal, its people and its architecture as well as its future prospects: "Montreal Augt. 3, 1816 My dear friend, I wrote you a few lines from Burlington and the next morning by 5 o'clock we were embar'ct on board the steam boat which was in every respect calculated for the navigation of lake Champlain the passengers were about seventy in number from various states and destined to various places – many of them were persons of information and being conversable the time pass'd pleasantly – the lake is a fine sheet of water ornamented with many islands and has lofty and romantic mountains in view – its banks are generally cover'd with wood, and in many situations exhibit cultivation and improvement – our passage was rapid – we sail'd near Isle aux noir which is strongly fortified and commands the entrance into Canada in this direction – it is a very important situation – we arrived at St. Johns a small town an hour before sunset and procur'd tolerable accommodations – there is here a British custom House but met with no trouble – we yesterday procur'd carriages and rode to la prairie, a distance of 18 miles – we here procur'd a boat in which we cross'd the St. Lawrence to this city passing a considerable rapid – the view as you approach the city is very fine and on entering it you are for the moment confus'd with noise and variety of the strange sounds which you hear – the lower class of people are mostly French, and talk with all the variety and vivacity of those of Europe – the houses are built of stone , having iron doors, window shutters and tin'd roofs – they are very strong, and perfectly secure against fire the streets are narrow and at present dusty – the weather is uncomfortably warm – the Cathedral, some of the convents, the government buildings and many of the private houses in appearance very much surpass'd my expectation – the population has increas'd some thousands within a few years, and there is every prospect of the city from its advantageous situation becoming a place of great business – we have engaged passages for Quebec and shall go on board the steam boat this evening – our friends will accompany us – having examined the curiosities of the city and neighborhood, we shall immediately return here, part if not the whole of the way by land – it is our intention to devote a short time to visit the nunneries, take a little rest and then commence our journey towards home – my father, mother and Elizabeth are well – they all desire particular remembrance to you and all other friends in which I sincerely unite. … I am writing in a small and warm chamber with a bad pen and must omit saying many things to you till another opportunity offers – the air is growing more cool, and the mountain and scenery back of the city looks very beautifully . I must prepare to send my portmanteau on board … J. C. Jr. …"
  • $200
book (2)

Public Novena For Poor Souls, Nov. 2nd to 12th – St. Joseph’s Colored Catholic Church, Richmond, Va. …

Printed pictorial card, measuring 5 ½ x 3 ¼ inches, printed on both sides, in very good, clean condition. This card advertises a public novena for poor souls in purgatory at the St. Joseph's Colored Catholic Church. The church, organized by Bishop John J. Keane, was the first Catholic congregation for African Americans in Virginia. John Joseph Keane (1839 –1918) was an Irish-born American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as bishop of the Diocese of Richmond in Virginia from 1878 to 1888. Despite opposition, Keane founded schools and churches for Catholic African Americans in the diocese. The original congregation began in the basement of the all-white (predominantly Irish American) Saint Peter's Church in 1879. The 13-member congregation included Emily Mitchell (born into slavery in 1824, brought from Baltimore and later serving Bishop James Gibbons), Julia Grandison (baptized in Georgia and brought to Richmond at age 9), Moses Marx (who began driving Bishop John Keane's buggy at age 12), Liza Marx (who learned to read and reminded the judge reading her mistress' will that he forgot the lines bequeathing money to Elizabeth Thompson and her next child of issue), and Julia Flippen as well as her children. In 1884, when the congregation had increased to about 50 including children, Bishop Keane signed a deed for a property on Shockoe Hill for what became St. Joseph's Church, the first Catholic congregation organized in Virgina for African Americans and invited the Josephites for help in furthering the Black apostolate. In 1884, Keane attended the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore. The Council appointed him in May 1885 to the committee for the founding of a Catholic university in the United States. He was appointed as the first rector of the Catholic University of America in 1886. He continued to serve as bishop of Richmond until August 12, 1888, when he resigned that post. His democratic and liberal policies made him enemies with conservatives in the hierarchy and at the Vatican. In 1896, Keane was forced to resign as rector of the university.
  • $175
book (2)

Autograph Letter, Franklin, [Venango County, Pennsylvania] May 10th, 1862, to Theora, Describing a Trip to Pittsburg and Western Pennsylvania

(Anon.) octavo, 4 pages, unsigned, possible incomplete, in very good condition. The writer describes his travels in Pittsburg and other western Pennsylvania towns, he provides an epistolary tour of Pittsburg's industries of the day, an oil refinery, comments on the pollution "earth and air are impregnated with the aroma of petroleum", lumber raftsmen and iron mills, before continuing on to New Brighton, New Castle, and Franklin, in Venango County: "My dear Theora, … My letter from Pittsburg was written on Thursday morning and mailed then and there so I suppose you have read it before this time and I shall start from the point where I left off …. After taking my breakfast at the St. Nicholas (which, by the way was an excellent one and at the moderate charge of 25 cents) I turned out to view the city, went to P. Office with your letter and thence across the Allegheny river and through the city of Allegheny to the heights beyond, from which a fine [view] of the rivers and surrounding country could be obtained – rambled over a German Catholic cemetery, on one of the highest hills and then descended towards the river and found myself, on plunging down into a deep ravine, in what I supposed by the stables and shanties around to be the Irish town, or suburb but the steep hill sides were terraced and laid out in rude gardens or graperies indicating a German population in part if not in whole. I threaded my way out towards the shore where a number of oil refineries are located. I entered one of them and discoursed the proprietor upon the subject of coal oil and he very politely showed me through his refinery and described the various processes and operations to which the crude material is subjected reserving only to himself the final chemical mystery which of course no "outsider" has a right to enquire into. He made me a present of a vial filled with the purified oil – transparent, warranted to be non-explosive, and to burn without smoke, or odor, in any properly constructed lamp; of which oil he offered to sell me one hundred barrels (more or less) at 20 cents per gallon! Cheap and brilliant light indeed. After parting from him I wandered among the oil boats, rafts and bins lying along shore all so saturated with oil, and the barrels which cover the landings and surrounding commons leak so profusely that earth and air are impregnated with aroma of petroleum and even the beautifully transparent waters of the Allegheny are glazed with a coating of the same material borne on the current towards the gulf of Mexico. I crossed, by a different bridge, to the Pittsburg side and got among the lumber raftsmen who tried to sell me shingles at $ 1.25 per bunch of 500 and boards proportionately low but I was not ready to purchase and left them for a peep at some of the large iron mills close at hand. These mills abound along the margin of both the Allegheny and Monongahela but more particularly in Manchester, which is across the latter river from Pittsburg. You may wonder how I had so much leisure time and I may state that a gentleman with whom I had conversation upon the subject of reaching the oil region, informed me that he had wells and property here and that he preferred to travel by the New Castle rout, when the Allegheny was not full enough for Steamboats to run. By this rout passengers take the cars (as I did) by the accommodation train of the Pittsburg and Chicago R. R. at 4.45 in the afternoon. As that hour approached I recrossed to Allegheny City, where the depot is, paid 55 cents for a ticket to New Brighton on the Beaver river, a distance of 28 miles, where we arrived about 6 ½ o'clock after a very pleasant run along the margin of the Ohio, among gardens and truck patches villas and towns so numerous that I cannot name near all of them, but there was Industry, Economy, and Freedom, - very good and suggestive titles; besides Rochester at the mouth of Beaver and but a short distance below New Brighto
  • $125
book (2)

Autograph Letter Signed, as United States Senator from Massachusetts, Philadelphia, February 13th, 1792, to Thomas Dwight, Springfield, Massachusetts

Strong, Caleb, (1745-1819) quarto, two pages, plus stamp less address leaf, in very good, clean, and legible condition. Strong writes: Dear Sir, There has not been a Word of Objection to the Claime of Mr. Cotton but it was professed that a number of these cases should be provided for in the Bill some of which were very doubtful and have occasioned as lengthy Debates in the Senate as any Subject during the present Session, the Consideration of the Bill has been put off several times that Evidence might be obtained concerning those cases, but I hope it will pass in some form or other in a few days. It is agreed on all hands that the Indian War is a very unfortunate Business, the Sentiments concerning it in Congress are almost as variant as among the People at large. So then there is to be no Theatre in Boston I am afraid the newly acquired fortunes can't now be spent in Massachusetts and that the Possessors will be obliged from that Consideration to leave the State – but there is one considering Circumstance the old Police of the Town is to be preserved and that will afford considerable relief to the married men. I am much obliged to Miss B. for her Complaisance in postponing the Ceremony until the Beginning of March but as it is uncertain whether I can return before the latter part of that month and it would be extreme Cruelty to Suggest a further Postponement I must request you to present my compliments to her and in my name at the wedding to wish her according to the ancient form, much Comfort in her new Boundings. I am dear Sir with Much Regard your friend & Servt Caleb Strong I have just had a Letter from Sedgwick which says that he proposed setting off from Stockbridge for this place today – " Caleb Strong (1745-1819) was a lawyer, Federalist Statesman, Massachusetts legislator and official. He graduated from Harvard in 1764; studied law under Joseph Hawley; was admitted to Massachusetts bar, 1772. Served on committee for drafting the Massachusetts constitution, 1779. He represented Massachusetts in the Federal Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, 1787, advocating annual elections of representatives and choice of a president by Congress, also making the successful motion that the House alone should originate spending bills although the Senate might amend them. He served as U. S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1789-1796, he formed, with Oliver Ellsworth and Rufus King the bulwark of the administration in the Senate. He contributed to the drafting of the Judiciary Act of 1789, espoused the Hamiltonian financial plan, and introduced the bill for the chartering of the first Bank of the United States. At the beginning of the two-party system he associated himself with the Washington administration and the Federalists, supported the ratification of the Jay Treaty, and deplored the excesses of the French revolutionary government. As Federalist governor of Massachusetts, 1800-1807, he was an able administrator; during his second period as governor, 1812-1816, he was in continuous opposition to the national administration and the War of 1812. He approved both the calling of the Hartford Convention in December 1814 and its subsequent report. American National Biography, vol. 21 pp., 39-41
  • $450
Autograph Letter Signed. Los Angeles

Autograph Letter Signed. Los Angeles, Aug. 7, 1888, to James J. Flynn, Democratic State Central Committee [San Francisco]

Jacobs, Louis T. quarto, one page, somewhat tanned, old tape repairs, mounted on separate stiff quarto sheet, good. 1888 Black immigrant 'stumps' California for Democrats. "Can you please forward me at your earliest opportunity a copy of President Cleveland Message to Congress wherein he recommends the payment of the Freedmen's Bank Depositors… sent sometime in Dec….86. I am a Colored man and as I am going to stump the State in interest of Democracy I would like to have it as it would enable me in my argument." Jacobs was a British "Mulatto", possibly born in Sierra Leone, Africa in the 1840s, who had immigrated to the US as a young man, in the 1870s. He had worked as a janitor at Los Angeles City Hall – where he probably acquired a taste for politics – before moving to northern California to become agent of an Oakland insurance company. Most African-Americans were Republicans in the post-Civil War era, so Jacobs undoubtedly saw an opportunity to advance his career by "stumping" California for the Democrats, who decried the "lawful robbery" of freed slaves, after the War, their deposits in a "Freedman's Bank" squandered by "Republican thieves". The Bank had collapsed in 1875, forcing depositors to wait a decade to recover their money until President Cleveland declared that the hapless "colored" should be reimbursed for their losses by Government funds.
  • $125
book (2)

Autograph Letter Signed. Los Angeles, Aug. 7, 1888, to James J. Flynn, Democratic State Central Committee [San Francisco]

quarto, one page, somewhat tanned, old tape repairs, mounted on separate stiff quarto sheet, good. 1888 Black immigrant 'stumps' California for Democrats. "Can you please forward me at your earliest opportunity a copy of President Cleveland Message to Congress wherein he recommends the payment of the Freedmen's Bank Depositors… sent sometime in Dec….86. I am a Colored man and as I am going to stump the State in interest of Democracy I would like to have it as it would enable me in my argument." Jacobs was a British "Mulatto", possibly born in Sierra Leone, Africa in the 1840s, who had immigrated to the US as a young man, in the 1870s. He had worked as a janitor at Los Angeles City Hall – where he probably acquired a taste for politics – before moving to northern California to become agent of an Oakland insurance company. Most African-Americans were Republicans in the post-Civil War era, so Jacobs undoubtedly saw an opportunity to advance his career by "stumping" California for the Democrats, who decried the "lawful robbery" of freed slaves, after the War, their deposits in a "Freedman's Bank" squandered by "Republican thieves". The Bank had collapsed in 1875, forcing depositors to wait a decade to recover their money until President Cleveland declared that the hapless "colored" should be reimbursed for their losses by Government funds.