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William Reese Company - Americana

EL GOBERNADOR DEL DEPARTAMENTO DE PUEBLA

EL GOBERNADOR DEL DEPARTAMENTO DE PUEBLA, A SUS HABITANTES. CONCIUDADANOS: COLOCADO POR EL SUPREMO GOBIERNO AL FRENTE DE VUESTROS NEGOCIOS, HOY HE TOMADO POSESION DEL CARGO DE GOBERNADOR, PRESTANDO EL DEBIDO JURAMENTO ANTE LA JUNTA DEPARTAMENTAL.[caption title and beginning of text]

Mexico]: [Texas]: Mozo, José Antonio Letterpress broadside, approximately 16 3/4 x 12 inches. Printed in Spanish in two columns. Old folds, short closed tear in bottom margin. Small portion of left margin clipped to allow for folding into a binding, a few small stab- holes. Near fine. An exceedingly rare, perhaps unique, Mexican broadside calling for Mexican unity in the face of losing the Texas Revolution. This proclamation was issued by Pueblan governor José Antonio Mozo just four months after the Fall of the Alamo and three months after the disastrous Mexican defeat at the Battle of San Jacinto. Here, Mozo reminds the Mexican people of their solidarity in the throwing-off of Spanish colonial rule in 1821, and calling for a renewed effort against the rebels of Texas. A rough translation of the document reads, in part: "Things have not gone smoothly since we Mexicans won our independence in 1821, mostly because of political infighting.We put aside our differences until the Spanish invaders were expelled. This is what we should have expected when the rebels from Texas took over one of our most fertile states. At first, while our Army was beating the rebel colonists, everyone was doing their duty. However, the moment General Santa Anna was taken prisoner, rebel agents cropped up inside the country, and even among its own children.They have already suffered the punishment they deserve, and the same fate must wait for those who imitate their example. No, there must not be many who, after the terrible lesson they received, dare to support their perfidious handling; but independence is always in danger, as long as we did not reconquer the Department of Texas, and those who make war there, have continued to use themselves, to disturb the inner tranquility, the evil of some and the simplicity of others. The Government will mobilize all its resources against the rebels, but the Government needs the cooperation of the inhabitants of the republic. Give it to us, for the part that touches you: forget old resentments: let us remember that we are Mexican; and recovering this name all its magic and its prestige, serve to unite the wills and so that the nation becomes as respectable today, as it was in 1821, and while its children were not divided into sides." Though the Treaties of Velasco - one public document and one secret treaty - were signed on May 14, 1836 and essentially gave birth to the Republic of Texas, the question of Texas independence in the eyes of most Mexican officials was not remotely settled. The government of Mexico refused to recognize the public treaty, claiming that Santa Anna was not authorized to agree to its terms; in fact, Santa Anna did not have the power to sign such a treaty under the Mexican Constitution. Further, Santa Anna claimed that he signed the treaty under coercion, as a prisoner, and therefore the treaties were null. Despite these claims by Mexican authorities, their generals continued to pull back the demoralized Mexican Army through mid-June of 1836, when the last of the defeated Mexican troops arrived in Matomoros. Almost immediately, as evidenced from the present broadside, Mexican officials called for a renewed effort to reclaim Texas. In the end, though, Mexico's government and military were simply too weak to attempt any further incursions into the new republic. A decade of more-of-the-same political infighting mentioned here drew focus away from recapturing Texas, and soon Mexico found itself with a new enemy - the United States. It was only after losing the Mexican-American War that Mexico officially recognized both the independence of Texas and its annexation by the United States in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. An early example of the renewed call for further Mexican action against the rebels of the Texas Revolution. Not in Streeter Texas, OCLC, or any reference known to us.
THE LIFE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON

THE LIFE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON, COMMANDER IN CHIEF OF THE AMERICAN FORCES DURING THE WAR WHICH ESTABLISHED THE INDEPENDENCE OF HIS COUNTRY, AND FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.TO WHICH IS PREFIXED, AN INTRODUCTION, CONTAINING A COMPENDIOUS VIEW OF THE COLONIES PLANTED BY THE ENGLISH ON THE CONTINENT OF NORTH AMERICA

Marshall, John Five volumes. xxxvi,579,[1]; viii,633,[1]; viii,572; viii,684; viii,843,[1]pp., including one in-text illustration, plus twelve folding maps. Frontispiece in three volumes (two of them folding). Contemporary tree calf, gilt spines, gilt leather labels, all edges marbled. Moderate wear to bindings, corners bumped and worn, a few of the labels tender. Armorial bookplate of Spains Hall at Finchingham in Essex (home of the Ruggles-Brise family since 1760) to each front pastedown, ink ownership signature of John Ruggles on each front free endpaper. Scattered foxing, some dust-soiling, a couple maps with small repairs to verso. Overall very good. Octavo issue of the British edition which, according to Howes, is the best edition of Marshall's classic biography of Washington. "After the able, accurate and comprehensive work of Chief Justice Marshall, it would be presumptuous to attempt a historical biography of Washington" - Jared Sparks. The first American edition and this first British edition contain a history of the colonies in the first volume which was omitted from later editions. Howes calls for ten maps and six plates, which conforms to this set and the list of maps and plates in the rear of the fifth volume, though one of Howes's "plates" is actually an in-text illustration on page 572 of the third volume. A quarto British edition was also produced at the same time. HOWES M317. SABIN 44788. REESE, REVOLUTIONARY HUNDRED 92 (ref).
THE HOUSE THAT JEFF BUILT

THE HOUSE THAT JEFF BUILT

Davis, Jefferson]: Johnston, D[avid] C[laypoole] Engraved broadside, 11 3/4 x 16 3/4 inches. Minute chip at right edge (image not affected). Slight toning, one small spot of foxing. Near fine. A sharp satire of the slave trade, Jefferson Davis, and the Confederacy consisting of twelve engraved vignettes parodying the nursery rhyme, "This is the House that Jack Built." Here, Johnston questions the literal humanity of the slave traders, in images and text. The first illustration shows "The House That Jeff Built," a slave holding pen with an auction broadside posted on the wall. Other illustrations shown enslaved Africans awaiting the auction, the auctioneer at his podium, and families and individuals being sold. One illustration is an isolated image of a whip, while in the next panel an overseer beats a slave, tied to a post, across his exposed back. The text is as caustic as the illustrations: "This is the thing, by some call'd a man, / Whose trade is to sell all the chattels he can."; and confirms the ultimate fates of all involved with the slave trade, "Here the slave breeder parts with his own flesh / To a trader down south, in the heart of secesh. / Thus trader and breeder secure without fail, / The lasting attachment of him with a tail." Finally, Johnston turns to Davis directly: "Here's the arch rebel Jeff whose infamous course / has bro't rest to the plow and made active the hearse, / And invoked on his head every patriots curse, / Spread ruin and famine to stock the slave pen.But Jeff's infamous house is doom'd to come down, / So says Uncle Sam and so said John Brown." David Claypoole Johnston (1797?-1865), dubbed "the American Cruikshank" by Clarence S. Brigham, was a noted cartoonist and humorist as well as a professional actor, performing for theatre companies in Boston and Philadelphia. As an artist, engraver, and lithographer, he produced numerous caricatures and political cartoons, many of which were considered too controversial for publication. OCLC locates nine copies, at Yale, Dartmouth, Miami University, Brown, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, Princeton, Boston Public Library, and Cornell. There is also a copy at the American Antiquarian Society. JOHNSON, DAVID CLAYPOOL [sic] JOHNSTON, 75. REILLY, AMERICAN POLITICAL PRINTS 1863-9. WEITENKAMPF 138. OCLC 12256874, 299946901, 191119927, 892484763, 966267362.
HIS EXCELLENCY GEORGE WASHINGTON ESQR. COMMANDER IN CHIEF OF THE AMERICAN ARMIES - THE PROTECTOR OF HIS COUNTRY. THE SUPPORTER OF LIBERTY. AND THE BENEFACTOR OF MANKIND. MAY HIS NAME NEVER BE FORGOTTEN

HIS EXCELLENCY GEORGE WASHINGTON ESQR. COMMANDER IN CHIEF OF THE AMERICAN ARMIES – THE PROTECTOR OF HIS COUNTRY. THE SUPPORTER OF LIBERTY. AND THE BENEFACTOR OF MANKIND. MAY HIS NAME NEVER BE FORGOTTEN

Washington, George] Partially handcolored engraving, 10 3/4 x 14 inches. Backed on later paper. Edges worn and a bit chipped, mostly in the lower edge. Minor separations at cross-folds; a few short, closed tears. Some old staining, later ink inscription in bottom margin reading "Handed down in Scofield Family since Revolutionary Days." Good overall. Matted. A rare and early equestrian portrait of George Washington in military dress, encircled by a foliated border wreath and surrounding text reading, "His Excellency George Washington Esqr. Commander in chief of the American Armies. The Protector of his Country. The Supporter of Liberty. And the Benefactor of Mankind. May his name never be forgotten." Riding a rearing horse advancing to the left, Washington brandishes a sword in his right hand while wearing a tricorner hat with cockade and jacket (hand-colored in blue). A military encampment, including four tents is visible in the background at left. The present example has been associated with the well-known "Alexander Campbell" mezzotint published in London in 1775. According to Wick, however, this "crude engraving" was likely copied from another contemporary work, which was itself sourced from the central vignette in a 1783 English printed handkerchief (Figure 10 in Wick's GEORGE WASHINGTON: AN AMERICAN ICON). The only difference in the two illustrations lies in the color of the tents in the background. In the slightly earlier image, the tents are black with white interiors; in the present image, the tents are white with black interiors. Regarding the date of creation of the etching, Wick claims it could have been "made any time after the late 1780s and may even have been produced as a memorial image in 1800." Both Wick and Hart also describe a later 19th-century imitation of this print, in which there is no punctuation in the surrounding inscription; Mitchell further explains that the imitation was printed from a copper plate that was too small to hold the entire image, leaving about a quarter-inch of the leaf border blank at the top. The present illustration bears no imprint, and the identities of the publisher and the engraver are unknown. Based on the quality and manner of the engraving, we believe that it was produced in the young United States, and is therefore among the earliest large images of George Washington published in his native land. Contemporary images of the "Father of Our Country" are growing increasingly rare in the market, and the present example is among the more difficult to procure, and has been so for more than a century now. In the 1904 catalogue of his own collection, Hampton L. Carson described the present engraving as "[e]xcessively rare. The only copy that has come under my observation." Not in Baker, nor are any copies listed in OCLC. CARSON COLLECTION 118. HART 725. WICK 100. MITCHELL CATALOGUE 99.
HY-BEAUTE COSMETICS STYLED FOR SMART WOMEN WHO CARE

HY-BEAUTE COSMETICS STYLED FOR SMART WOMEN WHO CARE

African Americana]: [Jordan, James Edward] Photographic broadside, 19 1/4 x 25 inches. Advertising broadside printed in red and black on glossy paper. Vertical creases. Slight wear and a few small closed tears to edges (not affecting text or images). Very good. A well-preserved advertising poster for Hy-Beaute Cosmetics, featuring images of eighteen different hair-silkening and smoothing products for women and men, and a "konk" straightener for men. The "konk" (or "conk," from congolene, hair-straightening gel made from lye) was a hairstyle popular with African-American men from the 1920s- 1960s. African-American women also used a variety of relaxers and straighteners to allow hair to be more easily worked into fashionable (i.e., "white") styles. A dozen female and two male models demonstrate the hairstyles attainable through application of various Hy-Beaute products. Entrepreneur James Edward Jordan (1888-1977) was born in Wrightsville, Ga., and moved to Atlanta in 1919. He founded a number of businesses, including Hy-Beaute Cosmetics and other beauty and barber supplies, a tailoring shop, clothing sales and department stores, a real estate agency, a photography studio, and a motion-picture production company. Many of these businesses (including Hy-Beaute) were located on or near Auburn Avenue, also known as "Sweet Auburn," the central business and cultural street of Atlanta's African-American community. JAMES EDWARD JORDAN PAPERS, MSS 565, Kenan Research Center, Atlanta History Center.
NOMENCLATURA DOS COLONOS EMBARCADOS ABORDO do Navio Francy "Guantanamo" [printed and manuscript caption title]

NOMENCLATURA DOS COLONOS EMBARCADOS ABORDO do Navio Francy “Guantanamo” [printed and manuscript caption title]

Chinese Indentured Servitude in Cuba] [3]pp. Partially-printed forms on two leaves, completed in manuscript. First leaf 16 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches, second leaf 13 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches. Old folds. Minor separations and some chipping to edges of first leaf. Minor loss along folds of second leaf costing a few letters, with minor tape repair on verso. Tender, but still in good plus condition. Manuscript manifest listing Chinese laborers bound for the Spanish colony of Cuba from Macao. The list includes 213 Chinese men bound for agricultural indentured servitude in Cuba aboard the ship Guantanamo, listing each person's name, age, and town of birth. Their ages range from twenty to forty. The document is signed on the final page by José de Aguilar, the Spanish consul at Macao. Formal slavery persisted in Cuba until 1886, but from the mid-19th century it was accompanied by a significant population working in indentured servitude. Cuba's massive sugar industry had consumed huge imports of African slaves in the 18th century. The abolition of the slave trade in 1808, vigorously enforced by the British Navy, meant that a new source of labor was necessary. Indentured servitude became the predominant source for labor in the region. Unlike the earlier waves of European immigrants who travelled to the New World as indentured servants, Asia was now the primary source. Between 1848 and 1874, 125,000 Chinese indentured servants arrived in Cuba alone - a figure outstripped only by the number who indentured themselves in California. A large percentage of these laborers were kidnapped from their homeland, with many unable to survive the long passage from China to Cuba. If they made it to Cuba at all, the largely Chinese population of indentured servants laboring in the coffee and sugar fields experienced a working life tantamount to slavery. "Some contemporaries and later historians.have condemned the servitude of the Asians as a thinly disguised revival of slavery. These critics have pointed to a variety of abuses to which the Asians were subjected, both legally - with severe laws governing absenteeism, vagrancy, and insufficient work - and illegally, in the form of harassment by vicious masters. Yet other observers have defended the system as a boon to the Asian workers. Voluntary reindenture at the end of their terms was common among the migrants, suggesting that many Asians judged the system to be beneficial to them" - Drescher. It is odd to think that anyone could be well served by indentured servitude, but the present document could help shed light on such a controversial topic. The present example is a valuable record of over 200 Chinese men, their age, and their home region in China that could serve any number of purposes for academics and genealogical researchers. Manuscript material covering the period of Asian indentured servitude in Cuba is growing increasingly scarce in the market. Seymour Drescher & Stanley L. Engerman, eds., A HISTORICAL GUIDE TO WORLD SLAVERY (New York, 1998), pp.140-42, 239-42.
HY-BEAUTE HAIR DRESSINGS

HY-BEAUTE HAIR DRESSINGS

African-Americana]: [Jordan, James Edward] Free-standing advertising board, 13 3/4 x 9 3/4 inches. Thick cardstock printed in red, blue, and sepia, with attached folding cardstock stand. Corners bumped, holes at corners from hanging, one scratch at upper left slightly affecting one image. Some toning and several faint water spots, but images remain bright and crisp. Very good. An uncommon survival, this is an original advertising "standee" for Hy-Beaute Cosmetics. It features images of three hairstyles (two women, one man) and three haircare products indicated "For Falling Hair and Itching Scalp": "Special Double Strength Hair Dressing," "Slik-Down Pomade," and "Smokeless Pressing Oil." From the 1920s onward, African-American women and men used a variety of relaxers and straighteners (made from lye, methylene glycol, and other caustic agents) to allow hair to be more easily worked into fashionable (i.e., often "white") styles. Entrepreneur James Edward Jordan (1888- 1977) was born in Wrightsville, Ga., and moved to Atlanta in 1919. He founded a number of businesses, including Hy-Beaute Cosmetics and other beauty and barber-supplies, a tailoring shop, clothing sales and department stores, a real estate agency, a photography studio, and a motion-picture production company. Many of these businesses were located on or near Auburn Avenue, also known as "Sweet Auburn," the central business and cultural street of Atlanta's African- American community. JAMES EDWARD JORDAN PAPERS, MSS 565, Kenan Research Center, Atlanta History Center.
ART WORK OF TACOMA AND VICINITY WASHINGTON

ART WORK OF TACOMA AND VICINITY WASHINGTON

Washington Photographica] Nine parts, each bound separately and uniformly, complete with titlepage in first volume. 27pp. of text printed rectos only, and eighty-one photogravure plates. Folio. Publisher's rosewood cloth backstrip and burgundy wrappers, front covers gilt. Minor fraying to spine cloth, some wear, discoloration, mild chipping, creasing, and soiling to covers. Contents of second volume loosely laid into the wrappers. Minor occasional toning. Very good overall. A complete set of the scarce "Art Work" series for Tacoma, Washington. Each volume contains between eight and ten photogravure plates, most full-page but some with more than one image per plate. Each part contains three text leaves printed rectos only, and altogether, the work is comprised of eighty-one photogravure plates (with tissue guards) containing over 100 distinct photographic images. The photogravures depict stunning views of rivers, mountains, mammoth tree forests, parks, landscapes, architecture, street scenes and city views, lumber mills and logging scenes, among other aspects of life in the Pacific Northwest. Highlights include "Panorama of South Tacoma," "Loading Lumber at Tacoma Mill Wharf," "On North Yakima Avenue," "Vashon College on Vashon Island," and "Log Drive on White River." Sadly, the photographers are not credited in this publication. A wonderful collection of early-20th century Tacoma photography.
ART WORK OF SEATTLE AND ALASKA

ART WORK OF SEATTLE AND ALASKA

Seattle Photographica]: [Alaska Photographica] Nine parts, each bound separately and uniformly, complete with titlepage in first volume. 26pp. of text printed rectos only, and eighty photogravure plates. Folio. Publisher's rosewood cloth backstrip and burgundy wrappers, front covers gilt. Mild fraying to spine cloth, some wear, mild chipping and light soiling to covers. Top corner of first few leaves of first volume creased. Internally clean. Overall very good. A substantial production providing a rich photographic tapestry of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska in the early twentieth century. Each volume contains nine photogravure plates (with only eight in the eighth volume), most full-page but some with more than one image per plate. Each part contains two or three text leaves printed rectos only. Altogether, the work is comprised of eighty photogravure plates with tissue guards containing over 100 distinct photographic images. Numerous photogravures depict indigenous Eskimos and other people, along with stunning views of rivers, mountains, mining, agriculture, landscapes, dogsled teams, totem poles, ships, and various aspects of life in the Pacific Northwest. Highlights include the "Largest Fir in Washington," "Bird's-Eye of Nome, Alaska," "An Arctic Musher," and the "Eskimo Salmon Dance." The photogravures were taken by a number of prominent western photographers, including Frank H. Nowell, W.P. Romans, Thomas W. Tolman, Wylie T. Dennison, and Asahel Curtis (estranged brother of Edward S. Curtis). The gravures are printed in sepia, blue, or green tints, and retain their clarity and power more than a century after their printing. "A magnificent work, relating mostly to Alaska, with many fine full- page tinted plates" - Decker. "Contains fine plates of scenery in Seattle and Alaska" - Soliday. DECKER 26:6. SOLIDAY I:1032. WICKERSHAM 412.
THE LIFE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON

THE LIFE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON, COMMANDER IN CHIEF OF THE AMERICAN FORCES, DURING THE WAR WHICH ESTABLISHED THE INDEPENDENCE OF HIS COUNTRY, AND FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.TO WHICH IS PREFIXED, AN INTRODUCTION, CONTAINING A COMPENDIOUS VIEW OF THE COLONIES PLANTED BY THE ENGLISH ON THE CONTINENT OF NORTH AMERICA

Marshall, John Five volumes. xxxii,458; vii,[1],541,[2]; viii,460; vii,[1],589,[2]; vii,[1],669,[4]pp., including one in-text illustration, plus twelve folding maps and three frontispiece plates. Extra-illustrated with twelve manuscripts and over 240 plates. Quarto. 19th-century three-quarter morocco and marbled boards, spines gilt, raised bands. Moderate shelf wear, mostly to bottom edges and corners; joints lightly worn. Bookplate of James Frothingham Hunnewell on each front pastedown. Occasional marginal dampstain to corners of text leaves. Overall very good. An especially desirable extra-illustrated copy of the first quarto British edition of Marshall's highly-influential biography of Washington. This is generally considered to be the best edition of Marshall's life of Washington, due to its handsome printing. This extra-illustrated set is even more desirable for the significant manuscripts and profusion of plates bound in. A landmark work in the early historiography of the American Revolution and the Federal period, and a biography that did much to shape the view of George Washington and his era for generations. Marshall "became America's first nationalist historian. He wrote about Washington and the United States as if they were inseparable" (Smith). Written in the early years of his tenure as Chief Justice of the United States, and at the encouragement of his Supreme Court colleague, Bushrod Washington (George Washington's nephew), Marshall not only had access to Washington family papers, he had been extremely close with the President in his final years. The text is written in Marshall's judicious prose, and is particularly strong on the aspects of the Revolution in which he participated, and on the partisan politics of the 1790s. Further, a close reading of Marshall's account of the origins of the Constitution offers insights into the Chief Justice's own views concerning the Constitution. Volumes two, three, and four cover Washington's life through the Revolution, and the fifth is a history of his presidency - the concluding volume caused much partisan rancor when published in 1807. Marshall's history of the colonial period is the subject of the first volume, and it was omitted from later American editions. The maps are mostly concerned with Revolutionary War engagements. Howes calls for ten maps and six plates, but one of those plates is actually an in-text illustration, and the present copy conforms to the list of maps and plates in the rear of the fifth volume, though the Boston map and the frontispieces are bound in slightly different locations. Jared Sparks, who compiled an edition of Washington's writings in the 1830s, commented that "after the able, accurate, and comprehensive work of Chief Justice Marshall, it would be presumptuous to attempt a historical biography of Washington" (quoted in Sabin). Thomas Jefferson was an original subscriber to the Philadelphia edition of Marshall's biography, and viewed it through the partisan politics of the day. In an 1802 letter to Joel Barlow, Jefferson wrote that he expected the work, due out at the time he would stand for re-election to the presidency, to be "written therefore principally with a view to electioneering purposes" (i.e., in contradistinction to Jefferson's policies). In fact, Jefferson encouraged Barlow to write his own history of the same period, which would correct the expected "perversions of truth" in Marshall's work. Jefferson's view of Marshall's LIFE did not improve with time, he quarreled with it well into old age. The political paranoia cut both ways - Marshall's publisher was C.P. Wayne, editor of the GAZETTE OF THE UNITED STATES, a Federalist organ, and he feared that the local postmasters (Jefferson appointees) who were charged with soliciting subscriptions to the work might not have put their hearts into it. This set is profusely extra-illustrated with twelve original manuscripts and over 240 engravings, portraits, maps, facsimiles of manuscripts and paintings, and other plates, including numerous engravings of George Washington peppered throughout the five volumes. The previous owner of this copy was James Frothingham Hunnewell, a Massachusetts merchant, antiquarian, historian, and bibliographer who authored several works, most notably the BIBLIOGRAPHY OF CHARLESTOWN AND BUNKER HILL and the foundational BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. Hunnewell had a deep appreciation of New England history and how it related to the larger world, evidenced by his committed service to and involvement with the American Antiquarian Society. The original manuscripts Hunnewell tipped in or pasted in to this copy are as follows: 1) Jeremiah Moulton. Autograph letter, signed, from Moulton to Capt. John Storer, regarding supplies and readiness for fighting Indians in Canada. York, Ma. [now York, Me.]: Aug. 9, 1738. [1]p. Minor repairs to verso. Very good. The text of Moulton's letter relates an order from Pepperrell ordering the British troops in New England to be ready for war with natives in Canada. The text of the letter reads: "Sir, Having had information That ye Indians seem to be somewhat Uneasey and have express'd themselves as tho' they intend War with the English in a Short Time and have accordingly made some Preparation by getting a Supply of Ammunition from Canada - It's tho't very proper to be in readiness least the Enemy put us to a Surprize and therefore you are Directed to take all Possible care with Speed & see that every Person in your Company be well fixed & Provided with Arms & Ammunition as ye Law Directs. Order from Coll. Pepperrell Jer Moulton." The letter is docketed on the verso: "On his Majesty's Service to Capt. John Storer in Welles." Moulton autograph material is exceedingly rare in itself, and the current example highlights the ongoing conflict between Native Americans and English colonists that lasted almost three centuries. George Washington would, of course, become intimately involved with fighting Native
TOBACCO WAREHOUSE [caption title]

TOBACCO WAREHOUSE [caption title]

Kentucky]; [Tobacco] Broadside, 14 x 6 inches. Docketed in manuscript on verso. Early folds, mild tanning, but overall very good. This apparently unrecorded broadside describes a public meeting in Hickman, Kentucky in which a committee of five men was appointed to "memorialize" the legislature on the subject of establishing a state tobacco warehouse and export inspection site in Hickman. They argue that the warehouse will be a "means to avoid the many heavy charges which are imposed, and the frauds which it is believed are practised in the inspection and sale of that article in New Orleans." They go on to emphasize Hickman's desirable location on a high bank of the Mississippi River that is easily navigable during all seasons of the year. They also provide evidence of Hickman's productivity, listing shipments of goods from Hickman, including nearly 3000 hogsheads of tobacco, almost 20,000 bushels of wheat, and over 1350 bales of cotton for the year ending 1846. Senator Thomas James presented the "memorial" to the legislature on February 3, 1847, and it was referred for further consideration. There is no evidence the legislature chose Hickman for the warehouse, however it is notable that the Kentucky Senate JOURNAL records warehouse proposals from other cities, including Paducah. This is the first time we have handled this broadside; we could find no listing of it in OCLC or in past auction records. JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY. (Frankfort, Ky.: A.G. Hodges, 1846-47).
HISTORIA DE LA CONQUISTA DE LA PROVINCIA DE EL ITZA

HISTORIA DE LA CONQUISTA DE LA PROVINCIA DE EL ITZA, REDUCCION, Y PROGRESSOS DE LA DE EL LACANDON, Y OTRAS NACIONES DE INDIOS BARBAROS, DE LA MEDIACION DE EL REYNO DE GUATIMALA, A LAS PROVINCIAS DE YUCATAN, EN LA AMERICA SEPTENTRIONAL

Villagutierre Sotomayor, Juan de Engraved "frontispiece," [32] leaves, 660pp., [17] leaves. Folio. 19th-century Spanish sheep ("pasta española"). Covers abraded, pinhole-type worming in spine, loss of lower inch of spine leather to insects. Text tanned (due to impurities in water during paper manufacture). Small insect damage to margins of first four leaves, not touching any text; similar small damage in inner margins of last four leaves. Overall, a decent copy of a scarce work. Although the author never set foot in the New World, his high position in the Consejo de Indias and other royal councils gave him access to much important documentation for the writing of this prized history of the conquest of the Izta Maya and the attempted conquest of the Lacandón Indians during the last decades of the 17th century; the conquest of Petén and the misadventures of Roque de Soberanis y Senteno and Martín de Urzúa, two governors of the Yucatán, make for very exciting reading. This is the first published book dedicated solely to the history of the Yucatán and the Maya, here offered in its first edition, first issue (with the incorrect catchword "gla" at the foot of the recto of the twenty-second preliminary leaf). Bedmar y Narvaez printed the titlepage in black and red, and the text is in double-column format. This copy contains both the engraved "frontispiece" and the black and red titlepage, but, as usual, not the very rare colophon. Although touted as "Primera parte" on the titlepage, there were no further parts; this HISTORIA. is complete, "all published." PALAU 366681. MEDINA, BHA 2051. SABIN 99643. LeCLERC 1546. SALVÁ 3422. HEREDIA 3407. EUROPEAN AMERICANA 701/262. For Villagutierre, see ARCHIVO BIOGRÁFICO DE ESPAÑA, PORTUGAL, E IBEROAMÉRICA, fiche 1019, frames 213-16.
GOBIERNO DEL DEPARTAMENTO DE PUEBLA. CIRCULAR. HA LLEGADO LA OCACION DE QUE SE PRUEVE EL VERDADERO PATRIOTISMO Y DE QUE SE DISTINGAN LOS FALSOS

GOBIERNO DEL DEPARTAMENTO DE PUEBLA. CIRCULAR. HA LLEGADO LA OCACION DE QUE SE PRUEVE EL VERDADERO PATRIOTISMO Y DE QUE SE DISTINGAN LOS FALSOS, DE LOS VERDADERAS AMIGOS DE LA INDEPENDENCIA DE LA PATRIA. LOS EXTRANGEROS QUE EN TEJAS QUIEREN FORMAR, EN TERRENO NUESTRO, UNA NACION NUEVA.[caption title and beginning of text]

Mexico]: [Texas]: Rincon, Manuel E. [2]pp. on a folded folio sheet, with integral blank leaf. Text in Spanish. Old folds, old dampstain in upper outer corner of first leaf and upper edge of central vertical fold. Tear in upper outer corner of first leaf, not affecting text. Contemporary ink notation at bottom of second page. Very good. Accompanied by a modern English translation. A rare circular decree written by Mexican general and statesman Manuel Rincon, who was serving at the time as governor of Puebla. Here, reeling from the Mexican defeat in Texas, Rincon attempts to rally the Mexican people by preying on their fears of invasion and colonization by the new Republic of Texas. Rincon writes (translated from the Spanish), in part: "Foreigners have taken over our territory of Texas. Their goal is to create a new nation, which they can then turn into a colony. Their ultimate goal is to colonize us. True Mexican patriots who value our independence must not be deceived by their devious use of our politicians, collaborators, who will rob us blind while shouting 'freedom and country.' We can defend our country militarily. But the danger is that the enemy will take advantage of our people's naiveté and lack of experience and sow discord among us, so that, instead of taking up arms against them, we will fight each other. I therefore issue the following orders to military commanders." Rincon then lays out five orders to help the Mexican military prepare for renewed conflict with the rebel Texans. Translated from the Spanish, they read: "1. Keep the troops under your command highly disciplined with weapons, ammunition and horses in good condition. 2. Ensure that all soldiers ordered to enlist on Dec. 31 of last year be able to answer the call to service when it comes. 3. The peace must not be disturbed for any reason, no matter what the pretext, and should any suspicious group of armed men be found in your territory, you will do everything in your power to repress them, urgently notify their immediate superiors to take the appropriate action, and with equal urgency notify me so that I may mobilize forces as needed to assist. 4. Commanders will be held responsible for any delay in providing help the moment it is requested, no excuses. 5. Commanders are authorized to increase their forces.make use of any inventory in customs, request loans from private parties, issue National Treasury receipts, which the Government pledges to honor, and in short, do anything necessary to preserve public order." Rincon concludes the proclamation by urging the Mexican people to '.impress upon the public what the true aims are of those who are attempting to disturb the peace.I have no doubt that we will all do our part and Puebla will do nothing to aid the foreigners besmirching Mexico's good name." The ink notation at bottom of second page indicates the document was received by the Town Council of Tehuancan. The Texas Revolution began as a series of escalating invasions and counter-invasions on the part of both Mexico and the Texians. The Siege of Bexar pitted Texian insurgents against Mexican forces on Mexican soil. Santa Anna then led Mexican forces into Texas to crush the rebellion as swiftly as possible, and before the Anglo Texans could be reinforced by more invaders from the north. Santa Anna's actions surrounding the Fannin Massacre changed the focus of the conflict for the Texians from a struggle for state and local rights and autonomy to an armed conflict against a foreign government. Though the Treaties of Velasco - one public document and one secret treaty - were signed on May 14, 1836 and essentially gave birth to the Republic of Texas, the question of Texas independence in the eyes of most Mexican officials was not remotely settled. The government of Mexico refused to recognize the public treaty, claiming that Santa Anna was not authorized to agree to its terms; in fact, Santa Anna did not have the power to sign such a treaty under the Mexican Constitution. Further, Santa Anna claimed that he signed the treaty under coercion, as a prisoner, and therefore the treaties were null. Almost immediately, as evidenced from the present circular, Mexican officials called for a renewed effort to reclaim the lands lost to the Texas revolutionaries. In the end, though, Mexico's government and military were simply too weak to attempt any further incursions into the new republic. A decade of more-of-the-same political infighting mentioned here drew focus away from recapturing Texas, and soon Mexico found itself with a new enemy - the United States. It was only after losing the Mexican-American War that Mexico officially recognized both the independence of Texas and its annexation by the United States in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. A feisty decree from a Mexican governor calling for military preparedness in anticipation of further conflict with Texas, which never materialized. Not in Streeter Texas nor in OCLC. We have been unable to locate any other copies anywhere.
ARCHIVE OF AMERICAN BICYCLE MANUFACTURERS' CATALOGUES AND ADVERTISING PAMPHLETS]

ARCHIVE OF AMERICAN BICYCLE MANUFACTURERS’ CATALOGUES AND ADVERTISING PAMPHLETS]

Cycling] Thirty-five pamphlets, six periodical issues, and one standing desk calendar. Individual details provided below. Pamphlets all in original wrappers. Several with minor toning, occasional chipping, creasing, or small tears, calendar partially perished. The majority very good to fine. The majority housed in a cloth binder and slipcase. A substantial and colorful collection of early catalogues and pamphlets presenting not only comprehensive listings of bicycles, components, and accessories, but also tips on how to live modern life more fully, thanks to ongoing advances in cycling technology. The English Rover Safety Bicycle, considered the first modern bicycle (a rear-wheel-drive, chain-driven cycle with two similarly-sized wheels), appeared on the market in 1885-86 and set off a worldwide bicycle craze. By the early 1900s, more than 1 billion bicycles were on the roads. With this collection, one can chart cycling's early history in the United States, and the evolution of some of the leading manufacturers, several of which combined bicycle and arms manufacturing. While most of these companies were headquartered in the Northeast, Chicago, or Ohio, several had satellite offices as far west as Denver and San Francisco. Most of the pamphlets are extensively illustrated, featuring images of products along with cyclists of all ages, including women in increasingly modern cycling outfits. Bicycles not only gave Western women enhanced independence and mobility, they also contributed to the "rational dress" movement, which liberated women from corsets and ankle-length skirts and advocated more practical clothing. The items included here are as follows: 1) WOLFF-AMERICAN HIGH ART CYCLES. New York: R.H. Wolff & Co., Ltd., 1896. 32pp. Black, green, and white illustrations. Quarto. 2) WOLFF-AMERICAN HIGH ART CYCLES. New York: R.H. Wolff & Co., Ltd., [1898]. [32]pp. Black and white illustrations. Stamps of Century Cycle Co., Bridgeport, Ct. on front free endpaper. Narrow octavo. 3) VICTOR SUNLIGHTS. Boston: Overman Wheel Co., [late 1800s]. [12]pp. Colored illustrations. Oblong 12mo. 4) VICTOR BICYCLES. Chicopee Falls, Ma.: Overman Wheel Co., [1892]. 39,[1]pp. Black and white illustrations. 5) UPHILL, DOWNHILL, OR ON THE LEVEL: THE STORY OF THE MORROW COASTER BRAKE. Elmira, N.Y.: Eclipse Mfg. Co., [ca. 1901]. 16pp. Black and white illustrations. Narrow 12mo. 6) RIDE A CYCLE 50 MILES AND PEDAL ONLY 35. Elmira, N.Y.: Eclipse Mfg. Co., [ca. 1900]. [4]pp. Printed in red and blue. Illustration in blue and white. Narrow 12mo. 7) THE WHEEL OF THE YEAR: THE 1898 GRANDE BICYCLES. Burlington, Vt.: Holton Hardware Co., 1898. [8]pp. Printed in purple. Purple and white illustrations. Narrow 12mo. 8) PORTFOLIO OF ILLUSTRATIONS SHOWING THE WHITE BICYCLES. Cleveland: White Sewing Machine Co., [1896]. [28]pp. Colored and black and white illustrations. Quarto. 9) IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS AND CYCLE WORKS. Fitchburg, Ma., 1897. 32pp. Sepia, purple, and white illustrations. Quarto. 10) IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS AND CYCLE WORKS: BICYCLE CATALOGUE 1899. Fitchburg, Ma., 1899. 28pp. Black and white illustrations. Narrow octavo. 11) IVER JOHNSON BICYCLES, VELOCIPEDES, JUNIORCYCLES, BABY WALKERS. Fitchburg, Ma.: Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, [ca. 1936]. 23pp. Red, blue, black, and white illustrations. Oblong octavo. 12) COLUMBIA BICYCLES. Boston: Pope Manufacturing Co., 1886. 51pp. Black and white illustrations. 13) COLUMBIA BICYCLES. Boston: Pope Manufacturing Co., 1893. 51pp. Black and white illustrations. Red ink stamp of C.F. Martin, Agent, Clinton, Ma., on front wrapper. Quarto. 14) COLUMBIA BICYCLES. Boston: Pope Manufacturing Co., 1894. 44pp. Printed in sepia. Black and white illustrations. Quarto. 15) COLUMBIA, HARTFORD, AND VEDETTE BICYCLES. Hartford, Ct.: Pope Mfg. Co., Eastern Dept., 1905. 24pp. Black and white illustrations. Quarto. 16) COLUMBIA BICYCLES. Westfield, Ma.: Westfield Mfg. Co., 1931. 19pp. Blue, red, black, and white illustrations. 17) THE FINEST CHILD'S SEAT. Indianapolis: Progress Mfg. Co., [ca. 1892]. [2]pp. Black and white illustrations. 18) THE HORSMAN BICYCLES. New York: E.I. Horsman, [1895]. [4]pp. Black and white illustrations. 19) LOVELL DIAMOND CYCLES. Boston: John P. Lovell Arms Co., 1894. 32pp. Black and white illustrations. Stamp of John Driscoll, Manchester, N.H., on titlepage. Oblong octavo. 20) REX CYCLE. Chicago: Rex Cycle Co., 1898. [31]pp. Printed in green. Green and white illustrations. Red ink stamp of Rex Cycle Company, New York, on p.[31]. 21) SILVER KING AND SILVER QUEEN BICYCLES. Springfield, Ma.: Hendee & Nelson Mfg. Co., [1896]. [20]pp. Black and white illustrations. Small oblong quarto. 22) THE STEARNS BICYCLES. Syracuse, N.Y.: E.C. Stearns & Co., [1895]. 36pp. Printed in sepia. Black and white illustrations. Oblong quarto. 23) ERIE BICYCLES. Buffalo, N.Y.: Queen City Cycle Co., [1896]. 31pp. Printed in red and black. Black and white illustrations. Inscription ("Edward A. King, Agent") on rear wrapper. Oblong 12mo. 24) CLEVELAND AND WESTFIELD BICYCLES. Chicago: American Cycle Mfg. Co., 1902. 15,[1]pp. Black and white illustrations. Quarto. 25) CATALOGUE NO. 13 OF IMPERIAL WHEELS. Chicago: American Cycle Mfg. Co., [1903]. 24pp. Black and white illustrations. Narrow octavo. 26) WILLIS' PARK ROW BICYCLE CO. NET CASH PRICES. New York, 1901- 1902. Two volumes. 16pp.; 16pp. Small octavo. 27) BICYCLES MANUFACTURED FOR J.E. POORMAN, AGENT. Cincinnati, 1891. [10]pp. Black and white illustrations. 28) AROUND THE WORLD ON A CLEVELAND BICYCLE. Cleveland: H.A. Lozier & Co., 1896. 31pp. Printed in red and black. Black and white illustrations. Quarto. 29) 365 DAYS AHEAD OF THEM ALL. Holyoke, Ma.: Keating Wheel Co., 1896. 32pp. Black, white, and sepia illustrations. Purple ink stamp of F. Sammis, Bridgeport, Ct. on titlepage. Quarto. 30) NEW MODEL ALVAH. Alvah Bicycle Works, 1898. [2]pp. Color illustration. 31) CENTURION BICYCLES. Boston: H.B. Shattuck & Son, [1896]. 8pp. Black and white illustrations
AUTOGRAPH LETTER

AUTOGRAPH LETTER, SIGNED, FROM HENRY CLAY AS SENATOR TO PUBLISHER GEORGE GETZ, EXPRESSING HOPE THAT THE PUBLIC’S SELECTION OF LEADER DOES NOT LEAD TO DISRUPTION AND ASSERTING THE NEED TO EJECT LEADERS CAUSING DAMAGE TO THE COUNTRY]

Clay, Henry [1]p. on a quarto sheet. Old folds, minor smudging to a few words. Near fine. An elegant and humble correspondence from a potential presidential candidate regarding the current leadership situation in post- Jacksonian America. At the time he penned the current letter, Henry Clay was serving his third of four stints as United States Senator from Kentucky. Clay, "The Great Compromiser" and a perennial runner- up in presidential elections was eyeing the highest office in the land yet again for the 1840 race, and hoped to restore the country to health himself. Ever the skilled politician, here Clay argues for a greater-good solution to the political leadership question. He is likely referring to the 1839 Whig national nominating convention, where he eventually lost the nomination to William Henry Harrison, when he writes: "On whomsoever public opinion may finally unite, whether it be myself or another, I sincerely hope that the harmony & concert, so essential to success, may not be disturbed. The great object should be to eject from the public councils those rulers who have brought ruin & affliction upon the country; & the selection of a person for that purpose should be regarded as a wholly subordinate question." In Clay's view, the "rulers who have brought ruin & affliction upon the country" were likely figures such as Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren, and their supporters in Congress. Van Buren's administration caught the blame for the Panic of 1837, which caused a years-long recession, which Clay sought to remedy with his America System. Consistent with his own political career, Clay argues here for capable leadership, whether or not it be him. Clay lost nominations to John Quincy Adams in 1824 and 1828, and to William Henry Harrison in 1836 and 1840, but still actively campaigned for the party's nominee in each case. Clay was accustomed to stepping back and playing a supporting role on the national stage of American politics and the present letter provides a glimpse into his thinking on the subject. Clay would unfortunately never get the chance to lead the country from the Oval Office, losing the 1844 presidential election to John Tyler before eventually retiring from politics in late 1851.
LIBRO EN QUE SE HACIENTAN LAS PARTIDAS DE LOS ENTIERROS DE ESPAÑOLES

LIBRO EN QUE SE HACIENTAN LAS PARTIDAS DE LOS ENTIERROS DE ESPAÑOLES, MESTIZOS, Y INDIOS DE ESTA CABECERA DE SANTIAGO AYAPANGO.[manuscript title on first text leaf]

Mexico] [1],194,[1]pp. plus leaves 195-287 numbered rectos only, ending with one unnumbered page. Folio. Contemporary limp Mexican calf wallet- style binding, manuscript titles and illustrations on covers. Noticeable wear and rubbing to covers, small paper label reading "Libro=25" affixed to front cover. Some foxing and staining to text, contemporary or near-contemporary manuscript notations and ink drawing on rear pastedown. Quite clean internally. Very good. A fascinating manuscript register recording the burials of almost 2,000 people in the colonial Mexican town of Ayapango and its surrounding villages. Most of the deceased are entered by name, with their race and at least an approximate age included; most are described as Indians. Each entry is signed by the local priest and in some cases the officiating priest also notes whether the deceased was intestate, or whether they were too poor to have last rites administered. Other circumstances of death are occasionally noted. One example is "Maria Josepha, india" who was buried on April 25, 1806, where it is noted that she did not make a will or receive the holy sacraments because her death was very sudden. The ledger is accomplished in several hands, owing to the fact that over a decade's worth of burials are recorded here. Along with the individual burial records, the text includes occasional summaries of the total burials carried out in a given month; these statistics are often organized by ethnicity. Most of the deceased here hailed from Ayapango, just southeast of Mexico City. Those from other towns were brought to Ayapango to be buried likely because the town was a "cabacera," which is the chief city of a province in Mexico. Such burials, for people from places like Chalma, Puxtla, and Centlalpan are recorded here. In addition to its genealogical value for including names and hometowns of the deceased, the present ledger is a trove of information for life in and around Ayapango in the late colonial period in Mexico. The ages of the deceased give insight into life expectancies; sadly many of the entries record the deaths of "párvulo," the Spanish word for "infant." The aforementioned information on the administration of last rites or the presence of a last will and testament provide a peek into the economic conditions in the area. In addition to the manuscript title on the first text leaf, the rear cover reads, in contemporary manuscript, LIBRO DE ENTIERROS DE TODOS CLACES. The rear pastedown includes a drawing of a figure on a pedestal bearing a banner that reminds us in Spanish that "Death finishes all," with a short poem on mortality beneath the drawing that contends that the poem is not intended to denigrate the dead. An important manuscript record of a central Mexican town towards the end of the Spanish colonial period, with rich value for statistical and social research.
TRACTS AND OTHER PAPERS

TRACTS AND OTHER PAPERS, RELATING PRINCIPALLY TO THE ORIGIN, SETTLEMENT, AND PROGRESS OF THE COLONIES IN NORTH AMERICA, FROM THE DISCOVERY OF THE COUNTRY TO THE YEAR 1776

Force, Peter Four volumes. 20th-century linen backed boards, printed label. Bindings slightly worn and faded, with occasional minor soiling. Moderate scattered foxing throughout, minor age-toning at edges. A good set, untrimmed. An important collection of accounts of the early history of the American colonies, gathered by the assiduous Peter Force. Among the items reprinted, all with their own titlepages and paginations, are A TRUE DECLARATION OF THE ESTATE OF THE COLONIE IN VIRGINIA (1610), Smith's .NEW ENGLAND., the first printed version of Oglethorpe's A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE COLONY OF GEORGIA., and works by the Gentleman of Elvas and Nathaniel Byfield. "A most interesting and valuable series of reprints of the rarest of tracts relating to America, all of which are noticed in this dictionary, under their respective names" - Sabin. "Some of these fifty-two tracts appeared here in print for the first time" - Howes. "This collection of tracts on early American history is indispensable to all students, whether of the north or the south, and by frequent reprints should be made accessible to all" - Larned. Force formed a very large collection relating mainly to American history, which he sold to the Library of Congress. HOWES F247, "b." LARNED 848. SABIN 25059.
CITY OF MEXICO FROM THE "CAMINO DEL NINA PERDITA." DRAWN ON THE SPOT

CITY OF MEXICO FROM THE “CAMINO DEL NINA PERDITA.” DRAWN ON THE SPOT, BY T. JAS. DUNPHY, 1st REGNT. PENNA. VOLUNTS. THIS PICTURE IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO CAPT. JOHN BENNETT, OF THE PHILADA. LIGHT GUARD [caption title]

Mexico]: Hoffy, Alfred, lithographer, after Thomas James Dunphy Handcolored lithograph, 14 3/4 x 23 inches. Old four-inch repaired diagonal closed tear in upper left corner not touching image. Previously mounted with old tape and paper remnants on verso and at corners, two vertical folds, minor edge wear, and toning. Overall, very good. An exceedingly rare Mexican-American War- related color lithograph drawn on stone by Alfred Hoffy after the original by soldier- artist Thomas James Dunphy. Dunphy was a private in the 1st Pennsylvania Regiment, which endured the Siege of Puebla that ended in October 1847, and then marched into occupied Mexico City two months later. Dunphy dedicated the scene to his commander Captain John Bennett of Company F, the Philadelphia Light Guard. The scene depicts two uniformed United States horsemen riding on the road toward the city, as the United States flag flies above the city's downtown area, just right of center of the image. All is peaceful, except for a vaquero chasing two steers in the foreground. The landscape is replete with indigenous Mexican vegetation, and with the architectural splendor of the Mexican capital city sprawled across the background. The artist who drew the lithograph of Dunphy's work, Alfred Hoffy, was one of Philadelphia's leading lithographers in the mid-19th century. He worked from at least 1839 to 1864 for a variety of publishers. His most famous and enduring work was on THE ORCHARDIST'S COMPANION., but he is also known for his portrait of the "Siamese Twins," Chang and Eng, which Peters calls "the best of the freak prints" in AMERICA ON STONE. The publisher Peter S. Duval was active for several decades, but was at his Ranstead Place address only from 1849 to 1855, according to Peters. Regarding early lithographers, Peters referred to Duval as "one of the most important of them all." Duval published several Mexican-American War scenes, namely a series by Dacre, in addition to the present example, and worked often with Hoffy. OCLC records no copies of this lithograph, and only one other copy has been traced, appearing at Anderson Galleries' Charles Peters auction, April 8, 1915, lot 177. The item was described as folded, so it may, in fact, be the same copy. PETERS, AMERICA ON STONE, pp.163-68 and 220-22.
SUBSTANTIAL MANUSCRIPT ARCHIVE BOUND IN ONE VOLUME CONTAINING CONTEMPORARY REPORTS AND ILLUSTRATIONS PERTAINING TO COMMODORE PERRY'S ARRIVAL IN JAPAN]

SUBSTANTIAL MANUSCRIPT ARCHIVE BOUND IN ONE VOLUME CONTAINING CONTEMPORARY REPORTS AND ILLUSTRATIONS PERTAINING TO COMMODORE PERRY’S ARRIVAL IN JAPAN]

Perry Japan Expedition] [354]pp. including twelve full-page or double- page ink and watercolor wash illustrations. Contemporary Japanese wrappers, string-tied, paper label completed in manuscript on front cover. Noticeable wear and rubbing to the binding, newer string. Uneven worming throughout, mostly unobtrusive. About very good. Large bound collection of contemporary manuscript papers, documents, and drawings relating to Commodore Perry and the Black Ships entering Edo Bay in July 1853. The text is comprised of accounts of the event, and transcriptions of official letters from President Millard Fillmore, Secretary of State Edward Everett, and Commodore Perry to the Japanese Emperor. Illustrations include two double-hemispheric world maps, a map showing the course of the Black Ship squadron, Edo Bay and the landing of the ships, Perry's marines marching, sketches of large cannons aboard Perry's ships, and diagrams and fortifications protecting the Japanese people from foreign invasion. In 1852, Perry was appointed head of a naval expedition charged with inducing the Japanese government to establish diplomatic relations with the United States. The expedition involved two visits to Japan. On his first, Perry arrived at Edo Bay on July 8, 1853. After a brief standoff and show of force, he was able to land the following week and deliver a letter from President Fillmore with the U.S. demands with the promise he would return the following year for a reply. On Feb. 13, 1854, Perry returned with a total of ten vessels and 1,600 men. After another standoff and three weeks of negotiation, Perry signed the Convention of Kanagawa at the end of March 1854, which opened the ports of Shimoda and Hakodate to American ships, provided for care of shipwrecked sailors, and the establishment of an American consulate in Shimoda. "The most important result, however, was that the visit contributed to the collapse of the feudal regime and to the modernization of Japan" - Hill. Altogether a very comprehensive manuscript archive of this important occasion that helped open Japan to world commerce and culture. HILL 1332 (ref).
A RECORD OF A TRIP THROUGH CANADA'S WILDERNESS TO LAKE CHIBOGAMOO AND TO THE GREAT LAKE MISTASSINI IN THE SUMMER OF 1906

A RECORD OF A TRIP THROUGH CANADA’S WILDERNESS TO LAKE CHIBOGAMOO AND TO THE GREAT LAKE MISTASSINI IN THE SUMMER OF 1906

Pauli, Frederick G. 61pp. including a map and illustrations from photographs, plus folding map. Frontis. Original printed green wrappers bound into contemporary half burgundy cloth and marbled boards, spine gilt. Boards rubbed, spine ends chipped. Bookplate on front pastedown, embossed stamps of Long Island Historical Society to titlepage and p.61, deaccession stamp of Brooklyn Historical Society on titlepage verso. Several closed tears along map folds, but overall very good. Presentation copy to Henry E. Pierrepont [Jr.] (1845-1911), with a letter from the author tipped in endorsing the benefits of "out-of-door living" and with Pauli's manuscript inscription on the front free endpaper. It is not clear what relationship Pauli and Pierrepont had, and whether Pauli was an investor in Chibougamau mines, hoping to enlist Pierrepont. Pierrepont subsequently gifted this copy to the Long Island Historical Society, as noted on their bookplate on the front pastedown. Frederick Pauli (d.1936) wrote this pamphlet as a travel guide for the Quebec wilderness, but perhaps more importantly as a survey of the new mining fields opening around Lake Chibougamau and the Gouin Peninsula, following discoveries of asbestos, copper, iron, and gold made by Peter McKenzie in 1903. Gold fever was strong for several years and Canadian mining officials lobbied for a railroad, or even a road, but the region was simply too remote; access was finally completed in the 1950s with the exploitation of copper. Pauli details his trip, his local guides, and the supplies they took on their month-long trip, accompanied by numerous photographs. He also provides best advices for backwoods cooking, fishing, bathing, and the like. Privately printed in a small edition, and quite uncommon in the market. "A rare work" - Heller. An intriguing view of the second Quebecois gold rush. PHILLIPS, SPORTING BOOKS, p.289. HELLER 589.
EXPERIMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS ON ELECTRICITY

EXPERIMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS ON ELECTRICITY, MADE AT PHILADELPHIA IN AMERICA.TO WHICH ARE ADDED, LETTERS AND PAPERS ON PHILOSOPHICAL SUBJECTS. THE WHOLE CORRECTED, METHODIZED, IMPROVED, AND NOW FIRST COLLECTED INTO ONE VOLUME, AND ILLUSTRATED WITH COPPER PLATES

Franklin, Benjamin [2],iv,[2],496[i.e. 510, accounting for mispagination, plus four extra pages where the page numbers have been duplicated, i.e. page numbers 112-113 and 416-417 appear twice],[16]pp. including leaf of errata and advertisement "concerning this fourth edition," plus seven engraved plates (two folding). Half title present but misbound (between pp.150 and 151). Quarto. Modern three-quarter calf and marbled boards, spine ruled in gilt, gilt leather label. Title, preface, and errata leaves expertly strengthened along the upper edge and foredge, outer corners of final four index leaves restored (not affecting text in any instances). An occasional small, closed tear in upper margin. Five-digit inked number in margin of preface leaf. Text with light, even tanning, offsetting from the plates. About very good. Untrimmed. "America's first great scientific contribution" - Howes. This is the fourth, first collected, and by far most desirable edition, containing for the first time complete notes on all the experiments, as well as correspondence between Peter Collinson, Franklin, and other collaborators. Franklin began experimenting with electricity as early as 1745, demonstrating the electrical property of lightning and inventing the lightning conductor. This volume includes summaries of his work with Leyden jars, charged clouds, and lightning rods, as well as his famous kite and key experiment. In addition to the electrical experiments it contains the important discovery of the course of storms over North America and other important meteorological observations. The work caused a sensation in the scientific world when first published in 1751, and ranked in the eyes of many of Franklin's contemporaries as far beyond any of his political achievements. Harvard and Yale awarded him honorary degrees in 1753; he received the highest award of the Royal Society, the Copley Medal, the same year; and he was elected to the Society in 1756, the first American to be so honored. This fourth edition is the first complete edition of the original work. The earlier editions were issued in separately published parts. Franklin edited this new one-volume edition himself, significantly revising the text, adding for the first time a number of his own philosophical letters and papers, introducing footnotes, correcting errors, and adding an index. This copy includes the errata/advertisement leaf which is often lacking. "America's first great scientific contribution" - Howes. HOWES F320, "b." PRINTING AND THE MIND OF MAN 199. SABIN 25506. FORD 307. MILESTONES OF SCIENCE 69.