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G. Heywood Hill Ltd

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The Oxford University Press and the Spread of Learning. An Illustrated History. 1478 – 1978. With a preface by Charles Ryskamp.

BARKER, Nicolas First edition. Preface by Charles Ryskamp, Director of the Pierpont Morgan Library. Illustrated with 332 pages of plates, many facsimiles. Small folio, original cloth lettered in gilt on spine with large gilt block on upper board with dust wrapper. A couple of small closed tears to wrapper, otherwise a very good copy. An informative and well-illustrated account of the history of OUP, the world's longest-established press, over its first 500 years. From the blurb: "This volume celebrates the quincentenary of the introduction of printing at Oxford with a pictorial history of its subsequent progress, illustrated by the books, documents, and pictures which are its tangible record. The story, although it properly begins with the arrival of Theodoric Rood and the first learned and educational books that he printed, stretches back to the early thirteenth çentury when scribes, illuminators, and binders of books were already found in Oxford; but it was not until the seventeenth Century that, at the initiative of two great men, Archbishop Laud and Bishop Fell, the University Press in its present form was established. It is the dark, dominant figure of John Fell, Dean of Christ Church, and then Bishop of Oxford, who emerges as the real founder of the University Press, and the man who determined the type of books which still preoccupy the Press; learned and educational books, and the Bible. After a decline in the eighteenth Century, the Press was rescued by William Blackstone, the great academic lawyer, who reorganized it in time to meet the great new demand for the Bible."
  • $124
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My Europe

LOCKHART, Sir Robert Bruce First edition. Inscribed by the author to Anthony Eden on the title-page: 'For Anthony Eden from Bruce in memory of my Danish birthday R.G. Bruce Lockhart, London 1952'. Eden appears occasionally throughout the text. With Author's Compliments Slip loosely inserted. 8vo, original cloth, spine lettered in gilt. A very good copy. Lockhart's memoir recounting his diplomatic missions to the Continent, including revolutionary Russia and the newly established state of Czechoslovakia. In his chapter on Denmark he describes a visit that he and Eden made to Copenhagen in 1948. Anthony Eden was British foreign secretary (1935-38, 1940-45, and 1951-55)and Prime Minister (1955-1957). Following active service in the First World War, Eden read Oriental Languages at Oxford. He was elected to the House of Commons in 1923. In 1935 he was appointed foreign secretary, a position he resigned in 1938 to protest Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's appeasement of Nazi Germany. When Churchill became Prime Minister in 1940, he was named secretary of state for war, and later during the Second World War once more served as foreign secretary. Eden succeeded Churchill as Prime Minister in 1955. In 1956, his failure to respond effectively during the Suez Crisis, and the subsequent loss of party and public support, ultimately lead to his resignation from office in 1957. He was knighted in 1954 and created Earl of Avon in 1961. A pleasing association copy.
  • $644
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Giants Cast Long Shadows

LOCKHART, Sir Robert Bruce First edition. Inscribed by the author to Anthony Eden on the title-page: 'For Anthony Eden from Bruce in admiration R.G. Bruce Lockhart, Falmouth 20th of April 1960'. Eden appears occasionally throughout the text 8vo, original cloth, spine lettered in gilt. A very good copy. Robert Hamilton Bruce Lockhart's series of succinct biographies devoted to distinguished people in all walks of life, including, inter alia; Harold Nicolson; Richard Crossman; Clemenceau; Lancashire-born Clem Charnock, credited with introducing football to Russia; Welsh novelist Howard Spring; Scottish international rugby union player K. G. MacLeod; and children's author W. E. Johns. Anthony Eden was British foreign secretary (1935-38, 1940-45, and 1951-55)and Prime Minister (1955-1957). Following active service in the First World War, Eden read Oriental Languages at Oxford. He was elected to the House of Commons in 1923. In 1935 he was appointed foreign secretary, a position he resigned in 1938 to protest Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's appeasement of Nazi Germany. When Churchill became Prime Minister in 1940, he was named secretary of state for war, and later during the Second World War once more served as foreign secretary. Eden succeeded Churchill as Prime Minister in 1955. In 1956, his failure to respond effectively during the Suez Crisis, and the subsequent loss of party and public support, ultimately lead to his resignation from office in 1957. He was knighted in 1954 and created Earl of Avon in 1961. A pleasing association copy.
  • $644
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Dr Livingstone’s Cambridge Lectures, together with a Prefatory Letter by the Rev. Professor Sedgwick Edited with Introduction, Life of Dr Livingstone, Notes and Appendix by the Rev. William Monk

LIVINGSTONE Dr David First edition. With portrait frontispiece and two folding maps. 8vo., original blue cloth decorated in blind, lettered in gilt on spine and upper board. A little staining to frontispiece, neat previous owners' names on free endpaper and title-page, otherwise a very good copy. David Livingstone had returned to Britain on 12 December 1856 to a hero's welcome, following his successful crossing of the African continent. Livingstone and John Murray had made arrangements for the publication of an account of his travels before Livingstone had even returned home, and at the beginning of 1857 he began work on the book that would be published in November of that year under the title Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa. Following the completion of his manuscript, Livingstone spent the latter half of 1857 undertaking speaking engagements across the British Isles and in December 1857 he travelled to Cambridge, where he addressed a meeting at the University's Senate House on 4 December 1857 and a meeting at the Town Hall on 5 December 1857. The text of the lectures is preceded by a brief biography of Livingstone by William Monk and a substantial 'Prefatory Letter' by the geologist Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873, the Woodwardian Professor of Geology at the University of Cambridge and the Vice-Master of Trinity College, Cambridge), who had hosted Livingstone at Trinity College after the first lecture. The text of the lectures is followed by Monk's lengthy 'Appendix' (pp. [49]-181, which 'is intended to convey valuable information illustrative of the Lectures, drawn mainly from Dr. Livingstone's own sources'. This copy (although without identifying marks) was previously in the noted collection of the explorer and bibliophile Quentin Keynes, who travelled extensively in Africa throughout the second half of the twentieth century, and collected a remarkable library of books and manuscripts relating to the exploration of Africa.
  • $644
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The British Gazette

CHURCHILL, Winston S. (Editor and Contributor) First edition of the complete run of 8 issues of The British Gazette, edited by Winston Churchill to present the government's case during the 1926 General Strike, published from 5-13 May 1926. 8 issues. Broadsheet each folded twice, and housed in a custom quarter morocco solander box. Peripheral chipping and short closed tears (most notably to issue 1), a little browning as usual. A very good set. Although no features or articles are signed by Churchill, at least one article in each of the issues can confidently be ascribed to him. "During the evening of 2nd May, the day before the strike was due to start, several newspapers including the Daily Mail and Daily Express were either suppressed or censored by the machine-minders. Aware of the dangers of a muzzled Press, Stanley Baldwin, then prime minister, summoned Churchill to organize an emergency newspaper. As would be expected, he rose to the challenge with drive and imagination, laying down his guidelines in advance. 'The essential thing is that we should produce a really powerful readable broadsheet not merely to contain news but in order to relieve the minds of the people. I do not contemplate violent partisanship, but fair, strong encouragement to the great mass of loyal people. it should have a leading article, not violent partisan, but agreeable to the great majority of the people of our side: constitutional, the hope for peace, Parliament maintains authority in the country, injury to trade and reputation of the country'" (Woods, pp. 161). Churchill took over the Morning Post building. The unions pulled out their men, but Churchill called Lord Beaverbrook, who sent the night superintendent of the Daily Express to single-handedly set the type and produce the first issue. Though consisting of only one leaf printed on both sides, it sold 232,000 copies, and daily sales figures reached over 2 million by the final issue. "In spite of pious preliminary statements, Churchill ran The British Gazette not merely as a medium for Government announcements and propaganda, but also as an avowedly strike-breaking weapon, to such an extent that in the subsequent Parliamentary debate, he was bitterly attacked by Labour MPs. His retort is one of his best-known; 'I utterly decline to be impartial as between the Fire Brigade and the fire'" (ibid., p. 162)
  • $514
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Edward Benes. Essays and Reflections on the Occasion of his Sixtieth Birthday. Edited by Jan Opocensky

LOCKHART, Sir Robert Bruce [et al] First edition. Inscribed by Lockhart to Anthony Eden on the title-page: 'To Anthony Eden from R. H. Bruce Lockhart. March 10, 1945. You may care to read the contribution by me on page 80. It was written in one day in January, 1944 and in a (?) in which you figure. I hope that you will appreciate the restraint which I exercised! The book was to have appeared in May 1944, for Beneš sixtieth birthday, but has only just been published. Perhaps it had to be approved by Moscow!' 8vo, original cloth, spine lettered in black. Spine faded otherwise a very good copy. The sole edition of a compilation of personal reminiscences in tribute to president of Czechoslovakia Edvard Benes. Beneš was a Czech politician and statesman who served as the president of Czechoslovakia from 1935 to 1938, and again from 1939 to 1948. During the first six years of his second stint, he led the Czechoslovak government-in-exile during World War II. As president, Beneš faced two major crises, which both resulted in his resignation. His first resignation came after the Munich Agreement and subsequent German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1938, which brought his government into exile in the United Kingdom. The second came about with the 1948 Communist coup, which created a Communist regime in Czechoslovakia. Before his time as president, Beneš was also the first foreign affairs minister (1918–1935) and the fourth prime minister (1921–1922) of Czechoslovakia. The de facto leader of the Czech National Social Party, he was known as a skilled diplomat. Sir Robert Hamilton Bruce Lockhart (1887-1970), diplomatist and writer, sometime Secret Intelligent Service agent to Russia; notable for his involvement in a failed attempt to assassinate Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin in 1918. Other contributors include Sir Ernest Barker, The Viscount Cecil, Robert J Kerner, The Earl of Perth, Matthew Spinka, Wickham Steed and A.J.P. Taylor. Anthony Eden was British foreign secretary (1935-38, 1940-45, and 1951-55)and Prime Minister (1955-1957). Following active service in the First World War, Eden read Oriental Languages at Oxford. He was elected to the House of Commons in 1923. In 1935 he was appointed foreign secretary, a position he resigned in 1938 to protest Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's appeasement of Nazi Germany. When Churchill became Prime Minister in 1940, he was named secretary of state for war, and later during the Second World War once more served as foreign secretary. Eden succeeded Churchill as Prime Minister in 1955. In 1956, his failure to respond effectively during the Suez Crisis, and the subsequent loss of party and public support, ultimately lead to his resignation from office in 1957. He was knighted in 1954 and created Earl of Avon in 1961. A pleasing association copy.
  • $647
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Gandhi and the Viceroy. Extracts from the letters which led up to Gandhi’s twenty-one day’s fast in February 1943.

GANDHI, Mahatma [and] LINLITHGOW, Victor Alexander John Hope Marquess of 1887-1952. First edition. A selection of extracts from the correspondence between Gandhi and the Viceroy of India between August 1942 and February 1943 8vo., pp. 12 original printed wrappers stapled as issued. A very good copy of an uncommon pamphlet. After the British failed to secure Indian support for the British war effort with the Cripps Mission, Gandhi made a call to "Do or Die" in his Quit India speech delivered in Bombay on 8 August 1942 at the Gowalia Tank Maidan. Viceroy Linlithgow remarked the movement to be "by far the most serious rebellion since 1857. Gandhi followed up his speech with a letter to the Viceroy on 14th August 1942. That letter is reproduced in full in this pamphlet. In the aftermath of the speech Gandhi was arrested for 6 months. In February 1943 Gandhi went on a 21 day fast in protest at his imprisonment, maintaining his resolve to continuous resistance. The fast proved unsuccesful and the British only eventually released Gandhi on account of his health in 1944. Victor Alexander John Hope, 2nd Marquess of Linlithgow was a British Unionist politician, agriculturalist, and colonial administrator. He served as Governor-General and Viceroy of India from 1936 to 1943. The publisher of the pamphlet, Peace News, had its origins in a pacifist study group convened by Humphrey Moore in Wood Green, London in 1936. The paper soon came to the attention of Dick Sheppard, the founder of the Peace Pledge Union (PPU), and within a few months Peace News became the official organ of the PPU. Copies listed at British Library. Society of Friends, Bradford University, University of Sussex, Pennsylvania State University and the Netherlands International Institute of Social History.
  • $644
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Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life among the Lowly. Introduction by Raymond Weaver.

STOWE, Harriet Beecher One of 1500 copies illustrated with 16 lithographs by Miguel Covarrubias, signed by the artist on the colophon page. Folio, original half morocco over marbled paper covered boards, lettered in gilt on spine, a near fine copy in original slipcase. Miguel Covarrubias was a Mexican artist and ethnologist and the co-discoverer of the Olmec civilization. Miguel's artwork and celebrity caricatures were featured in The New Yorker and Vanity Fair magazines. The linear nature of his drawing style was highly influential to other caricaturists such as Al Hirschfeld. Miguel's first book of caricatures The Prince of Wales and Other Famous Americans was a hit, though not all his subjects were thrilled that his sharp, pointed wit was aimed at them. He fell in love with the Harlem jazz scene, which he frequented with his wife Rosa and friends including Eugene O'Neill and Nickolas Muray. He counted many notables among his friends including Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes and W.C. Handy for whom he also illustrated books. Miguel's caricatures of the jazz clubs were the first of their kind printed in Vanity Fair. He managed to capture the spirit of the Harlem Renaissance in much of his work as well as in his book, Negro Drawings. He did not consider these caricatures, but serious drawings of people, music and a culture he loved. Covarrubias also did illustrations for George Macy, the publisher of The Limited Editions Club, including, as here, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and also Green Mansions, Herman Melville's Typee, and Pearl Buck's All Men Are Brothers.
  • $845
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The Zambesi Doctors. David Livingstone’s Letters to John Kirk. 1858:72. Edited, with an Introduction, by R. Foskett

LIVINGSTONE, Dr David First edition of David Livingstone's letters to the Scottish colonial administrator, explorer, and botanist Sir John Kirk (1832-1922), edited by the husband of Kirk's granddaughter, Daphne Foskett. 8vo., original cloth with dust wrapper. A near fine copy. In his introduction Foskett writes that the 'series of letters written by Dr David Livingstone to Dr (later Sir) John Kirk, and now published in this volume, began in 1858 when the two men were first brought together over the preparations for the British Government Expedition to the Zambesi, which Livingstone had been invited to lead. The correspondence concluded in 1872, one year before the explorer's death at Chitambo's village, Ilala, at a time when he was completely cut off from the civilised world and Kirk was British Consul and Political Agent at Zanzibar. The letters fall into four distinct groups but they are bound together by a connecting thread, a common interest in African exploration with a view to suppressing the slave trade which had its centre and markets at Zanzibar'. Only 14 of the series of 64 letters collected here had previously been published, and they are supplemented by three related letters by David Livingstone and his daughter Agnes Livingstone. The volume concludes with notes on the letters, a list of the letters, and an index. Reviewing the work, Ronald Miller judged that these 'letters are a valuable addition to our knowledge of Livingstone, for his intimacy with Kirk leads him to write more freely than in the published journals' (The Scottish Historical Review, vol. 44 (1965), p. 183). This copy (although without identifying marks) was previously in the noted collection of the explorer and bibliophile Quentin Keynes, who travelled extensively in Africa throughout the second half of the twentieth century, and collected a remarkable library of books and manuscripts relating to the exploration of Africa.
  • $65
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Pictures of Travel in the South of France. Illustrated with fifty engravings in wood.

DUMAS, Alexander 10 thousand of this illustrated translation of Dumas' Nouvelles impressions de voyage. Le Midi de la France. 8vo., handsomely bound in full dark green pebble grain morocco, boards with double gilt panel enclosing a rich gilt border, spine fully gilt, all edges gilt. Spine slightly sunned, a little spotting to edges under the gilt, otherwise a very good attractively bound copy. Although not as well-known as his adventure novels or historical fiction, Dumas' travel writings were the most successful of his non-fiction works. Dumas' itinerary took him from Paris to the palace at Fontainebleau (which inspired an anecdote of the abdication of Napoleon), thence to Cosne (a story about man who murders his family), then to Bourbon-Archembault, and then to Lyon. Dumas' visit to Lyon is the occasion for an extended account of the execution of Cinq-Mars by the order of Louis XIII. From Lyon, Dumas continued south to Vienna, Valence, Orange, and then to Avignon. At Avignon, Dumas recounts the assassination of his god-father, Maréchal Brune, in 1815. Dumas continues to Aigues-Mortes, Arles, and then to Marseilles. At Marseilles, Dumas describes the capture of the city by the forces of Henri IV in 1595. Dumas concludes the book with a short story, La Maison Phenicienne, (which he attributes to a manuscript found in an old chest, but slyly suggests was actually written by Méry), a pocket-size historical romance of the 1595 fall of Marseilles.
  • $384
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A collection of 7 Almanacks for 1806

[ALMANACK] The Gentleman's Diary, or the Mathematical Repository; An Almanack For the Year of our Lord 1806: Being The Second after Bissextile or Leap Year. Containing many useful and entertaining Particulars, peculiarly adapted to the ingenious Gentlemen engaged in the delightful Study and Practice of the Mathematicks. The Sixty-sixth Almanack published of this Kind; and the Fifty-fourth of the New Style in England. BOUND WITH: The Ladies' Diary: Or Woman's Almanack, for the Year of our Lord 1806. Containing New Improvements in Arts and Sciences, and Many Entertaining Particulars designed for the Use and Diversion of the Fair Sex. The Hundred-&-third Almanack published of this Kind. London: Printed for the Company of Stationers, by J. Adlard.And sold by G. Greenhill., [1806]. with woodcut image of a lady on the title-page. BOUND WITH: Vox Stellarum: Or a Loyal Almanack For the Year of Human Redemption 1806. Being the Second after Leap Year. And the 46th of the Reign of his present Majesty. In which are contained All Things fitting for such a Work; as A Table of Terms and their Return. A remrkable Chronology; the Eclipses, And other Matters both profitable and curious. Observations on the Weather and Weather Glasses, Rain. And an Hieroglyphic adapted to the Time. By Francis Moore. London. Printed for Company of Stationers, And sold by George Greenhill. [1806]. BOUND WITH: Merlinus Liberatus. An Almanack For the Year of our Redemption, 1806, Being the Bissextile, or Leap-Year; And from the Creation of the World, according to the best History, 5753, And the 117th of our Deliverance by K. William From Popery and Arbitrary Govenment; But the 111th from the Horrid, Popish, Jacobite Plots. By John Partridge. London. Printed for the Company of Stationers By William Thorne.And Sold by George Greenfield.[1806]. BOUND WITH: Old Poor Robin, An Almanack, Composed of A Variety of Subjects, both Ancient and Modern; And, for the Reader's farther Entertainment, Part in Prose, Part in Verse; Part Narrative, Part Contemplative; Part Serious, Part Comick; for the Entertinment and Improved Mind, and adapted to the meanest Capacity. Being A new improved Edition of a very old Ephemeris, for the Year of our Lord 1806. Written by Poor Robin, Knight of the Burnt-Island, and Well-wisher to the Mathematics. London: Printed for the Company of Stationers, By G. Woodfall. And sold by George Greenhill. [1806]. BOUND WITH: Speculum Anni: Or, Season on the Seasons. For the Year of our Lord 1806. Wherein you will find all Things necessary for such a Work; Sun and Moon's Rising and Setting.and other Novelties. By Henry Season. The Author's Seventy-third Impression. London: Printed for the Company of Stationers, By G. Woodfall. And sold by George Greenhill. [1806]. BOUND WITH: Atlas ouranios, The Coelestial Atlas; Or, A New Ephemeris For the Year of our Lord 1806. Wherein are contained The Heliocentrick and Geocentrick Places of the Planets, The Eclipses of the Luminaries. And some other remarkable Phenomena that will happen this Year. To which are added several useful Tables. By Robert White. London: Printed for the Company of Stationers, By G. Woodfall. And sold by George Greenhill. [1806]. 12mo, 168 x 105 mms., each pp. 48. 7 almanacs in one volume, all printed in 1806 and all printed in red and black, and with tabs or finding-strips at the fore-margin for each almanac, attractively bound in full straight-grain red morocco, gilt border on covers, all edges gilt, gilt spine
  • $980