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Rare Illustrated Books

Histoire archeologique descriptive et graphique de la Sainte-Chapelle du Palais

Histoire archeologique descriptive et graphique de la Sainte-Chapelle du Palais

DECLOUX, Alfred Pierre Hubert & DOURY. Architectes Paris: Felix Malteste et Cie, 1857. First Edition. Built by King Louis IX on the Île de la Cité in Paris between 1239 -1248 to house Christ's Crown of Thorns and relics of the Virgin and other saints, Sainte Chapelle suffered great destruction during the French Revolution. At the Salon of 1835, a young architect by the name of Jean Baptiste Lassus submitted two watercolours rendering Sainte Chapelle as it would have appeared in the fifteenth century. Awarded a second tier gold medal, Lassus's paintings highlighted the degradation of the once gothic masterpiece, inspiring interest in its restoration. Chief architect Felix Duban and Lassus began work on the chapel in 1836 forging a new scientific 'archeological' style of restoration. "Lorsqu'on fit des recherches, avant d'entreprendre les travaux de restauration, on retrouva les traces de l'ornementation primitive : les arabesques des colonnes, les verrières des consoles qui supportent les statues des apôtres, les étoiles d'or, sur fond bleu, de la voûte, la presque totalité des vitraux,.." (While doing research, before undertaking the work of restoration, traces of primitive ornamentation were found: the arabesques of the columns, the canopies of the consoles that support the statues of the apostles, the golden stars, on a blue background, of the vault, almost all the stained-glass windows...) Decloux & Doury, preface. Taking over from Duban, Lassus became the chief architect of Sainte-Chapelle in 1849. This volume illustrates the chapel as restored by the architect J.B.A. Lassus. The chromolithograph plates show decorative panels, the design of interior borders, statues, murals and stained glass windows, highlighted in gold. The five black & white engraved plates show cross sections, a view of the exterior, and plans of the upper and lower chapels. First edition: folio, twenty chromolithograph plates and five engraved plates mounted on India paper, sound copy in quarter morocco, cloth, gilt title and decoration, binding rubbed.
Fish Dainties

Fish Dainties

Wicken, H. Melbourne: Mutual Provedoring Co. Ltd, 1892. First Edition. Born in Lambeth, cookery writer Harriet Frances Wicken (1847 - 1937) emigrated from England to Australia in 1886. Having studied at the National Training School for Cookery in South Kensington in London shortly after it opened and acquiring a diploma, Harriet Wicken published her first book, the 'Kingswood Cookery Book', in 1885. An expanded Australian edition of her English cookery book assisted in securing her the position of head 'instructress' of domestic economy at the Sydney Technical College and ensured continuity for her publishing career. According to the 'Australian Dictionary of Biography', in other small cookbooks that appeared during the 1890s, such as The Cook's Compass (Sydney, 1890) to promote the Sydney grocers J. G. Hanks & Co, and Fish Dainties (Melbourne, 1892) for the Melbourne Mutual Provedoring Co., or Recipes of Lenten Dishes (1896) as a seasonal gesture, Harriet Wicken stressed simplicity and her favourite 'dainty' recipes. Among the fish cakes, patties and soufflé, recipes in 'Fish Dainties' include baked barracouta, blue cod pie, boudins of whiting, kromskies of oysters and lobster, steamed moki with piquante sauce, schnapper in aspic, and a sharp maitre d'hotel sauce. Octavo, bound in decorated paper boards with regency-style stripe in blue and cream with blue spine, 56 pages, boards chpped and worn, a good copy only, internally sound.
"Quo Vadis?" | Screen Play ("Whither Goest Thou?")

"Quo Vadis?" | Screen Play ("Whither Goest Thou?")

[SIENKIEWICZ, Henryk] Spencers Pictures Ltd Jamieson Lane, Sydney: The Swift Print, 1913. First Edition. Tightly modelled after an historical novel of the same name by Nobel prize-winning author, Henryk Sienkiewicz, published in Poland in 1895, "Quo Vadis?" is set in Rome at the time of Emperor Nero's reign, circa 64 AD. Reported as being the most expensive production of this nature to date, in "Quo Vadis?" we see the dramatic enactment of cruel and violent public spectacles hosted in Nero's huge amphitheatre. Ravenous lions stalk sacrificial Christians blamed for the apocalyptic blaze in the burning of Rome. Heroine Lygia enters the stadium lashed against her will to the back of a mad bull. Spencers Pictures Ltd secured the Australasian rights to the motion picture for the record sum of £4000 after phenomenal success at the box office across Europe. 'The Management deem it a great honour to present to the Amusement Loving Public of Australia Cines' 8000 ft. Masterpiece, "QUO VADIS?" which they regard as the Greatest Achievement in the Annals of Cinematographic Representation - a Wondrous Picture that will live for all time. It represents the dawn of a new era as far as film projection in Australia is concerned inasmuch as the screening will occupy an Entire Evening's Entertainment. So tensely interesting are the hundreds of mighty spectacles in "QUO VADIS?" that no other subject is to be given a place on the program.'. Quarto, printed paper wrappers, 16 pages, photographically illustrated with production stills throughout, light creasing and small tear (less than a centimetre) to front cover, a very good copy.