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La Fiorita d?Italia; in Italian

La Fiorita d?Italia; in Italian, decorated manuscript on parchment

Guido da Pisa BOOK DESCRIPTION: FIFTEENTH-CENTURY COPY OF GUIDO DA PISA'S HISTORY OF ROME, IN ITALIAN. In Italian, decorated manuscript on parchment, Italy, Tuscany, Florence(?), c. 1440-1460. Dimensions 260 x 182 mm., 83 folios, lacking nine leaves, horizontal catchwords, written in brown ink by two different scribes in Italian cursive mercantesca script in single column on 38 lines, penwork initials. BINDING: ORIGINAL dark brown calf over wooden boards blind-tooled with fillets, twisted rope and x-form motifs, fitted purple buckram case c. 1900. TEXT: Guido da Pisa is best-known for his commentary on Dante, and Dante is cited often in this work, a history of Rome composed within the format of a universal chronicle. This text is now remarkably rare; in fact this is the first copy to appear on the open market in over 140 years, and one of only a few copies on parchment. PROVENANCE: script and decoration suggest that the manuscript was written in Tuscany in the middle of the fifteenth century. The binding, decoration, the quality of the script and the choice of parchment support suggest it was made for a patron of some wealth and influence; several inscriptions from unidentified early modern owners; Gerali di Pontremoli (in Tuscany), inscription on front pastedown, records the acquisition of the book from his family on November 20, 1889. CONDITION: small stains, slight water damage outer margins ff. 65-68, clasps and catches missing, losses of leather especially at foot of boards and spine (the latter with modern conservation), worm holes, otherwise in very good condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1053)
PERSIUS

PERSIUS, Satires, with extensive glosses; JOHANNES BRITANNICUS, Commentary on Persius; PLINY THE YOUNGER, Epistulae; in Latin, manuscript on paper

Persius; Johannes Britannicus; Pliny the Younger BOOK DESCRIPTION: RENAISSANCE TEXTBOOK WRITTEN BY A STUDENT IN LATIN ON PAPER. In Latin, manuscript on paper, Italy (Cortona, Tuscany), after 1481 (likely after 1486 and before 1494). Dimensions 220 x 145 mm., 20 folios, missing two leaves, outer parchment flyleaves a folded fourteenth-century document originally functioning as an informal binding, ruled faintly, written in 17-19 long lines by a single scribe in Humanist semi-cursive script, virtually all marginal and interlinear space filled with unruled notes in tiny Humanist cursive by same scribe, slightly larger initials at beginning of each line, decorated occasionally. BINDING: slightly later (sixteenth century?) envelope-style limp parchment binding comprised of a single blank parchment sheet with all edges folded inwards and a curved-edge flap. TEXT: This textbook uniquely documents the practice of education in the Renaissance. Written by a student, it contains a rare copy of the Satires of Persius with lecture notes packing the margins and filling spaces between lines. Some of these notes repeat commentaries of Johannes Britannicus (published 1481-1486), showing how contemporary works informed university teaching. Others are clearly the individual reflections of the student. PROVENANCE: Details of the text and the watermark suggest a date after 1481, and likely after 1486, for this owner-produced manuscript copied by an Italian student who filled most of the blank spaces on every folio with an extensive gloss. The document serving as its cover provides evidence which points to an origin in Cortona, Tuscany. Later, in the sixteenth century, the manuscript was owned by two men who added their ex libris : Christofono bello Guido Carissimo (f. 19v) and Giovanni da Casentino (f. 20v), both of whom are otherwise unknown. CONDITION: chipped corners and edges, some loss of marginal notes, some discoloration, spotting, original ink blots throughout, one minor hole, extensive wear to outer surfaces and edges of folded parchment flyleaves, spots of modern paste on outer front cover and spine, staining and discoloration on outer cover, some cracking at spine, minor chipping on all edges, quires once tacketed now unattached, but overall in fair condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1052)
Breviary (Augustinian Use); in Latin

Breviary (Augustinian Use); in Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: ILLUMINATED MEDIEVAL BREVIARY ON PARCHMENT. In Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment, France (Lyon), c. 1440-1450 (likely before 1446). Dimensions 144 x 100 mm., 470 folios, lacking 24 leaves, written in a gothic bookhand ( textualis ) in two columns on 27 lines, TWO FULL AND NINE PARTIAL RINCEAUX BORDERS with flowers and burnished gold leaves, FOUR 6-line HISTORIATED INITIALS. BINDING: nineteenth-century gold-tooled light brown morocco, silk markers, chestnut morocco box. TEXT: The rich illumination of this Breviary signals a luxury production. Recitation of the text of the Breviary was at the heart of the religious life of monks, nuns, and friars. This Breviary was made for Augustinian use. ILLUMINATION: Four historiated initials; although the initials are very small, the figures within them are depicted with remarkable attention and skill, and perhaps were done by an artist from the workshop of the so-called Master of Roman de la Rose of Vienna, active c. 1425-1465 mainly in Lyon and probably identifiable as Jean Hortart. PROVENANCE: The manuscript was made for an Augustinian friar in the parish of St. Vincent in Lyon, c. 1430-1450 (but likely before 1446), as indicated by liturgical and textual evidence. The original owner (or user of the manuscript) was likely named Pierre, and his coat of arms was painted at the beginning of a daily office for St. Peter the Apostle on f. 394. The manuscript later belonged to a private collection, presumably European. CONDITION: some stains and signs of wear, wormholes on the final leaves, small loss of leather on the front board of binding and very slight fading of the gold-tooling, nevertheless, the front hinges are very fragile and would benefit from conservation before the binding becomes detached from the text block, otherwise in excellent condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1051)
Illuminated leaf of Musician Harping for a Recumbent Queen

Illuminated leaf of Musician Harping for a Recumbent Queen

The Spanish Forger (active Paris, c. 1890s to 1930s?) MINIATURE DESCRIPTION: ILLUMINATED LEAF IMITATING MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPTS BY THE INFAMOUS SPANISH FORGER. Illuminated leaf on medieval parchment, France, probably Paris, c. 1900-1925(?). Dimensions 225 x 195 mm., tempera and gold leaf. ILLUSTRATION: a courtly scene with a man playing a lion-headed harp, a crowned Queen reclines in a luxurious bed and listens attentively with a red rose held in her hand. Nearby, a maiden appears in doorway holding a chalice of wine. The scene is set in a curtained bedchamber with a wooden screen supporting an escutcheon with a white swan. PROVENANCE: Unmasked in 1930 by Belle da Costa Green, then director of the Pierpont Morgan Library, the Spanish Forger is known today as one of the most skillful, successful, and prolific forgers of all time. Scientific analyses of other works by the Spanish Forger have revealed the presence of green copper arsenite, a pigment not available before 1814. The Forger was active in the 1890s and was still painting in the 1920s. Like others, the present miniature is painted on medieval parchment?a reused sheet from an unillustrated Choir Book; private Swiss Collection. CONDITION: good condition, apart from minor flaking of the gold and the expected signs of age in the borders. FRAMED: with a carved and gilded sixteenth-century Italian frame. Full description and images available. (MIN 19-41)
Illuminated leaf of The Marriage of the Virgin

Illuminated leaf of The Marriage of the Virgin

The Spanish Forger (active Paris, c. 1890s to 1930s?) DESCRIPTION: ILLUMINATED LEAF IMITATING MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPTS BY THE INFAMOUS SPANISH FORGER. Single illuminated leaf on medieval parchment, France, probably Paris, perhaps after 1925. Dimensions 560 x 496 mm., tempera and gold leaf, text in a rounded Gothic book hand, music on red five-line staves in square notation, two historiated roundels, illuminated initial, richly decorated borders, large rectangular miniature, framed in gold. TEXT: painted on a reused sheet from a dismembered fifteenth-century Italian Antiphonal, with the antiphons "Sancta Maria Dei genitrix virgo" and "Dum esset rex" for the Office of the Virgin Mary. ILLUSTRATION: The Marriage of the Virgin is painted at center, with Mary and Joseph joining hands in the presence of the high priest and wedding party, depicted inside a vaulted cathedral; roundel in the right border depicts the Annunciation; a larger roundel at the bottom depicts the Adoration of the Magi. The initial 'S' includes a heraldic device with gold cross and four fleur-de-lis on a red shield with crowned helmet. PROVENANCE: Unmasked in 1930 by Belle da Costa Green, then director of the Pierpont Morgan Library, the Spanish Forger is known today as one of the most skillful, successful, and prolific forgers of all time. Scientific analyses of other works by the Spanish Forger have revealed the presence of green copper arsenite, a pigment not available before 1814. The Forger was active in the 1890s and was still painting in the 1920s. CONDITION: bright, fresh condition, apart from minor cockling of the parchment and some rubbing of the paint in borders and initial 'S.' Full description and images available. (MIN 17-03)
De proprietatibus terminorum (On the properties of endings) or De differentiae verborum (On the differences of words); in Latin

De proprietatibus terminorum (On the properties of endings) or De differentiae verborum (On the differences of words); in Latin, illuminated manuscript on paper

PSEUDO-CICERO BOOK DESCRIPTION: ATTRACTIVE HUMANIST MANUSCRIPT OF A REFERENCE WORK COMPARING SYNONYMS. In Latin, illuminated manuscript on paper, Italy, northern(?), dated 1445. Dimensions 152 x 105 mm., 93 folios, complete, vertical catchwords and quire signatures, written by one scribe in a humanist minuscule, red rubrics, two-line initials alternately red and blue, nineteen 3-line gold initials, one 4-line gold initial with white vinestem decoration. BINDING: modern blind-tooled brown leather, spine with three raised bands, title copied on bottom fore edge in an early hand. TEXT: Slightly smaller than a modern paperback, this handy little reference book?a kind of antecedent to Roget's Thesaurus?includes distinctions between words of similar meanings, or synonyms. Multiple versions of the text in this manuscript circulated from the early Middle Ages to the Renaissance, some attributed to Isidore, and our version, usually attributed to Cicero. The present version lacks a critical edition. No doubt it served a Renaissance student or scholar well. PROVENANCE: Copied in 1445, when it was signed and dated by the scribe and artist (f. 88v); his first name has been thoroughly erased, leaving us only with "de sancto petro." An origin in Northern Italy seems likely given the style of the script, decoration, and watermark, but it is not certain. Title and date recorded on f. 1 in ink in a modern hand, and "0111," added in pencil; no other evidence of previous ownership. CONDITION: bottom outer corner of ff. 1-29 repaired with modern paper (very slight damage to the text, usually a single letter or so), remaining corners are original and show some wear through f. 42, edges darkened and with a bit of foxing, but overall in very good condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1037)
Choir Book (Gradual); in Latin

Choir Book (Gradual); in Latin, stenciled book on paper

BOOK DESCRIPTION: LARGE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY STENCILED CHOIR BOOK IN ITS ORIGINAL BINDING. In Latin, stenciled book on paper, Belgium, Hainaut (Wisbecq, Brugelette), dated August 2, 1769. Dimensions 525 x 360 mm, 86 folios, complete, single full-length vertical bounding lines, created by means of stencils with up to twelve four-line red staves and twelve lines of text (some pages with fewer staves), text based on Roman type, square musical notation, red running titles, rubrics in various sizes in two shades of red.BINDING: ORIGINAL CALF BINDING, blind-tooled with three sets of triple fillets framing a floral and palmette border and a retangular center panel with fleurons at each corner, ornate openwork gilt metal corner pieces, brass clasps and catches, brass fore edge protectors, two metal catches, fastens back front, modern red cloth case. TEXT: This very large Gradual contains the sung portions of the Mass, the Introit, Gradual, and Alleluia, all with square musical notation. Stenciled manuscripts are curious hybrids. They are unique items, like handwritten manuscripts, but were produced with stencil-templates, and in that sense are more like printed books. Stenciled liturgical books, many of the Choir Books with musical notation, often made in monastic settings, are known from the mid seventeenth century until the latter decades of the nineteenth century, and in some cases later. PROVENANCE: The manuscript was made by Jean Baptiste Lebeau, the director of the Gray Sisters of Wisbecq as stated on the title page; completed on August 2, 1769. Wisbecq, a hamlet in Hainaut, Belgium, near Brugelette, was the site of a hostel dedicated to St. Nicholas since the thirteenth century, caring for travelers who were poor and ill. The Gray Hospital Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis were established there in 1406. The nuns of the convent were expelled in 1798, due to suppression of monasteries during the French Revolution. There are erased dealer's notes on the inside front cover and inside back cover in pencil, "40699."CONDITION: flyleaves soiled, binding slightly rubbed, spine expertly repaired, otherwise in very good condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1023)
Illuminated Leaf from a Medieval Gradual with a miniature of Saint Paul and musical notation

Illuminated Leaf from a Medieval Gradual with a miniature of Saint Paul and musical notation

Cristoforo Cortese (active Venice, c. 1390-before 1445) MINIATURE DESRIPTION: LARGE LEAF FROM A FIFTEENTH-CENTURY CHOIR BOOK. In Latin, illuminated leaf on parchment, Northern Italy, Venice, c. 1426-1430. Dimensions, 510 x 365 mm., one leaf, written in a rounded Gothic book hand with seven lines of text and seven 4-line red staves with square musical notation on the recto and verso, rubrics in red, initials in blue and red with contrasting pen decoration, one large historiated initial. TEXT: Leaf from a Gradual with the introit Scio cui credidi (I know whom I have believed) of the Mass for the Conversion of St. Paul (January 25). ILLUSTRATION: half-length miniature of Saint Paul holding a sword and blue book. PROVENANCE: The miniature is securely attributed to Cristoforo Cortese, the most accomplished Venetian illuminator of the early fifteenth century. It comes from a dismembered Gradual that probably dates soon after Cortese's return to Venice after a brief residency in Bologna, c. 1426-1430; former folio number "31" in brown ink on recto, partially-erased inscription beginning "XIV." at lower edge, verso numbered in Roman numerals "XXXI"; private German collection; private Swiss collection. CONDITION: in good condition with fresh colors, leaf with minor cockling, small stains at the edges, modern pencil marks, and remnants of a former paper mount on the verso. Full description and images available. (MIN 19-39)
The " Petites Heures " of Charles VIII of France

The ” Petites Heures ” of Charles VIII of France, Book of Hours (use of Paris); in Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: THE "PETITES HEURES" CHARLES VIII OF FRANCE; TINY BOOK OF HOURS FOR THE PERSONAL USE OF A KING. In Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment, France, Paris, c. 1490-1493 (before 1494). Dimensions 73 x 49 mm., 206 folios, complete, written in dark brown ink in a cursive gothic bookhand on 14 lines, burnished gold initials throughout, 5 large initials with scrolls extending into the margins, ONE HERALDIC MINIATURE, 10 SMALL MINIATURES, 12 FULL-PAGE MINIATURES. BINDING: refined 18th-century(?) paneled gold-tooled brown morocco, 19th-century clasps and catches. ILLUSTRATION: Illuminated by the Master of the Chronique scandaleuse, a masterful artist who often received prestigious commissions from King Charles VIII and other members of the royal family. The successful illuminations in this very tiny manuscript demonstrates the Master of the Chronique scandaleuse's utmost mastery of color at a microscopic scale. Characteristic of his palette is a preference for strong vibrant colors, as well as the abundant use of liquid gold for the depiction of drapery and scenic elements. PROVENANCE: Written and illuminated in Paris before 1494 for Charles VIII, King of France (r. 1483-1498). Unquestionable evidence of the personal use of the present manuscript by Charles VIII is provided by the ex-libris and motto "plus. quautre." followed by his name "charles. viiie." (f. 41v). The present manuscript included, only five manuscript Books of Hours are known to have been made for the personal use of King Charles VIII; Paris, Librairie Auguste Blaizot, 1967-1969 (catalogue 326, no. 1681; catalogue 331, no. 387); Paris, Hôtel Drouot, 4 décembre 2000 (collection Serrier), no. 25. CONDITION: occasional tiny chips in paint of the colored background at edges of miniatures frames, very faint offsetting from fictive golden frames onto facing rectos, slight scuffing at joints, otherwise in excellent condition. Full description and images available. (BOH 182)
The Hours of Françoise de Foix (Use of Bayeux); in Latin and French

The Hours of Françoise de Foix (Use of Bayeux); in Latin and French, illuminated manuscript on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: BOOK OF HOURS BELONGING TO THE CHIEF MISTRESS OF FRANCE IN THE 15TH CENTURY. In Latin and French, illuminated manuscript on parchment, Northwestern France, Normandy (Bayeux), c. 1480-1490. Dimensions 186 x 132 mm, 81 folios, lacking one leaf, written in brown ink in gothic textualis bookhand on 20 lines, 1- to 2-line champie initials in burnished gold, nine 4- to 5-line initials on burnished gold grounds, FOUR FULL-PAGE ARCHED MINIATURES WITH FULL BORDERS. BINDING: splendid sixteenth-century Parisian binding, gold-tooled à la fanfare by the royal "atelier du doreur à la première palmette" of Henri III of France; modern fitted case. ILLUSTRATION: The engaging miniatures are by an artist who painted another Book of Hours localizable in Bayeux. PROVENANCE: The localizable feasts in the calendar are characteristic of Normandy, especially of Bayeux. The original patron was probably a woman, or perhaps a couple, due to the use of both masculine and feminine prayers. Later, the manuscript belonged to Françoise de Foix, Countess of Châteaubriant and mistress of King François I (c. 1495-1537), who composed her personal prayer to the Virgin Mary on ff. 77v-78. The initials beginning each verse spell out "Honneste femme Françoise La Cointesse," suggesting that it was written by Françoise de Foix herself. In the second half of the 16th century, the manuscript belonged to Marguerite Fresneau; her name "Marguerite / Fresneau" stamped on the front and back covers of binding. The book was later owned by her granddaughter, Louis du Bellay de La Palus, abbess of the Benedictine Abbey of Norte-Dame de Nyoiseau (1643-45). In the mid-19th century, it belonged to Guglielmo Libri (1803-1869), an Italian count and notorious manuscript theft. A previous description records the manuscript as sold by Nicolas Rauch (1897-1962), bookseller, Lausanne, in 1952 (unverified). CONDITION: occasional damp stains in margins, binding very slightly scuffed in the corners, but otherwise in pristine condition. Full description and images available. (BOH 179)
Recueil de diverses receptes bien experimentés contre diverses maladies; and Receuille de plusieurs remedes tres excellens et mesme eprouvées

Recueil de diverses receptes bien experimentés contre diverses maladies; and Receuille de plusieurs remedes tres excellens et mesme eprouvées, Medical and Alchemical Recipe Collection; in French, manuscript on paper

BOOK DESCRIPTION: REMARKABLE TWO-VOLUME COLLECTION OF MEDICAL, ALCHEMICAL AND ARTISANAL RECIPES WITH ILLUSTRATIONS. In French, manuscript on paper, France (Normandy), v. 1, c. 1650, with additions dating c. 1650-1710; v. 2, early 18th-century (after 1712). Vol. 1: Dimensions 200 x 170 mm., 152 folios, lacking two folios, ff. 44-45, with the loss of the heading and first recipes of chapter 15, otherwise apparently complete, written in at least four hands with multiple inks, varying numbers of lines per page, in cursive script, NINE INK DRAWINGS OF CHEMICAL APPARATUS AND FURNACES. BINDING: vellum with a flap secured with a cord and twine. Vol. 2: Dimensions 200 x 160 mm. 39 folios, apparently complete, written in a single hand in cursive script, ONE DRAWING OF AN AMULET. BINDING: unbound (lacking covers) but sewn with a vellum cord.TEXT: Offering a rare and coherent portrait of the changing content of chemistry and medicine in early modern France, the first volume contains several hundred medical, alchemical, and artisanal processes. Begun as a medical prescription book, later owners recorded and illustrated (with nine drawings) predominantly chemical processes, focusing on metallic transmutation. The second volume is a collection of approximately 150 medicinal recipes and instructions classed according to the illness to be cured: fevers, illnesses of the chest, of the kidneys and bladder, of the stomach, pleurisy, hydropsy, poisons, plague, vapors, bloody fluxes, burns, and so forth. PROVENANCE: Written over a period of about fifty years by multiple writers in the second half of the seventeenth century in Normandy, France (with many later additions in spaces left blank), and continued in the eighteenth century in a second volume. CONDITION: clearly well-used, but in overall good condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1040)
Woven Book of Hours; in Latin and French

Woven Book of Hours; in Latin and French, illustrated book woven in silk

R. P. J. Hervier, designer; J. A. Henry, fabricator, for A. Roux BOOK DESCRIPTION: BOOK OF PRAYERS WOVEN IN SILK ON A JACQUARD LOOM. In Latin and French, illustrated book woven in silk, R. P. J. Hervier, designer; J. A. Henry, fabricator, for A. Roux, France, Lyon, c. 1886-1887. Dimensions 174 x 144 mm., 58 silk pages, complete, text in one or two columns, one half-page and three full-page illustrations, various styles of decorative borders and initials on every page, woven entirely in silver-gray and black silk. BINDING: Bound in white morocco by Lesort of Paris, elaborately gilt with interlaced initials "HM" front and back, cream-colored silk doublures, gilt edges and fold-ins, five raised bands, spine stamped "heures" and "lesort," original blue calf presentation box lined in white silk. ILLUSTRATION: Every page of this book is surrounded by border decorations of a wide variety. The half- and full-page illustrations are designed after paintings by Fra Angelico, Fra Bartolomeo and Raphael, and other Renaissance masters. PROVENANCE: Woven in Lyon by the firm of J. A. Henry, c. 1886-1887. The front doublure is gilt stamped with initials and date May 1900, but there is no indication that the silk pages were woven at this relatively late date. The silver-grey hue of the silk more likely indicates that this example was woven in the late 1880s and was untouched until it was bound and customized later; monogram "HM" gilt stamped on covers; pencil inscription on unnumbered silk page: Marie José Seiler, Chexbres [Switzerland]. CONDITION: In very good condition. Full description and images available. (BOH 166)
Book of Hours (Use of Paris); in Latin and French

Book of Hours (Use of Paris); in Latin and French, illuminated manuscript on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: LOVELY BOOK OF HOURS BY ONE OF THE MOST SKILLFUL PARISIAN ILLUMINATOR OF HIS GENERATION. In Latin and French, illuminated manuscript on parchment, France, Paris, c. 1460-1470. Dimensions 176 x 123 mm., 147 folios, complete, written in brown ink in a cursive bookhand on 15 lines, SIX HISTORIATED INITIALS, FIFTEEN LARGE MINIATURES. BINDING: 16th-century(?) gold-tooled brown morocco, attachment points for two clasps (both lost).ILLUSTRATION: An undoubtedly Parisian Book of Hours attributed to an artist in the circle of the Coëtivy Master, as indicated by the rendering of faces and draperies, the decorative scheme of the borders, and the designs for the miniatures. The Coëtivy Master (perhaps identified as Colin d'Amiens, active in Paris c. 1455 to c. 1485) and his workshop illuminated a great number of Books of Hours and created designs for printed books and tapestries; this master has been called the "most important artist practicing in Paris" in the third quarter of the fifteenth century. The fifteen large miniatures comprise a complete cycle for a Book of Hours; their borders are particularly richly decorated. PROVENANCE: Copied and illuminated in France and almost certainly in Paris c. 1460-1470. The inclusion of French prayers (or poems) and historiated initials for the virgin Saints Genevieve and Avia before the Hours of the Virgin and the richness of the borders hint that it could have been made to order as a commission. Richard de Lomenie, Paris, late 19th- or early-20th-century bookplate with arms and motto "Je maintiendray," with pasted-in circular label stamped "8"; private North American Collection. CONDITION: some miniatures rubbed or with isolated losses of pigment, some folios with cockling, some dampstaining to rear board and flyleaf, otherwise in excellent condition. Full description and images available. (BOH 168)
Processional (Dominican Use); in Latin

Processional (Dominican Use); in Latin, illuminated music manuscript on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: FOURTEENTH-CENTURY PROCESSIONAL FROM THE ROYAL ABBEY OF POISSY WITH SIXTEENTH-CENTURY ADDITIONS. In Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment, France (Poissy), c. 1330-1350; additions c. 1500-1520(?). Dimensions 150 x 95 mm., 66 folios, missing an undetermined number of leaves, some horizontal catchwords, I. Fourteenth century, ff. 1-40v: written in a formal gothic bookhand with square musical notation on red four-line staves, five or six lines of text and music on every page, II. Sixteenth century, ff. 41-66v: written in a gothic bookhand, square musical notation on red four-line staves, one-line blue or polished gold initials, TWENTY ILLUMINATED INITIALS, large white-patterned initials, extending into FULL-LENGTH BAR BORDERS. BINDING: eighteenth-century gold tooled dark brown or black leather, filigree tooled along the edges, spine with five raised bands, gilt edges, two leather strap closures with silver clasps (scallop shells). TEXT: This manuscript contains the chants and prayers that accompanied liturgical processions celebrated at the convent of Saint-Louis de Poissy, a Dominican convent for women of noble birth. PROVENANCE: Fourteenth-century Processionals from Poissy are not common, and the present manuscript is a fine addition to the corpus of Processionals from the Royal Abbey of Poissy, combining a very early example of a Poissy Processional, dating c. 1330-1350, with a later section in the characteristic "archaic" style of script and illumination practiced by the nuns at the abbey in the early sixteenth century, c. 1500-1520. Private ownership of the manuscript in recent times suggests it was among the books the nuns took from Poissy when they left the convent in 1790-1792, instead of relinquishing them to Revolutionary authorities; belonged to Jules Bonhomme (18??-19??), curé de Saint-Jean Baptiste de Grenelles, Paris, and chaplain to the Fort de l'Est, Paris, and collector of liturgical books; later note f. 66v, in pencil, "363" or "563." CONDITION: slightly trimmed (occasional slight loss of decoration), upper clasp and catches of binding missing, worn along the joints and spine, lower front joint cracked, overall in very good condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1084)
PSEUDO-AUGUSTINE

PSEUDO-AUGUSTINE, Sermones ad fratres in eremo (Sermons to the Brothers in the Desert); Publius Lentulus, Epistola de forma et statura Jesu Christi ad Senatum romanum (Letter on the form and stature of Jesus Christ to the Roman Senate); sermon by AUGUSTINE; in Latin, manuscript on paper

BOOK DESCRIPTION: EXCELLENT EXAMPLE OF A LATE MEDIEVAL CODEX COPIED BY AN IDENTIFIED SCRIBE FOR HIS PERSONAL USE. In Latin, manuscript on paper, Northern Italy, c. 1458. Dimensions 223 x 150 mm, 64 folios (contemporary foliation 1-72, lacking ff. 63-70), copied in 30-36 long lines in an informal cursive script (mercantesca) by a single scribe, calligraphic initial by scribe and first word of each sermon in the left margin, contemporary marginal annotations including nota bene symbols and corrections to or clarifications of the text. BINDING: CONTEMPORARY, ORIGINAL BINDING of leather spine over wooden boards, remains of tawed leather strap closure, evidence of chain hasp attached to lower back board by three nails. TEXT: A sermon collection, attributed to St. Augustine but certainly a later compilation, was a medieval best seller. Here we find selections from the pseudo-Augustinian collection combined with other texts, perhaps chosen by the scribe, including an apocryphal account of Christ's appearance. PROVENANCE: The manuscript was first copied in 1458 by Bartolomeus de Zachariis, as attested by the colophon on f. 62. The Zaccaria were a noble family attested in Genoa from the 12th century. The scribe does not identify himself as a member of a religious order but presumably copied these sermons for his own use in preaching. Later, the manuscript belonged to the library of a Dominican convent, possibly in Verona, according to a 15th century inscription on f. 72v. CONDITION: occasional light stains mostly to margins, few small marginal tears, few small wormholes ff. 1-6, some worming to upper and lower inner corners pastedowns, minor worming in binding, old repairs to spine, minor splitting along the line of nail holes, otherwise in excellent condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1013)
Vulgate Bible; in Latin

Vulgate Bible; in Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: VERY TINY ILLUMINATED MEDIEVAL BIBLE. In Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment, Northern France (Paris?), c. 1230-1250. Dimensions 113 x 72 mm., 512 folios, lacking at least three folios at the end with the conclusion of the Apocalypse, otherwise complete, copied in a minute gothic bookhand in two columns of 49-47 lines, SEVENTY-SEVEN PAINTED initials, FIVE HISTORIATED initials. BINDING: nineteenth-century blind-stamped brown leather over pasteboard by Riviere; some wear to joints and raised bands. TEXT: Latin Bible in the Vulgate translation; the order of the biblical books, choice of prologues, use of "modern" chapters, and readings of the text itself are all characteristic of the textual recension known as the Paris Bible. This extremely tiny volume (among the smallest thirteenth-century "pocket" Bibles known) contains the entire biblical text. ILLUSTRATION: books of the Bible and the prologue to Proverbs begin with painted initials, some extending full column, many with grotesques, three with animals. Five biblical books, Genesis, Psalms, Proverbs, Isaiah, and Romans, begin with historiated initials by a professional artist, likely working in Paris. PROVENANCE: Evidence of the script and decoration allow us to date this Bible to the second quarter of the thirteenth century, most likely to the 1240s, and evidence of its text certainly point to Paris; contemporary corrections throughout, and antiphons, canticles, and the Athanasian Creed were added to the Psalms quite early in its history; private family collection in Neptune, New Jersey. CONDITION: significant damage from damp throughout, including to the Genesis initial, occasional modern repairs, trimmed throughout, especially at top margin (loss of some running titles and tops of initials), occasional initials in the lower margin partially trimmed, Full description and images available. (TM 941)
Book of Hours (Use of Rome); in Latin

Book of Hours (Use of Rome); in Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: BOOK OF HOURS FROM ONE OF THE MOST CELEBRATED ILLUMINATORS OF RENAISSANCE FLORENCE. In Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment, Italy, Florence, dated September 7, 1508. Dimensions 90 x 55 mm., 199 folios, complete, vertical catchwords, written in brown ink in a gothic bookhand on 14 lines, painted 2-line initials, seven 3-line illuminated initials, FIVE HISTORIATED INITIALS with decorated borders, THREE FULL-PAGE MINIATURES with facing decorated borders. BINDING: nineteenth century red velvet over wooden boards, edges gilt and gauffered, housed in a custom chemise and slipcase. ILLUSTRATION: Book of Hours from the workshop of Attavante degli Attavanti, one of the most celebrated illuminators of Renaissance Florence. Characterized by brightly painted borders of vermillion, emerald, and azure overlaid with gold acanthus tendrils, cartouches, and putti. Portrait medallions of saints and prophets complete the borders. Major prayers are introduced with a double folio spread, pairing a miniature and an historiated initial to create luminous, eye-catching openings. PROVENANCE: A colophon on f. 199v dates the manuscript to September 7, 1508. It was created for a member of the Calcagni family of Poggibonsi whose coat of arms, a hound salient, appears in the lower margin of f. 14. The Calcagni family were based primarily in the town of Poggibonsi but held property in Florence. The Hours may have been made for Daddo Calcagni who owned two houses situated in via dell' Aloro to the west of the Canonica in Florence. Later, the manuscript belonged to J. Marechal Brown III (1915-1981). CONDITION: overall good condition. Full description and images available. (BOH 181)
Breviary (Dominican Use); in Latin

Breviary (Dominican Use); in Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: VERY SMALL ILLUMINATED BREVIARY WITH EVIDENCE OF FEMALE OWNERSHIP OVER FIVE CENTURIES. In Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment, Germany (Freiburg im Breisgau?), dated 1494. Dimensions 89 x 62 mm, 300 folios, complete, written in brown and red inks in a gothic textualis bookhand in a single column on 18 lines, thirteen 6- to 7-line initials in burnished gold on painted grounds with acanthus leaves in red, green and yellow in the margins, text frequently decorated with leaf motifs, line-drawn lamb in bas-de-page on f. 152v. BINDING: EARLY PINK VELVET over pasteboards, sixteenth century(?), working brass clasp and catch. TEXT: Breviaries contain the Psalms, lessons and prayers for the Divine Office, celebrated by the clergy and members of the religious orders throughout the day and night. This tiny Breviary links us directly to the daily life and religion of the nuns. PROVENANCE: Written and illuminated for a Dominican in 1494 in Germany, very likely for a Dominican nun from a well-born family at the convent of St. Maria Magdalena in Freiburg im Breisgau; dated by the scribe at the end of the text on f. 297v, "Anno domini 1494." Early changes to the liturgy, perhaps in the sixteenth century, are noted in the margins. The Prioress of St. Maria Magdalena, Maria Catharina Constia(?) added a lengthy note in German on f. 21, recording her gifting of the book in 1705; nineteenth-century printed image of St. Catherine of Siena was pasted on f. 299, suggesting that the manuscript remained in Dominican ownership until that date.CONDITION: some slight water damage to leaves at each end of the book, slight cockling throughout, lightly trimmed at top and bottom, dark spots on last few leaves, restored with new endleaves and pastedowns, in overall good condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1055)
Printed Book of Hours (Use of Rome); in Latin and French

Printed Book of Hours (Use of Rome); in Latin and French, illuminated imprint on parchment

BOOK DESCRIPTION: RARE PRINTED BOOK OF HOURS IN AN UNUSUAL FORMAT WITH VIBRANTLY PAINTED METALCUTS. In Latin and French, illuminated imprint on parchment, France (Paris), c. 1536 (almanac for 1536-1548). Dimensions 140 x 65 mm., 90 folios, octavo agenda format, complete, printed in black ink in Roman font in 32 long lines, 1- to 2-line initials throughout, 1 SIX-LINE METALCUT, 14 LARGE METALCUTS, printer's device set in architectonic liquid gold frame, all metalcuts hand-painted in bright colors with liquid gold. BINDING: late sixteenth- or seventeenth-century brown leather, gold tooled, with two sets of double fillets forming a narrow rectangular center panel and outer border, gild edges. ILLUSTRATION: This is a particularly appealing example of a printed Parisian Book of Hours with metalcuts that are so vibrantly and expertly painted that they are indistinguishable from illuminated miniatures. The palette features blue, red, orange, and green, with frequent use of liquid gold for highlights. PROVENANCE: Printed in Paris by Germain Hardouyn, with an almanac for the years 1536-1548, suggesting a date of printing c. 1536. It is a tiny book, in a distinctive and unusual format, very narrow and oblong, allowing for easy use as a vademecum for private devotion. The manuscript later belonged to a European Continental Collection. CONDITION: A few stains, sig. F4-6, loose, binding worn at joints and corners, but in overall good condition. Full description and images available. (BOH 180)
Gradual (noted Mass texts for select feasts); in Latin

Gradual (noted Mass texts for select feasts); in Latin, decorated manuscript and stenciled book on parchment and paper with musical notation

BOOK DESCRIPTION: HYBRID BOOK OF LITURGICAL MUSIC, MANUSCRIPT AND STENCILED, WITH EVIDENCE OF ACTIVE USE FOR CENTURIES. In Latin, decorated manuscript and stenciled book on parchment and paper with musical notation, Western France, Maine (Château-Gontier?), c. 1480-1520; 1607; 1747. Dimensions 309 x 213 mm., 76 folios, lacking one quire in the beginning, written in dark brown, brown and red inks in gothic textualis book hands, upright book hand modelled on Roman type, and a humanistic book hand, number of staves vary from 8-10 per page, various decorated initials throughout. BINDING: eighteenth- or nineteenth-century brown calf over wooden boards, blind-tooled with a panel design. TEXT: Containing the sung portions of the Mass, this remarkable Gradual was the liturgical lifeblood of a community in Western France for over 250 years. Hymns and prayers were added over time, revealing liturgical changes as well as technical shifts in bookmaking and musical notation from the handwritten manuscript in the fifteenth century to stenciled letters in the eighteenth century. PROVENANCE: The first part of the manuscript, ff. 1-35v, was copied in the late fifteenth or early sixteenth century, c. 1480-1520. The second part of the manuscript, ff. 36-45v, 50-61v, were copied c. 1607 (the date "1607" is included in the rubric on f. 55v). The final part of the volume, ff. 62-76v, and text added to blank space on ff. 14v-15, are stenciled, and date from 1747. The manuscript was copied for use in a church founded by the Canon Jean Le Boucher from Maine or Le Mans. Belonged to Giulio Constantini (his armorial bookplate with the motto "CONSTANTER," with the date, 1970, written on the bookplate in Roman numerals in pencil. CONDITION: signs of frequent use, stains, ink fading, small tears, repairs, leather slightly broken at the top of the spine, few wormholes on spine, stains on back cover, in overall very good condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1046)
Leaf from a Medieval Gradual with miniature of Two Birds in an initial ?E? with musical notation

Leaf from a Medieval Gradual with miniature of Two Birds in an initial ?E? with musical notation

Don Simone Camaldolese (active 1379?1405) DESCRIPTION: LARGE LEAF FROM AN ILLUMINATED FOURTEENTH-CENTURY CHOIR BOOK. In Latin, illuminated leaf on parchment, Italy, Florence, c. 1390. Dimensions 460 x 340, one leaf, written in a gothic book hand, 4-line red staves with square notation in red, one decorated initial in blue with red penwork on verso, one large illuminated initial. TEXT: Leaf from a Gradual with the introit Etenim sederunt principes et adversus me loquebantur (For princes sat and spoke against me) of the Mass for the feast of St. Stephen (December 26). The verso (true recto) with part of a chant ending "preparatio sedis tue" and the beginning of the following chant "Viderunt omnes fines terre." ILLUSTRATION: initial 'E' with two multi-colored birds or waterfowl in long-necked hoods, perhaps representing a goose with a yellow beak and a duck with an orange beak. PROVENANCE: This leaf possibly comes from a series of Choir Books illuminated by Don Simone Camaldolese, among the most notable illuminators of late fourteenth-century Florence, for the Olivetan convent of San Michele in Bosco in Bologna, c. 1390. The type of bird seen here with the body painted in blended primary colors is considered to be a signature of Don Simone; former folio numbers "XXII" in the right margin, "XXI" in the upper margin, and "4L"(?) in the corner. CONDITION: overall good condition, some isolated losses of pigments, some gold leaf rubbed, parchment with remnants of former mounts on the verso, edges partly lost or trimmed, some cockling. Full description and images available. (MIN 19-32)
Lives of Saints Nicholas

Lives of Saints Nicholas, Vitalis, Agatha, and Agnes; in Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT DEDICATED TO THE TECHNIQUES OF A MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPT. In Latin, illuminated manuscript on parchment, France, c. 1788. Dimensions 138 x 106 mm, 28 folios, complete, written in a mannered gothic bookhand by one scribe in fifteen long lines, TWENTY-FOUR ILLUMINATED INITIALS, six- to four-line, with extensions up to ten lines, initials often gold on colored grounds, ONE FIVE-LINE HISTORIATED INITIAL of St. Nicholas. BINDING: bound in brown pigskin, likely nineteenth century, coat of arms of La Tour d'Auvergne painted in full color on the front cover. TEXT: lives of the very popular St. Nicholas of Myra, and the important early Christian martyrs, St. Vitalis, St. Agatha, and St. Agnes, copied from either a liturgical source or a collection of saints lives for devotional reading; they are divided (imperfectly) into lessons, as readings in a Breviary would be, but they also include the repeated injunction to the reader to follow the example of the life of the saint. PROVENANCE: note in gold ink on the black flyleaf states that the manuscript was made for Louise-Henriette-Gabrielle de Lorraine (1718-1788), Princess of Turenne and Duchess of Bouillon; inside front cover, engraved book plate of Louise-Henriette-Gabrielle of Lorraine, showing the coats of arms of her husband and father (since the binding is nineteenth century, this was apparently added to the volume, perhaps from the volume's original binding); later note in pencil on the inside back cover states, "Ev[or W?]lls, 10518." CONDITION: a few leaves darkened, and slightly bowed, initials ff. 1, 4. 5, 8 with slight wear, covers bowed, slightly rubbed, but overall in excellent condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1091)
Processional (monastic use); Liturgy for burial; in Latin

Processional (monastic use); Liturgy for burial; in Latin, decorated manuscript on parchment, with musical notation

CHARMING PROCESSIONAL FOR USE BY AN INDIVIDUAL MONASTIC PARTICIPANT. In Latin, decorated manuscript on parchment with musical notation, Southeastern France (Savoy?) or Switzerland, c. 1400-1425. Dimensions 102 x 70 mm, 73 folios, lacking one leaf, vertical catchwords, written in brown and red inks in gothic textualis bookhand on 18 lines for text pages, and for music three staves of four lines ruled in red ink with square notation, capitals and cadel initials, 1- to 3-line initials, decorated with elaborate penwork throughout. BINDING: bound in eighteenth-century limp parchment with yapp edges and pastedowns hand-painted with conjoined red diamonds. TEXT: Chants for processions and other liturgical occasions at Candlemas, Lent, Holy Week, and the burial of the dead, followed by monastic canticles and Psalms. PROVENANCE: The style of the cadel initials and the floral forms in the hairline penwork suggest dating the manuscript in the first quarter of the fifteenth century. The violet ink of the penwork and the vertical catchwords suggest localizing the manuscript in an area with close contact with Italy, possibly in Savoy, in Southeastern France, or in Switzerland. The inclusion of the monastic canticles (read during for the Office of Matins) allows us to identify the use of the manuscript as monastic. This charming processional, used by an individual, would have fit easily into his or her hands. CONDITION: minor stains and smudging, small hole in last leaf, stains and scratches on binding, lacking leather straps, otherwise in very good condition. Full description and images available. (TM 1056)