William Reese Company - Americana

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BLUE BOOK [wrapper title]

New Orleans] [96]pp., printed throughout in black. 12mo. Original pale blue wrappers, printed in red. Spine sunned, minor edge wear. Internally clean. Very good plus. The last edition of the series of guides to the bawdy houses and prostitutes of New Orleans, issued between 1900 and 1915, and known collectively as the "Blue Books" of Storyville. Heartman identifies this is as the twelfth or thirteenth edition. Pamela Arceneaux, in GUIDEBOOKS TO SIN, condenses Heartman's last two editions into the same print run, having compared Heartman's two editions and found them identical. Arceneaux further believes that this edition could have been printed as early as 1913, based on intertextual clues found during her research, cross-referenced with contemporary New Orleans city directories. Further, the textblock of this copy is printed entirely in black, unlike the normal red-and-black printing of most other copies of this edition. Arceneaux explains on p.105 of GUIDEBOOKS TO SIN: "There appears to have been a printing of this edition in which all of the text and design elements of the interior pages are printed only in black ink, with none of the rubrication seen in THNOC's [The Historic New Orleans Collection's] seven identical copies. I have examined a copy of this item that is in private hands, and its size, the cover printing, and the quality of the paper are exactly the same as THNOC's seven. There is one other exception - three staples are used to bind the text block rather than the usual two seen in most issues. The printing on the interior pages, the overall wear, and the accumulation of rust around the staples leads me to believe that, even lacking the red-ink highlights of the others, this one is also of the Storyville period." The only way in which the present copy differs from the above description is in the number of staples - the present copy has two, as seen in the red-ink issue. Arceneaux does not postulate about the differences in this printing of the Blue Book from the red-ink version, but we might propose that the all- black-ink version of the Blue Book was perhaps a trial printing executed at the beginning of the period of this edition, or likely one of the very latest productions of this edition, once the printer had exhausted the red ink and there was still demand for the guidebook. The red-light district of New Orleans operated in a very public way until the U.S. government suppressed it at the time of the American entrance into the First World War. This guide lists women by address, followed by advertisements for brothels; all interspersed with advertisements for liquor and cigars. Included are lists of burlesque houses, names of landladies, and names of prominent women in the trade. The prostitutes are often identified by race, most commonly white, black, and octoroon. The earliest such guide appeared about 1896, and they were produced almost annually from 1900 to 1915. During this period, all of the guides issued under the title BLUE BOOK were the product of Billy Struve, allegedly from the second floor of Lulu White's saloon at the corner of Basin Street and Bienville (though that story is likely apocryphal). More likely, Struve assembled the BLUE BOOKS from his management offices at Anderson's (a saloon owned by the "Mayor of Storyville," Tom Anderson, located at the corner of Basin and Iberville) where, according to the city directories, he also resided for most of the Storyville years. An advertisement for Tom Anderson's New Cabaret and Restaurant is found on the rear wrapper of this edition. The two photographs include the facade of Emma Johnson's famous "Studio" and a portrait of the Oriental Danseuse, Rita Walker. Owing to their content and heavy use, all BLUE BOOK guides are extremely rare. A nice example of a rarely-encountered variant of the last Storyville BLUE BOOK. HEARTMAN, BLUE BOOKS XII/XIII. ARCENEAUX, GUIDEBOOKS TO SIN 10.
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VOL. 1. NO. 2. “GO AHEAD.” DAVY CROCKETT’S ALMANACK OF WILD SPORTS IN THE WEST, AND LIFE IN THE BACKWOODS. CALCULATED FOR ALL THE STATES IN THE UNION. 1836

Crockett, Davy] 48pp. including illustrations. Original pictorial wrappers. Spine perished, re-sewn at later date, cloth loop affixed at top of spine. Small repaired tear to outer margin of first leaf; expertly-repaired diagonal tear in the first leaf, penultimate leaf, and last leaf, mildly affecting text; a few short repaired marginal tears; minor staining, moderate foxing. Overall good plus. Volume 1, number 2 of the Crockett series of almanacs, and the last to be published in Crockett's lifetime. These earliest editions of the Crockett almanacs are quite scarce. The illustration on the front wrapper shows "Col. Crockett's Method of Wading the Mississippi," with Crockett striding across on stilts. In one paragraph of the text Crockett explains why he "didn't speechify in Congress the last Winter." The reason was that his "throat and jaws were so exflunctoficated with the influenza that I even snored hoarse." The illustrations and narrative text are typically wild and woolly, including Davy's fight with a giant catfish; the story of the Parson and his dinner of "bush eels"; Ben Harding's encounter with an alligator; Judy Coon stomping a nest of wild kittens to death; Zip Spooner's melee with a black bear; and similar ilk. From such tall tales legends are born. HENDERSON, p.96. HOWES C897, "aa." STREETER SALE 4184. ALLEN IMPRINTS 1201. DRAKE 13408. GROLIER AMERICAN 100, 39. AMERICAN IMPRINTS 31279. SABIN 17576 (ref).
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AFRICA AND THE AMERICAN NEGRO.ADDRESSES AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONGRESS ON AFRICA HELD UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE STEWART MISSIONARY FOUNDATION FOR AFRICA OF GAMMON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY IN CONNECTION WITH THE COTTON STATES AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION, DECEMBER 13-15, 1895

Bowen, J. W. E., editor 59,[2],61-242pp., plus [24] leaves of plates including frontispiece. Publisher's green pictorial cloth, gilt. Minor rubbing and wear to boards and extremities. Ownership inscription of Alonzo J. Ross on front free endpaper; bookseller's ticket on rear pastedown. Two-inch gouge in front fly leaf. Very good. An important collection of twenty-nine papers given at one of the first conferences to advocate for African-American missionaries to Africa, including portraits of almost all of the speakers. By the 1890s, European powers had carved up Africa into numerous colonies. American evangelists became increasingly concerned for Africa's spiritual welfare, especially in Catholic colonies. Although both European and American missionary efforts in Africa started in the early 19th century, unlike their European colleagues, American missionaries considered their work in light of the large African-American population they knew at home. Thus, white American understandings of race strongly influenced the missionary agenda, and with the abolition of slavery, white and black church leaders began promoting the idea that African Americans should play an active role in missionizing Africa. In preliminary remarks, Gammon Theological Seminary Prof. E.L. Parks writes: "The industrial, intellectual, moral and spiritual progress of the colored people in America is a prophecy, both of what they will become and will do for the redemption of their fatherland, and also of what the native African is capable of becoming" (p.10). The Congress was organized by Gammon Theological Seminary, a prominent African- American seminary then and now, to coincide with the Cotton States and International Exposition, held to promote the American South to the world. It drew nearly 800,000 attendees from the U.S. and thirteen other countries. President Cleveland presided over the opening events on September 18, 1895, which included the controversial "Atlanta compromise" speech by Booker T. Washington. In his speech, Washington outlined the agreement between him, other African-American leaders, and southern white leaders that southern blacks would work and submit to white political rule without additional demands for equality or integration, while southern whites would guarantee that blacks would receive basic education and due process in law, and northern whites would fund black educational charities. The papers are fascinating and wide-ranging, with several addressing the political and cultural conditions in Africa, in particular how the speakers believe the colonial partition of Africa enhances opportunities to promote Christianity throughout the continent. Also included are brief anthropological surveys of African languages, mythology and folklore, and the state of mission work on the continent. Finally, there are papers on the history of slavery in Africa, and on how African-Americans should relate to their "fatherland." Several important Africans and African Americans appear in the collection, including: Orishetukeh Faduma, who was born in Guyana and raised in Sierra Leone, where he later ministered; John H. Smythe, U.S. Minister Resident and Consul General to Liberia under Presidents Hayes and Arthur; Alexander Crummell, Episcopal priest and missionary to Liberia; Madison C.B. Mason of the Freedmen's Aid and Southern Education Society; John W.E. Bowen, who was born into slavery in Louisiana, was one of the first African- Americans to receive a doctoral degree, and was later president of Gammon; Henry M. Turner, first black chaplain in the United States Colored Troops, first southern-born A.M.E. bishop, and also a missionary to Liberia and Sierra Leone; T. Thomas Fortune, who was born into slavery in Florida and rose to become a prominent civil rights activist, journalist, and owner of the NEW YORK AGE, the most widely read black newspaper of the time; and R.S. Rust, Honorary Secretary of the Freedmen's Aid and Southern Education Society. Other notable speakers include: William Y. Atkinson, Governor of Georgia, with some surprisingly progressive remarks; Cyrus C. Adams, editor of the NEW YORK SUN; Heli Chatelain, African traveler, missionary, and philologist; May French-Sheldon, one of the first women to become a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society; and Joseph E. Roy, chairman of the World's Congress on Africa at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago and Western District Secretary for the American Missionary Association. An important snapshot of the place of African Americans in the late 19th century from authors who laid the groundwork for the modern civil rights movement.
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TURNER BROTHERS MANUFACTURERS OF GINGER WINE, SYRUPS, CORDIALS, NATIVE WINES, ETC. ETC. NEW YORK, BUFFALO & SAN FRANCISCO

Turner Brothers] Illustrated lithographic broadside, 23 x 18 inches. Mild spotting, slightly trimmed. Overall, an excellent display piece in very good condition. An exceedingly rare pictorial broadside advertising Turner Brothers wines, syrups, and cordials. The broadside was drawn by John Ffooks, who depicts the manufacturing facilities of the Turner Brothers in New York City, Buffalo, and San Francisco in three separate insets. The latter depiction is especially interesting, as it sets the Turner Brothers' branch office and factory within a sprawling panoramic image of San Francisco - an early depiction of the city in such breadth and detail. The whole of the lithograph is bordered in artfully-executed grape vines and vine leaves interspersed with small vignette portraits of the six Turner brothers who were partners in the company. Turner Brothers Wines & Spirits enterprise, a major American concern with national distribution capabilities operated from 1847 until the mid-1860s. The upper vignette features a view of their premier store in New York City, located at 350-352 Washington Street, at the corner of Franklin (present- day Soho/Tribeca). In the middle is a view of their establishment in Buffalo, where the business was founded. In the lower part of the composition is a fine panorama of San Francisco (where Turner Brothers had established a store), taken from a south- easterly perspective (perhaps the Rincon Hill area), looking towards Telegraph Hill, with the bustling downtown and harbour in the foreground. It is lovely depiction of San Francisco captured in the aftermath of the Gold Rush; interestingly, the distinctive bottles of the Turner Brothers have been unearthed at several California Gold Rush boomtowns, including Monte Cristo, Chips Flat, Excelsior, Downieville, and Chaparral Hill. The present broadside also qualifies as a rare early work of California wine interest. The Turner Brothers Wines & Spirits Company was a brilliantly successful, albeit evanescent alcohol and medicinal spirits empire. The company was founded in 1847 in Buffalo by the six Turner Brothers (Malcolm, James, Thomas, Archibald, Robert, and George), who were originally from Delaware County, New York, and children of Scottish immigrants. They traded in wines and manufactured their own sodas, ginger and berry wines, and medicinal spirits. Their enterprise enjoyed rapid success, and they soon opened a large store and factory in New York City. James ran the establishment in Buffalo; Malcolm oversaw the New York premises; while Robert ran the show in San Francisco; the other brothers remained partners but were less active in the day-to- day business. Taking advantage of the massive wealth generated by the California Gold Rush, in 1853, the Turner Brothers opened a store in San Francisco, where they were one of the boomtown's earliest major distributors of alcohol. After making a large fortune, the brothers sold the business in the mid-1860s, and subsequent to that the assets traded under different names. The brothers then used the proceeds to establish the Turner Brothers Bank, headquartered in New York City, seeking to take advantage of the international railway boom. This initially proved successful, and they soon opened branches in Berlin, Paris, and London. However, during the Panic of 1873, the railway boom went bust, and the Turner bank filed for bankruptcy in 1876. While the brothers personally retained some of their wealth, only Archibald re-emerged as a prominent player, serving as president of several New York banks over the coming years. The lithographers, Sarony, Major, and Knapp were a prominent firm that operated in New York City in one combination or another from the early 1840s until 1867, at which time Napoleon Sarony (who had earlier worked for Currier & Ives along with Henry Major) left the company to open what would become a world- renowned photography studio. Based on this fact, coupled with the Turner Brothers selling the wine business in the mid-1860s, the present broadside can be dated to no later than 1867. Little is known about the artist who drew the imagery, John Ffooks. We could locate no other copies of the present broadside in OCLC or auction records. A highly-interesting early work of California wine interest, New York business history, and American lithographic art. PETERS, AMERICA ON STONE, pp.350-356 (ref).
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CONSTITUTION OF THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AS ADOPTED IN STATE CONVENTION AT COLUMBIA, S.C., MAY 15, 1912 [caption title]

South Carolina Democratic Party] 4pp., printed in double columns on a single folded sheet. Light wear. Small gouge in upper inner portion of both leaves, touching a couple letters of text. Slight worming to lower right corner of pp.1-2 (no text affected). Very good. Uncommon pamphlet setting out the South Carolina Democratic Party's updated constitution, which effectively disenfranchised black voters for decades and became a model for similar strategies throughout the South. Southern states worked diligently to evade the Reconstruction Amendments (13th, 14th, and 15th), which required them to fully enfranchise former slaves and guarantee their civil rights. In South Carolina, the Democratic Party succeeded in its unconstitutional mission by transforming their party into a private "club." No white man would be excluded from the party provided that he promised to support the candidates nominated in the appropriate primary, however entrance for black men required them to have voted for former Confederate General Wade Hampton for governor in 1876 and voted an unwavering Democratic ticket ever since - they would also need to present a written statement, signed by ten white Democratic voters, swearing to this fact. As a result, South Carolina achieved the first "white primary." Other states followed, with other white primaries being established in Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Georgia. These, combined with barriers to voter registration and similar policies in other states, resulted in the complete disenfranchisement of blacks from 1890-1908 in all states of the former Confederacy. From its founding the NAACP worked to end these limitations. In 1947, South Carolina Federal District Judge J. Waties Waring noted that almost every elected official in South Carolina had been a nominee of the state's Democratic Party and as such, the Democratic Party primary clearly "control[led] the choice" at the general election; the party could no longer operate as a private club. Waring declared it was "time for South Carolina to rejoin the Union" (ELMORE V. RICE). Again. This is the first time we have handled this item. We could find no copies listed in OCLC and no listings at auction. RULES GOVERNING THE MEMBERSHIP OF DEMOCRATIC CLUBS, THE QUALIFICATION OF VOTERS AND THE CONDUCT OF PRIMARY ELECTIONS OF THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, ADOPTED MAY 15, 1912. [Columbia, S.C.], 1912. ELMORE V. RICE, cited in Michael J. Klarman, "The White Primary Rulings: A Case Study in the Consequences of Supreme Court Decisionmaking," FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY LAW REVIEW 29:1 (2001): pp.55-107.
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MAGDALEN FACTS. No. 1. NEW YORK, JANUARY, 1832 [all published]

McDowall, John R.] 104pp. Original pictorial wrappers. Front wrapper chipped in foredge, just touching the central image, spine chipped, small repaired marginal tear on rear wrapper. Scattered moderate foxing. About very good. Untrimmed. An important, early American work on the negative effects of prostitution centering on the "fallen women" of the Female Penitentiary of the County and City of New York at Bellevue. The author, John R. McDowall established the first and very short-lived Magdalen Society in New York in 1830, modeled after the Magdalen Society of Philadelphia which was founded thirty years earlier. McDowall was a Princeton-educated theologian and crusader against the ills of prostitution, and set up at Five Points in New York City in 1830 to assist the American Tract Society with educating the "unfortunate females" of Bellevue and New York City in "Sabbath Schools." The text presents facts relative to the success of his venture, and is divided into thirty-four "Articles" or chapters. The titles of these chapters include "The Abandoned - their moral character," "A Vicious Woman," "Magdalens - their prospects," "The Suicide," and "House of Refuge in New York," among others. McDowall also includes passages on the various Magdalen Society branches and similar organizations in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Boston, London, and "The Life and Appeal of a Georgia Magdalen, by herself." About half of the articles are intentionally sad or brutal stories about the dangers and consequences of reckless sexual behavior, designed both to discourage promiscuity and scare young women straight. In one chapter, titled "Two Females," two young women are forced into a life of sex slavery by an African-American captor who keeps the girls in the "rear apartment of his cellar." The front wrapper and titlepage include two woodcuts of the Female Penitentiary of the County and City of New York at Bellevue - an exterior of the building and an interior view of the "Night Rooms Without Beds" where "between 100 and 300 women in the prison sleep.giving from twenty to sixty women to each room." The last page prints the sheet music to a hymn called "The Magdalen" by the Rev. Philip Hawker of Plymouth, England. The rear wrapper prints the text of the CONSTITUTION OF THE MAGDALEN SOCIETY. for use by auxiliary branches. Article 2 states that "The immediate object of this society is the moral, intellectual, and domestic improvement of the female character." Sadly, by the time the present work was published, the Magdalen Society had ceased operations, so McDowall published MAGDALEN FACTS at his own considerable cost. He soon found himself in tremendous debt, and had to rely on help from charitable societies himself to make ends meet, along with defending himself against vocal and virulent critics who disagreed with his methods. He continued to rail against "licentiousness" with the publication of McDOWALL'S JOURNAL in 1833, and published several articles in notable New York area newspapers which were reprinted in publications across the United States. He could never escape his critics, who ridiculed McDowall for his interest in prostitutes and even began to accuse him of encouraging licentiousness by publicizing it. Exhausted by the controversies, McDowall died young in 1836. A scarce pamphlet with fewer than twenty copies in institutions, scattered over a handful of records in OCLC. Only four copies of the work have appeared at auction since 1886.
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A REPORT OF THE TRIAL OF ARTHUR HODGE, ESQUIRE, (LATE ONE OF THE MEMBERS OF HIS MAJESTY’S COUNCIL FOR THE VIRGIN-ISLANDS) AT THE ISLAND OF TORTOLA, ON THE 25th APRIL, 1811, AND ADJOURNED TO THE 29th OF THE SAME MONTH; FOR THE MURDER OF HIS NEGRO MAN SLAVE NAMED PROSPER

Hodge, Arthur] [2],186pp. Original rear drab board (spine perished and front board lacking). Minor foxing and occasional dampstaining to text. Good plus. Untrimmed. First American edition of the report of the groundbreaking trial of West Indian plantation owner Arthur Hodge for the murder of one of his slaves, after the London edition of 1811. Hodge, a prominent planter on Tortola in the British Virgin Islands, was notorious for the extreme brutality with which he treated his slaves. Between 1803 and 1811, the number of blacks on his estate diminished from 140 to thirty-five, a fact that neighbors reasonably attributed to Hodge's cruelties, which were known to include savage floggings, the forcing of boiling water down women's throats, and the dipping and resultant flaying alive of a child in a cauldron of scalding water. In 1811 the colonial court finally intervened, arresting Hodge for the 1807 murder of his slave, Prosper, whose punishment for allegedly stealing a mango from one of Hodge's trees consisted of a two-day cart- whipping that left "no black skin upon him remaining from his hips to his hands" (p.10) and finally resulted in his death. The prosecution's key witnesses included Stephen M'Keough, a former overseer of the plantation, and, most notably, Pereen Georges, a free black woman who had lived intermittently on Hodge's estate. The defense's main strategy of discrediting the witnesses easily failed, and Hodge was found guilty, sentenced to death, and hanged on May 8, 1811. The report, certified and submitted by Richard Hetherington, the president of the Virgin Islands and president of the Court for the trial, consists primarily of the transcription of the depositions and the trial as taken by A.M. Belisario, a member of the grand jury on Hodge's indictment. "The case created a tremendous stir in England where the revolting details of the defendant's crimes were capitalized to the utmost by anti-slave agitators. The jury's recommendation [for mercy] seemed especially preposterous for Englishmen. This affair, with that of Huggins, the Nevis planter who in 1810 murdered a slave in the presence of several magistrates and was nevertheless acquitted, did much to arouse public feeling, which had become somewhat dulled by the abolition of the slave trade." - Ragatz. A scarce and important record of unusual jurisprudence in the waning days of slavery in the British Empire. LIBRARY COMPANY, AFRO-AMERICANA (2nd SUPPLEMENT) 1080. RAGATZ, p.468 (ref). SABIN 4425, 32327. SHAW & SHOEMAKER 26592. FINKELMAN 290. DNB IX, p.952.
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THE NEGRO TRAIL BLAZERS OF CALIFORNIA.IT IS A TRUE RECORD OF FACTS, AS THEY PERTAIN TO THE HISTORY OF THE PIONEER AND PRESENT DAY NEGROES OF CALIFORNIA

Beasley, Delilah L. 317pp., including illustrations and frontispiece portrait. Original yellow pictorial cloth. Very faint evidence of call number removal from lower portion of spine. Very clean and fresh internally. Overall, a very attractive copy, much nicer than usually found. A presentation copy, warmly inscribed by Mrs. Beasley to "Mr. Beardsley" of Berkeley, California on the front fly leaf. This copy bears the bookplate of Catholic priest and noted collector Joseph M. Gleason on the front pastedown. A scarce, important and trailblazing early history of African Americans in California, privately published after years of assiduous research. Mrs. Beasley's book is a wide- ranging work, incorporating a historical narrative with biographical sketches of leading black citizens, including doctors, lawyers, musicians, journalists, religious leaders, and educators. She drew heavily on primary sources, including papers, memoirs, and oral histories at the Bancroft Library and California State Library, and travelled throughout the state to interview subjects. She also examined every African-American newspaper published in California since the first was issued in 1855. The resulting book is a monument to her efforts and to the African-American men and women she profiles, from the earliest pioneers through to Spanish- American War veterans and those involved with the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition. The book reportedly took eighteen years to complete - ten to research and the rest to write. COWAN, p.40. ZAMORANO SELECT 4. ROCQ 16678. ABAJIAN 2017. EBERSTADT 107:19.
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GERMAN CAMP-NEWSPAPER, PRISONER OF WAR CAMP, CONCORDIA, KANSAS [cover title]

German Prisoners of War]: [World War II] Two volumes. Vol. 1: Nos. 34-35 (1944), 2. Jhrg. Nos. 1-3, 6, 8-13 (1945); Vol. 2: Nos. 1-12 (1945). Two-sided sheet laid into Vol. 1 with an essay on peace from Karl Teufel on one side and an anonymous reflection on the German occupation of Holland on the other. Folio. Original three-quarter green cloth and paper-covered boards, manuscript title in green on cover of Vol. 1. Minor wear and spotting to covers, tidelines to front cover of Vol. 1, stain to upper corner of Vol. 2, reaching corners of about half the pages (no text affected). Trimming to lower margins, with slight loss of text to a few pages. Tight binding partially obscures inner margin in a few issues. Many issues have purple ink stamp and initials of the camp censor; occasional manuscript annotations including translations. Front free endpaper of Vol. 2 is a dedication page: "To Captain Karl C. Teufel as Souvenir for the Time from June to September 1945 [signed] Dr. Georg Graf Kesselstatt, Editor DER AUSBLICK." Occasional tanning. Very good overall. Collected issues of a German prisoner-of-war camp weekly newspaper, which began as NEUE STACHELDRAHT NACHRICHTEN, LAGER CONCORDIA (NEW BARBED WIRE NEWS, CAMP CONCORDIA). With issue number eight in the second year (March 11, 1945), the title changed to DEUTSCHE LAGERZEITUNG: ORGAN DER DEUTSCHEN LAGERFÜHRUNG, CONCORDIA ("GERMAN CAMP NEWSPAPER: ORGAN OF THE GERMAN CAMP COMMAND, CONCORDIA"), likely to align with titles of newspapers at other prisoner-of-war camps. After the war ended, the title changed again to DER AUSBLICK: ZEITUNG DER DEUTSCHEN KRIEGSGEFANGENEN, LAGER CONCORDIA (THE OUTLOOK: NEWSPAPER OF GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR). This collection contains some two dozen issues from the final years of World War II. The layout and printing of all versions of the newspaper is sophisticated. The title piece of NEUE STACHELDRAHT is hand-designed (possibly a linocut), featuring an image of a watch tower. The article text was initially produced on a typewriter, but the rest of the paper's contents - illustrations, maps, titles, and captions - are all hand-drawn, and then reproduced, along with the typed content, via offset printing. The issues are inconsistently paginated and most articles are unsigned, unless reproduced from external sources; translators are sometimes noted. The editorial staff is not mentioned in earlier issues, although some articles are signed "Hrg." ("Ed."). The issue for April 1, 1945 is the first to name an editor ("Schriftleitung: Oblt. Walberg"). The U.S. agreed to construct P.O.W. camps initially to support the British, who were running out of room for prisoners. The U.S. camps grew quickly; by the end of the war there were some 400,000 German prisoners held in the U.S. Camp Concordia operated from 1943-1945, and primarily housed German Army prisoners captured in North Africa, including Rommel's notorious "Afrika Korps." Concordia was the largest P.O.W. camp in Kansas, averaging 4,000 prisoners during its operation. The camp's aptly-named assistant executive officer and head of indoctrination, Capt. Karl C. Teufel (Teufel can mean "devil" in German) described the prison population as follows: "For the most part, they were members of the crack German Afrika Korps, which had fought under Rommel and had nearly won the North African Campaign.No better German soldiers existed anywhere, and these men came to this country still proud of their accomplishments, still assured of the coming victory of National Socialism over the rest of the World, still confident and arrogant in their own strength, and fully prepared to make things as difficult for their custodians as safely possible. There were a thousand Officers among them, ranging from second lieutenants to Colonels (two of whom were later promoted to General rank), and hence some of Hitler's best military brains were here also." Healthy enlisted prisoners were required to work, mostly on neighboring farms. Non-commissioned officers could only work in supervisory positions, and while officers could not be forced to work, they could volunteer. All prisoners were paid for their work in scrip, which could be spent in the camp canteen, or used to buy newspapers (like these), books, and magazines. The first issue in these volumes is the "Christmas Issue," No. 34, December 24, 1944, which calls on the prisoners to rebuild their physical strength and mental toughness in order to continue the struggle against the Allies. It also reproduces an article from the Associated Press, exaggerating the impact of the V-2 rocket attacks on England. Later articles criticize the Allied bombing of German cities for the loss of German civilian lives and historic buildings. Also included are updates about battles and German military advances. But then there are schedules for Christmas services (for both Catholics and Lutherans), Christmas hymns and stories, announcements of concerts (including Rossini and Tchaikovsky), updates on camp sports (mainly soccer and handball), upcoming film screenings, and a list of birthdays for the week. Nevertheless, keeping the peace in the camps was challenging. One of Capt. Teufel's main jobs at Concordia was weeding out the hardcore Nazis from the merely patriotic soldiers, and then relocating them to Camp Alva in Oklahoma, a maximum security facility specifically for uncompromising Nazis. This not only served to maintain peace in the camps for the American guards, but also kept average German soldiers safe from more extreme soldiers. The newspaper content was inspected and censored before publication. Blatantly pro- Nazi messages were prohibited (though oblique references slip in), but patriotic sentiment is allowed. Subsequent issues have similar recurring content as in the Christmas issue, especially pro-German material, such as uplifting passages to stay strong in the "Kampf," and slanted articles highlighting German successes in contrast to Allied laziness and incompetence. For instance, in a recurring
ALBERT HANFORD'S TEXAS STATE REGISTER FOR 1877

ALBERT HANFORD’S TEXAS STATE REGISTER FOR 1877

Texas] 168pp., plus large colored folding map. Publisher's printed grey wrappers. Wrappers repaired along joints, old staining, small chip to bottom corner of rear wrapper. Closed tear in the map neatly repaired, minor separations at cross folds. Even toning to text. Overall, a good plus copy. An elusive installment of Albert Hanford's annual TEXAS STATE REGISTER, which was published from 1856 to 1879. Part almanac, part promotional, the present book was an attempt to encourage immigration to Texas in the latter part of the 19th century. The text begins with a series of monthly almanac- style tables giving dawn, dusk, and moonrise times. These are followed by a recounting of the Battle of Galveston and other celebratory and patriotic vignettes lauding Texas. A long section describes Texas by county, giving statistics on population, climate, soil, rivers, minerals, productions, land prices, and more. The introduction to this section ends with a short reminder to immigrants that they "can hire lands in any part of the State, either for money, or on shares of the crops, as may be agreed between the contracting parties." The guide also includes sections on Texas law, courts, post offices, and railroads. The almanac concludes with a section called "The Travelers' Guide" which is composed entirely of steamship and railroad advertisements, followed by a section of general advertisements both for New York and Texas (likely to lure the former to the latter), as well as some ads for various businesses in New Orleans. The advertisements range from refrigerators to pharmacies and cotton merchants to printers, and more. Hanford even advertises his own "Celebrated Purified Whiskey." The large fold-out map (dated 1877, with copyright date 1875) depicts the expansion and growth of Texas at the time, including details of the developing railroads, forts, roads, and topography. The map is entitled "New Map of the State of Texas for 1877. Printed Expressly for Hanford's Texas State Register." It was published by Hanford, though it was "Drawn, Engraved & Printed" by the famed mapmakers at Colton & Company. Institutional holdings for the 1877 edition are sparse, but ultimately unclear based on the nature of library reporting of periodical catalog records. Suffice to say, any issue of Hanford's almanac appears to be rare in today's market. OCLC 4995266, 5879471.
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A VISIT TO THE NEW YORK MUSEUM OF ANATOMY, NO. 618 BROADWAY, ABOVE HOUSTON STREET, NEW YORK CITY

New York Museum of Anatomy] 10,[2]pp. 24mo. Original printed wrappers. Fine. A surprisingly well-preserved pocket-sized promotional pamphlet summarizing the holdings of the New York Museum of Anatomy, a scientific storehouse for strange and unusual anatomical wonders - "For Gentlemen Only." Upon paying the admission fee of fifty cents, the lucky visitor will be "ushered into the large hall of the Museum, containing over 100,000 Natural and Anatomical Preparations." Once there, "two or three hours spent in the thorough examination of these specimens will give a more true, accurate and permanent insight into the human system than any amount of reading - any number of engravings, paintings, or verbal descriptions." Notable among the most recent acquisitions is "No. 1,103, The Head and Right Arm of Anton Probst, who was recently executed in Philadelphia, for the murder of the Deering family" in June, 1866 (thus dating this pamphlet). Other exhibits include "No. 459, The World- Renowned Dissectable Female Figure.at one glance one thousand seven hundred parts of the human body can be seen"; and the similarly-themed "No. 516, The Great and World-Renowned Gertu, imported from Vienna, by the proprietors, at a cost of $15,000.pronounced by the many thousands who have seen it to be the very 'Ne Plus Ultra' of feminine beauty, the development of all the organs are magnificent, and being life-size it is more than worthy of admiration"; and then no anatomical museum would be complete without "No. 484, The Hermaphrodite." Moving to the "Pathological Room," one is encouraged to "note the inscription over the entrance - 'The Wages of Sin is Death'." Predictably, the only pathology discussed in this room is venereal disease, with numerous, detailed specimens of cases at varying stages of development. The visitor is urged to spend at least an hour contemplating the models, for the good of his own soul, of course. Next is the "Lecture Room, where the Demonstrator of Anatomy lectures, upon practical and scientific subjects, to the visitors, every evening, free of charge." And then from the Lecture Room, one moves to the area of "natural history and monstrosities," including a "man with a horn in his forehead," "embalmed bodies," "Aztec children," "children with the heads of monkeys," "pigs with the heads and trunks of elephants," wild boar skulls, a rattlesnake, coral snake, owl fish, devil-fish, and many more. In the "Wax-Work Exhibition" is the "Death-Bed of George Washington," a mechanical figure that bled and breathed realistically and gasped for air called the "Dying Zouave," the "Execution of Marie Antoinette" (with guillotine), and figures of Count Bismarck, Napoleon, and Charles Dickens. The New York Museum of Anatomy opened as the Parisian Cabinet of Wonders and Anatomy in 1861 before moving down Broadway and changing its name in 1863. The museum was founded by Henry Jacob Jordan (whose family business was museums of the fantastic) and Samuel T.E. Beck. The museum operated as a center of the fantastic in close proximity to at least two other "oddities" museums on Broadway until 1881. Rare. Not in Atwater, which holds the CATALOGUE OF THE NEW YORK MUSEUM OF ANATOMY and a broadside for the museum headed UNCEASING WONDERS! We found only two copies of this pamphlet listed in OCLC (New York Historical Society, Library Company of Philadelphia), however the Library Company's copy has an illustration of the museum's facade on the rear wrapper, while this copy has an advertisement for the recently published THE PHILOSOPHY OF MARRIAGE. OCLC 58764901. ATWATER 2598 (ref).
THE EVENTFUL NARRATIVE OF CAPT. WILLIAM STOCKELL

THE EVENTFUL NARRATIVE OF CAPT. WILLIAM STOCKELL, COMPRISING AN AUTHENTIC AND FAITHFUL DETAIL OF HIS TRAVELS IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES. OF HIS VARIOUS AND SIGNAL ENGAGEMENTS.AND OF HIS ADVENTURES AND ACHIEVEMENTS IN THE WHALE FISHERY

Stockell, William 326,[2]pp., plus twelve plates, including frontispiece. Contemporary patterned cloth, gilt morocco label. Boards a bit worn and soiled. Minor dampstaining to first several leaves, scattered foxing throughout. Good. A rare work by an American seaman who spent the first two decades of the 19th century serving in the American and British naval and maritime services. Stockell's narrative (which was "revised and corrected for the press" by Dr. Edwin A. Atlee) carries him across the globe, from Jamaica to Scotland, Malta, Quebec, Matanzas, Havana, New York, Montreal, Bombay, Brazil, Botany Bay, Madagascar, Calcutta, Malacca, China, Mozambique, the Greenland seas, and the West Indies. His adventures contain numerous accounts of the pursuit and capture of pirates, including a French privateer. Of particular note is his tale of a competition between two vessels for a whale. Whaling was of great interest to Stockell, and he provides a missive on the art of harpooning with details on the proper positioning of the attacking ship. In total, over seventy pages of the work are devoted to Stockell's whaling experiences. The many plates depict various dramatic scenes, including a whaling scene and his "rescue" by a crew of dead men. All told, a wonderful narrative of life on the high seas. Not in Jenkins or Smith. HOWES S1016. SABIN 91877. OCLC 5985500.
EMPLOYEES ITEN BISCUIT COMPANY SNOW WHITE BAKERY OKLAHOMA [cover title]

EMPLOYEES ITEN BISCUIT COMPANY SNOW WHITE BAKERY OKLAHOMA [cover title]

Oklahoma Photographica]: [African Americana] Four-panel panoramic silver gelatin photograph, each panel approximately 8 x 10 inches. With an additional 3 1/2 x 6-inch silver gelatin photograph mounted on the inside front cover. Each of the four panels mounted on linen and folded into a black pebbled cloth binding, gilt title on front board. Mild edge wear to boards, one of the panels with a small chip in lower left corner. Very good. A striking panoramic photograph of the employees of an early Oklahoma bakery, likely produced as a keepsake for the staff or management. The photograph shows some 200 employees of the Iten Biscuit Company of Oklahoma, a subsidiary of the main Iten company of Iowa. The arrangement of the employees in the photograph - the juxtaposition of race, gender, and class - is startling. At left, four horse-drawn carriages are controlled by African-American men in white uniforms and hats, with white men in overalls sitting in the carriages, holding the reins of the horses. The middle section is dominated by about 150 white women (and a handful of white men) in simple white dresses and bonnets. The right side of the image shows the executives of the company in dark suits and ties, and perhaps their wives and children, ranged around two Model-T Ford automobiles. The organization of the image divides the subjects into thirds, segregated by race, gender, and class. The photograph was likely taken about 1913. The Iten Biscuit Company's new Oklahoma City plant and distribution hub, in front of which the present panorama was taken, was completed in October 1912. Constructed at a cost of $250,000, the Iten Biscuit Company building in Oklahoma City consisted of five stories totaling about 126,000 square feet of space; it was also constructed with restrooms and a breakroom on each floor, quite unusual for a commercial building in 1912. The Iten Biscuit Company occupied the space for thirty years before being bought by Nabisco. The building still stands; it is now a large U- Haul Moving & Storage location at 100 SE 2nd Street in Oklahoma City. The photographer, Fred L. Stone was an early and quite notable Oklahoma itinerant photographer. He captured images of the Sooner state both before and after the Land Rush of 1889, and promoted himself as the official photographer for the largest newspaper in Oklahoma City, THE OKLAHOMAN. He also claimed to be the first photographer in Oklahoma with a panoramic camera, with which he extensively documented Oklahoma City, Tulsa, and numerous other sites in Oklahoma and the surrounding states. Stone garnered so much attention for his early adoption of the panoramic camera that he became known as "That Man Stone," which he later used as an imprint in his photographs, as seen here. We could find no other examples of this panoramic photograph in OCLC, the market, or at auction. It is possibly unique. An informative visual representation of race, gender, and class differences at an early- 20th-century Oklahoma commercial bakery.
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THE HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN INDIANS; PARTICULARLY THOSE NATIONS ADJOINING TO THE MISSISIPPI [sic], EAST AND WEST FLORIDA, GEORGIA, SOUTH AND NORTH CAROLINA, AND VIRGINIA.ALSO AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING A DESCRIPTION OF THE FLORIDAS, AND THE MISSISIPPI [sic] LANDS.

Adair, James [12],464pp., plus folding map. Half title. Quarto. Full calf, spine ruled in gilt, gilt leather labels. A few marginal annotations in ink and pencil. Small closed tear to top of leaves Ff and Ff2 (no text affected). Occasional mild foxing throughout. Very good. James Adair (1709-1783), "one of the most colorful figures in Southern colonial history" (Clark), emigrated from Ireland to South Carolina in 1735. He was heavily involved in trading with the Indians of the Southeast, including the Catawba, Cherokee, and Chickasaw, between 1735 and 1759, and this work contains a chapter on each of these major tribes. Considered by many to be the leading authority of his time on the southeast Indians, he offers detailed descriptions of Indian customs and religion, with many observations on Indian trade and traders. A large portion of the work is devoted to Adair's twenty-three arguments by which he attempts to prove the descent of the Indians from the Lost Tribes of Israel. The map "illustrates a Southeast with the Indians safely tucked away in the interior wilderness, exactly the condition Adair's readers would have approved of" (Cumming & De Vorsey). "The citations and quotations in Adair's HISTORY are evidence of wide and serious reading. He kept up the intellectual culture of an eighteenth-century gentleman, but he lacked polish in personal demeanor. In 1768 he visited Sir William Johnson, superintendent of Indian affairs, in an unsuccessful attempt to get Johnson's endorsement of his HISTORY. Johnson was condescending, writing to General Thomas Gage (10 Dec. 1768) that Adair's "appearance may not be much in his favor.but he is certainly well acquainted with the Southern Indians, and a man of Learning tho Rusticated by 30 years residence in a Wild Country." In 1775 Adair voyaged to England to get his HISTORY published. Returning to America in the same year, he resumed trading in new surroundings in western Tennessee, where tradition has settled him with an anonymous Indian wife or mistress.He believed that Englishmen could never live in security as long as Indians were numerous and strong and that English policy should therefore be to incite the tribes to war mercilessly against each other, a precept that Adair practiced. He is notable today for his active involvement in intertribal intrigues and wars and for his record of Indian culture" - ANB. HOWES A38. PILLING, PROOF-SHEETS 18. CLARK I:28. VAIL 643. FIELD 11. JCB (3)I:2013. SERVIES 517. BELL A59. SABIN 155. GRAFF 10. CUMMING & DE VORSEY 448. ESTC T86841. REESE & OSBORN, STRUGGLE FOR NORTH AMERICA 82. ANB 1, pp.60-61.
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A STATISTICAL AND CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF THE UNITED STATES AND TERRITORIES, AND TRAVELER’S GUIDE THROUGH THE UNITED STATES

Cunningham, G., compiler 48pp., plus six plates. 12mo. Original printed brown wrappers. Some chipping to spine, minor staining and foxing to wrappers, mild edge wear. Scattered minor foxing. Very good. A rare almanac-style compendium and traveler's guide to mid-19th-century America, with notable content on slave populations and early Mormonism. The publisher is G. Cunningham, who also printed an edition of the Mary Jemison captivity in Utica this same year. The most interesting section, on pages 38- 39, contains population statistics broken down by states and territories, and reported in six different demographic units: white males, white females, "Free Colored Males," "Free Colored Females," "Male Slaves," and "Female Slaves." The total of free African Americans is just 386,245; the population of slaves totals 2,487,213. The text also includes a historical account of the United States from Jamestown in 1607 through the ratification and effective beginning of the Constitution on March 4, 1789. It also includes historical and statistical accounts of American money, forms of government, lists of governmental officials and their salaries, passages concerning the American military, a section on voter qualifications in each state, a table entitled "Annual Cost to the People of Each State of Their Several Departments of Government," various tables of distances between locations in the Northeast, and more. The plates were engraved by M. Miller, who advertises his engraving and draughtsman business on the rear wrapper. The six plates depict seven images, including the Tripoli Monument, Mormon Hill in Manchester, New York (near Palmyra), the clock in the House of Representatives, the first church at Springfield, Massachusetts built in 1702, the Lexington meeting house involved in the battle in 1775, each side of the first American coin minted in 1652, and the Peak House, one of the oldest in New England, in Medfield, Massachusetts. The early depiction of Mormon Hill is especially notable. The image is surrounded by an unflattering history of Joseph Smith (here referred to as "Joe Smith" and described as "a lazy ignorant young man") and a dismissive account of the emergence of the early Mormon faith. The passage ends by noting that Mormons are now gathering at Nauvoo, Illinois, "where many converts are flocking to, from various parts of the United States and England." A similarly titled but decidedly different work was compiled by Montgomery Bartlett and published in New York in 1833, using population figures from the 1830 census and other contemporary statistics. Bartlett's work was not illustrated. Cunningham also published a work under this exact title in Rochester in 1843, compiled by Bixby. Apparently not in AMERICAN IMPRINTS, nor in Flake. A rare work, with just eight physical copies recorded in OCLC. OCLC 37127231.
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CHASE & BACHELDER’S AMERICAN MUSEUM OF ART

American Expansion] Color woodblock poster, approximately 37 x 27 inches. Clean and bright. Fine condition. Archivally matted and attractively framed. A very attractive print, appropriating a famed image of westward expansion as a metaphor for inexorable American progress. The print is based on an 1872 painting by John Gast, called "American Progress." Gast created the painting at the commission of the western travel guide publisher, George Crofutt, who produced a chromolithographic print of Gast's painting for subscribers to his guidebooks. This poster was likely created from Crofutt's print. The lower two- thirds of the poster consists of the allegorical scene, dominated by a lady liberty figure soaring above an expansive western landscape. Wearing flowing robes and with the star of American empire in her hair, she flies westward, holding a schoolbook in her right hand and stringing a telegraph wire with her left. A glowing sun rises in the east above a city along a river, and the snow- capped Rocky Mountains are seen in the background. Along the Plains below her are wagon trains moving westward (leaving cities behind but bringing civilization with them), railroad lines, buffalo herds, retreating Indians, prospectors, hunters, a farmer with a plow, and western animals. The reason for the creation of this print is somewhat mysterious. It is undated, and was printed in Nottingham, England, publicizing an enterprise called "Chase & Bachelder's American Museum of Art," which may not have actually existed. OCLC locates only two copies of this print, at the Autry Museum and the Newberry Library. There is also a copy at the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth. Scarce. OCLC 77662600. Patricia Hills, "Picturing Progress in the Era of Westward Expansion" in William H. Truettner (editor), THE WEST AS AMERICA: REINTERPRETING IMAGES OF THE FRONTIER, 1820- 1920, pp.134-36, 354. Brian W. Dippie, "The Moving Finger Writes: Western Art and the Dynamics of Change" in Jules David Prown, et al, DISCOVERED LANDS INVENTED PASTS: TRANSFORMING VISIONS OF THE AMERICAN WEST, pp.96-97.
AN HEBREW GRAMMAR

AN HEBREW GRAMMAR, COLLECTED CHIEFLY FROM THOSE OF MR. ISRAEL LYONS.AND THE REV. RICHARD GREY.TO WHICH IS SUBJOINED A PRAXIS, TAKEN FROM THE SACRED CLASSICS, AND CONTAINING A SPECIMEN OF THE WHOLE HEBREW LANGUAGE: WITH A SKETCH OF THE HEBREW POETRY, AS RETRIEVED BY BISHOP HARE

Sewall, Stephen] [2],v,[1],83pp. Half title. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper boards, raised bands. Binding rubbed and worn. Contemporary gift and ownership inscriptions on front pastedown, front free endpaper, and titlepage. Two-inch tear to upper margin of leaf D4 (no loss to text). Some tanning and foxing. About very good. An interesting association copy, inscribed on the front free endpaper: "Ensign Mann's Book. A Gift of ye. Revd. Timo. Harrington." Timothy Harrington (1715-95) was long-time minister of the First Church in Lancaster, Massachusetts, from 1748 until his death. The recipient, Ensign Mann (1740-1829), added his own inscription in Latin. Mann was a well-known schoolmaster and tutor in Lancaster until 1768 when he settled in Petersham, Massachusetts, and became leader of the Sons of Liberty there. Stephen Sewall (1734-1804) was professor of Hebrew at Harvard and was one of the leading scholars of his day, specializing in Oriental languages and Hebrew. In 1761, Sewall succeeded Judah Monis as instructor in Hebrew at Harvard, a position Sewall held for more than twenty years. This is the second Hebrew grammar produced in America, preceded only by a work by Monis published in 1735. Rosenbach asserts that the Hebrew types used in it were destroyed by fire in 1764. The final twenty-three pages are comprised of a study of Hebrew poetry. ROSENBACH AMERICAN JEWISH 43. GOLDMAN, HEBREW PRINTING IN AMERICA 172. EVANS 9514. ESTC W20434. SABIN 79458, 42873.
CONSTITUTIONS DES TREIZE ETATS-UNIS DE L'AMÉRIQUE. Nouvelle edition

CONSTITUTIONS DES TREIZE ETATS-UNIS DE L’AMÉRIQUE. Nouvelle edition

Constitutions] Two volumes bound in one. [4],324; 317pp. Contemporary French mottled calf, spine richly gilt with red gilt morocco label, marbled endpapers. Boards slightly bowed, minor wear to joints, gouge to lower front cover. Leaves expertly washed. Very good. The first French edition of the 1787 Federal Constitution, printed with the second French edition of the constitutions of the thirteen states. The original French edition of the state constitutions was inspired by Franklin and appeared in 1783. Franklin was then ambassador to the French Court and had just completed negotiations with Great Britain for the independence of the United States. The work was translated by the Duc de la Rochefoucauld, at Franklin's suggestion, and includes over fifty footnote annotations explicating the text. This edition, publishing the Federal Constitution for the first time, also includes the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and the treaties between the United States and France, the Low Countries, and Sweden. This 1792 edition in two volumes is significant for including the text of the Federal Constitution as well as the Bill of Rights (using the twelve amendments proposed to the first Congress, only ten of which were passed). The date of this edition of the American constitutions is significant, coming in the midst of the French Revolution, and at a point when the French revolutionaries were drafting their own constitution. This edition was probably created to aid in that project. HOWES C716. SABIN 16120. COHEN 3033 (note).
A TOUR OF DUTY IN CALIFORNIA; INCLUDING A DESCRIPTION OF THE GOLD REGION: AND AN ACCOUNT OF A VOYAGE AROUND CAPE HORN.AND THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS ATTENDING THE CONQUEST OF THE CALIFORNIAS

A TOUR OF DUTY IN CALIFORNIA; INCLUDING A DESCRIPTION OF THE GOLD REGION: AND AN ACCOUNT OF A VOYAGE AROUND CAPE HORN.AND THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS ATTENDING THE CONQUEST OF THE CALIFORNIAS

Revere, Joseph W. [4],vi,[2],305pp. plus six lithographic plates (including frontispiece), folding map, and [6]pp. of ads. Publisher's brown blindstamped cloth, spine gilt. Joints, spine ends, and corners neatly repaired. Bookseller ticket on front pastedown, contemporary gift inscription from a husband to his wife and later (different) ownership inscription on front free endpaper. Small closed tear in map neatly repaired. Some mild foxing and offsetting. Very good. "One of the most valuable books of the period" - Cowan. This work is often considered the best contemporary account of the conquest of California. Revere (1812- 80), the grandson of Paul Revere, was a U.S. naval officer with the Pacific squadron, and an observer of and participant in the events of the American military conquest of California. He later travelled in California and went to Sutter's Fort, which is illustrated in a charming lithographic frontispiece. The map illustrates the harbor at San Francisco. Revere fell in love with California and eventually acquired a rancho near Sonoma, where he finally settled for a time. "The book contains valuable chapters on land laws and land titles, as well as the complete report of Col. Mason on the gold fields" - ZAMORANO 80. HOWES R222, "aa." GRAFF 3474. WHEAT GOLD RUSH 165. HILL 1439. ZAMORANO 80, 63. SABIN 70182. COWAN, p.530. KURUTZ 529. REESE, BEST OF THE WEST 111.
MIRIAM COFFIN

MIRIAM COFFIN, OR THE WHALE-FISHERMEN: A TALE. IN TWO VOLUMES

Hart, Joseph C.] Two volumes. 209; 206pp. Half title in both volumes. Original publisher's brown cloth, gilt burgundy morocco spine labels. First volume expertly rebacked, retaining original backstrip, second volume with neat repairs to spine ends. Multiple early ownership inscriptions of Elizabeth Alice Gill. Moderate foxing throughout, occasional tidelines. Good. First edition of the first American whaling novel, written by Joseph C. Hart (1798-1855). Extremely popular at the time of its publication, Hart wrote it in part to encourage congressional support for the whaling industry. Hart spent time researching the industry and interviewing people in the whaling community in Nantucket, and the book remains a useful resource about the whaling days of Nantucket and New Bedford. The story centers on the life of the quasi-fictional Miriam Coffin, and contemporary readers would have easily recognized the real-life Kezia Coffin (1723- 98), wife of Captain John Coffin, a Loyalist with strong British ties and rumored contacts with smugglers. Kezia held a monopoly over trade in Nantucket during the Revolution, and many were forced to borrow from her at exorbitant rates due to trade embargoes and British attacks on Nantucket vessels. Eventually, Nantucket declared neutrality and Kezia's monopoly fell apart. She went bankrupt, lost her home, and was disowned by the Quaker meeting. In the novel, Miriam engages in corrupt financial speculations, which Hart contrasts with her husband's hard work and heroic bearing as he carves out a noble livelihood as a whaler. MIRIAM COFFIN definitely influenced Herman Melville, but not positively as far as he was concerned. In an unpublished review submitted to THE LITERARY WORLD, Melville wrote of Hart's novel: "The book is no book, but a compact bundle of wrapping paper. And as for Mr. Hart, pen and ink should instantly be taken away from that impossible man.The book deserves to be burnt in a fire of asafetida, and by the hand that wrote it. Seriously again.the book is an abortion.Take it back, I beseech, and get some one to cart it back to the author" (SOME PERSONAL LETTERS OF HERMAN MELVILLE, pp.30-31). AMERICAN IMPRINTS 24838. WRIGHT I:1133. FORSTER 360. JENKINS, p.107. Meade Minnigerode, SOME PERSONAL LETTERS OF HERMAN MELVILLE AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY (New York: E.B. Hackett, Brick Row Book Shop, 1922).
THE HOLY BIBLE: CONTAINING THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS: TOGETHER WITH THE APOCRYPHA. TRANSLATED OUT OF THE ORIGINAL TONGUES

THE HOLY BIBLE: CONTAINING THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS: TOGETHER WITH THE APOCRYPHA. TRANSLATED OUT OF THE ORIGINAL TONGUES, AND WITH THE FORMER TRANSLATIONS DILIGENTLY COMPARED AND REVISED, BY THE SPECIAL COMMAND OF HIS MAJESTY KING JAMES I. OF ENGLAND. WITH MARGINAL NOTES AND REFERENCES. TO WHICH ARE ADDED, AN INDEX; AN ALPHABETICAL TABLE OF ALL THE NAMES IN THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS, WITH THEIR SIGNIFICATIONS; AND TABLES OF SCRIPTURE WEIGHTS, MEASURES, AND COINS

Bible] 844,837-964,[28]pp., plus folding map and eight engraved plates. Old and New Testaments with separate titlepages. Thick quarto. Contemporary calf, raised bands, gilt burgundy morocco label. Moderate wear and spotting to boards, corners bumped, spine rubbed, right edge of spine label chipped. Light foxing and toning throughout, occasional light tidelines (no text affected), a few stray pen marks. Map expertly conserved, with a long vertical tear mended, and with a slight bit of loss in the lower edge, just coming across the neat line. Titlepage creased and chipped. Two-inch closed tear to lower margin of leaf X1 (no loss of text, possibly a paper flaw), one- inch closed tear to right margin of leaf AAAAAA3 (no text affected), long closed tear to middle of leaf FFF2 (neatly repaired, no loss of text), New Testament titlepage torn, with some paper loss, but no loss of text (filled with archival paper), two-inch closed tear to right margin of leaf CCCCC2 (no loss of text). MMMMM gathering repeated. A good, unsophisticated copy. The first Bible printed in Vermont, illustrated with eight plates and a map. Copies with the map and full complement of plates are most uncommon. Printed by John Cunningham and published in Windsor by Merrifield and Cochran, who sold the volume both wholesale and retail "at the sign of the Bible," the edition was also to be sold in Worcester, Boston, Walpole, and Middlebury. The eight plates, produced in a simple style (O'Callaghan describes them as "exceedingly coarse"), were engraved specifically for this edition and all are labelled as belonging to the first Vermont edition. They include: "Elijah Raising the Widow's Son," "The Holy Family," "St. Matthew," "St. Mark," "Jesus of Nazareth, Which was Crucified: He is Risen; He is Not Here," "St. Luke," "St. John the Evangelist," and "St. Paul." Seven were engraved by Isaac Eddy (1777-1847) of Weathersfield, Vt. and one by James Hill ("Jesus of Nazareth"). O'Callaghan and Hills call for seven plates total (six by Eddy and one by Hill), but McCorison calls for eight as found here. The anonymous "A Map of Palestine Describing the Travels of Jesus Christ" is not called for in any of the bibliographies cited. However, according to a notice in the Windsor newspaper THE WASHINGTONIAN, dated August 31, 1812, Merrifield & Cochran published three versions of this Bible: without plates ($5.00), with 8 plates ($5.50), or with 8 plates and map ($5.75). Contents following the New Testament include: Family Record (blank four- page form); A Clergyman's Address to Married Persons at the Altar; Chronological Index of the Years and Times from Adam unto Christ; Summary History of the Bible; An Index to the Holy Bible; An Alphabetical Table of the Proper Names in the Old and New Testaments, together with the Meaning or Signification of these Words in their Original Languages; Table of Weights and Measures Mentioned in Scripture; Table of Money; A Table of Kindred and Affinity, Wherein Whosoever are Related are Forbidden in Scripture, and by our Laws, to Marry Together; and A Table of Time. A good copy of the first Bible printed in Vermont, complete with illustrations produced by local artists and a map not found in all copies. McCORISON 1366. HILLS 209. O'CALLAGHAN 1812.2. HERBERT 1559.
MORRISON & FOURMY'S GENERAL DIRECTORY OF THE CITY OF AUSTIN 1898=99. CONTAINING THE PRESENT STATE

MORRISON & FOURMY’S GENERAL DIRECTORY OF THE CITY OF AUSTIN 1898=99. CONTAINING THE PRESENT STATE, COUNTY AND CITY GOVERNMENTS, AND.A COMPLETE CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY ALSO A VALUABLE STREET AND AVENUE GUIDE

Texas] [3]-8,358,[2]pp., plus 16pp. of advertisements dispersed throughout, and two small advertisement broadsides tipped in. Initial leaf of advertisements used as front pastedown, as issued. Original printed yellow cloth. Cloth soiled and rubbed, neatly repaired along edges, corners, and spine ends. Small abrasion to rear pastedown, occasional minor foxing. Withal, a good copy of a traditionally fragile production. A rare and comprehensive directory for the capital city of Austin, Texas, published by Morrison & Fourmy, with government, business, street, and personal listings, along with information on post offices, "money order offices," societies, associations, churches, and schools. Morrison & Fourmy began publishing directories in the late 1870s and were the leading directory publishers in Texas for the next two decades. Early directories for the city are relatively scarce, and contain interesting information about the period, particularly in the form of advertisements. The advertisements feature railroads, breweries, printers, banks, hotels (with both a mention on the back cover and an interior advertisement devoted to Austin's famed Driskill Hotel), and more. One of the small broadside advertisements tipped-in to this edition touts "Tillotson Normal and Collegiate Institute for the Colored Youth of Texas," a college for African-American students which was "largely the gift of Northern friends, but aided somewhat by the people of Austin who are in sympathy with it and its work." This historically black college is still in operation as Huston- Tillotson University in east Austin. Based on the serial nature of the book, an exact population is difficult to determine in OCLC, but at most there are about ten copies in institutions, mostly in Texas. This is only the third Morrison & Fourmy Austin directory ever offered by this firm. OCLC 8488153, 13377538, 702363697.