Fine Editions Ltd

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The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even. A Typographic Version by Richard Hamilton of Marcel Duchamp’s Green Box, Translated by George Heard Hamilton

DUCHAMP, Marcel (1887-1968); Richard Hamilton (interprets); George Heard Hamilton (translates) First Printing of this typographic analog of one of the "most complex as well as one of the most rewarding artistic experiences of modern times" (from the appendices). Demy 8vo (229 x 150mm): unpaginated (including one leaf folding and another printed on frosted glassine), with profusion of photographic plates, full-page drawings, diagrams, various typographic formats, annotations, vignettes, and musical notation, all relating to Marcel Duchamp's groundbreaking magnum opus, "The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even" (known familiarly as "The Large Glass"), a composition in oil paint, lead wire, and lead foil on two glass panels. Printed in red and black. Original light lime green paper-covered boards, spine and upper cover lettered in black-and white stippled type; original glassine dust jacket. Book and glassine dust wrapper in excellent, unmarked condition (small corner tear to jacket). Typographic interpretation of Duchamp's Green Box (`La Mariée mise à nu par ses célibataires même (Boîte verte), a collection of 94 documents explaining the development and function of "The Large Glass," assembled between 1915 and 1923. During the 1930s, Duchamp oversaw the first printed edition of the Green Box, with each of the 94 original notes meticulously reproduced in collotype in exact facsimile (including torn edges, blots, erasures and even the occasional illegibility) and issued loose in a green box, in an edition of 300 with twenty deluxe versions. By 1956, the British artist Richard Hamilton had worked through the notes to develop a diagram of the areas in the glass to which he believed the subject of each notes related. And in 1960, Hamilton and George Heard Hamilton, professor of art history at Yale, produced this English translation of the Green Box, using typography, layout, and graphic design to communicate the intent of the original documents in a new (bound) format, the Green Book. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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Children’s Literature] The Good Lion, Illustrated by Francesca Ivancich Scapinelli

HEMINGWAY, Ernest (1899-1961) First and only printing in separate format (one of 250 trade copies, this being no. 49) of this children's story written for the son of a friend. Royal 8vo (233 x 155mm): [32]pp, with nine full-color illustrations reproduced from original paintings by Francesca Ivancich Scapinelli. Printed on Mohawk Superfine Cover Smooth stock, hand-sewn and bound over finely woven grey cloth-covered boards; upper cover with paste-down panel illustrated with winged lion of St. Mark, spine with label titled in gold. Very Fine and unread. Grissom A.70.1.a. Hanneman C362. First published in the Italian magazine Epoca (May, 1950) and then, in English, in Holiday magazine (March, 1951), and finally in the Finca Vigia short-story collection (1987) and in Ernest Hemingway: The Collected Stories (1995). Scapinelli, whose sister, Adriana Ivancich, was one of Hemingway's romantic interests, challenged the author to write a story for her son, Gherardo. Two fables resulted, this and "The Faithful Bull." Arrigio Cipriani, son of the owner of Harry's Bar, in Venice, a favorite Hemingway haunt, contributed an appreciation. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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Children’s Literature] A Present for a Little Boy [Original Wrappers]

DARTON, William (1755-1819) Early printing, in original wrappers, of an uncommon Harvey and Darton juvenile book. 12mo (157 x 100mm): [48]pp, with title-page vignette and 21 half-page and 3 full-page wood engravings (two partially hand-colored). Original red card covers printed in black, upper cover with title within decorative border, lower cover with publisher's advertisement; string-bound, as issued. Covers worn and rubbed with some loss of legibility, V-shaped tear to upper cover expertly repaired, early ink gift inscription to upper cover verso. Contents generally clean, large tear to fourth from final leaf skillfully mended without loss. Osborne II, pp. 703-04. Welch (American Children's Books) 264. Dartons G226(8); Oppenheimer 2087 (1805 edition). National Book League 525 (1805 edition). Fanciful anecdotes, mainly about animals (including one about a pig taught to read and spell), originally published in 1798 with four illustrations. "William Darton's influence on the flourishing children's book trade of the early nineteenth century stretched across generations. Between 1795 and 1806, three sons were apprenticed to him. Although it is seldom possible to distinguish the work of individual apprentices in looking at Darton imprints of this early period, a viewer should think of a workshop in which the father and a number of apprentices worked together, including at different times William the younger, Thomas, and Samuel Darton; some publications may include work by any or all of them." (Children's books published by William Darton and his sons : a catalogue of an exhibition at the Lilly Library, Indiana University, April-June, 1992) N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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Four Quartets, comprising] East Coker; [together with] Burnt Norton; [together with] The Dry Salvages; [and] Little Gidding

ELIOT, T. S. (Thomas Stearns, 1888-1965) Four beautifully preserved (and unfaded) first and early impressions of the separate appearances in pamphlet form of Eliot's wartime masterpiece. 8vo (229 x 160mm): each 16pp. East Coker: yellow wrappers printed in black over mauve card covers, stapled. Fine, barring minute numeral "2" to top corner of front wrapper, neat name and date to front flap. Burnt Norton: aquamarine wrappers printed in black over white card covers, stapled. Fine (trace of soiling to front cover edges). The Dry Salvages: pale blue card covers printed in black, stapled. About Fine (numeral "3" to top corner of front cover, neat name and date to inside front cover). Little Gidding: mauve card covers printed in black, sewn (Gallup's first binding). Fine (trace of fading to two edges). Sixth Impression (February 1942) of first Faber edition of first title (East Coker first appeared in two separate printings associated with its publication in The New English Weekly); first separate edition of the second title (first published in Collected Poems, 1936); third impression, first edition, of third title; first impression, first edition, of fourth title. Gallup A36c, A37, A39, A42. Modern Movement 92 ("the most important poem since Yeats' The Tower, and, as many think, of the century"). East Coker is the village in Somerset from which Eliot's ancestors departed for the New World, in 1669. Burnt Norton refers to the Gloucestershire manor house erected on the foundation of a house that burned to the ground in the 17th-century. The Dry Salvages is a group of rocks off Cape Ann, and so harks to the poet's New England roots. Little Gidding was the manor in Huntingdonshire where Nicholas Ferrar founded an Anglican religious community in the mid-17th century. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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A Farewell to Arms

HEMINGWAY, Ernest (1899-1961) First Impression, second state ("serious" spelled correctly, p. 66), of Hemingway's "first full-length novel and probably his best." (Modern Movement) Crown 8vo (190 x 122mm): 350pp. Publisher's calico-grain magenta cloth, spine stamped in gold, bottom edge untrimmed; white dust jacket printed in blue, green, and black, beautifully illustrated by Lee Elliott and priced 7s/6d (Grissom's Jacket B, with Arnold Bennett blurb on front flap). Better than Near Fine (spine lightened a degree, edges dust-soiled), tightly bound and clean throughout (apparently unread); about Fine jacket, vivid and bright (imperceptible professional restoration to spine tip nicks, short closed tear to front panel). Uncommon in this condition. Hanneman 35A. Grissom A.8.2.a. Modern Movement 60. With A Farewell to Arms, Hemingway "consolidated the reputation he had made with The Sun Also Rises and two major collections of short stories. Set on the Italian front during World War I and partially based on Hemingway's wartime experience with the Red Cross in that theatre of the war, A Farewell to Arms is both a war story and a love story, the work that the author once referred to as his Romeo and Juliet." (Literary Encyclopedia) The subject of numerous film and television adaptations, most notably the 1932 Academy Award-winning Frank Borzage film starring Gary Cooper, Helen Hayes, and Adolphe Menjou, and the 1957 Oscar-nominated Charles Vidor film starring Rock Hudson and Jennifer Jones. Yet another example of the value to be found in the graphically superior designs of many British editions of American authors's works. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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The Gold-Headed Cane [Biographical sketches of John Radcliffe, Richard Mead, Antony Askew, David Pitcairn, and Matthew Baillie]

MACMICHAEL, William, 1784-1839] An untrimmed, wide-margined copy of these adventures of a famous cane. Crown 8vo (200 x 120mm): [8],179,[1]pp, with title-page vignette and numerous woodcuts (mostly of portraits busts and coats of arms) in text. Recently bound in light gray paper-covered boards, with off-white paper title label printed in black to spine. Very occasional light foxing, few finger-soiled page margins, else Near Fine or better, tightly bound copy. Allibone, v. II, p. 1192. Heirs of Hippocrates 1397. Garrison-Morton 6709. Osler 6717. Waller 16091. Cushing M48. Recounts the "lives" of a gold-headed cane, successively in possession of the Georgian physicians John Radcliffe, Richard Mead, Anthony Askew, David Pitcairn, and Matthew Baillie, and then returned to a glass case in the library of London's Royal College of Physicians. "A gold-headed cane was once a conspicuous part of the physician's adornment, and the particular gold-headed cane of this work was owned by Dr. John Radcliffe (1650-1714), an irascible London physician, who passed it on to a younger contemporary. The custom of passing on the cane continued through a series of five physicians, ending with Matthew Baillie, whose widow presented it to the Royal College of Physicians in 1823. The originally anonymous book is written as an 'autobiography' of the cane and, in a series of charming essays, tells the story-actually biographies-of its several owners. Along the way there is much information concerning the state of medicine and its practice in England during the eighteenth century." (Heirs of Hippocrates) N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. Recounts the , successively in possession of the Georgian physicians John Radcliffe, Richard Mead, Anthony Askew, David Pitcairn, and Matthew Baillie, and then returned to a glass case in the library of London's Royal College of Physicians. "A gold-headed cane was once a conspicuous part of the physician's adornment, and the particular gold-headed cane of this work was owned by Dr. John Radcliffe (1650-1714), an irascible London physician, who passed it on to a younger contemporary. The custom of passing on the cane continued through a series of five physicians, ending with Matthew Baillie, whose widow presented it to the Royal College of Physicians in 1823. The originally anonymous book is written as an 'autobiography' of the cane and, in a series of charming essays, tells the story?actually biographies?of its several owners. Along the way there is much information concerning the state of medicine and its practice in England during the eighteenth century." (Heirs of Hippocrates) N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed.
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The Professor : A Tale [Original Cloth]

Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), writing as:] BELL, Currer Single-volume issue of Charlotte Bronte's first book, overshadowed by the later successes of Jane Eyre, Shirley, and Villette, and only published posthumously, in 1857. Thick crown 8vo (196 x 118mm): viii,294, 2,[4],258,[2],8,24 [publisher's catalogue, date April, 1859.]pp. Publisher's secondary binding of dark green morocco-grained (diagonally run) cloth, covers decorated and ruled in blind, spine lettered and decorated in gilt, pale yellow end papers (also bound in cloth with grain running horizontally and off-white end papers). Diamond-shaped Westleys & Co. bookseller ticket ["Bound by / Westleys / & Co. / London"] to rear paste-down, in the design used from 1860-c.1865. Top edge dust-soiled, ownership name to fly leaf partially erased, else a superb example, tightly bound in original cloth and exceptionally clean throughout. Smith 7. After the devastating commercial failure of the Brontës's Poems (only two copies sold), Charlotte began circulating the manuscript of her slim first novel, The Professor, a roman-o-clef based on her experiences in Brussels, where she studied as a language student, in 1842, at Constantin Héger's school for girls. "In the novel William Crimsworth, an Englishman, becomes a teacher in Brussels and falls in love with a fellow teacher. Crimsworth is based on Héger, to whom Brontë was devoted. In her novel Villette (1853), she used plot material from The Professor and expanded the character of Crimsworth into that of Paul Emanuel." (Britannica) Smith notes that 719 copies of the unsold two-volume first edition sheets were bound into a single volume. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
The Bridge

The Bridge

First Printing (second edition overall, following the Holland paper issue published in Paris) of this "landmark achievement in the genre of the modern long poem." (Literary Encyclopedia) Squarish demy 8vo (219 x 154mm): [2],82pp, with frontispiece photograph of Brooklyn Bridge by Walker Evans. Publisher's fine bead dark blue cloth, upper cover and spine lettered in gilt, fore- and bottom edges rough-trimmed, title page in red and black. A fine copy, wanting the dust jacket. Modern Movement 64 ("masterpiece of neo-romanticism"). Schwartz & Schweik A3.1. First published in limited format, in Paris, by Harry Crosby's Black Sun Press, in February, 1930, some six weeks before this Liveright issue with Crane's many corrections and alterations (especially with respect to "Cape Hatteras"), which was intended as the trade edition. Crosby's suicide in December 1929, while publication was still being arranged, was a sad portent of Crane's own tragic end two years later, when he leapt into the Gulf of Mexico from a ship bringing him back from Cuba to the United States. Walker Evans, whose photographs illustrate both editions, was then unknown. Crane began this attempt to investigate "the myth of America" with Ave Maria, "set aboard Columbus's ship as he returns to Spain after discovering America. Later sections dealt with aspects of American history, myth, and folklore, moving into the modern age with its attendant technological and scientific advances. . . . while celebrating the symbols of man's attempt to spiritually transcend the bounds of mortal existence, Crane also strives to deal with the limitations of progress." (Literary Encyclopedia) N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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A dictionary of the English language: in which the words are deduced from their originals, and illustrated in their different significations by examples from the best writers. To which are prefixed, a history of the language, and an English grammar By Samuel Johnson, LL.D. In two volumes

JOHNSON, Samuel (1709-1784) First London Quarto Edition (preceded by Dublin quarto of 1775; sixth edition overall), first edition published after Johnson's death with his final corrections, and first edition with Johnson's portrait (dated August 21st, 1786, executed while printing was in progress), the "most amazing, enduring and endearing one-man feat in the field of lexicography" (PMM). Printed from Johnson's own corrected copy of the fourth folio edition, of 1773. Collated and complete in two thick demy quarto volumes (271 x 207 mm). Unpaginated, comprising half title (in vol. I only, as called for), separate title pages for each volume, preface, history, grammar, advertisement, dictionary (printed in three columns), with frontispiece portrait of Johnson (dated August 21st, 1786) engraved by Thomas Cook after a portrait by Joshua Reynolds in vol. I. A crisp, clean example, finely bound in recent Cambridge-style paneled calf (end papers renewed), free of foxing (aside from end sheets). Provenance: William and Hannah Watson of Parliament Street (list and dates of birth of their children in contemporary hand to final front blank of vol. I). Fleeman 55.4D/8. Courtney, pp. 39-68 (for concise commentary and discussion of various eighteenth- and nineteenth-century editions, foreign and domestic). Alston, V 186. PMM 201. Sawyer & Darton, pp. 346-49. Lowndes 1217. Grolier (Johnson) 20 (for first edition) and 87 (for Cook's portrait engraving). Grolier (English 100) 50 (for first edition). In 1746, "there arrived the most significant career opportunity of Johnson's entire life. A group of booksellers headed by Robert Dodsley perceived the need for a new English dictionary to replace the semi-standard Dictionarium Britannicum of Nathan Bailey (1730). They found a receptive ear in Johnson, who had pondered for many years on the absence of an English equivalent to the great continental glossaries sponsored by public bodies and academies. . . . . Ultimately the work appeared in two folio volumes, on 15 April 1755, garnished with preliminary matter, including a preface of extraordinary dignity and eloquence. The Dictionary left an immense mark on its age. It soon became recognized as a work of classical standing, and in spite of some minor blemishes it has never lost its historical importance as the first great endeavour of its kind." (ODNB) According to Noah Webster, "Johnson's writings had, in philology, the effect which Newton's discoveries had in mathematics." (PMM) N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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Parallax

CUNARD, Nancy (1896-1965) First Impression of this "forgotten modernist masterpiece," out of print for more than 90 years. (Dispatches from the Secret Library) Demy 8vo (223 x 133mm): 24pp. White paper-covered boards titled in black and decorated with drawings by Eugene McCown; fore-edge untrimmed. One of 420 copies hand printed by the Woolfs (Virginia set the type and selected the title [see The Diary of Virginia Woolf, v. II, p. 320]). A note on the front paste down says this was Raymond Mortimer's copy (the critic and literary editor, Charles Raymond Bell Mortimer, 1895-1980). A handsome example (covers toned, as usual; several small stains to page margins only, else tightly bound and clean throughout). Woolmer 57. F. R. Leavis, New Bearings in English Poetry (1932, dismissed Cunard's poem as "simple imitation" of Eliot's The Waste Land and Laura Riding and Robert Graves, in A Survey of Modernist Poetry (1927), called it imitation as well. But Parallax was without its admirers. Samuel Beckett, whose early work Cunard published, was a fan, and William Carlos Williams thought Cunard "one of the major phenomena of history." Janet Flanner had even higher praise, calling Parallax "superior" to The Waste Land. Oliver Tearle, in The Great War, The Waste Land and the Modernist Long Poem, from which this information is drawn, notes that while Parallax "was clearly influenced by Eliot's poetry, Cunard is doing something far more interesting: she is offering a critique of Eliot's bleak vision of postwar life but in the form of a poem that adopts a similar length and style to Eliot's. . . . Since Nancy Cunard's poem encourages us to recalibrate our understanding of modernist poetry, it is itself parallactic." N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
Poems

Poems

First and only Impression, limited to 350 copies, hand printed by Leonard and Virginia Woolf. Crown 8vo (190 x 130mm): 29,[3]pp. String-bound stiff buff wrappers, lettered and with clover design in red on front cover. A superb copy, partly unopened, fresh, bright, and virtually pristine. Woolmer 12. Privately published, as Ad Familiares, in 1917, with Bell adding four poems to this issue, including one dedicated to Russian ballerina Lydia Lopokova, wife of John Maynard Keynes. Bell was Virginia Woolf's brother-in-law, married to her elder sister, Vanessa. According to historian Stanley Rosenbaum, He "may, indeed, be the least liked member of Bloomsbury. . . . Bell has been found wanting by biographers and critics of the Group-as a husband, a father, and especially a brother-in-law. It is undeniable that he was a wealthy snob, hedonist, and womanizer, a racist and an anti-Semite (but not a homophobe), who changed from a liberal socialist and pacifist into a reactionary appeaser. Bell's reputation has led to his being underestimated in the history of Bloomsbury." (Georgian Bloomsbury, v. III: The Early Literary History of the Bloomsbury Group, 1910-1914). N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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Specimen Days & Collect

WHITMAN, Walt (1819-1892) Second Printing (per BAL, not, as often described, second issue), with sepia photograph printed (not pasted on stiff coated paper, as in first printing) of Whitman and a butterfly tipped in facing p. 122. (The first printing only appeared under the Rees Welsh imprint; later printings were published by McKay, who bought out Rees Welsh in November, 1882). Small 8vo: vi,7-374pp, with final advertisement leaf. Original mustard-yellow S cloth, spine and front cover lettered, ruled, and decorated in gilt, mottled blue leaf-pattern endpapers, all edges trimmed. BAL Binding C. An exceptionally fresh copy, pages just barely toned, else clean and bright throughout. BAL 21422 and 21627. Myerson A11.1.b2. Wells, pp. 27-28. Collection of assorted prose, including youthful reminiscences, early tales, travel diaries, nature notes, and observations made during the Civil War, together with a few poems, the essay the 'Death of Abraham Lincoln,' and the prose stream from Two Rivulets. The book was another Whitman compendium, bringing together between one set of covers a diverse group of writings. "He thought of it as a prose volume to match his Leaves of Grass, and Rees Welsh published it in a matching binding so that buyers could own an attractive set of Whitman's work." (Folsom, Whitman Making Books/Books Making Whitman) The photograph appears opposite a page where Whitman talks of the "white butterflies" that he sees on one of his trips to Timber Creek in New Jersey: "You can even tame such insects," he writes; "I have one big and handsome moth down here, knows and comes to me, likes me to hold him up on my extended hand." N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
Dust Jacket Art] The Judson Murder Case

Dust Jacket Art] The Judson Murder Case

First Crime Circle Edition of this obscure (and scarce) detective novel by an obscure crime writer (neither title nor author mentioned in Barzun's exhaustive Catalogue of Crime), but with fabulous dust jacket art by the incomparable Bip Pares. Crown 8vo (183 x 119mm): 254,[2]pp. Publisher's orange diamond-patterned cloth, spine lettered in black; dust jacket priced 7s/6d. An exceptional copy, tightly bound and clean throughout (end sheets and preliminaries toned), in the superb jacket, still vibrant, marred only by a few trivial nicks. First published in New York, in 1933, by E. J. Clode. The New York Times Book Review critic said the story "provides good light entertainment and a sufficiently baffling puzzle." Ethel "Bip" Pares (1904-1977) is "a name seen so often on some of the most eye-catching designs of the nineteen-thirties and forties. . . . She has long been admired and collected - she is said to have designed some 600 dust-jackets in all . . . " (blog post by Laurence Worms, Ash Rare Books) Our own favorite is Bip's design for Olaf Stapledon's Star Maker. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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The Uncollected Stories of John Cheever 1930-1981 [Advance Reading Copy]; [together with] The Uncollected Stories of John Cheever 1930-1981 [Advance Excerpt] [and together with] Uncollecting Cheever: The Family of John Cheever vs. Academy Chicago Publishers

CHEEVER, John (1912-1982); Anita Miller (1926-2018); A trio of publications (Advance Reading Copy, Advance Excerpt, and First Printing), all unread and virtually pristine, documenting four years of litigation in state and federal courts that ended in a stop-publish order barring a volume of uncollected short stories by John Cheever. Demy 8vo (228 x 151; 228 x 151; 227 x 140mm): xx,534; iv,5-23,[1]; xii,363,[1]pp. The uncorrected proof was suppressed prior to publication due to a legal dispute with Cheever's estate. Original sky-blue blue wrappers printed in black. The excerpt was permitted publication in lieu of the first trade edition. Stiff blue card printed in orange on upper cover. Miller's account, Uncollecting Cheever, appeared in 1998. This collection of 68 stories (legally barred from publication or even circulated to reviewers in the form of this scarce advance ready copy) begins with Cheever`s first published story, ''Expelled,'' from a 1930 issue of the New Republic, and ends with his last, ''The Island,'' from a 1981 New Yorker, although most are from the early years (Cheever had chosen not to publish these early stories in collected form during his lifetime because he did not believe they measured up to his later works). The book's editor, Franklin Dennis, maintained that the Uncollected Stories not only offers examples of Cheever`s finest work, including two O. Henry prize-winners, but that it has significant historic value, showing ''his stunning evolution from proletarian writer to magical realist.'' A neighbor of the Cheevers, Dennis tracked down obscure and missing stories, then, with the family's approval, took the project to Academy Chicago, one of several publishers for which he worked as a freelance publicity agent. At that point, the Cheevers started legal proceedings to break their contract and take the book to a large New York publisher. Legally prohibited from sending out proof copies of the book to reviewers, Academy Chicago was allowed to distribute a booklet (the Advance Excerpt also on offer here, "not for sale") with part of Cheever biographer Scott Donaldson`s introduction and three of the stories. Donaldson says that half a dozen of the stories can be included with Cheever's best work "and that's enough to justify the book right there. Maybe another 15 or 20 are canonical Cheever." After a long and expensive legal battle, Academy Chicago lost the right to publish all the works but thirteen of the stories, which appeared in 1994, in a volume entitled Fall River and Other Uncollected Stories. The entire saga (albeit from the publisher's point of view) is recounted in Uncollecting Cheever: The Family of John Cheever vs. Academy Chicago Publishers. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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Children’s Literature] The Little Train

GREENE, Graham, 1904-1991]; Dorothy Craigie (illustrates), 1901-1971 First Impression, second issue, with reviews on front flap (the first issue appeared in plain boards with plain buff dust jacket) of Greene's first children's book. Both issues are scarce and sought-after, and this is the more attractive. Oblong royal 8vo (176 x 243mm): [3],42,[3]pp, illustrated by Craigie on every page in color. Original yellow cloth, spine and upper cover delightfully decorated with tiny steam locomotives in red, black, and green, lower cover with vignette of black lantern with red light, top edge stained yellow, map end papers, light blue dust jacket, priced 7/6, with wispy white mottling, lettered in black and red decorative train pattern in manner of upper cover. Remarkably fine and fresh, internally clean and bright, with only mild rubbing to boards and tiny nick to bottom edge of jacket. Miller 23a. Brennan 18. Wobbe A19a. Greene's name appears on neither book nor dust jacket (he first acknowledged authorship on the title page of The Little Fire Engine, published in 1950). Dorothy Craigie, the illustrator, was Greene's girlfriend at the time and is credited with authorship as well. Greene presumably wanted the book published as a result of her efforts, and not only because he had written the text. He may also have feared jeopardizing his reputation as a serious novelist. This is the first of a series of four transport books for children produced by their partnership. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? [Inscribed]

McCOY, Horace (1897-1955) Second Cheap Edition of McCoy's first book-beautifully inscribed-about the tragic finale of a marathon dance during the Depression. Crown 8vo (184 x 121mm): [6],186,[6]pp. Publisher's red cloth, lettered and ruled in black. Inscribed on fly leaf, apparently to a friend: "To Shep- / in friendship- / Horace / Aug, 1940" An excellent example, about Fine (dust-soiled top edge, nicks to spine ends), tightly bound and clean throughout. Hanna 2287 (for first trade edition). First published in 1935, in New York, and brilliantly filmed, in 1969, by Sydney Pollack, with Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, Bruce Dern, and Gig Young. "Shortly after arriving in Hollywood [in 1931], McCoy began work on a story about a marathon dance. It began as a short story, became a screen treatment, and evolved into a novel. Rejected by the studios, it was published as They Shoot Horses, Don' t They? It was not a commercial success, reportedly selling three thousand copies. And it provoked a wide and varied response among contemporary reviewers in America. . . . [but] enjoyed much greater success in Europe, especially France. It was translated in the forties and by 1947 McCoy was regarded there as among the great writers of American fiction." (Literary Encyclopedia) N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable polypropylene sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Orpheus in Mayfair and Other Stories and Sketches [Presentation Copy to Constance Lytton]

Orpheus in Mayfair and Other Stories and Sketches [Presentation Copy to Constance Lytton]

First Impression (published August 1909 on verso of title page). 8vo (189 x 121mm): [2],x,306,[2]pp. Publisher's forest green cloth, upper cover and spine lettered in gilt, bottom edge untrimmed. Inscribed by Baring on fly leaf, "C. L. from M. B., 1910." "C. L." is identified in a pencil note on the front paste down as Constance Lytton (Lady Constance Georgina Bulwer-Lytton [1869-1923], the influential British suffragette and campaigner for prison reform, votes for women, and birth control. An excellent copy with dust-soiled top edge, but square and tightly bound, gilt undiminished, internally fresh. Clute & Grant, p. 85. Sullivan, p. 22. An "extremely difficult to find" collection of 25 weird, supernatural, and fantastic stories, most previously published in London's Morning Post, including the "outstanding" story" "Venus," featuring astral projection to Earth's sister planet, where enormous mushrooms are fed upon by giant caterpillars; "The Shadow of a Midnight," about a premonitory vision of murder, and the title tale, a classical myth translated to turn-of-the-century Mayfair. (Sullivan) Baring descended from a long line of financiers (his farther was first Baron Revelstoke, director of the Bank of England and senior partner of Baring Bros.). After Eton and Cambridge, Maurice joined the diplomatic service then worked as a journalist and reported the Russo-Japanese War from Manchuria. Later he was a correspondent in Russia and is credited with introducing Chekov's work to the West. He was widely connected socially, including to some of the Cambridge Apostles, to The Coterie, and to the literary group around G. K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc. Many of his poems, stories, and novels, according to the ODNB, "have come to be regarded as minor masterpieces in character study and social depiction," still appreciated "for the purity and simplicity of their style, and for the sensitivity and erudition which they display." N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
The Garden [Signed]

The Garden [Signed]

First Impression of the squeal of sorts to the author's The Land, winner of the Hawthornden Prize, with decorations by Broom Lynne. Demy 8vo (214 x 137mm): 135; [1]pp. Publisher's russet cloth, titles in silver to spine, top edge red, decorative end papers; illustrated dust jacket priced 8/6. Signed by Sackville-West to half-title. About Fine, jacket just a shade sunned to spine panel, lightly scuffed to top of front fold. Also issued as a signed limited edition of 750 copies, but scarce as a signed trade edition, as here. Cross & Ravenscroft-Hulme A.44a. Like The Land, The Garden is divided into the four seasons. It is more personal and less sweeping than the earlier poem, and tries to sum up Sackville-West's horticultural aesthetic as displayed in the garden at Sissinghurst, with its linked sections "distinguished by predominant colour themes (such as the influential white garden), or by concentration on the flowers of a certain season, . . . [that] simultaneously evoke characteristic English and Kentish gardens while also assimilating more exotic Mediterranean touches." (ODNB) N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).
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J R [Signed]

GADDIS, William (1992-1998) A superlative signed First Edition (so stated) of this "epic work," the "greatest satirical novel in American literature." (Literary Encyclopedia) Royal 8vo (236 x 152mm): [6],726,[4]pp. Publisher's black cloth, titled in gilt on spine and in blind on upper board, top edge stained pink, untrimmed fore-edge; illustrated dust jacket priced $15. Signed by Gaddis on half-title. Fine (and unread), very tightly bound and fresh throughout; Fine jacket. Twenty years after publishing his first book, The Recognitions, one of Time magazine's 100 best novels, Gaddis produced this highly acclaimed work, winner of the National Book Award. The first line of the novel presents its theme: "-Money.?". J R tells the story, through conversations, letters, and telephone calls (indeed, the novel's 726 pages contain very little but dialogue), of eleven-year-old J. R. Vansant, who accumulates an enormous fortune from his school's public telephone booth. Gaddis draws on a huge range of social and economic thinkers from Marx, to Max Weber, George Simmel, and George Bernard Shaw, whose interpretation of Wagner's Ring as an allegory of the rise of capitalism is central to J R. N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, with dust jackets carefully preserved in archival, removable mylar sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. (Fine Editions Ltd is a member of the Independent Online Booksellers Association, and we subscribe to its codes of ethics.).