James Arsenault & Company

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Petit Cabinet Des Fées

Petit Cabinet Des Fées

Perrault, Charles] 16 vols., 48mo (11 cm), marbled paper wrappers, title labels on blue-green paper affixed to front wrappers. Fold-out frontis plates (2.25" x 3.5" b&w engraving on 4.5" x 4.5" leaf). Housed in later paperboard box with original labels affixed. A set of sixteen Perrault fairy tales, with charming illustrations, bound in a marvelous variety of marbled papers. Petit Cabinet Des Fées went through various editions and permutations in the first few decades of the nineteenth century. This seems to be among the most extensive. The volumes included are: 1) La Biche au Bois. 62 pp. Frontis. affixed to inside front wrapper. CONDITION: Rubbing on front wrapper edge with loss, bottom corner loss on half-title p.; 2) L'Oiseau Bleu, Suivi de l'Histoire de Rosimond et de Braminte. 64 pp.; 3) La Princesse Fortunée, Suivie De Fortunio et des Ayeux, ou le Mérite Personnel. 62 pp. CONDITION: 1 cm x 3 cm chip to half-title page; 4) Serpentin Vert, Suivi d'Alidor et Thersandre. 64 pp. CONDITION: Lacking frontis., erased pencil note on title page; 5) La Chatte Blanche, Suivie de L'Histoire du Roi Alfaroute. 65 pp.; 6) Le Prince Lutin. 57 pp.; 7) La Princesse Belle-Étoile, et le Prince Cheri, ou en bienfait n'est jamais perdu. 68 pp.; 8) Gracieuse et Percinet, Suivi de Quiribirini. 64 pp.; 9) Finette Cendron Suivie du Pecheur et le Voyageur, de Joliete, et de la Veuve et Deux Filles. 64 pp.; 10) Le Petit Poucet, Suivi de la Belle et la Bète. 62 pp.; 11) Riquet à la Houpe, Suivi de Cendrillon et de la Supercherie Malheureuse. 64 pp.; 12) La Belle aux Cheveux D'or, Suivie du Prince Desir et de la Reine des Fleurs. 65 pp.; 13) Le Nain Jaune, Suivi des Voyageuses, Contes de Fées. 64 pp.; 14) La Boone Petite Souris, Suivie de L'Ile in accessible, et de La Petite Aurore. 62 pp.; 15) La Barbe Bleu, Suivie du Petit Chaperon Rouge, de la Belle au Bois Dormant; du Chat Botté, et de l'Histoire de Florise. 63 pp. Frontis. detached. 62 pp. 16) Les Fées, Suivies de Bellote et Laideronette, De l'Anneau de Gygès, du Voyage supposé, et des trois Souhaits. 65 pp. CONDITION: Very good overall.
The Log Book of the Northern Cavern and Fell Club 1934. [cover-title]: Cavern and Fell 1934 Records

The Log Book of the Northern Cavern and Fell Club 1934. [cover-title]: Cavern and Fell 1934 Records

Simpson, E., photographer, et al. 8vo (8" x 10"), original printed wrappers. 117 pp. of typescript. 16 original silver print photographs wth typed captions. Inscribed on an endpaper "Presented to Mrs. Robinson of the Craven Arms with the compliments of the Cavern & Fell-in appreciation of the very many kindnesses shown to them.". A very fine and unusual typescript journal of the Northern Cavern and Fell Club of Yorkshire, including typescript accounts of spelunking adventures and sixteen striking original photographs. This remarkable journal consists of lists of the of?cers of the Northern Cavern and Fell Club (est. 1928); a list of over a dozen meets the Club held in 1934; a table of contents indexing meets, events, and detailed narrative accounts of the club's expeditions written by members. The meets took place at such caves as Gaping Ghyll, Arncliffe, Fountains Fell, Alum Pot, Isle of Skye, Mere Gill and Lingmell Girdle. The photographs capture subterranean scenes during the Club's meets as well as group and solo images of Club members. These variously show the spelunkers carrying and transporting gear; at the openings of various caves; rappelling and on ladders; climbing on different perilous sections of their routes (as indicated by captions); inside massive caves; at the club's annual dinner with family members, and so forth. Captions include: "W.J. Haworth Esq. President 1934"; "Public Enemy No. 1, Public Enemy No. 2, and Public Assistance Required"; "Transport at G.G."; "The Swildon's Hole Diving Party," etc. In this final image a group of seven spelunkers are pictured in a cave-a party of amused and amusing gents, two with headlamps and one with a mask. Another remarkable cave image pictures the Pen-y-Ghent entrance-showing a dangling ladder and sunlight shining into the hole from above. Another intriguing shot shows a man in a wheelchair reading a map as spelunkers stand nearby on a rock-face during a event. The text includes descriptions of club get-togethers; a joint-meet with the Halifax Vandals; the commemoration of Club President Wally Haworth's marriage in 1934; a piece entitled "Baulked at Bentham; Captured at Clapham. Was it Night Starvation or Ovaltine Orgy?"; verse by member George Butterworth entitled "Through A Looking Glass"; an interesting diagram of the Washfold Pot's levels; a reproduced letter from the Gritstone Club ("The Grits") on their expedition down Washfold Pot, and so forth. An incident termed the "Gingling Accident" is extensively detailed. Several letters concerning the accident are reproduced, including one penned from the hospital by an injured Club member, reading in part: "I am trying to forget the ghastly nightmare of the week-end, but shall never forget the wonderful work of your own and kindred club members, specially your belay pin feat." The journal is rounded out with editorial notes; an account of the Christmas meet at Giggleswick; and a club roster. Some representative passages Pen-y-Ghent, Long Churn; 14 Apr. 1934 "Sunday morning found the gang.complete with ladders and ropes at the cottage ready for the fray. Cars were taken to Higher Birk with and from there a short walk soon landed the party at the hole. The stream had been diverted down a side passage thus leaving the ladder descent dry. It was afterwards learned that a Giggleswick party had been down the previous week-end but had failed to get very far. Nobody having thought of bringing a stake the fellows dispersed in search of more ammunition, and eventually a couple of branches were found which were believed to be strong enough-one quite dry and the other apparently half rotted. However, the N.C.F.C. are known for not being too particular a club and it was unanimously decided that 'it'll do.' The two ladders were fastened together and hung down, and Downham slipped down. About twenty feet down there was an ominous crack and tho that worthy had been making a fairly quick descent, the next 60 feet were accomplished decidedly quicker. Fortunately, when the dry stake had snapped a dozen willing hands had grabbed the ladder and held it in position for the man below.quite an interesting descent! The ladder position was moved and shortly all men were safely below with the exception of Gregson." "The open pitch being perhaps 80 feet, starting with a small circular hole at the surface and opening out into quite a bell-shaped pot. The passage below follows the stream, and there are two ways. The passage is a huge though narrow fissure, and it is possible to traverse along the top or drop through the ?ssure and follow the stream. Downham, Dawson and Gregson has previously followed the upper traverse a considerable distance, but had not reached the end, and so it was decided to first follow this mode of progress to its-eventual-painful conclusion. It has the only advantage of being quite dry, and a terrific distance was squirmed before the end was reached by a blockage in the passage, which even the thinnest member, one Thornber, failed to get through. And so a return was made practically to the pot again, when a rope was lowered down the fissure from a huge chock stone. The pitch is perhaps twenty to thirty feet, and a painful progress is made to the notorious 'mauvaispas' a climb down between the fissure walls into the stream bed. A rope was put down on this occasion for both Dawson and Downham has unpleasant and nightmare recollections of the climb back up that ghastly pitch without a rope. Four men got below." "It was here that Downham and Dawson had stopped on their previous expedition. The going was considerably difficult. Progress being made along the water course, the ?ssure still continued, and was fortunately wide enough at the bottom to get through by lying in the water and squirming a difficult way along. Judging by the lurid remarks of George Bowen on this his ?rst real pot, the going was considerably more than difficult. The water was devilishly cold, and it was no pleasant task bellying along. Dawson was ahead
Game in the Desert. Illustrations by T. J. Harter

Game in the Desert. Illustrations by T. J. Harter

O'Connor, Jack Hardcover. 4to (26 x 19.5 cm), green "snakeskin" cloth, gilt title at spine and front-cover. In original glassine wrapper, housed in original green box with title, promotional text, and limitation statement on lid. Color frontis., xx, 298 pp., b&w plates. Some pages uncut. First edition. One of 950 hand-numbered copies; this copy number 501.Celebrated author and outdoorsman Jack O'Connor (1902-1978) penned over a dozen nonfiction books as well as a few western novels, and served as Shooting Editor for Outdoor Life magazine for over thirty years, introducing millions of readers around the world to hunting and firearm culture. His 1939 classic Game in the Desert offers an in-depth account of hunting some of the most sought-after game-big and small-in the American Southwest and northern Mexico: deer, antelope, bighorn sheep, elk, doves, desert pig, quail, black and grizzly bears, mountain lion, wild turkey and even Mexican jaguars. Each chapter is devoted to an animal and details their habitat and behavior, and also includes some of the author's hunting stories. O'Connor hunted around the world, and this work is based largely on his observations of game while in the field. As noted on the box label: "It is a book written primarily for the sportsman, but beside being a sporting book of high order, it is also a comprehensive and authoritative work on the natural history of Southwestern wildlife." CONDITION: Fine in vg glassine; box near fine with minor rubbing.
The Victoria Falls Zambesi River: sketched on the spot by T. Baines

The Victoria Falls Zambesi River: sketched on the spot by T. Baines

Baines, T[homas] Folio, half recent red morocco, original pebbled burgundy cloth with gilt title on upper cover. 8 pp. of text, tinted lithographic title with bird's eye view and ten tinted lithographic plates, all loose in portfolio, as issued. Ticket of "Whitley Brothers, Second-hand Booksellers, and Stampdealers, 15 Church Street, Cape Town" in lower right corner of front paste-down. A spectacular volume of lithographic views of Victoria Falls on the Zambesi River, accompanied by the artist's lively account of his visit, with references to the views. The prefatory text by artist Thomas Haines-entitled, "The Mosi-O-A-Tunya (Smoke-Sounding), or Victoria Falls"-offers an account of his expedition with South African explorer James Chapman to the African Interior. Beginning in Walvisch Bay on the West Coast and terminating at the mouth of the Zambesi River, Haines's narrative spans from 23 July 1862 to 5 Aug. 1862. Haines provides glosses for each of the views and chronicles the circumstances in which he encountered each scene. He observes with an artist's eye the geology, flora, and fauna of the region-such as the gigantic aloe, tall mochicheerie, and ana trees, new varieties of quagga or zebra, pebbles and crystals of quartz, agate, red jasper, black scoria, and so forth. Haines also describes the party's Makalaka and Bushman "followers"; his encounters with Chief Sekeltu and the hostile Matabili; transportation woes; and dramatic hunts for buffalo, rhino, etc. The expedition ends prematurely, Baines noting "Our exhausted resources, the death of some of our followers by illness, and the murder of others by a marauding party of Matabili, prevented us from renewing our journey." The lithographs include the title-page "Bird's Eye View of the Victoria Falls from the West") and ten plates, as follows: 1) "The Falls by Sunrise, with the 'Spray Cloud' Rising" 2) "The Leaping Water or Westernmost Catarat" 3) "The Falls from the Western End of the Chasm" 4) "Great Western (or Main Fall" 5) "Herd of [Water] Buffaloes Driven to the Edge of the Chasm" 6) "Centre Rock Fall, and The Eastern Cataracts" 7) "Zanjueelah, The Boatman of the Rapids" 8) "The Falls from the East End of the Chasm to Garden Island" 9) "The Falls from the Narrow Neck Near the Eastern Headland of the Outlet" 10) "The Profile Cliff, Narrow Gorge and Torrent of the Zambesi." Some representative passages: "Immediately beyond was the belt of dark fresh green forest fringing the ravine of the Victoria, and from behind this rose the white vaporous spray clouds, from which the Falls derive their name of Mosi-o-a-tunya (or smoke that sounds), screening as with a misty veil their now darkened southern face, beyond which a long vista of the brown, palmy, island-studded upper river glittered like silver in the sunlight, the banks showing in warm and soft gray tints the detail of their features, and the mountains melting faint and blue into the distances." View Number 8 "The old boatman of the rapids, named Zanjueelah, had quite a collection of hippopotamus and other skulls, and, taking his formidable spear, he led us to the narrow skiff, the only one I believe that goes quite to the Falls. . As we passed the end of one island, a hippopotamus, or perhaps more than one, disturbed in some peaceful dream, launched down the bank, and plunged into the water just astern. Others appeared in the smooth water on our left where I had fired at them on previous days, but we did not think it advisable to take the old man's attention from the course of his boat with another rapid immediately ahead, and therefore left the sea-cows in peace until our return." "A couple of fine men, bearing the large heavy spears used upon the river, arrived soon after, having been sent by Moshotlani, the petty chief of the ferry, to learn the object of our visit. Chapman answered that, knowing the wish of [Chief] Sekeletu to engage in commerce with the white man, he had brought up a few goods for preliminary traffic . the death of the unfortunate missionaries was a delicate subject for persons situated as we were to touch upon." CONDITION: Good, damp-stains to covers, contents clean with just a faint touch of foxing to a few plates, some minor repairs to edges of plates, and just a bit of occasional minor chipping.
The Topography of Troy

The Topography of Troy, and Its Vicinity; Illustrated and Explained by Drawings and Descriptions

Gell, W[illiam] Folio, contemporary or slightly later half vellum and blue paper over boards, gilt-stamped black title label and black collector's label with gilt crown above intertwined X and S at spine. Title page with hand-colored vignette, [i, verso blank], [1]-17, [18 blank]-124 pp., 28 hand-coloured plates, of which 9 are etchings and 19 aquatints (three of the latter large fold-outs), 2 hand-colored maps, 1 hand-colored etching on title-page,11 hand-colored etchings in the text, 1 uncolored aquatint in text. Archaeologist William Gell's marvelous volume of hand-colored etchings and aquatints depicting "that part of the Troad, which is more particularly connected with the Iliad of Homer." The introduction includes Gell's account of his journey, and is followed by the plates and maps, each of which is accompanied by descriptive text. "A classical scholar of some repute, educated at Jesus College, Cambridge, and widely traveled in Greece and Asia Minor, Gell became with his many publications the leading topographer of classical lands before the arrival of William Martin Leake.Gell visited the Troad between December 2 and December 7, 1801 on his first trip to Greece, in the company of Edward Dodwell (1767-1832) and a certain Mr. Atkins. He used with consummate skill a camera lucida to produce in a very short time extremely accurate sketches. The production of this handsome folio with its forty-five plates was meant to supply accurate illustrations of the scenery covering the whole region of the, so far, purely literary dispute on Troy. It was giving irrefutable material to scholars 'without encountering the difficulties of a tedious voyage'.Gell spent five days in the area and the result was certainly the most beautiful book on Troy ever published."-Lascarides. REFERENCES: Abbey Travel 399. Lascarides, The Search For Troy, 81. CONDITION: Good, early clipped bookseller's description affixed to upper cover, short tear in vellum at upper right edge of spine, edges worn, lower fore-corners bumped, small and faint library blind-stamp in upper right margin of title page and one other leaf, old ink accession number at foot of dedication page, light stain apparently where pocket was removed on rear paste-down, plates with some offsetting from text.
Newmann's Magical Library. Some interesting data on this great collection

Newmann’s Magical Library. Some interesting data on this great collection, and its owner, who for nearly fifty years has entertained the public with demonstrations of hypnotism, Mind Reading and Occult Psychic Phenomena

Campbell, Loring and Kathryn; Leig Gilstad, et al. 8vo, printed brown wrappers. 31 pp., including 4 pp. ads, text on inside of wrappers, numerous b&w illus. A scarce compendium of articles, reviews and images describing the fifty year career and Magical Library of highly-regarded mentalist C. A. George Newmann, inscribed by Newmann to friend and fellow stage performer, Lester Klock. Includes an account of Newmann's 7,000 volume collection, which embraced technical, historical, rare, and curious items, as well as periodicals and memorabilia. According to contributor Leif Gilstad, as a child Newmann could always find the hidden objects in games, and predict teachers' questions. As an adult, he became a scholar and was known for his "Gay Nineties" blind-folded drives through town to announce his shows. Newmann's inscription reads "To my old friend LESTER KLOCK with sincere, good wishes. C. A. George Newmann. March 6 - 1946." Klock was a versatile midwestern Vaudevillian, whose various acts are documented in a scrapbook he assembled, recently sold by us and described here: KLOCK SCRAPBOOK. OCLC records just three copies. CONDITION: Good, ink inscription on title p. with Hermann's name and address bleeding through to portrait; the ink inscription inside back wrapper offset onto flyleaf; otherwise, an appealing, clean, sound item.
Klondyke. The Yukon (Klondyke) Mines

Klondyke. The Yukon (Klondyke) Mines, and How to Reach Them

12mo (6" x 4"), red cloth, gilt-stamped text at front-cover. 32 pp., color folding map (7" x 12", plus margins). A scarce Klondike guidebook published in London at the height of the gold rush. This book was issued by the British Columbia Development Association, Ltd. in response to a deluge of applications for particulars concerning the new gold fields on the Yukon River and how to reach them. Among the subjects covered are the Situation and Position of the Goldfields; Mining Regulations; and The Routes, including The White Pass Route. Also included is a lengthy Appendix comprising circulars and extracts from newspapers. The company offers several invaluable tips to prospective miners, such as "The Company has to point out in the first place that it would be altogether undesirable for any emigrants to the Yukon Gold Fields to arrive in British Columbia before the end of February next, at the earliest" and "The Company would, in conclusion, urge in the strongest terms that no one with less than £300 capital should think of starting for the Yukon." The "Map Shewing the 'White Pass' Route to Yukon Goldfields via Skagway Bay" depicts several routes stemming from Vancouver and Victoria and leading to the gold mines. The "Gold Bearing Region" is identified in yellow. Also indicated on the map are important bays, wharves, and passes, railways, rivers, ports and more. The two main routes shown are the Sitka & Fort St. Michael (4,050 miles), and the Skagway & White Pass (1.410 miles). The latter "saves" 2,640 miles compared with the former. OCLC records just eight copies, with five holdings in the U.S. CONDITION: Good, some wear, fading, and scuffing to covers, gilt text at front-cover faded; contents bright and clean; map very good.
Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]

Henry Dearborn family association sammelband.]

Dearborn, Henry, et al. Boston; Augusta and Hallowell, Maine, and other locales, 1800-1810. An intact and appealing sammelband of eleven pamphlets including two orations by army officer, congressman, and secretary of war Henry Dearborn, of Gardiner, Maine, as well as an interesting pamphlet on the Louisiana Purchase. This sammelband was evidently compiled by Dearborn's son-in-law Joshua Wingate, who served under Dearborn: three presentation inscriptions bear Wingate's name, in addition to that of his brother Joseph F. Wingate. Also included here are four early Maine imprints (pre-1820). Born in Hampton, New Hampshire, Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) was a doctor prior to the Revolutionary War. In view of the looming British threat, Dearborn organized a militia company, and, after learning of the fighting at Lexington and Concord, accompanied his sixty men to Cambridge. His company was incorporated in the regiment of Col. John Stark and fought in the battle of Bunker Hill in 1775. In Sept. 1775, Dearborn took part in Benedict Arnold's failed expedition to Quebec, the journal he kept constituting an important source of information on the campaign. During the assault on Quebec, Dearborn was taken prisoner and later exchanged, after which he took part in the campaign against Burgoyne. At Valley Forge the winter of 1777-78, he fought in the battle of Monmouth the following June-the action of his regiment receiving praise from General Washington. In 1779, he played a central role in the expedition against the Iroquois Confederacy. Later joining Washington's staff, he participated at the siege of Yorktown. In 1783, Dearborn settled in Gardiner, Maine where, upon the organization of the U.S. government, he was appointed by Washington as marshal of the Maine militia (1789-93). He served in the U.S. House of Representatives from the District of Maine between 1793 and 1797. In 1797, Augusta, Maine was renamed after Henry's daughter, Augusta Dearborn. Under President Thomas Jefferson, he served as Secretary of War (1801-09), and acted as commanding general of the U.S. Army in the War of 1812. In 1818, Dearborn's "correct account" of the Battle of Bunker Hill was published in which he accused Gen. Israel Putnam of inaction and poor leadership during the battle. The article caused a major, long-lasting controversy amongst veterans of the war and various historians. Three of the present orations (one of which is by Dearborn) were delivered in connection with the Bunker Hill Association, the organization that designed and constructed the Bunker Hill Monument. Born in Essex County, Mass., Joshua Wingate (1773-1843) graduated from Harvard and married Henry Dearborn's daughter Julia (1781-1867). Wingate served as chief clerk for his father-in-law in the War Department, and was named postmaster at Portland, Maine in 1804. Two years later, President Thomas Jefferson appointed Wingate as the customs collector for Bath, Maine. In addition to his duties as collector, Wingate served as a brigadier general in Maine's militia and represented Bath at Maine's constitutional convention in 1819. After resigning as collector in 1820 in favor of his brother Joseph F. Wingate, he lived in Portland, where he engaged in politics. He ran unsuccessfully for governor and served as president of the board of directors of the Portland branch of the Bank of the United States. Wingate was a founding member of the Maine Historical Society. Joseph Ferdinand Wingate (1786-?) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. Born in Haverhill, Mass., Wingate engaged in mercantile business in Bath, Maine, where he would also serve as collector of customs from 1820 to 1824. He was as member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1818 and 1819, and was elected to the Twentieth and Twenty-first Congresses (1827-31). CONTENTS: Dearborn, Henry A. An Oration Pronounced at Boston on the Fourth Day of July, 1811, Before the Supreme Executive and in Presence of the Bunker Hill Association. Boston: Printed by Munroe & French, Printers to the State, 1811. 8vo, 15 pp., inscription (likely a presentation inscription, part of which has been excised) at title-page, "Joshua Wing[ate]." [with] Dearborn, Henry A. S. An Oration Delivered at Salem, on the Fourth of July, 1806. Salem: Printed at the Register Office, 1806. 8vo, 14 pp. [with] White, William Charles. An Oration, In Commemoration of the Anniversary of American Independence. Delivered in Boston, July 4th, 1809, at the request of the Bunker Hill Association . To which is added, An Introductory Address, by David Everett. Boston: J. Belcher, printer, 1809. 8vo, 12, [6] pp., title-page inscribed, "Majr.[?] J[oseph]. Wingate Jr. from his brother Jos. F. Winga[te]." [with] Weston, Nathan. An Oration, Pronounced July 4th 1810; Before the Republican Citizens of Augusta and the Neighbouring Towns. In Commemoration of American Independence Hallowell: Printed by N. Cheever, 1810. 8vo, 19 pp., title-page inscribed, "[to] Joshua Wingate from his friend R. C. V[?]." [with] Brazer, Samuel. Address, Pronounced at Worcester, on May 12th, 1804, in Commemoration of the Cession of Louisiana to the United States. Worcester: Sewall Goodridge, 1804. 8vo, 15, [1] pp. Historian Peter J. Kastor notes that Samuel Brazer (1785-1823) was among a number of pamphleteers and editorialists of his day who were "eager to help secure approval of the [Louisiana Purchase] and extend federal rule west of the Mississippi [and] claimed that the greatest benefit of the purchase was the peaceful resolution of the Mississippi Crisis" (Kastor, William Clark's World). Further, Kastor and François Weil have argued that Brazer articulated the way the majority of Americans would eventually understand their role in the negotiations surrounding the Purchase. In the present address, Brazer notes that "The acquisition of the vast territory of Louisiana, in itself was a great, a wonderful achievement of wisdom and policy. The means by which it was obtained, afford an honorable,
Copper River and Cook's Inlet

Copper River and Cook’s Inlet, Alaska. Pacific Steam Whaling Co. All American Route

San Francisco: Pacific Steam Whaling Co., 30 California St., 1897. A scarce pamphlet produced by the Pacific Steam Whaling Co. of San Francisco and Seattle for prospectors venturing to Alaska's Cooks Inlet and the Copper River mining district, on Prince William Sound. This "first class line of passenger steamers" ran between San Francisco, Seattle and Copper City, and sailed every fifteen days through the inland waters of Alaska-"thereby avoiding the rough weather experienced on the outside passage." The text offers a detailed account of the Cooks Inlet and the Copper River region, a portion of which is excerpted from a lecture delivered in Sitka (in Nov. 1897) by one Rt. Rev. I. T. Rowe (Bishop of Alaska) which was published in the "Alaskan." The text covers Chefflon Creek; the Keokuk gold district; historic explorations of Alaska; the route by way of Copper River and Prince William Sound; gold mining success stories ("He almost broke his back carrying $65,000 of Gold"); Fish and Game; Copper River Indians (by turns "unfriendly" and "friendly"; said to steal; etc.); When to Start for Copper River; Cooks Inlet District; Climate of Southern Alaska; and Cooks Inlet Placers. Another extract is taken from the San Francisco Call (of Nov. 1897), covering the discovery of Great Bed of Copper in Cooks Inlet and Prince William Sound; "sensational" gold mining stories; When to Start for Cooks Inlet; What to Buy for an Outfit; Clothing; Cooking Utensils and Mining Implements; a Table of Distances; and finally, "Nuggets of Information"-such as the following: "Winter lasts nine months"; "Citric acid should be taken to prevent scurvy"; "Good moccasins are better than leather or gum boots"; "Do not underestimate the hardships of the trip"; "A sleeping bag lined with fur is the thing. Keep it free from vermin"; "The best way to live is to imitate the Indians in dress and habit." Established by group of Californian businessmen in 1883, Pacific Steam Whaling Co. was based in San Francisco and soon opened a branch in Seattle. The company established a shore-whaling station at Point Barrow, Alaska, and sponsored whaling expeditions to the Arctic region. The company's large salmon cannery at Orca, Alaska is mentioned as well. It appears the company operated at least until 1908. Among its ships were the Mary D. Hume, Newport, Thrasher, Grampus, Baleana and Narwhal. OCLC records three copies, at Wisconsin Historical Society, University of Washington and University of Wisconsin. CONDITION: Good, small tape repair on final page and back-wrapper, top of pamphlet lightly trimmed (part of "R" in River excised), illegible ink inscription on back-wrapper, partial separation along spine, text good.
Newton's White Box : 20 Postcards

Newton’s White Box : 20 Postcards

Newton, Helmut 8vo (8" x 5"), white paperboard box with slip-off lid. 20 color and black & white postcards (6" x 4.25"), loosely inserted in an internal tray; titles in French printed on verso of postcards. Inscribed on front panel of lid in black ink: "For Polly and Henry with my love. Helmet, New York. 14. 3. 1977. P. S. A set of real French postcards.". A presentation copy of an early and exceedingly rare Newton publication, comprising twenty erotic postcards reproducing his photographs, inscribed to the noted fashion editor and stylist Polly Allen Mellen and her husband. First and only edition. This is one of only two examples that we have been able to trace. The other copy, which appeared in the trade in 2014, was inscribed by Newton in 1976 to Rudi Gernreich (1922-1985)-an innovator of twentieth century fashion, best known for his scandalous "monokini," or topless female swimsuit. Although identified as "Series No. 1" on the lid, no other series of Newton's postcards is known. Born in Berlin, Helmut Newton (1920-2004) was known for his radical, edgy and provocative photography. As documented in these photos, Newton preferred working outside the studio and often shot his models outdoors and in elegant mansions, villas and hotels. Newton pushed the boundaries of the fashion industry of his day with his often-sinister, erotically-charged imagery-leading some feminists to criticize his work. He began working for Vogue in the '50s, and soon-like Richard Avedon and Norman Parkinson-became one of the magazine's foremost photographers. While 1976 saw Newton's first recorded publication, White Women, the present postcards are variously dated from 1971 to 1975, evidently indicating publication prior to White Women. Newton's first group exhibition-at Emily Lowe Gallery, New York City-and his first solo show, at Galerie Nikon in Paris were both held in 1975. It is possible that White Box was published in connection with the latter. In any case, it is not listed among the photographer's known publications on the website of the Helmut Newton Foundation. Polly Allen Mellen (1924-) is a fashion editor and stylist who worked for Harper's Bazaar (under Diana Vreeland) and later Vogue (under Vreeland and Grace Mirabella)-her career spanning over sixty years. She served as a nurse's aide during WWII and moved to New York in 1949. At Harper's Bazaar she met her future longtime collaborator Richard Avedon, who initially found Mellen "too noisy." In time, however, Avedon would describe her as "the most creative sittings editor I ever worked with." Nicolas Ghesquiere has suggested that Mellen's work at Harper's and later Vogue came to "define a new, more modern ethos about clothes and how women wore them. With an almost playful daring, [the ethos] brimmed with a kind of strong, smart, unabashedly celebratory feminine independence-as well as an artful element of provocation and extravagance-that Mellen herself embodied and drew upon in her collaborations" (Ghesquiere, Polly Mellen). Over the course of her career, Mellen worked with such photographers as Newton, Avedon, Arthur Elgort, Irving Penn, Steven Meisel, and Mario Testino. Polly and Henry Wigglesworth Mellen (1920-2014) married in 1965. No copies recorded in OCLC. Apart from the copy offered by Peter Harrington in 2014 we find no other copies recorded, no sales records, nor any other mention of White Box. REFERENCES: Ghesquiere, Nicolas, Polly Mellen (2010) at interviewmagazine[dot]com; Warren, Lynne. Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century Photography, Vol. 3 (New York: Routledge, 2006), p. 1159; Helmut Newton at icp[dot]org; Polly Mellen styled the controversial Bathhouse Series & Nastassja Kinski (2014) at agnautacouture[dot]com
The Cabinet-Maker's Guide: Or Rules and Instructions in the Art of Varnishing

The Cabinet-Maker’s Guide: Or Rules and Instructions in the Art of Varnishing, Dying, Staining, Japanning, Polishing, Lackering and Beautifying Wood, Ivory, Tortoise-shell and Metal. With Observations on their Management and Application

Siddons, G. A.?] Hardcover. 16mo, original printed blue boards, title printed at spine. 108 pp. Publisher's ad on back board. Pencil notes and drawings on front and rear endpapers. Recent half green morocco and green cloth slipcase. A beautiful copy in original boards of the first printing of the first furniture finisher's manual published in the United States, reprinted from the first British edition of the same year. Described on the title-page as a "New Edition, with considerable Additions," this first American edition provides concise instructions on the application of varnish and stains, dying woods, inlaying, laquering, glue-making, japanning, polishing, etc. The work had enormous influence. According to Robert Mussey, the author of the introductory essay for the Dover reprint edition of 1987, it went through at least fourteen editions as well as more than seventy pirated editions. Mussey also observes that the actual authorship is uncertain, suggesting several possibilities. The traditional attribution to Siddons is from the title-page of an 1837 London edition. Interestingly, Greenfield was also the place of publication of Asher Benjamin's The Country Builder's Assistant (1797), the first architectural book authored by an American published in the U.S. REFERENCES: Rink 1793; not in American Imprints. CONDITION: Very good, paper cracked at hinges but holding firm, moderate wear to extremities, one leaf with a closed tear (no loss of text).
Woods and Lakes of Maine. A trip from Moosehead Lake to New Brunswick in a Birch-Bark Canoe. To which are added some Indian place names and their meanings now first published by Lucius L. Hubbard. New and Original Illustrations by Will. L. Taylor

Woods and Lakes of Maine. A trip from Moosehead Lake to New Brunswick in a Birch-Bark Canoe. To which are added some Indian place names and their meanings now first published by Lucius L. Hubbard. New and Original Illustrations by Will. L. Taylor

Hubbard, Lucius 8vo (8.25" x 6.5"), original pictorial brown cloth stamped in black and gold. Frontis., xvi, [1], 223 pp., numerous b&w engravings, 1 folding map at rear, 23" x 18". Early ticket of "Henry C.Squires Sportsmen's Supplies, 178 Broadway, N.Y." affixed to upper left corner of front paste-down. Second edition, revised. Hubbard notes in the introduction that his intent is to offer "a true and circumstantial delineation of the camper's life in the Maine forests, especially as seen by one who goes into them with an Indian guide." The map is entitled Third Edition Revised Map of Moosehead Lake and Northern Maine and is dated 1891. Lucius Lee Hubbard (1849-1929) was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was educated at Harvard, the University of Bonn, and Boston University Law School, where he received an LL.B. After settling in Cambridge and marrying in 1874, he returned to the University of Bonn, earning a Ph.D in geology. He practiced law in Cambridge and also pursued his interest in geology. Hubbard relocated to Houghton, Michigan and became a member of the Michigan Geological Survey in 1890, serving as its director from 1893 to 1899. Hubbard's tours of the Maine woods began when he was a student at Harvard and continued until his removal to Michigan. His guide-books provide an excellent record of the region during the golden age of sporting in Maine. REFERENCES: Williamson 4757; Thompson, Edward V. Important Maine Maps, Books, Prints and Ephemera. Orono, 2003, 331B. CONDITION: Very good, bright copy, bit of wear to head and foot of spine; partial split in paper at inside front hinge, but hinge tight; contents bright and clean; map with some separation at folds but all in one piece.
The Penobscot Man

The Penobscot Man

Eckstorm, Fannie Hardy 12mo (8" x 5.75"), green cloth. Title and ornament in black on front cover, gilt-title, author, and publisher at spine. Frontis., xii, 351 pp. A Maine classic on the log drivers of the West Penobscot River. Signed by the author on the reverse of the frontispiece, below a statement reading "This edition with frontispiece and the author's autograph bound up June 1931." The title-page retains an earlier publication date of 1924 (the first edition appeared in 1904). The copyright page is dated 1931. Chapters include: Lugging Boat on Sowadnehunk; The Grim Tale of Larry Connors; Hymns before Battle; The Death of Thoreau's Guide; The Gray Rock of Abol; A Clump of Posies; Working Nights; The Naughty Pride of Black Sebat and Others; Rescue; Joyfully; and 'Tis Twenty Years Since. In the last chapter Eckstorm "defends her research and conclusions against critics who had long viewed river drivers as ignorant, brutal, and rum-prone, and saw The Penobscot Man as an exercise in romanticism." (Sprague, The Mirror of Maine, Orono, 2000). Fannie Hardy Eckstorm of Brewer was the daughter of the Penobscot River fur trader Manly Hardy. Her family was personally acquainted with John Neptune (1767-1865), Lieutenant Governor of the Penobscot Nation and a powerful shaman, as well as many other native people. Hardy accompanied her father on numerous expeditions into the Maine wilderness and developed a keen interest in the world immediately around her. Recently described as "an independent scholar of remarkable skill," (Sprague) she wrote about Maine folklore and ballads, birds, lumbering, trapping, and Indian religion and language. CONDITION: Near fine, spine slightly sunned.
Woods and Lakes of Maine. A trip from Moosehead Lake to New Brunswick in a Birch-Bark Canoe. To which are added some Indian place names and their meanings now first published by Lucius L. Hubbard. New and Original Illustrations by Will. L. Taylor

Woods and Lakes of Maine. A trip from Moosehead Lake to New Brunswick in a Birch-Bark Canoe. To which are added some Indian place names and their meanings now first published by Lucius L. Hubbard. New and Original Illustrations by Will. L. Taylor

Hubbard, Lucius 8vo (8.25" x 6.5"), original pictorial green cloth stamped in black and gold. Frontis., xvi, [1], 223 pp., numerous b&w engravings. Early to mid-twentieth century bookplate at front paste-down. Second edition, revised, with no date on the title page, a copyright date of 1883 (the date of the first edition) on the copyright page, and a preface dated 1888. Hubbard notes in the introduction that his intent is to offer "a true and circumstantial delineation of the camper's life in the Maine forests, especially as seen by one who goes into them with an Indian guide." Some copies were issued with a map. This copy was not. Lucius Lee Hubbard (1849-1929) was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was educated at Harvard, the University of Bonn, and Boston University Law School, where he received an LL.B. After settling in Cambridge and marrying in 1874, he returned to the University of Bonn, earning a Ph.D in geology. He practiced law in Cambridge and also pursued his interest in geology. Hubbard relocated to Houghton, Michigan and became a member of the Michigan Geological Survey in 1890, serving as its director from 1893 to 1899. Hubbard's tours of the Maine woods began when he was a student at Harvard and continued until his removal to Michigan. His guide-books provide an excellent record of the region during the golden age of sporting in Maine. REFERENCES: Williamson 4757; Thompson, Edward V. Important Maine Maps, Books, Prints and Ephemera. Orono, 2003, 331B. CONDITION: Good, head of spine frayed, touch of wear to extremities, contents clean.
From Lake to Lake; or

From Lake to Lake; or, a Trip Across Country. A Narrative of the Wilds of Maine. With thirty illustrations, drawn by Reder, Garrett, Reed, and Myrick

Farrar, Capt. Charles A.J. 12mo (7.5" x 5.5"), white cloth with black title and pictorial design. [13], 224 pp., [4] pp. publ. ads., 30 engraved plates. Early ownership inscription on endpaper. First edition. A novel based on Farrar's experiences in the Rangeley Lakes region. He relates in the preface that the incidents contained in this book occurred during the year 1876-the first summer a steamboat was ever run on the Richardson Lakes, and during which he took his first trip from the Richardsons to Parmachenee Lake. He notes, "Should any of my readers ever make the trip from Lake to Lake I sincerely hope that they may have better luck and better weather than I did." Some of the Chapters are titled: "We Make a Start," "A Rough Passage," "A Successful Hunt," "We Retrace our Course," "Bad News," and "The Wrecked Steamer." The most prolific 19th century writer on the Maine woods, Farrar's other works include guide-books to Rangeley and Moosehead Lake, a series of camping narratives, including Camp Life in the Wilderness and Through the Wilds, and four north woods adventure stories: Eastward Ho!, Wild Woods Life, Down the West Branch, and Up the North Branch. REFERENCES: Williamson, A Bibliography of the State of Maine, #3275; Thompson, Edward V. Important Maine Maps, Books, Prints and Ephemera. Orono, 2003, 323A; Wright III, 1801. CONDITION: Good, light wear to extremities; contents good, margins of most leaves toned; some loss to paper at inside front hinge, paper cracked at inside back hinge, but both hinges sound; front-end paper partially separated.
Picturesque Kineo

Picturesque Kineo

8vo, light brown pictorial wrappers. [24 pp.], illus. throughout with photos, train schedules, floor plans. Includes unattached flyer in color entitled "Early Opening of Mount Kineo House", "C.A. Judkins Mgr.". An appealing promotional brochure for a visit to a Maine north woods paradise during the age of the grand hotel. "Well up into the piney woods of Maine, where the heat and dust of the great city can never penetrate.there is far-famed Kineo, Kineo the mountain, Kineo the hotel, Kineo the beautiful." (Picturesque Kineo). Once the largest hotel on any inland waterway in America, Mt Kineo House was situated on a peninsula with a bold promontory (comprised of flint, hence the Abenaki name Kineo), jutting out from the east side of Moosehead Lake. The location now contains the original golf course, staff dormitory, several original cottages, and the Old Oak Lodge constructed in 1912. Begun as a tavern in 1844, the first Mt Kineo House was built in 1848 by Capt. Joshua Fogg but burned in 1868. The House succumbed to fire again in 1882 and was rebuilt in 1884 with the addition of the "Northwood Ho! " golf course and club. Purchased by the Central Maine Railroad in 1911 and managed by the Ricker Hotel Co, by 1917 there were accommodations for 500 guests who could enjoy a view in each room, rely on a well-known New York staff physician, drink medicinal water, and experience daily music concerts. Rooms cost $4.00 a night in season and direct transportation from Boston with a splendid buffet parlor was offered for $15.00. An attractive example of Kineo memorabilia, or Kineo-iana, if you will. CONDITION: Very good, small stain on back cover, light gray stains on edges of upper cover. REFERENCES: Mount Kineo, in Wikipedia; Harris, Brian. The New Mount Kineo House.
Mount Desert on the Coast of Maine. "Infinite Riches in a Little Room." [Cover title: Guide Book for Mount Desert]

Mount Desert on the Coast of Maine. “Infinite Riches in a Little Room.” [cover title} Guide Book for Mount Desert

Martin, Clara Barnes; [Bryant Bradley], photographer 12mo (7.25" x 5"), green cloth, title and borders in black. Frontis, [11], 5 mounted half-stereoview photographs, including frontis., 1 folded engraved map (18" x 14") in lower cover pocket. Sixth edition. First issued in 1867, this fine guide-book went through six editions, only four of which (the third through the sixth) were illustrated with photographs. The five images in this sixth edition are different from those that appear in the other photographically illustrated editions. The photographs are large half stereoviews, and while no credit is given to the photographer, they are known to be the work of Bryant Bradley (1838-1890), originally from Cornish, Maine, who lived and worked in Bar Harbor in the 1870s and '80s. Bradley's work is generally of high quality and the present images are no exception. The views included herein, by title, are as follows: Spouting Horn; Eagle Lake; Cathedral Rock; Otter Cliffs; and Somes' Sound,-West Shore. Also included in this volume is a crisply engraved folding map entitled "Mt. Desert Island Maine." Clara Barnes Martin of Portland, Maine was a respected figure in literary circles of the day who was fluent in Russian and regularly reviewed Continental literature for the New York Evening Post. REFERENCES: Williamson 6316; Thompson, Edward V. Important Maine Maps, Books, Prints and Ephemera (Orono, 2003) 292. CONDITION: Good, light whitish dampstain to upper right corner of front cover, a few light spots to back cover lacking front free endpaper, frontis. partially separated at hinge; map crisp and very good.