G.Gosen Rare Books & Old Paper

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BOMBASTES FURIOSO: A Burlesque Tragic Opera.

BOMBASTES FURIOSO: A Burlesque Tragic Opera.

Rhodes, William Barnes Rhodes, William Barnes. BOMBASTES FURIOSO: A Burlesque Tragic Opera. With Designs by George Cruikshank. London: Thomas Rodd, Great Newport Street; and T. Griffiths, Wellington Street, Strand. MDCCCXXX [1830]. Printed by Lowndes and White, Crane Court, Fleet Street. 12mo. 16cm. [1 blank; 34 pages followed by a full-page woodcut , "Tu ral, lu ral, la, /Tu ral, laral, laddi" below three men and a woman dancing and singing; original wrapper front and back, with eleven blank sheets bound in behind] Nine woodcuts: seven full-page and the vignette on the title page, and one on the wrapper (bound in) which differs from the one on the title page. Both feature a pair of boots, initialed "G.C." with the same motto: "who dares this pair of Boots displace / must meet Bombastes face to face." The image on the wrapper has the boots in a standing position with the feet parallel, pointing in the same direction. The vignette on the title page has the feet pointing in opposite directions. The cover to the wrapper is whitish-yellow paper. An advertisement for Tom Thumb, with Illustrations by George Cruikshank announces it is "in the press" appears on the wrapper's back. Below are ten more titles "in active preparation" by T. Rodd. A verse drama of forty minutes running time written by William Barnes Rhodes (1772 – 1826). A career banker at the Bank of England, Rhodes rose to the position of Chief Teller. He was a collector of English drama, and the sale of his collection, prior to his death, went on for ten days. He left behind two other dramas, neither of which was printed at the time Bombastes was printed. A volume of Epigrams was printed in 1803. This edition is one of at least two printings by T. Rodd, as the publisher's biography of Rhodes concludes, "The mirth-inspiring pencil of Mr. George Cruikshank, seconded by the talents of the Artists whose names grace the cuts, enable the Publishers to present once more for Public approbation BOMBASTES FURIOSO." Cohn mentions another printing, of few copies with letterpress and woodcuts on India paper. (The first printing by Rodd is believed to have been in 1822.) Cohn, 692. Bound in gilt-ruled mottled brown calf, binder's stamp of F. Bedford. Maroon endpapers, page edges gilded. Bookseller's tag of Henry Southeran & Co. at 14 Strand, London, W.C. This copy was re-backed, with the remains of the original back strip laid down. On the front pastedown is the armorial book plate of J. Leveson Douglas Stewart Glenogil, and on the back pastedown is the armorial book plate of Albert L. Cotton. J. Leveson Douglas Stewart Glenogil is listed in William Carew Hazlitt's A Roll of Honor…, published by Quaritch in 1908. Wear to the binding noted, the text block is fine.
That Heathen Chinee and Other Poems Mostly Humorous.

That Heathen Chinee and Other Poems Mostly Humorous.

Harte, F. Bret Harte, F. Bret, That Heathen Chinee and Other Poems Mostly Humorous. By F. Bret Harte, Author of "The Luck of the Roaring Camp" and "Sensation Novels Condensed." London: John Camden Hotten, 74 & 75, Piccadilly, [1871]. Savill, Edwards and Co., Printers, Chandos Street, Covent Garden. 17 cm. First English edition, first issue, with the misprint on line 14, p. 126: "Sandy cMGee;". There is another misprint for the first poem in the table of contents. "That Heathen Chinee" is listed as being on page "L1." As the first poem in the book, it begins on page 15 (unpaginated). All poems listed in the table of contents are present. Colored frontispiece and a colored vignette on the title page. An imperfect copy, with gathering "D" bound in front of gathering "C". The pagination is as follows: vi; B1-8 (corresponding to pages 15-28); D1-8 (corresponding to pages 45-60); C1-8 (corresponding to pages 29-44; E1-8 (corresponding to pages 61-76); F1-8 (corresponding to 77-92); G1-8 (corresponding to pages 93-108); H1-8 (corresponding to 109-124); I1-8 (corresponding to pages 125 – 140); K 1 (corresponding to pages 141 and 142, both unpaginated, p. 141 has the text of "Fate". The verso has the printer's name and address, but is otherwise blank. Eighteen pages of John Camden Hotten's advertisements follow the text. Bound in quarter green cloth with cloth corners on marbled boards, this copy belonged to Fleet Surgeon John Lloyd Thomas, R.N., H.M.S. "Endymion," with his bookplate pasted in over part of his signature. His book plate is over-stamped with Japanese characters. The book tag of Jiujiya Book Store, at No. 6, Yatozaka, Yokohama, is pasted onto the front endpaper. On the frontispiece is the embossed stamp of the bookseller W. H. Smith & Son, Strand, London. On page 28, Thomas wrote: "Vide page after -60- for continuation of 'Jim.'" On page 58, Thomas signed his name in full: "John Lloyd Thomas." Thomas also inked his initials on the bottom of the text block: "JLLT." On the title page is a curious ink annotation: "Jay Ell Tomas / H.M.S. "PORPOISE." / 1896." Thomas went to China in 1894 on the "Porpoise," but the spelled abbreviations of his name remain a mystery. Dr. John Lloyd Thomas (1857-1913) became Fleet Surgeon, R.N. in 1900.. From the John Lloyd Thomas obituary in the British Medical Journal, June 14, 1913: "In 1894 he went to China in the "Porpoise", and in the following year attended the wounded Chinese soldiers and sailors at Chefoo during the China-Japanese war; his services were favourably noted, and he was promoted staff-surgeon in 1896. After a term of service from 1897 to 1899 in the Royal Naval Barracks, Portsmouth, he went out-again; to China in the "Endymion" in 1899. In the following year he served with the second Peking Expedition, and the excellent health of the brigade was attributed in a large measure to the sanitary arrangements made under his supervision. He was specially promoted fleet surgeon for these services, and received also from the Emperor of China the Order of the Double Dragon, first division of the third class. He came home in 1902, already unfortunately suffering from the disabling disease which was to shorten his life." H.M.S., "Endymion" was a first-class protected cruiser of the Edgar class. She served in China during the Boxer Rebellion and later in the First World War, and was sold in 1920. Not to be confused with her storied predecessor of the War of 1812, which was broken up in 1868. Condition good, binding and printing errors as noted above.
Liberty

Liberty

Tucker, Benjamin R. [George Bernard Shaw] Tucker, Benjamin R., Liberty, Not the Daughter but the Mother of Order. Vol. XI, No.6, New York, N.Y., July 27, 1895, Whole No. 318. A single issue. 12 pages. This issue has selective general commentary of current events on the front page: the "Debs insurrection" in Chicago, a new anti-trust law in Texas and Balfour's "Quixotic attacks on the evolutionary philosophy of life" among them. This issue is important for the long review-article by George Bernard Shaw to Tucker about Max Nordau, which bears the title, "A Degenerate's View of Nordau," a twenty-six column article (three columns to a page.) An article by Tucker, "Voluntary State Socialism," Stephen T. Byington's "Anarchist Letter-Writing Corps," "Expert Reasoning" by Henri Rochefort from L'Intransigeant and a humorous excerpt from Le Figaro about increasing tax on alcoholic beverages. The last page, page 12, is a page of advertisements for Tucker's publications. Shaw's long review-article on Nordau is comprehensive and includes mentions of Whistler, Burne-Jones, Liszt, Wilde, Ibsen, Wagner and Monet, among others. Not one to mince words, Shaw begins his letter-article to Tucker: "I have read Max Nordau's 'Degeneration' at your request, --- two hundred and sixty thousand mortal words, saying the same thing over and over again. That, as you know, is the way to drive a thing into the mind of the world, though Nordau considers it a symptom of insane 'obsession' on the part of writers who do not share his own opinions. His message to the world is that all our characteristically modern works of art are symptoms of disease in the artists, and that these diseased artists are themselves symptoms of the nervous exhaustion of the race by overwork." This is the first edition of Shaw's famous statement on the sanity of art and the creative impulse of the artist. It was republished as a pamphlet in 1908. Condition very good.
ALS on Grand Union Hotel

ALS on Grand Union Hotel, New York Stationery

Emerson, L. Grand Union Hotel, New York City, January 18, 1883. Autograph letter, ink on paper, signed "L. Emerson" on a sheet of the illustrated Grand Union Hotel stationery, which boasts a half-page woodcut illustration of the Grand Union Hotel, situated across Forty-second Street from the original Grand Central Depot, at the published address: "Grand Union Hotel, opposite the Grand Central Depot, New York City, Fourth Avenue, Forty-first and Forty-second Streets." A woodcut measuring 10 cm x 19.5 cm, the Grand Union Hotel had 450 "elegant rooms," an elevator, the European Plan and a restaurant, as well as private dining rooms. Rates for a single room started at $1.00. Written from Washington, D.C., on Grand Union Hotel stationery, L. Emerson wrote a nephew, Rufus Emerson, about the train trip from Boston to New York, crossing the Hudson River on the railroad ferry to New Jersey, and continuing south through Philadelphia to Washington, D.C., lodging there at the St. James Hotel, kept by Mr. Woodbury, originally from Salem, N.H. and his chief clerk, a Mr. Wheeler of Haverhill, Massachusetts and the cashier of the "eating room" was a friend of the recipient of the letter. Half of the letter is devoted to L. Emerson's visits to the Smithsonian and Government buildings in Washington, and to the Capitol to hear a debate on using public money to help "the illiterates of the South especially – this will be spirited and animated. Hoar leads off." He also visited the Union Market, describing the vendors as well as the people there, "… such a multitude of blacks vending their goods – They looked pitiful." Condition fine.
Odds and Ends. In Verse and Prose.

Odds and Ends. In Verse and Prose.

Merle, William Henry Merle, William Henry, Odds and Ends. In Verse and Prose. By William Henry Merle, Esq. Illustrated by George Cruikshank, from Designs by the Author. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, Paternoster Row, 1831. 8vo. 20 cm. Presumed first edition. Thirteen illustrations, of which eleven are woodcuts, and one is a signed etching by George Cruikshank, with "WHM" opposite Cruikshank's initials. Cohn 552, This copy was bound without the advertisement. Pages 8-9 are used as a frontispiece. The etching is: "An antique glass supposed to have been in the possession of Mary Queen of Scots," with the writing thereon reproduced in facsimile. [viii; 146 numbered pages with one additional leaf (p. 147-148). The verso of p. 147 is blank but for "S. Manning & Co., Printers, London-House yard, St. Paul's"; 1 blank] Bound in half long grain tan calf, spine and corners over marbled boards, matching marbled endpapers. Gold ruling and a decorated gilded spine with "Odds and Ends," "Cruikshank" and "1831," all on the spine. Five raised bands. Top page edge gilded. Armorial book plates of bibliophiles Thomas Gaisford (1779-1855) and The Glen, Charles Tennant (1768-1838). Tennant was the chemist who discovered bleaching powder and subsequently founded an industrial dynasty. Gaisford was a classical scholar, clergyman and the Dean of Christ Church, Oxford 1831-1855. Gaisford's bookplate is found on the inside front pastedown. Tennant's bookplate has been trimmed to shape and is opposite Gaisford's. A fine copy with a remarkable provenance.
NOBODY

NOBODY, AND SOME-BODY. With the true Chronicle Historie of Elydure, who was fortunately three severall times crowned King of England.

[Two Original Woodcuts] [Smith, Alexander], NOBODY, AND SOME-BODY. With the true Chronicle Historie of Elydure, who was fortunately three severall times crowned King of England. The true Coppy thereof, as it hath been acted by the Queens Maiesties Seruants. Printed for Iohn Trundle and are toobe sold at his shop in Barbican, at the sign of No-body. Two woodcut illustrations from the first edition of 1606, one is the hand-colored title page woodcut vignette with The Prologue on the verso. The other is of "Somebody," without hand-coloring. Both of these woodcuts have vertical chain lines. 17 cm x 11.5 cm Additionally, these two woodcuts are sold with a facsimile reprint of the 1606 edition, printed for private circulation in Glasgow, December 1877, in an edition of only fifty copies. As much an exact reproduction as a reprint, it is a typographical facsimile, the peculiarities of type and spelling carefully preserved. The importance of preserving illustrations of early seventeenth century habits is demonstrated by a notable allusion in the play to the treatment of thieves taken in the theatres of the day: "somebody once pickt a pocket in this Play-house yard, /was hoysted on the stage and shamd about it." [The letter "s" in "hoysted," "Stage" and "shamd" is faithfully reproduced in the old letter form not available here.] The hand-colored title page has been trimmed across the bottom, the final phrase "Barbican, at the sign of No-body" was lost. Additionally, the reproduced limited edition text is accompanied by a small archive of supporting correspondence and articles. Numerous articles are pasted onto front endpaper, and between the initial blanks: a clipping from Academy, March 2, 1878; the entry from H. Southeran & Co.'s Catalogue, April 30, 1878; an entry by Alexander Smith from Notes and Queries, September 11, 1878; Smith's entry in Notes and Queries, June 6, 1874, pages 441 - 443, which gives a textual examination and brings up Shakespeare's Tempest text. As for the dating of the original play, Smith quotes Ben Johnson: "As there is no date to the play, the year in which it was printed must remain a matter of conjecture. John Trundle, the publisher, as far as I can learn, carried on business, perhaps from 1598 until, at least, 1625. Ben Johnson in Every Man in his Humour, makes referenceto Trundlein these words Act I, Scene 2: 'Well, if he read this with patience I'll be gelt, and troll ballads for Master John Trundle yonder, the rest of my mortality.'" Manuscript material relating to this limited edition consists of 2 1/2 page unsigned manuscript by the editor Alexander Smith in which he recounts how he came to know of Nobody, and Some-Body through his friendship "... with Dr. George H. Kingsley -- brother to the late Canon Kingsley -- the librarian to the Earl of Ellesmore.. He was kind enough to procure for my use three old plays of great rarity and interest one of them being 'Nobody & Somebody." He details his bibliographic work on the play subsequent to his discovery of it. Two ALS by E. Christie-Miller to Smith about the woodcut illustration and thanks for the receipt of copy of this reprint. Two additional reproductions (1877) of the original woodblock prints are laid in. See also: STC (2nd Ed.), 18597; ESTC S113225.
The Moral Characters of Theophrastus.

The Moral Characters of Theophrastus.

Theophrastus [Theophrastus] The Moral Characters of Theophrastus. Translated from the Greek, By Eustace Budgell, Esq; Reddere persone scit convenientia cuique. Hor. London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, at Shakespeare's Head, over-against Catherine-Street in the Strand, 1714. [engraved frontispiece by Lud. Du Guernier deli & Sculp; vi; life of Theophrastus xvi; the preface viii; 80; iv] 12mo. The introduction begins the text on page 1, chapter 1 begins on page 5; erratum on page 80, advertisements for Jacob Tonson's books 4 pages. Page 79 mis-numbered as "89." Bound in blind-stamped eighteenth century calf, re-backed, six raised bands. Book plate and embossed stamp of the Sondley Reference Library 1879 – 1919, City of Asheville, North Carolina. Ownership signature of Henry Reid above the book plate. With the bookseller's tag of Joseph McDonough Rare Books, Albany, New York. The fraught history of the Sondley Library, its holdings, its generous benefactor and its eventual piecemeal dispersal is a cautionary tale to any benefactor who might assume economic conditions and local politics will leave his/her bequest unaltered and intact in perpetuity. In the late nineteen-eighties, the trustees of the Sondley Library authorized the sale of those books they deemed irrelevant to the Pack Memorial Library's purposes, namely North Carolina history. Jacob Tonson, the printer, is mentioned in Howe's List of London Bookbinders 1648 – 1815. "From his will it appears he was a bookbinder, a stationer and a printer, as well as a bookseller, d. 1735." Lowndes, Vol. IV, 2663b, "Of this translation, Addison, in the Lover, remarked, 'it was the best extant of any ancient author in the English Language.' "
York Chapbooks

York Chapbooks

Wordsworth, William et alia [Chap Books, York Chap Books] James Kendrew, Ten Chapbooks bound. Book plate of Irwin Laughlin, whose motto was: Alias Aliis Hic Mihi, Ex-Bibliotheca in Aedibus Meridianis. Irwin B. Laughlin was an American diplomat, whose home in Washington, D. C., 1630 Crescent Place, now Meridan House, which once housed this book. Binding stamp partially illegible, Piccadilly. A marvelous collection of early illustrated nineteenth century classic children's stories in near fine condition. Bound in full brown calf with cover and spine decoration in gold, five raised bands, 10.5 cm x 6.5 cm. Hinges cracked but holding. 1. The World Turned Upside Down, or, No News and Strange News. Decorated with Wood-Cuts. York: Printed by J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date]. 31 pages, 29 woodcuts, wrapper is counted in the pagination. Percy Muir says, "By far the best version of 'The World Turned Upside Down' is that of the two sisters [Ann and Jane Taylor] published by Tabart in 1810, and illustrated by their brother Isaac." The back cover of the wrapper has a list of "Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew." Fine. 2. The Death and Burial of Cock Robin; to Which is Added, Pizarro and Alonzo; or, Industry better than Gold. York: Printed by J. Kendrew, Colliergate. 10 cm x 6 cm, 31 pages, frontispiece (verso of title page), pp. 1-16 "Cock Robin"; pp. 17-29 "Pizarro and Alonzo"; "Industry better than Gold," pp. 29-31. The date given on Cock Robin's coffin on page 11 is "1805." This comports with Osborne, p. 91, "An elegy on the death and burial of Cock Robin. Ornamented with cuts. York: Printed by J. Kendrew [ca. 1820]. Pp16. 9.5 cm x 6.5 cm. The woodcut on page 11 shows Cock Robin's coffin inscribed with the date 1805." The back cover of the wrapper has a list of "Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew." Fine. 3. The Cries of York, for the Amusement of Good Children. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate. 10 cm x 6 cm, 30 pages, horizontal frontispiece on the verso of the wrapper front cover, 27 additional cuts, the last being of "The Comet, As seen at York, 1811," above the alphabet given in upper, then lower case letters, with numbers 1 to [1]0. Osborne, p. 59, dates the chap book "1826?", and he gives the title as "amusement of young children." (Underlining not Osborne's.) A popular subject for children's literature, the balloon above the girl's head holds "Fine Vacomb [Acomb?] sand," in the large frontispiece. The back cover of the wrapper has a list of "Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew." Fine. 4. The Cries of London, for the Instruction and Amusement of Good Children. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate. 10 cm x 6 cm, 31 pages, frontispiece followed by a title page The Cries of London, for the Instruction and Amusement of Good Children. Illustrated with Woodcuts from Life. Roman letters, old English capital and small letters, and Italic capital and small letters are given on the verso of the title page. 23 cuts pp. 5 – 28; "The Dead Twins" follows on p. 29 – 31 with 2 additional woodcuts, the back cover of the wrapper has a list of "Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew." Osborne, Vol. 2, p. 629, describes his copy as having the woodcut appearing on p. 18, "My good soul, will you buy a Bowl?", on the front cover, and printed on orange paper, also with "Rabbits! Rabbits!" on the cover, which appears on p. 21 in this copy, with the cry as, "Rabbit! Rabbit!." Osborne dates this chapbook "ca. 1820." Fine. 5. [Lady Eleanor Frere Fenn 1743 - 1813] Mrs. Lovechild's Golden Present, for All Good Little Boys and Girls. Decorated with Woodcuts. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate. Osborne dates this chapbook as "ca. 1820." 10 cm x 6 cm, 31 pages. 31 woodcuts. There is a frontispiece on the verso of the front cover, followed by a title page replicating the front cover. On the verso of the title page is "A Card," in which Mrs. Lovechild "… begs to lay before them a new introduction to letters, under the title of her Golden Present …" an illustrated abcedarium, pp. 5 – 16; followed by her explanation of letters, vowels, and syllables, pp. 19 – 23; the Lord's Prayer follows on p. 24 with an anecdote and a woodcut on p. 25. "The Virtue of a Rod, or, the, History of a Naughty Boy" follows on pp. 26 – 31, illustrated with three woodcuts. The naughty boy lived in Baltimore County, Maryland. An American edition was advertised by Isaiah Thomas in 1786. The back cover of the wrapper has a list of "Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew." Osborne, Vol. 2, p. 721. Fine. 6. The History of Whittington and His Cat; How from a poor Country Boy, destitute of Parents or Relations, He Attained Great Riches, And was promoted to the high and honorable dignity of Lord Mayor of London. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date, ca. 1820]. 10 cm x 6 cm, 31 pages. Frontispiece of Sir Richard Whittington on the verso of the front cover, followed by a title page, the verso of which is Roman capital and small letters above Italic capital and small letters. Eleven woodcuts, ten in the text; and, a moral for the story, "Reflection" on p. 29, followed by a six-stanza poem, "Against Lying." The back cover of the wrapper has a list of "Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew." Fine. 7. A Visit to the Tower, Being An Account of Several Birds, and Beasts. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date, ca. 1820]. 10 cm x 6 cm. Two woodcut portraits in octagonal frames on the verso of the title page. Twelve woodcuts of animals, pp. 3-15. On the verso of p. 15 (unpaginated) are two woodcuts, one of a boy fishing and another of a man with what appear to be four babies' baskets. [William Wordsworth 1770 – 1850] Page 16 is also unpaginated, with Kendrew's printing device above a half-title for "Kendrew's Edition of 'We Are Seven.' " Second title, starts with new pagination Page 17 is page 1 and the frontispiece with Wordsworth's quatrain, for The Little Maid and the Gentleman; or, We Are Seven. Embellished with Engravings. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, 23, Colliergate, [ca. 1820]. The verso of the title page is blank. There are twelve additional woodcuts above the verses, with another on the back cover, pp. 1 – 16. Page 16 is not numbered. Osborne, Vol. I, p. 87. Osborne says: "On cover: Kendrew's Edition of We Are Seven. Some of the illustrations are Bewick woodcuts which appeared in A New Year's gift and were also used to illustrate The Entertaining Story of Little Red Riding Hood (qq.v.). A chapbook edition of the poem was published in 1798. In a letter to Francis Wrangham, dated June 5, 1808, Wordsworth comments on the chapbook trade and adds: 'I have so much felt the influence of these straggling papers that I have many a time wished that I had talents to produce songs, poems, and little histories that might circulate, among other good things in this way, supplanting partly the bad; flowers and useful herbs to take [the] place of weeds. Indeed some of the Poems which I have published were composed not without a hope, that at some time or other they might answer this purpose." Fine. 8. The History of Tommy and Harry. Embellished with Engravings. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date]. Verso of front cover is two sailing ships, referring to p. 28. The verso of the title page with a woodcut of Harry, is blank. Six additional woodcuts in the text, with Roman capital and small letters and Italic capital and small letters above the numbers 1 to [1]0. The back cover of the wrapper has a list of "Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew." Fine. Osborne, Vol. I, p. 260. 9. The Entertaining Story of Little Red Riding Hood, to Which Is Added, Tom Thumb's Toy. Adorned with Cuts. York: Printed for J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [ca. 1820]. 10 cm x 6 cm. 31 pages. A penny chapbook in prose. Frontispiece on the verso of the front cover. Roman capital and small letters and Italic capital and small letters above the numbers 1 to [1]0 are on the back of the title page. Pages 1 – 17 have seven woodcuts illustrating Little Red Riding Hood. Little Tom Thumb's Toy begins on page 18, with 3 woodcuts. A poem by Ann Taylor, "My Mother," begins on page 29 and has one woodcut. The woodcuts in Little Red Riding Hood are by Bewick, some of which appeared in A New Year's gift and were also used to illustrate Wordsworth's We Are Seven. (See above.) Osborne, Vol. I, p. 36. 10. [Second Copy] The World Turned Upside Down, or, No News and Strange News. Decorated with Wood-Cuts. York: Printed by J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [no date]. 31 pages, 29 woodcuts, wrapper is counted in the pagination. Percy Muir says, "By far the best version of 'The World Turned Upside Down' is that of the two sisters [Ann and Jane Taylor] published by Tabart in 1810, and illustrated by their brother Isaac." The back cover of the wrapper has a list of "Penny Books Printed and Sold by J. Kendrew." Fine.
Bertram; or

Bertram; or, the Castle of St. Aldobrand, an Italian Tale, on Which Is Founded One of the Best Tragedies of Modern Times.

Maturin, Rev. Robert Charles [Byron] Maturin, Rev. Robert Charles, Bertram; or, the Castle of St. Aldobrand, an Italian Tale, on Which Is Founded One of the Best Tragedies of Modern Times. London: Printed for the Booksellers, Price Sixpence, no date, [1816]. Crown 8vo. 27 pages. Hand-colored frontispiece of "Mr. Kean as Count Bertram," a colored vignette on the title page, "Bertram's Shipwreck." A copy with a doubly distinguished provenance, with the armorial book plate of Albert M. Cohn, with the motto, "Lux Dei Ibi Salus"; and, the book plate of Nathan Comfort Starr, Cambridge Massachussets, 1923. Additionally, there is a bibliographic slip pasted in giving the citations for the title in Reid, Douglas and Cohn. Cohn assigned this title 538 in his catalogue raisonné of George Cruikshank, stating, "Coloured woodcut frontispiece and title vignette after G. Cruikshank. The illustrations are also found in an uncolored state." Cohn gives the collation as: "Title + pp (7) – 30." In this copy, 16 blank leaves were bound in behind the chapbook. There is an initial blank Cohn does not mention, nor does he say the verso of the full-length frontispiece of Edmund Kean in fetters is blank. Bound in half dark brown calf over marbled boards and matching endpapers, with gold ruling on the covers and spine, and gold titling on the spine of three compartments, with two raised bands. The front hinge is cracked but holding, otherwise very good. An extraordinary double association copy, with a penciled date of "1816" on the title page. An annotation of "Cruikshank" in pencil is on the verso of the front endpaper. The stage play on which this author's summary is based was first performed on Thursday, May 10, 1816, at Drury-Lane, its author was Rev. Robert Charles Maturin, son of William Maturin, one of the Clerks of the Roads in Ireland. The postscript adds an interesting connection to Lord Byron: "It was sent by the Author, at the recommendation of Mr. Walter Scott, to Lord Byron … The Noble Poet read it with such admiration that, before he slept, he sent it to the other members of the Committee, requesting them, if they did not agree with him in considering it a most extraordinary work, they would forthwith transmit it to the Managers of Covent Garden, that the deserving Author might have the chance of both Theatres for its acceptance. It was cheerfully accepted, and the Noble Lord the same day, sent the Author a handsome present."