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AARDVARK BOOKS

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“U.S.S. OREGON” BATTLESHIP POSTCARD COLLECTION (74 Items)

A collection of 70 unique postcards, 2 postal envelopes, 1 stereocard, and one "Roll of Honor" card that all commemorate the impressive Battleship Oregon. 36/70 postcards are colorized; 19/70 postcards have handwriting on the back; 16/70 postcards have cancelled stamps on the back, with postmarks dating back to 1906. The The vast majority of the cards were printed in 1900s - 1940s, are in very good plus condition, with age-toning to several. One postal envelope and a couple postcards date from the 1980s. Includes four-page typed essay entitled "U.S.S. Oregon: The Bulldog of the Navy" written by Eric Becklund that details the long history of the battleship. From the opening of Becklund's essay: "The pride of the fleet, the Battleship Oregon was the heroine of the Spanish-American War and served as a training vessel and standard bearer during World War I. At the beginning of World War II our ship was honorably offered back to full service. "Instead, the U.S.S. OREGON was plundered for her metals. She was taken from her honored position as a maritime museum and given to the scrappers. They started with her thirty piece silver set, an appropriate payment, and she was left with a broken and dishonored hulk. "Commissioned in 1895, her finished cost was $6,230,000. She was normally crewed by 32 officers and 441 men. Her major defensive armor consisted of an 18-inch thick steel belt. This was backed by six inches of wood, two and three quarters inch steel plates and a 10-foot belt of bunkered coal. "The U.S.S. OREGON's offensive armament made it the most heavily armed and armored battleship in the world. The armament included four thirteen-inch guns, firing shells of 1,100 pounds each, eight eight-inch guns, back of and flanking the thirteen inch pieces, four six-inch guns, twenty four rapid-fire guns of smaller caliber, and six torpedo tubes. "It is interesting to compare this ship with her foreign contemporaries, the Renown and the Jaureguiberry classes of England and France, respectively. Oregon weighed 10,288 tons. The Renown was 12,350 tons and the Jaureguiberry 11,824, both larger than Oregon. On the other hand, Oregon's armor was inches thicker than either of the foreign battleships. Total muzzle energy of Oregon's broadside was 169,152 foot-tons, as compared to 72,237 for Renown and 81,346 for Jaureguiberry. Thus, on a slightly lesser tonnage, American designers had produced a ship of more twice the firepower of foreign battleships at the same date. "The U.S.S. OREGON's greatest contributions occured during the 1898 Spanish-American War." The story goes on to document its naval history, decommission, and modern tribute."
  • $308
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BLACK & WHITE (SIGNED WITH ORIGINAL DRAWING); Simplified Drawing

Brown, Paul Wide octavo, 8.7 in. x 11.2 in. Unpaginated. Inscribed, signed, and dated (1941), and with an original drawing of a horse's head, by the author on the second free front endpaper. First edition with "A" to copyright page. Richly illustrated in black and white with horse and other drawings by the author. Pictorial paper covers and spine. Rubbing to top/bottom of spine with shelfwear to edges. Bottom front corner exposed. Illustrated endpapers. Light age-toning to pages. Maintains the two pages of basic cut-out figures on cardpaper at rear endpapers. Rubbing to dustjacket edges, with several closed tears along edges. Chips to top/bottom of dustjacket spine and rear top edge. Protected in mylar. Paul Brown's inscripption reads: "To Claudius' Family. With lots of luck." Paul Brown's "How-To" book on drawing horses. As he writes on the dustjacket: "This book will prove of the greatest value to commercial artists, teachers of art, students, and to every amateur who has the desire to draw." Paul Brown (1893-1958) was an American author and illustrator, best known for his lovely illustrations of many equine books stories, but he did also write and illustrate some pony stories of his own. He was born in Minnesota and began sketching from an early age. He was one of America's premier illustrators of books about horses and equine sports. He did not ride or own a horse but he spent innumerable hours studying them and was a big fan of racing, polo and horseshows. As well as the many non-fiction equestrian books he illustrated, there were also lots of children's stories. In the 1930s he began to write his own pony stories illustrated with his own work. These were mainly books for younger readers/picture books. He also provided illustrations for numerous magazines and worked as a commercial artist for Brooks Brothers. (from Pony Mad Booklovers).
  • $385
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CLARK GABLE’S CLAIM SUBMITTED TO SUPERIOR COURT LOS ANGELES, AGAINST THE ESTATE OF CAROLE LOMBARD, SIGNED BY CLARK GABLE

Gable, Clark Single sheet (9 ½ in. x 14 in) typewritten form, probably filled out by the attorney for the estate (W.I. Gilbert, Jr. of Los Angeles), and signed by Gable. An official creditor's claim form submitted by Executor Clark Gable to the Superior Court of the State of California in and for the County of Los Angeles, petitioning the estate of Carole Lombard (she had died in a tragic place crash one month previously, on January 16, 1942), for "Poultry and Feed" purchased from Ed. Kehl Milling Co. of Van Nuys. Original receipt from feed store attached. Soon after they first encountered one another, Clark Gable asked Carole Lombard to dance. Later, Gable drove Lombard to his hotel and allegedly propositioned her. Lombard responded: "Who do you think you are, Clark Gable?" Later, Gable drove Lombard back to the ball, and then home. At one point, sexually rejected, Gable claimed that he had somewhere else to be, and "Lombard acidly asked if he had a date with Loretta Young (with whom he had recently fathered a secret child) and Gable left in a huff. The next morning, a hungover Gable awoke to strange cooing sounds". [Lombard] decided she'd been too hard on him, so she called up a pet shop and had them send over a pair of doves as a peace offering. She then bribed one of the hotel clerks to release the doves in Gable's apartment while he was still asleep. Then he found a card attached to the leg of one of the birds, with the words "How about it? Carole." Two items appear on the invoice for a total of $120, but one has been crossed out and balance remaining was $51.22 ($1009, in 2024 dollars). SIGNED by Clark Gable on reverse. Circling back to the cooing doves, Gable kept those two doves, daily feeding them because they were "the only living issue of h is great love with Carole Lombard. Gable kept those two doves and eventually the two became 35, all kept in a vast cage with a 50-foot runway, with a tree growing right up the center, "so that they feel as free as if they flew unfettered in the forest".
  • $358
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THE FRESCOES BY DIEGO RIVERA FROM CUERNAVACA (SIGNED)

Rivera, Diego (Text by Emily Edwards and photographs by Manual Alvarez Bravo) 7 3/4 in. x 5 in. Card covers, creased, edge-worn or edge-torn. Printed on cheap, brittle paper, now browned. Paper to spine split, folded over and/or chipped. Text block (neatly) detached from covers, awaiting professional reattachment. Black and white photographs of Diego Rivera's Frescos, now housed at The Palace of Cortes in Cuernavaca, Mexico. SIGNED by Diego Rivera on first blank page. The mural, entitled HISTORY OF MORELOS - CONQUEST AND REVOLUTION) was commissioned by Dwight Morrow, U.S. Ambassador to Mexico at the time. The book contains photographs from the early career of renowned Mexican photographer Manual Alvarez Bravo when he was taking on freelance commercial work. His interest in Rivera's work had everything to do with his own then-largely-unrealized expression of the deeper Mexican experience - historical, cultural, spiritual. One eight-panel fold-out, black and white photograph of the mural. Also included, perhaps necessary to get the booklet published in the first place, are sections for example, entitled "What a Tourist Should Know of Cuernavaca", as well as tourist promotional advertisements for hotels, restaurants, theatres, tour buses, telephone service, ice cream! As testimony to the size, scope and local nature of this little pamphlet, the last page contains photographer Bravo's own advertisement, which reads, "Fotografias de la Pintura Moderna Mexicana y de la Escultura Precortesiana. You can buy photographs of modern Mexican painting and of pre-coquest sculpture from Manuel Alvarez Bravo. Av. Guatemala No. 20. - Mexico, D.F." ". During the summers of 1925 and 1926 Emily Edwards, an artist best known for her early then later art teaching work at Jane Addams's Hull House in Chicago, traveled with a friend to Mexico, where she met the muralist Diego Rivera, who became a life-long friend. Her studies with Rivera stimulated an interest in Mexican murals, and Edwards subsequently spent ten years in Mexico, sketching in small villages and conducting research for a book on Mexican mural painting from the pre-Columbian era to modern times. She published this small pamphlet, The Frescoes by Diego Rivera, in Cuernavaca (1932). A scarce piece of ephemera, even more scarce with signature of the artist. No copies located in the OCLC. "Probably no painting by Diego Rivera lends itself more simply and generously than the frescoes painted in the Palace of Cortes in Cuernavaca. The mural begins with the invasion of Mexico by the Spanish.Rivera chose to focus on the region of Cuernavaca, primarily because of the emblematic sufferings of the indigenous peoples of that region, their response to the Spaniard's violent invasion, and events in the wake of that initial conquest." "In the Frescoes of Cuernavaca, Diego Rivera has placed salient historical facts covering four centuries upon a broken wall space, and, as in the passing of a vision, time does not count, interruptions do not interrupt. Here is a firm grasp of facts, but having passed through the crucible of the artist's imagination the subject matter emerges as something larger than fact, indeed as an eternal comment on human destiny.In the kneeling woman about to be branded, her warm, dark flesh against a white covering, her delicate feet under her agonized body, is concentrated the terror and ignominy of all conquered peoples." No doubt enhanced by her personal friendship with Rivera, Emily Edwards was able, in this brief, 27-page pamphlet, to communicate such considerations and accomodations BEHIND the eye of the artist, as they resulted in the actual compositonal decisions. For instance, "the narrowness of the corridor (where the frescos were located) constituted a handicap which Rivera had to consider in his composition as the long section of wall must be seen from points near to it than its own height. By creating a background of landscape along the top of the entire wall, as a continuation of the landscape seen through the arches, and building down from this to the large foreground figures, he has made it possible to see the decoration as a succession of planes, which compensates somewhat for the eye not being able to take in the whole." (pp. 17) Provenance: This pamphlet, signed by the artist Diego Rivera came from the collection of Dutchess County (NY) artist and silversmith John Corcoran in partial exchange for a piece of custom furniture he fabricated for an art dealer who had the booklet in her private collection for several decades.
  • $4,400
  • $4,400
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AMERICA’S YOUNGEST EVANGELISTS, AGES 9 AND 11: TWO SIGNED 10″ x 8″ 1929 PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE VAN GUNDY EVANGELIST TEAM

Van Gundy, Violet and Jack (Photographer: "F.C. Dando") Two black and white photographs produced, as indicated by the image's signature, by "DANDO. L.A.": one each of the proclaimed "World's Youngest Evangelists." A few small brown spots across bottom inch of the photo of Jack. On the back of each photo in identical child's handwriting is the name of the child, followed by "One of Worlds Youngest Evangelist. Bible Standard Temple Oct. 20, 1929, to" The receiver's name is not indicated. Presumably, these photos were pre-inscribed to be sold at the revivalist event, with the name of the purchaser to be written in at the time of purchase. Violet Van Gundy (1918 - 2010) was born in Des Moines, Iowa, the daughter of George Van Gundy and Virginia Troutman Van Gundy. Her brother, Jack Warren (now deceased) was born in 1920. When Violet was very young, her parents moved to Hollywood, California, where her family met Hal Roach, the producer of "Our Gang", which later became "The Little Rascals". She starred as "Baby Violet" on the show for over four years. During her time in Hollywood, she assisted Mary Pickford and Charlie Chaplin and others. As teenagers, she and her brother, Jack, converted to Christianity and formed Van Gundy's Evangelist Team and subsequently joined Billy Graham's Youth for Christ Ministry. Through this ministry, P.D. Fulwood, Sr. asked them to come to Tifton, Arizona. Services at the Methodist Church were so highly attended, they were asked to come back for a week-long tent revival. It eventually went on for three weeks. Her Christianity and her work for the Lord is how Violet wanted to be remembered. The Van Gundy's fell in love with Tifton and the community and decided to stay. For approximately 55 years, Violet and Jack were owners and operators of Van Gundy's Motor Court, now Town Terrace Motel ("The Pink Motel"). The photographs have the imprint of F.C. Dando, of Lamson Studios in Los Angeles.
  • $330
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THE CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF OREGON 1811-1912 (4 Volumes, Complete); (With notice of antecedent explorations) ILLUSTRATED

Gaston, Joseph Four Volumes, each measuring 8" wide x 10.5" high. 3940 pages total (684; 1060; 1096; 1100). Three-Quarter bound (corners and wraparound spines of handsome Morocco leather (goatskin) over rugged teal boards. Gilt lettering to spines. Endpapers are a marbling of duo-tone forest and light green, alternately patterned in nested waves, laced throughout with gold outlines. Marbling to all edges in a lighter version of the green-and-gilt endpapers described above. Ex-library, with library nameplate to front pastedown. Volume IV , which shows some waviness from past water contact, recently spruced up by professional conservator . Hinges are all tight and strong. Very heavy set. Comprehensive reference tor the historically minded Oregonians, and Pacific Northwesterners in general. A handsome set. First Edition. Joseph Gaston was a local historian, journalist, railroad-builder and farmer who settled outside of Portland, Oregon. This exhaustive and beautiful labor of love, which followed his history of Portland, consists of one volume of history and three volumes of family histories of Oregonians -- where they came from, where they settled and worked -- how they spent their time -- children - civic and/or political participation, accomplishments, etc. The biographical sketches are, all in all, highly informative but folksy as well. "Captain Henry Wade. The Umpqua and Coquille Rivers around Gardiner, Oregon and for many miles in its vicinity are as open books to Captain Henry Wade, who has been familiar with these streams in their various aspects for many years, as commander of different steamboats plying upon them.He has now retired from river traffic and is giving his time to the management of the comfortable fortune which he acquired through judicious investments during his active work." Near Fine (Volumes (I, II, III); Good Plus (Volume IV)
  • $440
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LOLITA (2 PAPERBACK VOLUMES IN SLIPCASE, COMPLETE)

Nabokov, Vladimir First Edition, First Impression (with "900 Francs" to rear panel of each volume. Two softcover volumes (18 x 11 cm.) 7 in. x 4 3/8 in., light green, with black chain and white borders to front panels. No pages 11-12, as called for in the true first issue. Previous owner's name to front free endpaper of Volume I (Edw. M. Plunkett) Subtle but evident bump to rear corner of Volume One, extending back from 188 to 151, and some minor edge- and corner-wear. A similar, very light bump to the upper front corner of cover to Volume two, extending forward to pp. 74. Light general rubbing to extremities, and evident read-crease to both spines -- this book has been read and enjoyed! A nice workable copy of the rare first printing of one of the most controversial books -- and talked and written about books of the twentieth-century. The set housed and protected in a dark-green, cloth-covered slipcase, which shows minor finger spotting. Nabokov finished Lolita on 6 December 1953, five years after starting it. Because of its subject matter, .The manuscript was turned down. by Viking, Simon & Schuster, New Directions, Farrar, Straus, and Doubleday. After these refusals and warnings, he finally resorted to publication in France." ".Lolita was published in September 1955, as a pair of green paperbacks 'swarming with typographical errors'. Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out, there were no substantial reviews.Eventually, at the very end of 1955, Graham Greene, in the London Sunday Times, called it one of the three best books of 1955 This statement provoked a response from the London Sunday Express, whose editor John Gordon called it "the filthiest book I have ever read" and "sheer unrestrained pornography". British Customs officers were then instructed by the Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, France followed suit, and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita; the ban lasted for two years. The first American edition was issued by G. P. Putnam's Sons in August 1958. The book [went] into a third printing within days and became the first since "Gone with the Wind" to sell 100,000 copies in its first three weeks." (Wikipedia compendium) Provenance: This set originally belonged to Edward M. Plunkett (and bears his name on the front free endpaper of Volume 1). Plunkett (1922 - 2011) a Michigan-born artist who studied in Chicago and at the Sorbonne and whose paintings have been exhibited at The Whitney Museum in New York, in museums in France, Holland, Switzerland and in New York at The Museum of Modern Art. His work is found in numerous collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, This copy of Lolita was passed down to Edward Plunkett's nephew Peter Hutton (1944-2016), an artist, Bard College professor and experimental filmmaker (who had his own MOMA retrospective in 2008). Dutchess County (NY) artist and silversmith John Corcoran then obtained this copy of Lolita from the estate of Peter Hutton, with whom he was friends. "Viewed simply as a novel, "Lolita" deals with situations and emotions that would remain exasperatingly vague to the reader had their expression been etiolated by means of platitudinous evasions. As a case history, "Lolita" will become, no doubt, a classic in psychiatric circles. As a work of art, it transcends its expiatory aspects ; and still more important to us than scientific significance and literary worth, is the ethical impact the book should have on the serious reader." (foreword). Provenance: This copy from the collection of the late filmmaker and professor Peter Hutton, who was Plunkett's nephew or maybe god son?
  • $4,950
  • $4,950