Sophie Dupre Archives - Rare Book Insider

Sophie Dupre

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Autograph Open Letter Signed to the “Electors of Stafford” (Richard Brinsley, 1751-1816, Dramatist)

SHERIDAN "residing in or near London and entitled to vote at the Stafford Election. Gentlemen, A Report was most insidiously and falsely circulated at Stafford that my son did not mean to propose himself to succeed me as the Representative of your ancient Borough, which I have had the honor to represent for twenty six years and that I wish'd to support a gentlemen of the name of Mansel Philllip. in consequence of this fraud I understand that a great advantage has been taken. I assure you that my son is in Stafford, and canvassing against Mr Mansel Phillip with whom we have no connexion.", 1 side 4to., no place, no date but Sheridan was an Anglo-Irish playwright, writer and Whig politician who sat in the British House of Commons from 1780 to 1812, representing the constituencies of Stafford, Westminster and Ilchester. The owner of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in London, he wrote several prominent plays such as The Rivals (1775), The Duenna (1775), The School for Scandal (1777) and A Trip to Scarborough (1777), along with serving as Treasurer of the Navy from 1806 to 1807. He held the posts of Receiver-General of the Duchy of Cornwall (1804–1807) and Treasurer of the Navy (1806–1807). Sheridan was noted for his close political relationship with the Prince of Wales, leading a faction of his supporters in the Commons. By 1805 when the Prince was cooling on his previous support of Catholic Emancipation Sheridan, George Tierney and others announced their own opposition to it. After his death in 1816, Sheridan was buried at Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, and his plays remain a central part of the Western canon and are regularly performed around the world.
  • $882
book (2)

Fine Autograph Letter Signed “L. Pasteur”, in French with translation to Mister President (Louis, 1822-1895, French chemist, developer of pasteurisation)

PASTEUR acknowledging "receipt of the letter by which you and Mr. Vice-President of the Compagnie Générale Transatlantique kindly inform me that a sum of 3.780,20 francs has been subscribed by the Company to contribute to the creation of the "Pasteur Institute". On behalf of the Patronage Committee of this establishment and myself, I send you the expression of all our gratitude. The total subscription today amounts, in round figures, to the sum of 2.500.000 francs. Please accept, Mr. President, the assurance of my highest consideration." with an autograph postcript that "The Crédit Foncier de France, which concentrates all subscriptions, will send you a receipt for the sum of 3780,20 francs.", 1 side 8vo., Paris, 23rd May He was the director of the Pasteur Institute, established in 1887, until his death, and his body was interred in a vault beneath the institute. Although Pasteur made groundbreaking experiments, his reputation became associated with various controversies. Historical reassessment of his notebook revealed that he practiced deception to overcome his rivals. A French national hero at age 55, in 1878 Pasteur discreetly told his family to never reveal his laboratory notebooks to anyone. His family obeyed, and all his documents were held and inherited in secrecy. Finally, in 1964 Pasteur's grandson and last surviving male descendant, Pasteur Vallery-Radot, donated the papers to the French national library. Yet the papers were restricted for historical studies until the death of Vallery-Radot in 1971. In 1995, the centennial of the death of Pasteur, a historian of science Gerald L. Geison published an analysis of his private notebooks in his The Private Science of Louis Pasteur, and declared that Pasteur had given several misleading accounts and played deceptions in his most important discoveries. Max Perutz published a defense of Pasteur in The New York Review of Books. Based on further examinations of Pasteur's documents, French immunologist Patrice Debré concluded in his book Louis Pasteur (1998) that, in spite of his genius, Pasteur had some faults. A book review states that Debré "sometimes finds him unfair, combative, arrogant, unattractive in attitude, inflexible and even dogmatic". Transcription Paris le 23 mai 1888. Monsieur le Président, Je m'empresse de vous accuser réception de la lettre par laquelle, vous et Monsieur le Vice-Président de la Compagnie Générale Transatlantique vous voulez bien m'informer qu'une somme de 3780,20 francs a été souscrite par les soins de la Compagnie pour contribuer à la création de l'"Institut Pasteur". Au nom du Comité de patronage de cet établissement et au mien, je vous adresse l'expression de toute notre gratitude. Le total de la souscription s'élève aujourd'hui, en chiffres ronds, à la somme de 2.500.000 francs. Veuillez agréer, Monsieur le Président, l'assurance de ma haute considération. L. Pasteur. Le Crédit Foncier de France, qui concentre toutes les souscriptions, vous fera parvenir un reçu à souche de la somme de 3780,20 fr. Translation Paris on May 23, 1888. Mister President, I hasten to acknowledge receipt of the letter by which you and Mr. Vice-President of the Compagnie Générale Transatlantique kindly inform me that a sum of 3.780,20 francs has been subscribed by the Company to contribute to the creation of the "Pasteur Institute". On behalf of the Patronage Committee of this establishment and myself, I send you the expression of all our gratitude. The total subscription today amounts, in round figures, to the sum of 2.500.000 francs. Please accept, Mr. President, the assurance of my highest consideration. L. Pasteur. The Crédit Foncier de France, which concentrates all subscriptions, will send you a receipt for the sum of 3780,20 francs.
  • $2,302
  • $2,302
book (2)

Fine Unsigned Autograph Letters to his publisher, George ALLEN (John, 1819-1900, Writer and Critic)

RUSKIN (1832-1907, Craftsman and Engraver who became assistant to Ruskin and then became his publisher) saying he is "much pleased at your being in so good spirits. I am fairly well, and the new notions getting into close form. The Laws of Fresole had better be planned as a series to be finished next year, of properly elementary teaching. I will do it in twelve parts of the size of Fors [Clavigera] at the same price, giving four to line, four to colour, four to shade. One plate in each and supplementary plates arranged for an appendix. Then the general and wide teaching, with old Modern Painters in bits will follow under another name. Write here, tomorrow, but all next week to Broadlands. You'll get the Thistle on Monday or Tuesday.", 2 sides 8vo., Corpus Christi College, Oxford headed paper crossed out, Heren Hill, 4th December with the year added The Laws of Fesole is sub-titled 'A Familiar Treatise on the Elementary Principles and Practice of Drawing and Painting as Determined by the Tuscan Painters'. It was ultimately published in four parts between 1877 and 1879. The letter is housed in a 6½" x 9½" burgundy leather envelope which has "Original Autograph Letter by John Ruskin Presented with the Library Edition of Ruskin's Works 1912" embossed in gold lettering across the front. John Ruskin was a controversial and at times self-contradictory but perceptive English writer, critic of art, architecture, and society. He was also a painter and engraver. In 1870, he was appointed the Slade professor of Fine Art at Oxford. George Allen was initially Ruskin s student and then assistant drawing master at the Working Men s College before he went into publishing business with Ruskin. He made many of the engravings for Ruskin's work and published his "Collected Works" posthumously.
  • $2,686
  • $2,686
book (2)
book (2)

Autograph Letter Singed to Mrs Ralph Wigram (Ernest Aldrich, 1897-1958, American born Shipbroker and second husband of Wallis Simpson, later the wife of King Edward VIII)

SIMPSON (Lady Ava Waverley, née Bodley, 1896-1974, wife, first of Ralph Follet Wigram and secondly of Cabinet Minister Sir John Anderson, Political and Society Hostess) saying that he cannot "begin to tell you how shocked and grieved I was to hear of your tragic loss, nor how deeply I feel for you in this sad moment. The universal tribute paid to the memory of your husband testifies to the affection and esteem in which he was held by all who knew him. I can only add my voice to that of the multitude, and mourn the loss of one whose exceptional qualities of heart and head have left a gap in the world that will be hard to fill. What his loss must mean to you I can well understand and I want you to know that you have my warmest and most profound sympathy.", 2 sides 8vo., with original autograph envelope, Guards Club, Brook Street headed paper, 3rd January postmarked Simpson's second wife was Wallis Warfield Spencer (1896–1986), the Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania-born former wife of Earl Winfield Spencer Jr. and the only child of Teackle Wallis Warfield. They married in London, England, on 21st July 1928, and divorced on 3rd May 1937. As his obituary in The New York Times noted, the publicity over his second wife's remarriage to the Duke of Windsor and her subsequent fame thrust him into the role of "the forgotten man". The two remained friends, however, the newspaper noted, with the now Duchess of Windsor sending him flowers when he was in hospital for surgery and Simpson offering advice and clarification when his former wife was working on her memoirs. Ralph Follett Wigram (1890-1936) was a British government official in the Foreign Office. He helped raise the alarm about German rearmament under Hitler during the period prior to World War II. His sudden death at the age of 46 is somewhat mysterious. Sources disagree on several points. For one, some say he was found dead at home, but a letter from Churchill says he died in Ava's arms. His death certificate recorded the cause of death as pulmonary haemorrhage, but a letter from Henry Pelling indicates he committed suicide while deeply depressed.
  • $345