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Les Psaumes de David

Les Psaumes de David, Mis en Vers François

GENEVA PSALTER Neuchâtel: Jean Pistorius, 1704. 12mo (140 x 82 mm). [16], 216, [8]; 34, [2] pages. Typographic music. First two leaves with small rust holes from the nail holding the edge pin, short closed tear in last leaf. Contemporary painted silver-gilt-tooled parchment over thin wooden boards, covers with dogtooth border framing two assymetrical flowering plants at top and at bottom with small bird and star tools, painted green, light brown and red, at center a wreathed cartouche containing the tooled initials "AL" on upper cover and a simple cruciform ornament on lower cover, the cartouches painted light brown and flanked by two cherubs and leafy ornaments, flat spine with ornamental panels, pair of leather and metal fore-edge pin clasps on lower cover, attaching to edge pins on upper cover, edges stained red and with gauffered borders, front pastedown and rear endpapers of bronze-varnish paper: the design, of leafy volutes and an eagle, in gold ink over a color block print of violet and red blossoms and leaves, front free endpaper overlaid with a stenciled brocade paper with a simple overpainted drap d'or design in thick green and orange gouache; paper spine liners form a different block-printed paper. The gilding slightly rubbed in places, colors faded, but overall in very good condition. Provenance: Grandson de Blonay, bookplate.*** A pocket Calvinist hymnal in a lovely painted and silver-gilt-tooled Swiss or South German binding. The covers with their cheerful and colorful flowers, birds, cherubs, and stars open to reveal endpapers with gold-patterned eagles and foliage on a muted colored ground. The French psalter of the Reformed church, first established in 1562, underwent multiple revisions. The 150 psalms of this edition, officially sanctioned by the Protestant Church of Geneva (under the aegis of the Académie de Genève), are in the version of Valentin Conrart, who died in 1675 after completing only 51 psalms, and Marc-Antoine de La Bastide, who finished the rest. While revising the text, Conrart and his successor maintained the meters of the earlier versions, so that the same melodies, derived from Gregorian chant as well as popular tunes, could continue to be used. Johann Pistorius published repeated editions of this hymnal for about 30 years, starting ca. 1700; his 1729 and 1730 editions were printed in Basel. The official approbation, dated 1679 (date of the first edition of this version), prefaces the text, which is printed in small types. Each psalm opens with four or five lines of printed music, providing the melody. Tables at the end include a concordance to the incipits of earlier versions (also printed following the title of each psalm). Part 2 contains Les formes des prieres ecclesiastiques (drop-title) and various prayers. This copy possibly remained in the town of its printing until the twentieth century: it was owned by the de Blonay family, whose imposing Château de Grandson in Neuchâtel remains one of the best-preserved medieval castles in Switzerland. The Zwischgold-tooled painted parchment binding, with its owner's stamped initials, may also be Swiss. While it shares technical elements with the Germanic Bauerneinbände (peasant bindings), the tooling is more detailed and it lacks the mosaic bands that characterize those usually somewhat cruder bindings. The endpapers preserve a fine example of bronze-varnish paper (Bronzefirnispapier) in which the gold-colored ink pattern has been stamped over block-printed paper. These papers were produced only from about 1680 to the 1730s, after which brocade paper became more popular. The front free endpaper was covered over at a somewhat later date with a mounted sheet of white-stencilled brocade paper sporting a rather primitive "drap d'or" onlay of thick gouache (the endpaper and following flyleaf are dented by the edge-pin nails slightly protruding from the inner front cover, but, unlike the title-leaf they are not pierced). KVK and OCLC locate only the Württembergische Landesbibliothek copy of this edition. US libraries hold very few copies of these Calvinist hymnals, notwithstanding their popularity; while there are a handful of copies from later editions (Geneva 1705, Amsterdam 1708 and 1716) in American libraries, I locate only two US copies of much later Pistorius editions, printed from Basel. On the decorated endpapers, cf Krause and Rink, Decorated paper: a guide book (Stuttgart 2018) pp. 52, 56, 98-99.
  • $3,600
  • $3,600
Biorama des enfans ou les petits ambitieux

Biorama des enfans ou les petits ambitieux

SAVIGNAC, Alida de (1790-1847) Paris: (Imprimerie A. Pinard for) Désirée Eymery, 1836. 8vo (128 x 207 mm). 71 pages, engraved frontispiece, engraved title with vignette and 8 engraved plates, each with four scenes, all engravings hand-colored under the publisher's direction. Fifth and sixth plates in wrong order; some light foxing to text, front free endpaper creased. Original illustrated publisher's buff boards, the etched illustrations showing at center of front cover a proscenium on a pedestal bearing the title, the closed curtain painted with a female figure and flanked by female statues, surrounded by a neo-Renaissance border of swirling tendrils, floral swags, chinoiserie grotesques, and two pairs of nymphs; at center of back cover a ship within a cartouche edged with wheat sheaves and arrows, other vignettes on smooth spine (covers bowed and somewhat soiled, front hinge weak, front free endpaper creased).***Only Edition of an entertaining and instructive tale within a tale, for older children (boys). Four cousins gather during their winter holiday, and at the end of a long day of play talk turns to their futures. All four harbor outsized ambitions, in four different areas - art, the marine, commerce, and the law, vying for who will be the most powerful minister of state. Having overheard their chatter, their hostess, the mother of two of the boys, plans a show for Carnival that will relieve them of their naiveté without, she hopes, dampening their enthusiasm. Enter the Biorama, a large box with moving figures (a pun on the "diorama," invented by Daguerre and Charles Marie Bouton in 1822), operated by an assistant while an older cousin, disguised as an elderly Italian, narrates the moral tale "Les Petits Ambitieux." Four magic talismans are given by a Venetian sorcerer to a quartet of youngsters with analogous interests to our boys. One embarks upon the hardscrabble life of an artist, another becomes a sailor (flouting his father's wish that he attend the naval academy), the third enrolls as a law student, and the fourth enters the world of business at the lowest rung, as a grocery assistant. All undergo hardships, temptations, and trials, from poverty to the jealousy of their peers, through which they are guided by their magic talismans, which invariably counsel patience, charity and kindness to one's fellows, assiduous study, and respect of one's superiors. Their life stories contain lessons in history, art, geography, commerce, and even chemistry (the businessman owns a sugar refinery), as well as glimpses of social corruption worthy of Balzac. The crucial episodes in each character's career are illustrated in 32 engraved scenes,eight per character, set four apiece within ornamental borders on the hand-colored plates, representing the scenes of the Biorama.With guidance from their talismans, the young men eventually attain the summits of their chosen professions, but only after many years of struggle. At the end the magic ingredients of the talismans are revealed to be nothing more than "good sense," and the source of their wisdom is found ... in the "Bibliothèque d'Education," Quai Voltaire, founded by the publisher, Désirée Eymery (daughter of Alexis). Adélaïde Esther Charles d'Abillon de Savignac, daughter of aristocrats who lost their fortune in the Revolution, was a rebel against the social norms of her class, refusing to marry, and supporting herself as a teacher. She elaborated her own child-centered pedagogy and became a prolific author of children's books that combined, like this one, instruction and fun. A proponent of women's education, she was a contributing journalist to a number of periodicals for girls and women. In this copy the title is dated 1836, as in the BnF copy. The Cotsen copy, the only other copy located, appears to be undated: cf. A Catalogue of the Cotsen Children's Library 5071 (illus.). See A. Gorse, article A. de Savignac, Plumes et pinceaux: discours de femmes sur l'art en Europe (1750-1850) 2012, online
  • $2,000
  • $2,000
The Draughts of the Most Remarkable Fortified Towns of Europe

The Draughts of the Most Remarkable Fortified Towns of Europe, with a geographical description of the said places … to which is prefix’d an introduction to military architecture, or fortification..

BOYER, Abel (1667-1729) London: printed for Isaac Cleave and John Hartley, 1701. 4to (220 x 172 mm). [4], 29, [1 blank] pp. Double column. 44 engraved plates, the first folding and unnumbered, the rest numbered 1-43, containing birds-eye plans of fortiifed towns. Soiling to title, light narrow dampstain to text and upper margins of first few plates. Contemporary English blind panelled Cambridge-style calf (upper cover detached, lower joint weak). Provenance: Martine-Marie-Pol de Béhague, comtesse de Béarn (1870-1939), by descent to her nephew, Hubert de Ganay, and thence to his heirs; bookplate with initials H H.***First Edition of an illustrated treatise on fortified towns by a Huguenot refugee, man of letters and lexicographer. A native of Languedoc, Boyer fled France for the Netherlands after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. "In 1687 poverty may have obliged Boyer to serve briefly in the army of the Dutch republic, as did many other Huguenots at the time. The experience, if it took place, may have contributed to his later close technical interest in things military which, he claimed in 1696, was based partly on what he had seen of some of the battlefields of Flanders" (Oxford DNB).Following a brief introduction to the principles and terminology of military architecture, displayed in the folding plate, the text contains detailed descriptions of each of the towns, illustrated in the attractive, unsigned engravings. Mainly French and Belgian, they also include cities in Germany and Italy. ESTC T 112446 (13 US locations).
  • $750
A suite of engraved prayer cards

A suite of engraved prayer cards

PASQUIER, Jean Jacques (ca. 1718-1785), publisher Paris: chez Pasquier, rue St. Jacques vis-à-vis le Collège de Louis le Grand, 1789. 12mo-size (136 x 71 mm). 51, [2] leaves, entirely engraved, on both rectos and versos, 52 of the 53 leaves each with an engraved vignette on the recto, 5 with additional vignettes on versos or at foot of recto, the rest filled with text, ornamental page borders throughout, Pasquier's imprint at foot of every recto and continuing onto most versos. Plate 19 underinked (faintly printed). A stub following leaf 51, a couple of imprints and several foliation numbers cropped, light dampstain to a few leaves. Contemporary calf, smooth spine gold-tooled and lettered "Figure[s] de Pieté," gilt edges, marbled endpapers (rubbed). Provenance: contemporary ms. notes to fol. 3, several inscriptions on front flyleaf (one rubbed out and another crossed out in ink); presentation inscriptions on front and rear flyleaves to Jean Louis Madé, student of the Jesuit collège (petit seminaire) of Agens, from one of his teachers (Degaud?), dated 27 July 1840 ***An unusual collection of small engraved prayer sheets or cards published by the engraver and print publisher J. J. Pasquier. Each leaf is illustrated with a different devotional engraving and an instructional text or prayer. On the rectos a title (with a few exceptions) and an illustration, often in medallion format and often with a decorative border, precede the texts, in a variety of different scripts. Subjects include prayers to the Sacred Hearts of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, to one's guardian angel, to St. Denis, patron saint of France, and St. Genevieve, patron saint of Paris, the prayer "Pater de la Jardinière," and prayers for various occasions: before study, before the Sacrament, to ward off lightning, etc.; devotional exercises, including the acts of contrition, of faith and hope; instructions for saying the rosary and for obtaining various types of indulgences, and other brief devotional instructions. A few sheets contain dates in the mid-1780s. The two final unfoliated leaves differ from the rest: the penultimate leaf, the only one that is unillustrated, contains a "Prière pour attirer la Bénédiction du Ciel sur l'Assemblée Nationale," published in the summer of 1789: that body was seated only from June 17 to July 9 1789, after which it was renamed the Assemblée Legislative. The final leaf contains a portrait of the deceased mendicant priest Benoit Joseph Labre (1746-1783), with his life dates; the text is headed "Maximes sur la vie pauvre et cachée." Labre became the object of a quasi-cult in France on the eve of the Revolution, and popular images of him proliferated to such an extent that they were said to have numbered over 150,000, few of which have survived.The illustrations are designed to appeal through their sheer variety, of shape, subject presentation, and ornamentation. Rather than by Pasquier himself, they may have been produced by various engravers who worked for his shop. Similar in function to traditional prayer cards, but in a slightly larger format, these small agenda-format leaves were apparently usually sold one by one, no doubt by colporteurs, as inexpensive memory aids or supports for private devotion. Most have long since disappeared. Those that are preserved tend to be found within the covers of devotional albums or commonplace books. For example, a late 18th-century devotional manuscript from the south of France which passed through our hands, now Johns Hopkins MSB 186, illustrated with numerous small engravings, includes six prints from the present series (nos. 8: Dévotions du Rosaire, 9: Obligations pour gagner des Indulgences, 15: Le Pater de la Jardinière, 19: La Couronne de St. Joseph, 21: Moyens pour arriver à une grande perfection, and [52], the unnumbered Labre memorial print). In the Johns Hopkins manuscript, these engravings were cut out around the borders, thus eliminating their imprints, inset, and illuminated. Collected volumes such as this one, clearly sold as such since the prints have added engraved numbering, may have been marketed to the Jesuit colleges which made up a large part of the clientele of Laurent Cars, in whose shop Pasquier had worked. The present volume, still in its simple contemporary calf binding, was later given to a seminarian by a cleric-professor of his collège, in Agen, in southwestern France. I locate no other copies of this collection. The Bibliothèque nationale de France holds two "recueils" of prints by Pasquier, but the BnF online catalogue does not list their contents. Cf. Thieme-Becker 25:274 ("Pasquier, Jean Jacques"); cf. V. Meyer and C. Noûs, "Laurent Cars, un graveur-éditeur entrepreneur sous Louis XV," Dix-huitième siècle, vol. 52, no. 1 (2020) 355-378.
  • $3,200
  • $3,200
Witty Apophthegms delivered At Severall Times

Witty Apophthegms delivered At Severall Times, and upon Severall Occasions, by King James, King Charls, The Marquess of Worcester, Francis Lord Bacon, and Sir Thomas Moore. Collected and revived

[BAYLY, Thomas (d. ca. 1657)], compiler London: Printed for Edward Farnham, 1658. 12mo (141 x 81 mm). [6], 168, [2 blank] pages. Additional engraved title (A1). Printing error obscuring a few letters on last page. Marginal tear to frontispiece, small tear in E1 with loss to a couple of letters, slight marginal browning. Contemporary blind-panelled sheep, edges red-stained (rebacked, scrapes). Provenance: effaced old signature on title; S. J. Coventry, later signature; Robert S. Pirie, bookplate, bibliographical and purchase notes (purchased July 1962). ***First Edition of the collected "wit and wisdom" of five often rather somber public figures: King James I, King Charles I, Henry Somerset, 1st Marquess of Worcester, Francis Bacon, and Thomas More (presented in that nonchronological order), whose cartouche portraits appear on the additional engraved title. Each gentleman's pearls are distilled into numbered paragraphs, from 31 paragraphs for More's reflections from prison, to 184 for Bacon, the others each containing around 50 paragraphs. Mixing anecdotal accounts with reported speech, brief witticisms, and moralistic vignettes from the classics, the florilegium covers a diverting variety of subjects, including women, sex, marriage, politics, poetry, cosmology, necromancy, alchemy, drunkenness and death.The earliest modern "table talk," or tidbits of wisdom collected from the lips of the great, may have been Martin Luther's Tischreden, first published in 1566. "Apophthegms" or sentences were a rather stiffer version of this genre (later known as "-ana"). Bayly's is a characteristic collection. "The man whose table talk was most persistently reported in collection after collection and edition after edition was the Solomon of Great Britain, James I" (Wilson, p. 40). But the text is derivative on several levels: Bayly borrowed from earlier publications, including his own compilation of Worcester's Witty Sayings, published in 1650, Bacon's Apophthegmes new and old (1626), and Ben Agar's King James, his apopthegmes (1643).ESTC R 204091; Wing (2nd ed.) W3236; Gibson, Bacon, A Bibliography (1950) 159; Grolier Wither to Prior 1077. Cf. F. P. Wilson, "Table Talk," Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 4, No. 1 (1940): 27-46.
  • $800
Mademoiselle de Lafayette. [With:] Petit Souvenir des Dames

Mademoiselle de Lafayette. [With:] Petit Souvenir des Dames

JANET, Louis (publisher) Paris: (Ad[rien] Egron for) [Louis] Janet, 1814. 24mo (101 x 61 mm). 48 pages; [12], [6] leaves. Frontispiece portrait, engraved title, and six engraved plates by Leroux after Desenne. Printed in very small types. The Petit Souvenir, entirely engraved, comprises [19] pages, for weekly and monthly notes, all with rule border, all blank except for heading, and, for the months, 12 engraved vignettes and part-borders; four blank pages at end (with rule borders). 12-page letterpress calendar for 1814 bound at end. A few small spots, stains to two calendar leaves. Original pink glazed boards, edges gilt over marbling, matching slipcase (the latter rubbed).***Only Edition of a women's literary keepsake devoted to thwarted loves. In 1636 the unhappily married King Louis XIII allegedly became enamored of the 17-year-old Louise Motier de Lafayette, who may have reciprocated his affection. Richelieu tried to make her his spy; she refused, and a year later entered the convent of the Visitandines at Chaillot, of which she later became the Mother Superior. King and nun remained close friends. The almanac contains a prose account of her life, and various romances (poems) on other star-crossed lovers, both fictive and historic, also shown in the delicate engravings. Besides the titular subject, shown with Louis XIII, these include Clément Marot & Marguerite de Valois, and Valentine de Milan [Valentina Visconti], mourning her husband Louis de Valois, Duc d'Orléans, assassinated by his cousin in 1407. An exception to the general sentimentality is a portrait of "la Coquette," showing a fashionably dressed woman reading a letter in front of her writing table, while a suitor waits behind.Grand-Carteret, no. 1806, states that this belongs to the same series as two other almanacs of the period, Marie-Antoinette and Madame Elisabeth de France (his nos. 1745 and 1744), although those were published by Le Fuel and were in a larger format. Like those almanacs, this one was reissued over several years, with different calendars; his copy had a calendar for 1817. I locate no other copies.
  • $350
Die letzte Rechenschafft Jeglicher und aller Menschen

Die letzte Rechenschafft Jeglicher und aller Menschen

FRANCISCI, Erasmus (1627-1694) Nürnberg: Wolfgang Moritz Endter and Johann Andreas Endter, 1681. Thick 8vo (161 x 95 x 77 mm). [26], 1214, [2] pages. Title printed in red and black, double-page engraved frontispiece (or additional engraved title), sixty-four numbered engraved plates, of which four folding; 43 signed by Cornelius Nicolaus Schurtz, 21 unsigned (including one of the two frontispiece engravings), folding plates 36 and 41 by J. Sandrart. Final errata leaf. Two gothic typefaces, woodcut initials, typographic printed music on p. 257. Contemporary vellum over pasteboards, upper cover stamped in silver-gilt (faded) I.B.G.V.H. [Johann Bernhard Graf von Herberstein] and 1681, manuscript spine title, edges red-stained, lacking pair of fore-edge ties. fine. Provenance: Johann Bernhard Graf von Herberstein (1630-1685), binding and ms. inscription on frontispiece; Christoph Wenzel Graf von Nostitz [-Rieneck] (1648-1712), bibliophile, art collector and art patron, engraved armorial bookplate with initials C.W.G.V.N.; stencilled shelfmark 58 on backstrip; with Haus der Bücher, Basel, catalogue 706, Deutsche Literature der Barockzeit, part 1 (1963), no. 280.***First Edition of a very rare baroque emblem book on the Last Judgment, by one of Germany's first professional writers, a beautiful copy in immaculate condition. Francisci, son of the Lübeck jurist Franciscus von Finx, named himself "son of Franciscus," i.e., Francisci. More unusual than this endearing foible was his successful career as a free-lance man of letters. A prolific and popular polymath, Francisci died at the age of 68, "having left behind almost as many volumes" (Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie). Throughout his career, he worked as a sort of house author with the Nuremberg publishing house of the Endter family. "There was hardly an area of knowledge at which he did not try his hand. As one of the first full-time professional authors of Germany, Francisci understood how to switch, if the need arose, to a new area of interest that promised good sales for his publisher" (Dunnhaupt, Bibliographisches Handbuch, I, p. 628, my trans.). With gusto and success he catered to an audience hungry for tales of distant lands, for folklore and "a world saturated with wonders" (Faber du Faur, German Baroque Literature, p. 198), compiling tales of travel and distant lands, compendia of natural history and curiosities, historical works, and devotional meditations. As the thickness of this volume intimates, Francisci's Sitzfleisch was awe-inspiring. His versatility, huge readership, and connections with many members of the "republic of letters" made him one of the most influential German writers of the Baroque. While the prose of his religious works may seem cloying to the modern reader, they sold as well as his secular compilations. Being widely read across social classes, fine copies of his books are rare. The 64 Bedenckungen (considerations) of the present treatise are interwoven with fables, anecdotes, and digressions. Each is illustrated with an engraved emblem (Sinnbild), set within an exuberant ornamental border (the borders of most of the 21 unsigned plates, apparently by a less skilled engraver than Schurtz, are plainer). Francisci is known to have worked closely with his illustrators, and presumably collaborated on the design of these engravings, by Cornelius Nicolaus Schurtz, Joachim von Sandrart, and one other engraver (the 21 unsigned plates are in plainer borders and appear to be the work of a less skilled engraver). Characteristically varied in subject-matter, the emblems and emblematic scenes are largely secular, showing scenes of war, domestic life, natural disasters, seafaring including shipwrecks, the plant and animal world, including exotic species, children romping, fireworks, alchemical apparatus, and even an amputation and a corpse being dissected in an anatomy hall. Only a few contain biblical scenes. Most striking are the four folding plates, frightening panoramas of Judgment Day, and the two unearthly frontispiece illustrations, of which the first shows two men, a virtuous man and a sinner, in bed dreaming of their respective afterlives. Himself a tireless hymn-writer, Francisci dedicated this work on Doomsday to one of the most important composers of Baroque hymns, Magdalena Sibylla of Hesse-Darmstadt, Duchess of Württemberg (1652-1712). The book includes twenty original hymns or Kirchenlieder, to be sung to identified choral melodies. The presumably less well-known music for one Trostlied (hymn of consolation) is provided on p. 257, with accompanying bass line. This edition collates ):(8 ( - ):(1.8) ):( ):( 8 ( -):():(8) A-4G8: the signing of the two preliminary quires is odd, but this copy is complete. The double-leaf engraving at front may have been counted as the first leaf of the first quire, since the first letterpress leaf following the letterpress title is signed "):(iii". Both the first quire, containing the title-leaf and dedication, and the second, containing laudatory poems signed by S. E. Gr. zu L and by Joachimus Simon, the foreword, and the table of contents, contain no 8th leaf. This matches other copies, and seems to have been due to composing miscalculations, resulting in the removal of the final blank of each quire. (Some cataloguers included the two-leaf engraved title or frontispiece in their folio count, counting [15] preliminary leaves, and others more correctly count [13] leaves.)Not in NUC; OCLC locates a single copy in an American library, at Berkeley. VD-17 reveals that this edition is one of two variant typesettings with the same imprint (the other is VD17 1:664300Y); priority is not known and they may be different states of the same edition. A second edition (or possibly a re-issue of these sheets) appeared in 1684. VD17 12:102498K; Goedeke, Grundriss zur Geschichte der Deutschen Dichtung III: 90, 176; Dünnhaupt, Personalbibliographien zu den Drucken des Barock (1990-93) 1538, 32.1; Dünnhaupt, Bibliographisches Handbuch der Barockliteratur (1980-81) I: 649, 32; Praz, Studies in Seventeenth-Century Imagery 339.
  • $8,750
  • $8,750
Le Calendrier de Paphos

Le Calendrier de Paphos, Dédié aux jolies Femmes. Recueil de Pièces en vers les plus ingénieuses, et les plus galantes, faites par les Dames, ou en leur honneur. Avec le nom des auteurs

VOLTAIRE (François-Marie Arouet, called), and others Paris: chez Desnos, 1778. 12mo (124 x 68 mm). 4, 82, [1] pp. Two parts, continuously paginated. Engraved frontispiece, engraved title (letterpress title removed), six engraved plates before lettering, all with tissue guards; one woodcut vignette of a rose. Small repair to outer blank corner of frontispiece, else a fine, untrimmed copy. 19th-century green straight-grained morocco gilt, sides with triple filt fillets framing a wavy double border with roses, spine gilt with roses in compartments, turn-ins gilt, gilt edges, by Dupré, stamp-signed on front turn-in; later two-part blue morocco slipcase by Riviere (slightly scuffed). Provenance: Sir David Lionel Salomons, Broomhill, Tunbridge Wells, armorial bookplate; Carlo de Poortere, bookplate.***Only Edition, a special copy with the engravings avant la lettre, of a literary almanac in two parts, unusually dividing the contributors by sex, with part 1 (pp. 7-34) containing only poems by women, and part 2 only by men. A table at the end of each part lists the authors. In the ladies' section are verses by the mother and daughter Mme and Mademoiselle Deshoulières (ou Des Houlières), Mlle de Scudery, Mme de La Suze, Mme de Liancourt, and other seventeenth-century, i.e., "classical" writers. The male contributors include a few more modern authors, notably Voltaire, whose 13 occasional verses, most dedicated to individual women, represent a lighter side of his oeuvre.The unsigned engravings, of scenes set in elegant interiors or pastoral settings, show a wedding banquet; a couple engaged in a playful chase, with Cupid seizing the woman's dress; Reason (Athena with a lion) being seduced by folly (a female fool, complete with rattle, bells, and crazy hat); a female Narcissus, admiring herself in a pond; a courting scene with musical instruments; and a lady daydreaming alone in her bedchamber. Grand-Carteret tells us that these plates, along with a seventh plate, were also used in a different Desnos almanac (Les Caprices de l'Amour et de Baccus), printed there with expressive captions. The frontispiece shows the bust of a smiling Voltaire being crowned with stars by one of two attendant muses. Grand-Carteret inattentively suggested that the bust might portray Alexis Piron, another contributor, not noticing the lightly etched titles of two books held by the recumbent muse, namely Charles XII and La Henriade, both of course by Voltaire, and referring to the poem on p. 41, "A Madame la Marquise de Boufflers en lui envoyant la Henriade & Charles XII."The rose decor of the binding echoes the woodcut vignette of a rose printed at the end of the publisher's anonymous dedication (to all ladies [Mesdames]). The copy was deliberately bound without the letterpress title; it also does not contain the (always optional) Tables of losses and wins at the gaming table, announced in the subtitle. Copies apparently differed, and the almanac may have been reissued periodically. Some copies include a section of music, according to Grand-Carteret, who dates the almanac to 1789, whereas Cohen-de Ricci dated it to 1781. Both their copies seem to have also lacked a letterpress title: OCLC locates only the BnF copy, with the letterpress title, dated 1778 (it is digitized on Gallica but without the plates).Bengesco, Voltaire, Bibliographie de ses Oeuvres IV: 2238; Cohen-de Ricci 37-38 (7 or 8 plates); Grand-Carteret 611 (7 plates).
  • $850
Urbs Bamberga

Urbs Bamberga, et Abbates Montis Monachorum prope Bambergam, elegiaco versu descripti

HOFMANN, Martin (1544-1599) Nuremberg: Paul Kauffmann, 1595. 4to (198 x 140 mm). Collation: A-K8. [80] pp. Italic (text) and roman types (shoulder notes and preliminary verses), a few words in gothic and greek types, three full-page woodcut coats-of-arm within ornamental borders, woodcut title ornament, head- and tail-pieces and initials, two metalcut tailpieces, type-ornament section dividers. Light spotting to first and last few leaves, overall slight discoloration. Late 19th-century English tan calf, covers with central blind-stamped circular monograms of William Stirling-Maxwell, that on front board with "Gang forward" motto, blind fillet frames, blue endpapers, by Leighton (stamp-signed on front inner board), upper cover detached. Provenance: five lines of contemporary manuscript verse on C3v; Sir William Stirling-Maxwell (1818-1878), bookplate and supra-libros.***first edition of a neo-Latin verse description of Bamberg and chronicle of the abbots of Bamberg's Benedictine Abbey of St. Michael (or Michelsberg), by that city's first historian.Intended by Henry II, Duke of Bavaria and future Holy Roman Emperor, as the "second Rome" when in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric and his family seat, the city's importance only increased after the 13th century, when it became a Prince-Bishopric, and it remained a prosperous cultural center and link toward the Slavic lands well into the Baroque period. Bamberg's medieval architecture was influential in northern Germany and Hungary; undamaged in WWII, it is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In his 18-page poem on the town, Hofmann leads the reader around his city's streets, hills, bridges, and major buildings, providing historical background. Forty-seven abbots, of which 34 pre-Reformation and 13 post-Reformation, are memorialized in verse in the longer part of the book, from Ratto (d. 1020) to the current abbot Johann V (d. 1627). These accounts contribute a few historical details not included in Hoffman's major work, left unfinished at his death, the Annales Bambergenses, which ended in 1440. Illustrated are the arms of the dedicatees, the reigning Prince-Bishop of Bamberg, Nithardus (Neytard von Thüngen) and the current Abbot of St. Michael, Johannes V, as well as Hofmann's own arms, granted him by Maximilian II along with the title of Poet Laureate. The last quire contains matter usually considered introductory: a poem from the author to the reader, a philosophical poem on life ("Homo bulla"), and dedicatory verses from Christoph Girschner (or Girsner), Secretary to the Bishop, and Joannes Cyaneus, a fellow Poet Laureat. At the end of the poem on Bamberg, a jaded reader, probably not a native Bambergian, added his own summary of the city, rich in ecclesiastical benefits and hence corruption: Encomium Bambergae / Hortus deliciarum: / Thesaurus reliquarum / Dissipatio bonorum / Perditio animarum. I locate two copies outside Germany, at Yale and the British Library. VD 16 H 4298; BM/STC German p. 409; cf. Flood, Poets Laureate in the Holy Roman Empire: A Bio-bibliographical Handbook (2006), H-90; Neue Deutsche Biographie 9: 459.
  • $4,800
  • $4,800
Dichtkundige almanach

Dichtkundige almanach, of keur van Heldenbrieven, Vertelzels, Theatrale en andere Dichtstukjes

PAINTED AND EMBROIDERED BINDING - Amsterdam: M. Schalekamp, 1795. 36mo (binding size 97 x 62 mm). 71, [1] pp. Title and text within type-ornament borders. Four double-page engraved plates, two signed by W. J. Strunck. Contemporary embroidered binding of beige silk over binder's board, both covers with an outer wavy border of gold satin stitch enclosing a gouache and watercolor medallion under glass, each cover with a different scene, within an oval relief frame of goldwork, red thread and satin stitch, the medallion suspended from a ring hanging from a ribbon and flanked with sprigs, the design composed of couched and separate colored and gold pailletes, silver-gilt thread, purl and goldwork, spine plain with two silver-gilt rectangles, pale orange silk liners, preserving original wrappers of orange block-printed patterned paper with sprigs and dots, gilt edges. Loss of 5 sequins on upper cover and 3 on lower cover. Provenance: Robert de Beauvillain, full-page bookplate.A Dutch almanac in a striking, possibly Netherlandish embroidered binding with watercolor miniatures. The painting on the front cover shows a young man wearing a tricorne standing jauntily in a mountainous landscape, and that on the rear cover two shepherds at dusk. This "Poetic Almanac, or choice of Heroic epistles, Tales, Theatrical and other Poetic Pieces," was published in Amsterdam, and sometimes also sold in Utrecht, from 1771 to the late 1790s. The almanac includes a 12-page tabular calendar with Saints'days, moon phases and eclipses, a schedule of the ringing of the Amsterdam city bells, and tales and poems, some adapted from classical mythology. The romantic double-page engravings by Strunck show Mirtil and Chloe (Daphne's children), Hero and Leander (in a dramatic scene of roiling seas and lightning), a pastoral love scene, and a woman in a dungeon with snakes, illustrating the final poem, "Elane, Romance." OCLC locates a single copy of a different year in the US, at the Grolier Club;  that copy, of the 1781 issue, is also in an embroidered binding, with a floral design and no miniatures. On Strunck, cf. Thieme-Becker 32:217.
  • $3,800
  • $3,800
Les soirées de la Tante

Les soirées de la Tante, ou Histoires amusantes à l’usage du premier âge. Par un ami des enfans

EYMERY, Alexis (publisher) Paris (printed in Blois by d'Aucher-Éloy): A. Eymery, Ledentu, Lecointe et Durey, and d'Aucher-Éloy in Blois, 1825. Oblong 12mo (110 x 175 mm). [4], 173, [1] pp. 6 plates of etchings with engraving, unsigned, seven tailpiece vignettes printed from six "polytypages," of which one (the repeat) signed D. (for Duplat).  Edges untrimmed, fine. Later half crushed havana morocco, spine gold-tooled in compartments, by Jean Stroobants (stamped signature on front free endpaper), preserving original blue printed wrappers, upper wrapper with title and imprint, lower wrapper with a polytypage of a windmill, both within a white on black grapevine border. Provenance: faded contemporary signature on verso of title, Clemence Pigeaux; bookplate of Victor Mercier (motto Librorum flos illibatus), sale, 26 April - 4 June 1937. Only Edition of a very rare children's book. This fine copy has never grazed juvenile hands.During a fortnight's visit to the perfect bourgeois family, a maiden aunt tells a nightly story to her niece and nephew. Each has a moral lesson, but the tales range in complexity, and some are quite bloody. An old nurse is saved from penury by her now rich former charges. A kind doctor is saved from brigands by his faithful dog; the dog later gets rabies, and reluctant to put him down, the doctor keeps him enclosed; the dog escapes, people die: the doctor's mistake was to love too much. A chilling and still disturbingly relevant tale of a charlatan's prediction which leads to the death of an innocent man cautions against superstition and trust in con-men. Etc. The six lively etchings are characteristic of Alexis Eymery's juvenile publications,  a publisher and bookseller with a sub-specialty in children's books, some of which he wrote himself, under various pseudonyms. Eymery (1774-1854) partnered for a time with the children's book publisher Pierre Blanchard, and from 1815 to 1819 worked on his own. Although the BnF authority file records that he declared bankruptcy in 1819, he continued to publish after that date, and his "Librairie d''Education," in the Palais Royal and on the Rue Mazarine, remained in business from 1809 to 1830.Like other French children's book publishers of the period, Eymery, or his printers,  often used recently invented experimental graphic reproduction techniques for the decoration and illustration of his editions. In this edition the tail-piece vignettes were printed from polytypages, a form of stereotyped plate made from woodblocks or from relief etching on a varnished stone. The most successful, for a time, of a handful of such techniques was that of Jean-Louis Duplat. Duplat's method, which he called "la gravure en relief sur pierre," was fairly cumbersome, requiring two steps to make the matrices, but he nonetheless managed to illustrate a full edition of La Fontaine's Fables with 266 polytypages, published by A.-A. Renouard in 1811.  A few of Duplat's cuts showed up in later French children's books, such as this one; some are signed with his initial D, like the horse vignette used here on pages 54 and 125. Not in Gumuchian; OCLC gives only two locations, BnF and Lyon.
  • $2,000
  • $2,000
Les Aveux d'une Jolie Femme

Les Aveux d’une Jolie Femme

[BENOIST, Françoise-Albine Puzin de la Martinière (1724-1809)] A Bruxelles, et se trouve à Paris [i.e., Paris]: chez la veuve Duchesne, 1781. 2 parts in one, 12mo (164 x 89 mm). Part 1: 232 pp.; part 2: [225]-467 [i.e., 475], [1 blank] pp. Half-titles. Woodcut title vignettes, part 2 vignette with monogram DC (the publisher's device?), woodcut headpieces. Very occasional light foxing, else fine. Contemporary speckled calf, flat spine with gold-tooled diaper design, morocco gilt lettering-piece, blue marbled edges, marbled endpapers. Second (or possibly first) edition of a fictional autobiography of a courtesan by a French woman novelist and libertine. Another edition of the novel appeared the same year, under the same veuve Duchesne semi-false "Brussels" imprint, with a different title, Les Erreurs d'une Jolie Femme, ou l'Aspasie moderne. Library catalogues give the Erreurs priority, on unexplained grounds. The present edition is rarer. The work was reprinted in 1782 (under this title), and was translated into German the same year. A supposed 1771 edition (titled Les Aveux) mentioned by Gay and others appears to be a ghost. This first-person confessional novel relates the spiral into vice of a pretty young girl, lively of wit but perilously vain, whose poor but honest artisan parents envisage for her a bright future by sending her to live with a Marquise. The latter, and her wily cousin (and lover) the Baron de Germeuil, cultivate the girl's talents, letting her learn all the skills usually reserved for boys, thus (says her later self) inflating her egotism and unwarranted sense of superiority. So is she primed for a fall ... Benoist's writing is characterized by psychological acuity and close observations of subtle social interactions. Although the author left ten or eleven novels and two plays, all centered on the "feminine condition," little is known of her life. Madame Benoist was born in Lyon, and moved to Paris. Probably self-educated, like most women of her age, she frequented "minor" literary salons. These 18th-century salons were the center of a veritable feminist movement, where women could express themselves on matters of literature or philosophy. The principal contemporary description of Madame Benoist was left by Madame Roland, in the Memoirs she wrote from prison; aged 16 when she met her, Roland describes Mme Benoist as an "openly voluptuous" and still highly seductive woman at the advanced age of forty. Widowed by then, she appears to have been a "libertine," or what a later century would call a sexually liberated woman. (For a discussion of the meaning  and impact of 18th-century female "libertinage," see the first chapter of Montonen's doctoral dissertation, cited below, and the main source for the above paragraph.) She was a good writer, to judge from the prose of this novel. The widow Duchesne (ca. 1713-1793) was the daughter of the bookseller André Cailleau. She married another bookseller, Nicolas-Bonaventure Duchesne, who died in 1765, after which she managed the business until her death. It seems likely that the woodcut of a wreathed monogram CD or DC on the second title is her device. Of this edition, OCLC locates only one copy in the US, at Bryn Mawr. Copies of the 1781 Erreurs are found at Princeton, U. Chicago, and U. Illinois. Barbier I: 356 (Erreurs: II:171), no priority given; Gay-Lemonnyer I: 335, citing the ghost 1771 edition, and this 1781 edition, calling the Erreurs a reprint. Quérard (I: 274), Conlon (81:765), and Martin, Mylne, Frautschi (81:12) were all unaware of this edition, citing only the 1781 Erreurs and the 1782 Aveux. Cf. Jane Montonen, Libertinage et feminisme dans les lettres du Colonel Talbert de Francoise-Albine Puzin de la Martiniere Benoist, doctoral dissertation, Florida Atlantic university, 2014 (online), pp. 1-10.
  • $1,500
  • $1,500
Livre des cantiques ... Seconde edition

Livre des cantiques … Seconde edition, augmentée de plusieurs cantiques. [Part 2:] Les Evangiles et les Epitres Pour tous Les Dimanches, Jours solennels & Fêtes

HUGUENOTS - [ARNELL, Laurent, editor] Stockholm: de l'imprimerie de l'Historiographe du Royaume, Par Hartwig Gercken, 1734. Agenda format 12mo (168 x 69 mm). [4], 304; 392, [20] pp. 2 parts, with alphabetical index and final errata page. Woodcut title-page ornaments and tailpieces, type-ornament headpieces. Light foxing to first few leaves. Contemporary speckled sheep, gilt edges, marbled pastedown endpapers, very worn, spine completely abraded with loss at top, paper lettering-piece barely legible (Livre de Cantiques). ***A rare hymnal, with a catechism and prayers, for the small French Huguenot community who had taken refuge in Sweden. Most had fled to Sweden after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, although a few French Calvinists had settled there earlier. They were not warmly welcomed by the Swedes, who tried to amalgamate them with the English and German reformed groups. A small community persisted, and in 1700 a first hymnal was published in Stockholm to meet their needs. This second edition was substantially revised and enlarged.The hymns are in French, with headings in Swedish and (usually) German, all indexed in the final table. Containing more hymns than psalms, this is among the earlier French Lutheran hymnals. The Genevan reformist and poet Benedict Pictet was the first to advocate adding hymns to the psalters of the Reformed French communities, but only in Germany did this truly catch on, after about 1705. This Stockholm edition clearly follows the German model. In a prefatory letter to the reader, the editor Laurent Arnell, then pastor of the French Lutheran church in Stockholm, explains that he decided to publish this because so few copies remained of the 1700 edition. As the latter contained an insufficient number of hymns, he added 85 new ones, and along the way he couldn't resist improving some of the wording, the result being that he spent far more time on this revised edition than intended. Ars longa ... Part 1 contains 224 hymns, of which numbers 17-58 correspond to 38 psalms, including four given in two versions. The French text of the psalms may derive from various sources: during the late 17th and 18th centuries a plethora of different French paraphrases of the psalms appeared: "A côté de la soixantaine de poètes qui ont donné une traduction complète en vers de l'ensemble des 150 psaumes, plus de 250 noms peuvent être cités pour la paraphrase de quelques psaumes seulement" (Le Chant de David, Les Pseaumes en vers français, exhibition at the Bibliothèque Part-Dieu Lyon, Sept-Dec. 2010). As opposed to the psalms, many of the present hymns were probably either written or heavily revised by Arnell. Printed as prose, without music, many include verbal indications of melodies, referring to tunes used for other hymns (e.g., "Sur l'air du N. 163"), which were already firmly associated with a melody. The work opens with "Catechism in the form of hymns" ("Le Catéchisme en forme de cantiques"). Citing its rather clumsy verses, Puaux remarked that it was rather foolhardy of Arnell to undertake his revision. Part 2 contains the Gospels and Epistles for every Sunday and feast day, and also includes a "Catéchisme de Luther" (pp. 233-252) in more traditional question and answer form, including advice on explaining to children the Ten Commandments, Articles of Faith, Sacrament, and other ceremonies and symbols. Further instructive material includes biblical passages on the duties of various social states (women, husbands, parents, etc.) and a prose account of the Passion. Prayers for various occasions and social groups and the Litany conclude the edition. There is an index of incipits in French, Swedish, and German. OCLC locates 5 copies, of which one in the US (Yale), with no US copies of the 1700 edition. Bibliographie des Psaumes Imprimés en Vers Français (1525-1900) (apparently still unpublished) no. 1537 (cf. BM Lyon online catalogue entry for this edition). Cf. F. Puaux, Histoire de l'établissement des protestants français en Suède (1892), p. 66.
  • $1,700
  • $1,700
A composite geographical almanac

A white silk embroidered almanac binding on a composite geographical almanac

EMBROIDERED ALMANAC BINDING [France, 1788. 24mo (binding size 97 x 65 mm). [64] pp. Apparently lacking title, replaced by the engraved title of a different almanac, 2 foldout engraved mapsheets at front and back containing 7 different maps. Corner of fol. B1 torn away. Contemporary ivory silk over pasteboards, covers embroidered alike with a frame of couched green thread enclosing repeated small purl bows or leaf motifs, at center an oval cartouche composed of a band of silver metallic thread edged in green silk thread, enclosing two birds nuzzling on a green branch, the birds composed entirely of purl, the cartouches "tied" at the top with a triple bow, each loop composed of bronze-colored purl filled with silver metallic purl, tied with a ribbon of pink silk embroidered thread and small sequins, the covers edged with needle-looped metallic lace, backstrip with zig-zag pattern of purl (lacking a few pieces), yellow silk liners, free endpapers of copper-glazed paper. Provenance: Carlo de Poortere, bookplate.*** An odd little almanac binding, probably the work of an amateur, on an unidentified almanac with geographic content whose missing title was replaced by the engraved title of an unrelated almanach galant, Le Trottoir du Permesse, ou le Rimeur fantastique, Paris: Jubert, [1788]. The maps show the world in two hemispheres, France, and the continents (Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America).
  • $500
Etrennes mignones [sic] curieuses et utiles ... pour l'année 1785

Etrennes mignones [sic] curieuses et utiles … pour l'année 1785

ALMANAC Paris: N. Crapart & C.J.C. Durand, 1785. 32mo (92 x 58 mm). Collation: 1-68 (nested quires). [48] leaves. Folding woodcut maps of France écclesiastique at front and Environs de Paris at back, printed on one sheet enclosing text. Contemporary gold-blocked green morocco, reddish-gold Brokatpapier pastedown endpapers, gilt edges (very minor wear to corners). Provenance: Carlos de Poortere, bookplate. *** A very good copy of a classic Paris almanac. The Etrennes mignonnes may have been the most long-running of all Parisian almanacs, and one of the most stable in format and contents. With occasional variations in the title, this almanac appeared yearly from 1724 to 1848, spanning five generations and weathering several very different governments and social regimes. After 1750 the engraved title was dispensed with, and the quality of printing may have declined somewhat, but the contents remained consistently serious, containing historical, geopolitical, and political information about various French regions and other countries, charts of royalty and nobility, densely printed summaries of news from the previous year, descriptions of recent scientific inventions, guides to measurements, tariffs, lists of trade fairs, and so on. Grand-Carteret 107. On the contents and economics of the Etrennes mignonnes and their imitators, see V. Sarrazin, "L'exemple des Etrennes parisiennes: succès, évolution et mutation d'un genre d'almanachs du XVIIIe au XIXe siècle," in Lüsebrink, ed., Les lectures du peuple en Europe et dans les Amériques du XVIIe au XXe siècle (2003): 39-48.
  • $450
The storming of the Bastille. "Prise de la Bastille par les Bourgeois et les braves Gardes Françaises de la bonne Ville de Paris

The storming of the Bastille. “Prise de la Bastille par les Bourgeois et les braves Gardes Françaises de la bonne Ville de Paris, le 14 Juillet 1789. Dédiée à la Nation.

FRENCH REVOLUTIONARY FAN [France, 1789. Hand-colored engraved folding paper fan, printed on recto and verso on two adhered sheets, the recto with a full-width etched and engraved scene of the taking of the Bastille, colored in watercolors and white gouache, within stencil-printed decorative border, the verso with an engraved poem; mounted on original plain wooden sticks, the guards with narrow fillets of decorative bone along edges and at rivet, the unfolded leaf measuring approx. 137 x 500 mm., total fan measurement 208 x 500 (10 3/4 x 20 in.). Condition: a few small chips and old paper patches, mainly to the borders, one small patch within the engraved area, affecting only the background, slight wear along a few pleats, one or two small stains, 2 words slightly rubbed on verso, a guard relined.***A fine ephemeral survival: a rare fan on a popular and dramatic theme, no doubt issued soon after the event depicted. Although by July 14 1789, the Bastille was nearly empty, and its historical reality was that of "the least cruel of all the [French] state prisons" (Marion, Dictionnaire des Institutions francaises, p. 40), its potency as a visually imposing symbol of tyranny was undiminished. The day of its storming by a crowd of about 1000 "bourgeois" was unfortunately one of intense bloodshed, with over 100 people, including 98 attackers, several soldiers and the garrison commander the Marquis de Launay, losing their lives. De Launay's head and that of Jacques de Flesselles, "Prévôt des Marchands," were later paraded on pikes. This commemorative fan for ladies avoids all gore. The etched scene on the fan's front is a panoramic view showing several events occurring simultaneously, with six objects and figures number-keyed to an explanatory text printed on the verso. On either side are two militiamen with pikes and cannons, watching the action: at the left a group of citizens bearing an ax, pike, sword, and a striped banner (a precursor of the Tricolore?) approach the fortress, looming massively behind them, a white flag waving from its battlement, while citizens with pikes can be glimpsed on the main opened drawbridge and within the fortress; in the middle foreground the Governor de Launay is seized by the "grenadier and the compagnon clockmaker" (whose names are elsewhere variously given as Harné or Arné and Humbert or Hemert); on the right a crowd of citizens, with a boy drummer at the front, are about to confront the heavily guarded first drawbridge, leading to the courtyard, while smoke and flames pour out of other buildings, one identified as de Launay's house. On the verso is the text: the title, keyed explanations, and the lyrics to a song in 8 stanzas, with the heading "Chanson d'un premier Capitaine Commandant de District, en l'honneur des Bourgeois de la Ville de Paris, sur l'air de Calpigi," and incipit "Enfans, le Ciel benit vos armes / ils sont passez ces jours d'allarmes...".Fans at the time were often used as propaganda vehicles and adapted popular prints; those responding to current events were probably produced rapidly by specialized imagiers (print engravers and publishers) who probably disposed of sheets with the borders pre-stencilled, which they could quickly print off with new topical engravings. Contemporary prints of the taking of the Bastille were produced in the hundreds, if not thousands, and many examples survive. One of the more finished engravings titled "Prise de la Bastille," by Jacques-Louis Bance, had a title very close to that of the present fan; another, titled "Prise de la Bastille le 14 juillet 1789," was by Dupin (copies of both can be viewed on Gallica). Anonymous copies and adaptations included other prints, a broadside with a song, and several fan leaves (Cf. Hennin Collection 10341 in the BnF, and British Museum, Schreiber Collection of Fans, nos. 93-96). The Hennin and British Museum examples, and a fan on the same subject in the Fitzwilliam Museum (inventory no. 1877051), all differ from the present example in both the image and the printed song; most have a smaller image on the front of the fan, flanked by text.References: Collection Michel Hennin. Estampes relatives à l'Histoire de France, vol. 118, Pièces 10278-10385; British Museum, Catalogue of the Collection of Fans and Fan-leaves presented to the British Museum by the Lady Charlotte Schreiber (1893), nos. 93-96.
  • $4,800
  • $4,800
Zeichen- Mahler- und Stickerbuch zur Selbstbelehrung für Damen. [With:] Zweiter Theil

Zeichen- Mahler- und Stickerbuch zur Selbstbelehrung für Damen, welche sich mit diesen Künsten beschäftigen… Mit 48 Kupfertafeln und einem auf Taffet mid Seide und Gold gestickten Modelltuche. [With:] Zeichen- Mahler- und Stickerbuch … Zweiter Theil Mit 24 Kupfertafeln und einem auf taffet mit Seide und Gold gestickten Modelltuche

NETTO, Johann Friedrich (1756-1810) Leipzig: Voss und Compagnie, 1798. Two parts in two volumes, oblong folio (280 x 450 mm). Volume 1: 38 pp. 47 engraved plates, of which four folding: 23 numbered etched plates, all signed Netto fec. or f., each in two states, hand-colored and uncolored (plates 19 and 20 larger and folding); an uncolored impression of plate 21 bound at front, as the pattern plate for a silk embroidery sampler, containing over forty-five embroidered motifs in colored silk thread, plus one unnumbered demonstration pattern sheet with punched designs for transfer. Volume 2: 40 pages, 23 etched & engraved plates, all signed Netto fec.: 11 plates in two states, hand-colored and uncolored, the uncolored impression of plate 12 bound at front as the pattern plate for the magnificent silk sampler, at center a large scene of an erupting volcano, flanked by four smaller motifs, all embroidered in colored silk and gold and metallic thread. Titles on original large guards of the same pale green paper as the facing flyleaf. Vol. 1 title creased, vertical crease through first leaf of Chapter 1 (fol. B1), occasional faint discoloration, the plates in fresh condition with fine original coloring, and the samplers with the original paper backing and in equally fine condition. Bound ca. 1798-1799 in red calf-backed black straight-grained goatskin over boards, covers with gold-tooled entrelac roll border, at center of upper covers an onlaid gold-tooled and -lettered green morocco title label; black endpapers, speckled edges (some cracks, extremities worn, large chips with loss to vol. 1 cover label). Contemporary bookseller's or owner's inscription on front flyleaf of vol. 1: 2 bände, mit gestichten Modelltuchen eingebunden... *** A magnificent copy of Netto's first two path-breaking embroidery pattern books for women (only editions), complete with the embroidered samplers. A third volume of patterns was published under the same title in 1800; the three volumes are usually found separately. This set was uniformly bound soon after publication of Part Two. Copies with the samplers are exceedingly rare, and those few that have survived are usually well-worn. The samplers in this set are in remarkably fresh condition, as are the engraved plates. That for the second volume, showing Vesuvius (presumably) erupting, is especially finely worked and preserves every original sequin and gold thread. Netto, a Leipzig drawing master, was apparently the first and only needlework pattern book editor to embrace the ingenious idea of providing a genuine sampler to aid his female readers in interpreting the engraved patterns provided in his manuals. In his introduction he refers to an early essay in the genre, published in 1783 (not identified, no copies located), which he found unsatisfactory, as it lacked the essential instructional element for ladies: "Since that time members of the beautiful sex in Germany have begun more frequently than hitherto to occupy themselves with needlework; at the same time none of the books that treat this art have provided the complete instruction that can be afforded by a model sampler." He sought to remedy this in his first needlework book, the present first volume. His manual distills the result of "twenty years attention and experience in this and related arts"; the sampler was embroidered under Netto's supervision by "the best [female] embroiderers" (Stickerinnen). As usual these women remain anonymous. Both volumes contain "exquisite depictions of the neoclassical garlands, bouquets, medallions and allegorical motifs associated with late eighteenth-century design in Europe. Netto's books provide an invaluable glimpse into the creation of designs for embroidery, the means by which they reached their intended audience and the technical information provided to the purchaser" (Cora Ginsburg catalogue, 1998, p. [6]). In the first volume, the embroidered motifs of the finely worked sampler, which follows the patterns given on plate 21, progress from upper left to lower right from the simple to the more elaborate. Shown are blossoms, flowering plants, a wild strawberry plant, a canary, ornamental trims, ribbons and bows, garlands, a wheat sheaf and a cornucopia, flower baskets, butterflies, palm trees, a cottage, neoclassical monuments, fountains, broken columns and circular colonnades, and an altar in a grotto. These designs can be used, he explains in the text, for small workbags, portfolios, and "souvenirs," and the small bouquets can decorate "negligés." The embroideries of Netto's beautifully worked sampler for the 1798 volume are pictorial rather than ornamental, showing an erupting volcano (presumably Vesuvius) in an Italianate landscape, flanked by candelabra and, at top, two vignettes of cottages. The character of the engraved designs also differs markedly between the two volumes, those of the first volume being smaller and more delicate than the bolder designs used three years later. "Netto's earlier book... held smaller and more delicate designs, a lingering influence of the Louis XVI style, while those of the later edition, larger in scale, show that of the Directory" (Margaret Abegg, Apropos Patterns, Bern 1978, p. 183). The 1795 volume contains a technical manual covering drawing, painting, colors (Farbenlehre), and different types of needlework, in 86 paragraphs divided into 12 chapters, with a final chapter describing each plate. The engravings are provided in color, Netto explains, as a guide to choosing the colored threads, while the black and white plates are meant to be pricked through for direct use as patterns. The plates supply copious individual decorative motifs as well as larger patterns for dresses, chemises, shawls, and other elements of clothing. In the 1798 volume Netto delves more deeply into the application of the arts of drawing to embroidery, and his 40-page manual includes chapters on drawing, perspective, and painting; embroidering with English wool; the use of corals, pearls, gold and silver; allegorical motifs for fire screens, tablecloths, potpourris, etc.; embroidering on leather for portfolios, bags, etc; and a glossary of colors for landscape painting. The introduction concludes with an explanation of the plates. Netto intended this new series of designs to show that taste is not the exclusive domain of the French (a prejudice which he decries in the preface). His designs were intended to last, being motifs that will not go out of style. "The flowers, for example, the bouquets, the landscapes, and other parts will [in future] still be embroidered in the same manner and with the same colors as at present. Also the text, which has proven itself in the experience of many, will lose nothing of its usefulness" (p. 4). These costly volumes could only be published by subscription, as explained by Netto in a prospectus to the second volume, issued in 1797 (described in Cora Ginsburg catalogue 1998, available as a PDF on the firm's website). The volumes were produced and delivered in the same order in which the subscription orders were received. They could be ordered with or without the embroidered models; for the less expensive copies the embroideries were replaced with a hand-colored engraving (hence the count provided in the titles of 48 and 24 plates respectively). Netto succeeded in providing patterns of lasting utility: "It is not unusual for embroidery designs to be used over a long period of time so Netto's judgment of his influence was a reasonable prediction. Eleven years after the publication of his second volume the designs were in fact still being used. A silk embroidery in the collection of the Museum of the City of New York was worked by Catharina Kieslich in 1809 and includes motifs of houses, monuments and garlands taken from Netto's masterful drawings (illustrated in M. Davis, Early American Embroidery Design, New York 1969, p. 34)" - Cora Ginsburg 1998 catalogue, loc. cit. Besides his further volume of embroidery patterns, issued in 1800, Netto went on to publish a knitting manual (L'Art de tricoter) in 1802, a periodical devoted to the arts of the needle (Taschenbuch der Strick-, Näh- und anderer weiblichen Arbeiten, 1801-4), and a few other manuals of the domestic arts for women, all now quite scarce. Netto was the only needlework pattern book artist named in Jessen's classic survey of ornament prints, where his books are described as the "most distinguished" (am stattlichsten) of the spate of women's needlework manuals that appeared in the late eighteenth century in response to the new vogue for female handiwork. All volumes of Netto's Stickerbücher are rare. Guilmard knew of only the second and third volumes. In North America, copies are held by the Smithsonian (volume I), the Metropolitan Museum of Art (vols. I and II), Winterthur Museum and Library (vols. I and II, with the 1797 Prospectus), Clark Art Institute (vols. I, without pl. 21 or the sampler, and vol. III), and New York Public Library (vol. 1). Of the copies that I have seen, the present one is by far the best. The embroideries of the samplers differ in different copies. For example, in this copy the sampler for the first volume closely follows the engraved model, while the embroiderer of the vol. 1 sampler in the Winterthur copy took liberties and made up some of her own designs. (An exact count of the embroidered motifs is difficult, since some of the motifs have multiple elements). The sampler for the 1798 volume follows more or less the same design in both this and the Winterthur copy, but it is here brighter, crisper and of superior workmanship. No effort was spared to make this embroidery enticing - neither sequins nor gold thread, nor fumes of the volcano, delicately drawn directly on the silk in charcoal or ink. In both volumes the samplers are preserved with their original paper backing, attached with the original large, regular stitching. Berlin Katalog 1529 (vol. 2); Guilmard, Maîtres ornemanistes, p. 461; Paludan & de Hemmer Egeberg, 98 Mønsterbøger ... 98 Pattern Books for Embroidery, Lace, and Knitting (Den Danske Kunstindustrmuseum, 1991), no. 70; cf. Peter Jessen, Der Ornamentstich (1920), p. 359.
  • $32,000
  • $32,000
Le Livre de S. Augustin. De l'esprit et de la lettre. Traduit en François

Le Livre de S. Augustin. De l'esprit et de la lettre. Traduit en François, Sur l'Edition des Pères Benedictins de la Congrégation de S. Maur

AUGUSTINUS, Aurelius; DUBOIS, Philippe (1626-1694), translator Paris: Jean Baptiste Coignard, 1700. 12mo (157 x 94 mm). [12], 259, [5] pp. Woodcut title vignette, headpiece and initial. Ruled in red throughout. Some discoloration and a few spots. Eighteenth-century French dark blue Jansenist goatskin, spine with red morocco gilt lettering-piece, gilt edges, turn-ins gold-tooled, brocade paper endpapers with multiple colored stencilling on a gauffered gold ground; joints and extremities rubbed. Provenance: Martine-Marie-Pol de Béhague, comtesse de Béarn (1870-1939), by inheritance to her nephew, Hubert de Ganay, and thence to his heirs; bookplate with initials H H.*** First Edition of this translation of St. Augustine's De spiritu et littera, by the Academician Philippe Dubois or Dubois-Goibaud, who also translated the Confessions. The Approbation, dated 8 August 1697, is followed by a royal privilege dated January 1698 to an anonymous libraire, who soon after transferred the privilege to the Royal Printer Jean-Baptiste Coignard II. Coignard finished the printing on 23 December 1699. The book's sober, undecorated covers, the mark of the so-called janséniste style, open to reveal exuberantly colored German floral endpapers. Called "papier doré gauffré" in French, brocade paper was a specialty of Augsburg and Nürnberg, and was probably first produced by engravers or goldsmiths. The pattern was printed either in negative relief, with the motifs in intaglio, so that the "gold" leaf (actually a mixture of brass and an alloy of copper, tin, zinc, and sometimes lead) appears as the ground, as here; or in positive relief, usually showing the patterns in gold on a colored ground. The colors were applied successively using stencils (usually cut in oiled paper or in thin metal sheets). Cf. C. Kopylov, Papiers dorés d'Allemagne au siècle des Lumières (2012), pp. 17-19.
  • $500
Officio della B. V. Maria per tutti i tempi dell' anno

Officio della B. V. Maria per tutti i tempi dell' anno, Con le dichiarazioni, e spiegazioni dell' Abate Alessandro Mazzinelli

OFFICE OF THE VIRGIN, Latin and Italian Rome: Gioacchino & Giovanni Giuseppe Salvioni, Stampatori Pontificii Vaticani, 1756. 8vo (210 x 135 mm). [24], 407, [1] pp. 2 parts, the Office of the Dead separately titled. Printed in red and black. Engraved frontispiece and 12 full-page engravings by Arnold Van Weserhout and Jacob Frey after Joseph Passarus (Giuseppe Passaro), two engraved title vignettes and 12 tailpiece vignettes, a few unsigned, others by Frey after Passaro or by M. Schedi (engraver), 3 engraved initials, numerous red-printed woodcut initials. Occasional light browning. 18th-century Roman(?) gold-tooled red goatskin, covers with densely tooled dentelle border built up from leafy plant tools, sprigs, floral and arabesque tools, each cornerpiece enclosing a grid with gold dots, blossom tools and dots in central field, ornamental centerpiece of large foliate, arabesque and dandelion tools, spine in six uniformly gold-tooled compartments, block-printed pastedown endpapers with flower and fruit design stencil-colored in red, green and yellow, gilt edges with gauffred border design; upper cover a bit faded and bowed, corner bumped, a couple of scrapes to lower cover. Provenance: Horace de Landau (1824-1904), bookplate, shelfmark no 47854; Vicomte de Cossette, armorial bookplate.*** A rococo binding on a luxuriously printed and illustrated Office of the Virgin, from the Salvioni press, official printers to the Vatican. The Salvioni press used several workshops, sometimes collectively mislabeled as the "Vatican" or "Salvioni" bindery. Those bound for the papal library were finely executed, and different binderies can be identified by their tools, color of leather, and stylistic details. The present pretty but crowded binding decor, with its in places overlapping tooling, does not seem to belong to the corpus of binderies represented in, for example, the Vatican Library's 1977 exhibit catalogue of Legature papali. Stylistically it uses types of tools and decoration - the wide "Louis XV" style border, and the basketweave cornerpieces - in vogue during the reigns of Clement XIV (1769-1774) and Pius VI (1775-1799). Its decoration is similar, for example, to binding no. 262 in Legature papali, but it is of inferior workmanship, and does not use the same tools. It was probably produced in a Roman shop executing many commissions and forced to work quickly, although it could even be a provincial binding. Cf. Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Legature papali da Eugenio IV a Paolo VI, no. 262, plate CXCI.
  • $2,000
  • $2,000
Hommage aux dames. - Souvenirs et pensées

Hommage aux dames. — Souvenirs et pensées

JANET, Louis, publisher Paris: (Richomme for) Louis Janet, 1821. 18mo (binding size 123 x 80 mm). [20],156 pp. Engraved title with stipple-engraved vignette, and 6 engraved plates, after Fragonard (2), Wilkie (3), and Mlle. Lescot. 8-pp. calendar for 1821. Souvenirs: [14] pages, entirely engraved: title with medallion vignette and 12 pages for notes, blank except for medallion vignette of a putto and the name of the month. Printed on wove paper, the Souvenirs on thinner paper; occasional faint foxing. Publisher's decorative case binding of gilt paper boards, covers each with a different onlay of white paper with hand- or stencil-colored engraved frame comprising 8 emblematic and ornamental compartments, colored in red, green, blue, pink, yellow and gold, backstrip onlay with ivy and blossoms, gilt edges, green glazed endpapers, matching slipcase (with different decorated frame design), lined in pink glazed paper; some very slight scuffing, slipcase rubbed and soiled.*** A fine annual literary almanac, preserved in its original cartonnage (paper-covered boards) with matching slipcase. This pretty if largely vacuous production for ladies, containing poems, chansons and short prose pieces by popular or aspiring writers, illustrated with six engravings, appeared yearly from 1813 to 1835. Editorship has been attributed to Charles Malo. The engraved plates, each with an accompanying description, reproduce paintings by Fragonard, David Wilkie, and Antoinette Cécile Hortense Lescot; the latter's pious painting is noted to have been exhibited in the Paris Salon in 1817. Like all issues this one contains a supplementary quire titled "Souvenirs," with one page per month for personal notes, each illustrated with a delightful stipple-engraved roundel. Grand-Carteret tells us that these Souvenirs were hotly collected ("fort recherchés") later in the century, citing the high prices in an 1896 bookseller's catalogue (p. xlix, note 2). Among the poems are a delightful short love poem to "A Portrait" by Marceline Desbordes-Valmores, and a longer, quasi-feminist poem defending the right of women to speak about politics, by the princesse [Constance] de Salm ("Stances addressées aux hommes, sur les femmes qui s'occupent de politique"). More conventional is a pastoral poem by the late "dame [Marie-Emilie Maryon de] Montanclos" (d. 1812). A few other women may have been hiding behind initials and surnames. With the exception of Pierre Didot (Didot fils aîné) and the duc de Nivernois (Louis-Jules Barbon Mancini-Mazarini), most of the contributors were obscure even then. Such almanacs were typically given, mainly to women, as traditional New Years Day gifts or étrennes (from which some almanacs had derived their titles). During the Bourbon Restoration, when cheaper paper bindings had largely replaced the leather or textile of the most luxurious 18th century almanacs, somewhat more than half of a typical press-run would be cased in colorful cartonnages, as here, and furnished with a calendar, while the remainders were placed in printed wrappers and set aside, sometimes to be reoffered with a new title (op. cit., p. lii, note 1). Pierre-Claude-Louis Janet (1788-1840), "the most famous publisher of almanacs, was known for the particular care he took in producing them" (Malavieille, p. 20). Indicating the grass-roots sources of almanac literature, a prefatory note from the editor instructs anyone wishing to submit a piece to do so before May 15, in order to be sure to get into the next year's issue. In form and content this almanac perfectly corroborates an amusing contemporary description, quoted at length by Grand-Carteret, of a crowded bookshop in Paris on New Years Day, with its brightly colored shelves and eager customers, including the rich man who pays 20 francs for a "brilliant Almanac," whose negligible contents he would have sneered at were it in an ordinary binding, and the young man leafing through a new almanac with trembling fingers, seeking his two lines of verse... did the editor include them? Victoria Dailey has a copy with the same date, whose contents differ entirely, both in text and plates, as well as in the engraved Souvenirs. The BnF, which has digitized six issues, not including this one, dates each volume after the calendar, but of course they were printed the previous year, though released only on New Year's Day. Grand-Carteret, Les almanachs français 1680 & pp. xlviii-lii; cf. S. Malavieille, Reliures et cartonnages d'éditeur en France au XIXe siècle (1985), pp. 19-20.
  • $800
book (2)

Theses ex metaphysica, et physica, quas … publice propugnandas exhibet Joannes Baptista Tonti De Castro Misani … Institutore Iosepho Vannucci Armininensis ..

TONTI DE CASTRO, Giambattista, respondens; VANNUCCI, Giuseppe, praesens Rimini: Nicola Albertini, 1776. 4to (268 x 202 mm). xxx, [1] pp. Woodcut title ornament, head- and tail-piece, and initial. Some light foxing, slight curling to corners. Contemporary Italian dominoté paper wrapper, printed in light brown with an allover repeated geometric pattern of 3 by 3 grids, the white squares each with a brown dot, each grid separated from its neighbors by two double parallel lines flanking a single line (a few tears to backstrip, minor fraying to edges). *** A printed announcement and program of a thesis defense, in geometrical woodblock-printed wrappers. Two hundred numbered statements summarize the "theses" that the student, Giambattista Tonti, was to defend in an oral examination held before his professor, Giuseppe Vannucci, a month later in the episcopal seminary of Rimini. Vannucci, a secular archpriest (or rector), is described in the title as a doctor of theology and professor of philosophy. He was also versed in the sciences; three editions appeared in 1787 of a treatise he wrote on the earthquake that struck Rimini in 1786 (Discorso istorico-filosofico sopra il tremuoto che ...scosse ... la città di Rimini). The subjects upon which his student was required to speak range from philosophy to hard science: from questions on the nature of thought and language, Hobbes' ("impius") mechanistic theory of human nature, and the metaphysical theories of Descartes and Leibniz, the subjects move into physics: beginning with general theories, including those of Newton, and thence to hydrostatics, hydraulics, capillarity, and electricity, including its more freakish natural manifestations and its effect on the weather. An eye-catchingly decorated witness to the universality and rigorous expectations of (Catholic) university education during the Enlightenment.
  • $450
La Militare Architettura overo Fortificatione Moderna

La Militare Architettura overo Fortificatione Moderna, Cavata dall' Esperienza, e da varie maniere più pratticabili, Con le regole principale dell' Aritmetica … et un trattato dell' arte militare

RUGGIERO, Pietro Milan: Lodovico Monza, 1661. 4to (250 x 193 mm). [12], 238, [5] pp. Additional etched and engraved title (included in collation), 15 folding etched plates of architectural plans and diagrams; 1 woodcut table, 38 numbered woodcut diagrams in part 1 (the engraved plates continuing that numbering but skipping no. 39, thus numbered 40-54), woodcut initials, head- and tailpieces, and printer's device at end. Printed on thick paper. Small hole in margin of last leaf, some marginal dust-soiling. Contemporary parchment over pasteboards, manuscript title lettered in capitals along spine, blue-speckled edges (binding darkened & soiled). Provenance: Earls of Macclesfield, blindstamp in both titles, bookplate with ms. press number, sale Sotheby's London, Oct 30, 2007, lot 3745.*** only edition, rare, of a treatise on fortress construction, with sections on military strategy and siege warfare, by a Burgundian Frenchman who had settled in Milan. Pietro Ruggiero (or Pierre Rougier) identifies himself on the title as an engineer in the army of his Catholic Majesty (i.e, the Spanish army, under Philip IV). In his dedication to Juan José of Austria, the King's bastard son and a popular general, he alludes to the latter's successful campaigns against rebels in Sicily and Catalonia, and states that he (Ruggiero) directed the Spanish-Italian recapture of the French-occupied fortress of Longone on the island of Elba, which took place in 1650. In four books, Ruggiero's treatise addresses the basic rules of geometry for surveying, the construction of fortifications, fortress defense, and general military tactics. Each of these broad subjects is treated in detail. The second and longest book contains chapters on the history of fortress-making from the Romans to the present, ancient vs. modern fortress construction, the various parts of the fortress, such as bulwarks, ramparts, bunkers or pillboxes (case matte), curtain walls (cortine), where to build one's fortresses (borderlands are recommended), and requirements of different physical locales (swamps, lowlands, riverbanks, islands). Explaining that the rules of "modern" fortification have evolved because of new weaponry, Ruggiero reviews offensive fortifications such as circumvallations, trenches, batteries, mines, tunnels, and redoubts, and defensive constructions, including fortresses, fortified towns, moats, ravelins, and obstacles whose expressive Italian names describe their functions: pincers, tongs, scissors.... The architecture of fortresses is illustrated in the etchings, keyed to the text of a series of chapters on angles, lines, and calculations of ground area for various shapes: pentagons, hexagons, four-pointed stars, quadrilaterals, and irregularly shaped fortresses. The third book is devoted to the art of siege warfare. While Ruggiero stresses that general rules cannot be prescribed since each fortification is different, in 23 chapters he provides a variety of different scenarios and lines of attack. He uses numerous examples of actual battles, most from recent decades. The final book contains a mini-treatise on the art of war, with chapters on artillery including powder and balls for cannonry vs. musketry, army movements and marches, quartering of troops in various types of landscapes, different national types of army encampments, quartering of the cavalry, battle formations, the supplying of fortresses during sieges, and other logistical issues. The last few chapters provide instruction on the use of the surveyor's compass. The handsome etched and drypoint title shows a fortress on a hill in the background with cannons and engines of war in the middle distance and accoutrements of engineering and military life (sectors, compasses, barrels, shovels, spears) under a tree in the foreground, with the title engraved on a banner at top. The remaining illustrations of fortress plans, diagrams of encampments, architectural details of rampart angles, etc., are carefully integrated with the text. The bibliographer Mariano d'Ayala criticized the author's pompous style but called the book important, "at least for its abundance of material." OCLC locates three copies in N. American libraries, at the Getty, LC, and the Canadian Centre for Architecture. Piantanida, et al., Autori Italiani del Seicento, 1461; Mariano d'Ayala, Bibliografia Militare-Italiana (1854), p. 118.
  • $4,400
  • $4,400
La Creazione

La Creazione, e Le quattro stagioni Poste in musica dal Celebre J. Haydn. Manuscript libretto

[SWIETEN, Gottfried Bernhard van] - HAYDN, Franz Joseph [Turin?, 1835. Manuscript on paper. 4to (binding size 264 x 197 mm). [26] pp. Contents: Fol. 1r title, verso blank, f. 2r-5v text, La Creazione, incipit: "Raffaele / Creò dapprima Iddio il ciel, la terra; / Ma giaceva la terra informe e vuota," f. 6r half-title for Le quattro Stagioni, 6v-13v text, Le quattro Stagioni, incipit: "Coro di Contadini, e Contadine. / Vieni deh Flora, vieni / Prezioso don del Ciel." Written in brown ink in an elegant Italian cursive on fine wove paper, no visible watermarks. Three blank leaves at front and back, the outermost being a wrapper of thicker paper (second flyleaf at back adhered to the third), the text block stitched into a Piedmontese case binding of gold-embroidered ivory silk over thin pasteboards, both covers with outer border of a leafy scrolling vine with floral sprigs composed of gilt or silver-gilt appliqués of leaves, blossoms and roundels on stems of couched silver-gilt thread, a larger flowering branch at each corner, at center of upper cover a large gilt monogram CF within a cartouche of repeated leaf appliqués with at top a closed crown, at center of lower cover a large flowering plant of gilt appliqués, couched thread, sequins, etc. (turn-ins of upper cover unsewn, dampstain within upper left quadrant of upper cover). A manuscript of excerpts from the librettos for Haydn's late oratorios, the Creation (Die Schöpfung, first performed 1798) and the Seasons (Die Jahreszeiten, 1801), translated into Italian from the German of his librettist and patron Gottfried van Swieten (1733-1803). Bound in brightly gilt embroidered silk binding, the manuscript was probably produced for a court or private musical event.Both librettos had an English origin. The Creation text, based on Genesis and Milton's Paradise Lost, was taken from a manuscript libretto by an unknown author, originally intended for Handel, given to Haydn by the English impresario Johann Peter Salomon, and brought back by him from England in 1795.  The Seasons was loosely based on extracts from James Thomson's poem of the same title (1730), but van Swieten had greater leeway in rearranging the text.It was still considered a given in the early nineteenth century that vocal compositions in languages other than Latin and Italian would be translated into the language of the audience. The Creation was first performed in Italian in Milan in 1810, using Giuseppe Carpani's verse translation of van Swieten's libretto (first published in Vienna in 1801). The manuscript contains an abridged version of Carpani's text (with some variants). The Quattro stagione is also abridged, and seems to be based on portions of an anonymous translation first published in Dresden in 1802, and used for the oratorio's first performances in Italian, in 1811 in Milan and Bologna (cf. editions of Milan: Mussi, [1811], and Bologna: Ramponi, [1811]).The manuscript was exhibited in Turin in 1998: cf. Francesco Malaguzzi, Legature romantiche piemontese: legature del periodo romantico in raccolte private, no. 67 and p. 30. Malaguzzi stated that the manuscript contains "watermarks of the Biella papermakers the brothers Avondo, datable to the third decade of the 19th century," but this cataloguer failed to see any watermarks.
  • $2,600
  • $2,600
Le Voyageur fidele

Le Voyageur fidele, ou Le Guide des Etrangers dans la ville de Paris

PARIS - [LIGER, Louis (1658-1717)] Paris: Pierre Ribou, 1716. 12mo (157 x 86 mm). [8], 517, [3] pp. Woodcut headpiece and initials, typographic ornaments. A few pages faintly printed, occasional light foxing, minor staining to pp. 280-281. 19th-century jansenist red morocco, turn-ins gold-tooled, gilt edges (extremities scuffed). Provenance: Martine-Marie-Pol de Béhague, comtesse de Béarn (1870-1939), by descent to her nephew, Hubert de Ganay, and thence to his heirs; bookplate with initials H H.***A traveler's guide to Paris in the final days of the Sun-King's reign, filled with information on Parisian gastronomic and material culture and its many purveyors, First Edition, second issue, with the same sheets as the 1715 edition and only the title reset.Louis Liger, whose name is given in the title of the 1715 issue (replaced here by the price, quarante-cinq sols), was an agronomist and compiler of several popular works on domestic economy, gardening, and agriculture. The present anecdotal guide to Paris, an outlier in his oeuvre, is narrated by a fictional visitor from Germany, who relates 13 days spent exploring the city: a conceit familiar to modern readers of guidebooks (and the NY Times), but which must have had the snap of novelty then. Each day is devoted to a different neighborhood, starting with the Ile de la Cité, Notre-Dame, etc., moving on to the Marais, the Halles, Faubourg St. Honoré, St. Germain, etc., and ending with several faubourgs, all now part of Paris: the hospice of the Salpêtrière, the Invalides, the Observatory and the Champs-Elysées, at the time a pleasant leafy esplanade where masked couples partied and flirted. Described are the churches, monuments, private residences, and inhabitants of each quartier, including local thugs, madames, prostitutes and their johns: the descriptions are interwoven with personal anecdotes (meals, concerts, a mugging, a brawl over a woman, etc.). Following this narrative section are 13 chapters or "Articles" on specific topics, with practical information on lodging and commodities. The first five chapters cover churches not previously mentioned, schools, academies, lectures, private tutors, and libraries, including the Bibliothèque royale (previously open on Tuesdays but now, because of the overflow of books, closed to all except those who "are known and have friends there," although foreigners are well received [p. 316]), the Bibliothèque of the Abbaye de Saint-Victor (designated a public library in 1654), and private or monastic libraries such as the Bibliothèques Ste-Geneviève and libraries of the Cordeliers or the Jacobins (Dominicans). Follow a couple of chapters listing hôtels garnis (hotels), and hôtels particuliers (private grand houses). Having dispensed with culture, the narrator cuts loose and goes shopping. The remaining Articles portray a Paris chock full of riches, culinary, sartorial, artisanal, mechanical and artistic. A litany of the many public plazas where markets are held introduces chapters on butchers, the fish market, vegetable markets, cheese vendors, cork vendors (very important), candle-vendors, mouth-watering descriptions of melons and pastries (no need to single out the best patisseurs, as they are in every quartier, and a brief account of the "caffez," filled with mirrors and lights, where nouvellistes and beaux esprits meet to hold conversations on les belles lettres, to fortify themselves for which they consume prodigious amounts of coffee, chocolate and various drinks no longer known, like rossolis and populo (both made with spirits, cinnamon and sugar). Reluctantly leaving the Parisian table, the author turns to every other item for sale in the city. While individual merchants are not named, the clustering of professions by street in Paris made it easy to advise the reader where to find linen and textiles, haberdashery, fans, ribbons and lace, ready-made clothes, used clothes, tailors, dress-makers, theater costumes, embroidery, tapestries of many different kinds including of gilt leather, tortoiseshell boxes, children's toys, coffee tins, furniture, mirrors, crystal chandeliers, objets de curiosité such as antiques, porcelain, paintings, shells, or gold and silver-inlaid objects, and the goldsmiths and silversmiths who made them, and conservators who restored them. For simpler needs the affluent male or female reader learns where to find bonnet-makers, glove-makers, perfumers, furs and leather goods. And let's not forget wig-makers (all 200 of them, on the Quai des Augustins), the many gadgets needed for carriages, weaponry for war or the hunt, garden implements, construction materials such as pierres de taille, and their manufacturers, the metalworkers, glaziers, paper-makers, shoemakers, sculptors, engravers, and architects, and finally, laborers and domestic servants.Scarce. OCLC lists two copies of the 1715 issue in N. America (Columbia and Northwestern). Dufour, Bibliographie artistique, historique et litteraire de Paris avant 1789 (1882), pp. 322-23.
  • $2,800
  • $2,800