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Autograph Letter, Signed, to Rufus King on Proof Copy of Circular.

Manuscript; King, Rufus; King, Thomas Worthington A Soon-to-be-Distinguished Ohioan Launches His Law Practice [Manuscript]. [King, Rufus (1817-1891)]. King, T[homas] W[orthington [1820-1851]. [Autograph Letter, Signed, to Rufus King on Proof Copy of a Circular for Rufus King's Law Practice, Philadelphia, October 14, 1841]. 4 pp. 11-1/2" x 9" bifolium circular, integral address leaf with postmarks and residue from wax seal. Moderate toning, negligible light soiling, horizontal and vertical fold lines, minor chips and tears to fore-edges. $500. * Born and raised in Chillicothe, Ohio, and Harvard graduates, Rufus and Thomas Worthington King were the grandsons of founding Father Rufus King of New York [1755-1827] and Thomas Worthington, Ohio senator and governor. Both had distinguished careers. Thomas was involved in the China trade and wrote a notable travel diary; Rufus was a lawyer, president of the University of Cincinnati, dean of the Cincinnati Law School and author of a history of Ohio. The circular is a proof copy for Rufus's recently established practice. (He studied at Harvard Law School and was admitted to the Ohio Bar in March 1841.) Thomas, then based in New York, oversaw its production. The first part of the appended letter discusses its final text, print run and distribution. Added in manuscript by William to its list of references, all of them leading lawyers and judges, such as Joseph Story, is William B. Reed of Philadelphia, a lawyer, politician, diplomat and man of letters. Thomas probably received this endorsement from Reed while in Philadelphia, where he mailed the circular to his brother. The rest of the letter discusses family matters and recent personal events.
  • $500
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Memorandum to Chief Justice Groner and Mr Justice Miller, 1940

Examples of Wiley Rutledge's Work When He was Justice of the U.S. Court of Appeals [Manuscript]. Rutledge, Wiley [1894-1949]. Memorandum to Chief Justice Groner and Mr Justice Miller: No. 7520. Baltimore & Ohio R.R. v. Corbin, November 27, 1940. 2 pp. [with] Memorandum to Chief Justice Groner and Mr Justice Miller: No. 7520. Baltimore & Ohio R.R. v. Corbin, November 27, 1940. 1 pp. [And] Memorandum to Chief Justice Groner: No. 7520. Baltimore & Ohio R.R. v. Corbin, December 2, 1940. 1 pp. Three single-sided typescript documents on 10-3/4" x 8" United States Court of Appeals, Washington, D.C. letterhead, all initaled "W.R." Moderate toning, negligible light soiling, staple holes to upper-left corner of 2 pp. November 27 Memorandum, "file" in pencil to upper-right corner of its first page, check mark in pencil to head of December 2 Memorandum. $350. * These memoranda concern the appeal of a wrongful death case against the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in which a driver was struck in his car at a railroad grade crossing with a broken warning signal. Judged by Chief Justice Groner and Associate Justices Miller and Rutledge, the Court affirmed the judgement on December 9, 1940 in an opinion written by Rutledge, who would later serve as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1943 to 1949. The memoranda trace Rutledge's final steps when he wrote the Court's opinion. The 2 pp. November 27 Memorandum is a draft of the opinion. The 1 pp. Memorandum shows how he will incorporate a suggestion from Chief Justice Groner. The December 2 Memorandum discusses two changes he will make to its final version. Taken together, these documents are fine examples of Rutledge's working process.
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Autograph Letter, Signed, To John Hare, London, October 29, 1824

An Imprisoned Forger Asks For a Favor [Manuscript]. Fauntleroy, Henry [1784-1824]. [Autograph Letter, Signed, To John Hare, (Newgate Prison, London), October 29, 1824]. 1 pp. [With] [Autograph Copy of a Letter to Henry Fauntleroy, (London), October 29, 1824]. 1 pp. 8-3/4" x 7-1/4" bifolium. Autograph letter signed "H. Fauntleroy" to recto of first leaf, annotation and signature of "J.J. Fauntleroy" to its foot. Copy of another letter in a third hand, dated October 29 with initials "JH," to recto of second leaf. Address and docket to verso. Moderate toning, horizontal and vertical fold lines, adhesive residue (from former mounting?) to verso along horizontal fold, a few small faint stains, tiny holes and small clean tears starting along folds without loss to text. $500. * Fauntleroy was an English banker convicted of forgery in 1824. He admitted his guilt, but pleaded that he forged documents in order to access funds to pay his firm's debts. Several bankers and merchants stepped forward to defend his integrity during the trial, but he was sentenced to be hanged. He appealed his case twice without success. Appeals for clemency followed, but they were not successful. He was hanged in November 1824, one of the last people to be executed for forgery before it ceased to be a capital crime in 1836. In this letter, written eight days after his imprisonment in Newgate and the day before his trial, Fauntleroy asks Joseph Hare to go to his house with his brother and retrieve "a Watch given to me by the House some years back which I am anxious to give to a sincere friend of mine." The copy of the additional letter appears to be from Hare to Fauntleroy confirming that he can fulfill his request. Hare was one of three men responsible for sorting out the firm's accounts after the discovery of the fraud.
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Observations Upon the Ordinance of the Lords and Commons at.

Oxford: Printed by Leonard Lichfield, 1645. 34 pp. Anti-Puritan Criticism of the Westminster Assembly [Boughen, Edward (1587-1660?)]. Observations Upon the Ordinance of the Lords and Commons at Westminster. After Advice Had with Their Assembly of Divines, For the Ordination of Ministers Pro Tempore, According to Their Directory for Ordination, And Rules for Examination Therein Expressed. Die Mercurij. 2. Octob. 1644. Oxford: Printed by Leonard Lichfield, Printer to the University, 1645. [ii], 34 pp. Quarto (6-3/4" x 5-1/4"). Disbound stab-stitched pamphlet. Light toning, leaves starting to separate at ends but secure, faint dampstaining to outer corners, light foxing and tiny spark burns to a few leaves, occasional early ink underlining, marginal marks and brief annotations (two or three-word glosses), many affected by trimming. $350. * One of two issues from 1645. The Westminster Assembly of Divines was called by Parliament in the lead-up to the first English Civil War. Influenced by Puritan theology, Parliament sought to strip out Catholic influences from the Church of England, including the anti-Puritan policies and appointments Charles I had made. The Assembly was another tool for this project. (It would eventually produce, among other important documents, the Westminster Confession of Faith.) Attributed to Royalist divine and Arminian theologian Edward Boughen, this pamphlet criticizes the Assembly's conclusions on the ordination of ministers, claiming that the Assembly had "neither skill nor authority to provide for Ordination" or other religious matters. English Short-Title Catalogue R20014.
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A View of the New Directory and a Vindication of the Ancient Liturgy.

Owned by a Royalist Politician and Secretary to Charles I [Hammond, Henry (1605-1660)]. A View of the New Directory and a Vindication of the Ancient Liturgy of the Church of England; In Answer to the Reasons Pretended in the Ordinance and Preface, For the Abolishing the One, And Establishing the Other. Oxford: Printed by Leonard Lichfield, Printer to the University, 1645. [viii], 112 pp. Quarto (6-3/4" x 5-1/4"). Disbound. Moderate toning, faint dampstaining to outer corners, light foxing and soiling to a few leaves, owner signature of Sir Philip Warwick, and brief annotation or owner signature (likely an annotation attributing the work) to title page, occasional early underlining, marginal marks and brief annotations, most in pencil. $450. * First edition. Hammond was a Royalist cleric, theologian and prolific writer of controversial sermons and tracts on various topics. A View of the New Directory criticizes the decision of the Westminster Assembly, a Puritan body assembled by Parliament, to replace the Anglican Book of Common Prayer with the Directory for Public Worship. Three subsequent editions appeared in 1646. Our copy of the first edition was owned by Sir Philip Warwick [1609-1683], an English writer, politician and committed Royalist. Warwick was close to Charles I and served as one of his secretaries during the first English Civil War. His loyalty was rewarded by Charles II with a knighthood. English Short-Title Catalogue R200188.