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Expose [Exposé] of Newburyport Eccentricities

Expose [Exposé] of Newburyport Eccentricities, Witches and Witchcraft. The Murdered Boy, and Apparition of the Charles-Street School-House

Davis, H. P. 12mo (23.2 x 14.6 cm), blue paper wrappers. 24 pp. One illustration of the Charles Street Schoolhouse. An entertaining account of the causes of certain mysterious and ghastly occurrences at an elementary school in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Published contemporaneously with the events it describes, the heart of this text is found in its two final chapters, "Modern Witchcraft" and "Apparitions," which give accounts of various "spirit manifestations," and in particular-the appearance of a certain "boy-ghost" who "haunted" the Charles Street Schoolhouse during the years 1872 and 1873. It is related that prior to these hauntings a boy who attended this school was tragically murdered. Before the boy-ghost appears in earnest, various signs indicate his presence-including disembodied hands and faces, knocking sounds, and so on. One day in 1872, the ghost emerges in full-form: Late in October the climax of this long series of visitations and troubles was reached. On a particular day, never to be forgotten, from early morning till the middle of the afternoon session, the disturbances were in full force, when now for the first time, the most appalling and terrible object seen by the human eye, was visible,-a Ghost!.He appeared to be about thirteen years of age, visage pale, eyes blue, mouth sad, and the whole effect was that of extreme melancholly.[Ms. Perkins] was able to look through the figure, it was so transparent, and yet the outline and surface retained all their integrity, but so very thin that it seemed as if a slight breath might totally disperse it. In time, it is discovered that all of these spirit manifestations are the cunning tricks of one Edward, a mischievous Newburyport boy. Once identified, townsfolk begin flocking to Edward's house, whereupon he explains and demonstrates to the visitors-with great pleasure-how he conjured the ghost at the Schoolhouse. The exposé is preceded by an overview of the town's peculiar elements, such as its curious laws, forms of punishment, and its eccentric inhabitants. Also provided is an account of Puritan-era Newburyport and its witchcraft accusations, detentions, and court proceedings during the 17th century. CONDITION: Front and back wrappers lightly chipped at margins, back wrapper detached and moderately soiled; contents lightly creased.
Album Des Rieurs

Album Des Rieurs

Scherer, Leo Oblong 8vo, original red cloth, blind-stamped ornaments and gilt-rule borders to covers, re-backed, original spine laid down. Illustrated title, 24 tinted lithographs. A rare collection of comic illustrations, a fair number of which involve the antics of children and animals. A couple's "repas Champêtre" is interrupted by a horse and rider flying over the stone wall behind them; a regiment of toddling girls in their walkers stands arrayed before the Napoleonic figure of a boy who announces "Le patrie en danger"; an artist paints a young woman's portrait, her mother remarking "N'est ce pas Mr. l'Artisse que ma Clarisse passerait bien pour une vierge?" The quality of the drawing and lithography is excellent. Artist Leo Scherer (1827-1876) is an obscure figure. He is listed in Benezit as a painter born in Ettelreid, Germany, the brother of artists Sebastien, Alois, and Joseph Scherer. OCLC records two other works by him, Alphabet Drolatique (1850) and Le Vrai Portrait du Juif-Errant, an undated broadside recorded in a single copy, in the Wandering Jew Collection at Brown University. The evidence of these two works as well as the present one suggest that Scherer spent at least part of his career in France. No works by him in German come up in OCLC. Date of publication taken from caption reading "Paris le 6 Aout 1850" on plate 17, which shows the ludicrous circumstances on a flooded Parisian street. Only two copies in OCLC, one at the New York Public Library and the other at Die Deutsche Nationalbibliothek. CONDITION: Very good, minor soiling.
A Voyage to the South Seas

A Voyage to the South Seas, in the Years 1740-1. Containing a Faithful Narrative of the Loss of His Majesty’s Ship the Wager on A Desolate Island.

Bulkeley, John, and John Cummins 8vo (8" x 5.25"), bound to style in recent full brown calf, raised bands, gilt rules, author and title labels at spine. xx, 220 pp. Bookplate of William D. Claflin Jr. laid-in. Early ownership inscription at p. [iii] of "Samuel[?] Fourier.". The first edition of this captivating narrative of a harrowing voyage through the Straits of Magellan to Rio de Janeiro following a shipwreck off the coast of Chile. Part of George Anson's fleet and commanded by Capt. Cheap, the Wager was en route to harass the Spanish when it was wrecked off the southern coast of Chile after rounding Cape Horn. Following the wreck, gunner John Bulkeley and carpenter John Cummins led a small group of survivors-who refused to accompany Cheap and others northward-back through the Straits of Magellan in a longboat. After arriving safely in Rio de Janeiro the men finally returned to England-thus concluding a voyage of almost two years. Bulkeley and Cummins' narrative is especially remarkable for its description of the travails they endured while passing through the Strait of Magellan. A principal source on the wreck of the Wager, this work is also an important supplement to the Anson accounts. Two editions were published in 1743: the first, here, published by Jacob Robinson; the other, published by J. Twig, omitting the authors' names. CONDITION: Light chipping at margins of title-page and p. 1. REFERENCES: Hill 210.
Moate [Moat] Mtn.

Moate [Moat] Mtn., Northwest from Conway, N. H. [drawing]

Smith, William Thompson Russell, artist Pencil on wove paper, 12" x 8" (sheet size); draft of letter in ink on verso. A handsome, delicately sketched view of Moat Mountain in New Hampshire, as seen from North Conway. On the verso is a draft of an amusing letter to a neighbor, written at Branchtown, July 11th, 1848, in which Smith complains he cannot be expected to keep his cattle out of orchard if the neighbor's broken fence is not repaired. Russell Smith (1812-1896) was the patriarch of a family of celebrated Philadelphia artists which included his wife, Mary Priscilla Wilson Smith, his daughter, Mary Russell Smith, and his son Xanthus Smith. Russell was born in Scotland and acquired an affinity for painting during what was a sickly childhood. Throughout his life Russell worked in several subject areas, including theatre backdrops and as the official artist of several geological expeditions in the 1840s. His legacy, however, rests on his landscapes, which some have described as examples of "romanic realism." The terms derives from Smith's ability to meld a picturesque reproduction of nature with what Xanthus called "a certain looseness of handling . which conveys a happy impression of which he endeavored to express upon his canvas." This drawing is from a small archive of Smith family drawings, watercolors, and oil sketches in our inventory. The collection was acquired from a Smith descendant in Maine and includes works by Russell Smith, his wife, Mary Priscilla Wilson Smith, and their children Xanthus and Mary. The drawing is unsigned, but is unquestionably Russell's work. CONDITION: Very good, a touch of foxing.
Frankford Creek

Frankford Creek, Pa., June 4th,1837 [drawing]

Smith, William Thompson Russell, artist Pencil and wash on wove paper, 8.5" x 12.25" (sheet size). A charming wash drawing by Russell Smith of Frankford Creek, a minor tributary of the Delaware River in southeast Pennsylvania; with a half-hidden couple holding hands in the shadows of a copse of large trees, and a field down to the shore in the center background. Russell Smith (1812-1896) was the patriarch of a family of celebrated Philadelphia artists which included his wife, Mary Priscilla Wilson Smith, his daughter, Mary Russell Smith, and his son Xanthus Smith. Russell was born in Scotland and acquired an affinity for painting during what was a sickly childhood. Throughout his life Russell worked in several subject areas, including theatre backdrops and as the official artist of several geological expeditions in the 1840s. His legacy, however, rests on his landscapes, which some have described as examples of "romanic realism." The terms derives from Smith's ability to meld a picturesque reproduction of nature with what Xanthus called "a certain looseness of handling . which conveys a happy impression of which he endeavored to express upon his canvas." This drawing is from a small archive of Smith family drawings, watercolors, and oil sketches in our inventory. The collection was acquired from a Smith descendant in Maine and includes works by Russell Smith, his wife, Mary Priscilla Wilson Smith, and their children Xanthus and Mary. This drawing is unsigned, but is unquestionably Russell's work. CONDITION: Very good, slight toning at edges.
Winnipiscogee from Woolfboro

Winnipiscogee from Woolfboro, Septr. 8th, 1850. [drawing]

Smith, William Thompson Russell, artist Ink and pencil on wove paper, 8" x 12" (sheet size). A fine view of Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire, looking south from Wolfeboro, with a few sheep and trees in foreground, the lake at center with a single steamboat as well as a sailboat, mountain ranges, and the suggestion of clouds in background. Russell Smith (1812-1896) was the patriarch of a family of celebrated Philadelphia artists which included his wife, Mary Priscilla Wilson Smith, his daughter, Mary Russell Smith, and his son Xanthus Smith. Russell was born in Scotland and acquired an affinity for painting during what was a sickly childhood. Throughout his life Russell worked in several subject areas, including theatre backdrops and as the official artist of several geological expeditions in the 1840s. His legacy, however, rests on his landscapes, which some have described as examples of "romantic realism." The term derives from Smith's ability to meld a picturesque reproduction of nature with what Xanthus called "a certain looseness of handling . which conveys a happy impression which he endeavored to express upon his canvas." This drawing is from a small archive of Smith family drawings, watercolors, and oil sketches in our inventory. The collection was acquired from a Smith descendant in Maine and includes works by Russell Smith, his wife, Mary Priscilla Wilson Smith, and their children Xanthus and Mary. The drawing is unsigned, but is unquestionably Russell's work. CONDITION: Chipping and creasing on upper right corner, tack hole upper left corner, light toning.