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The Tuggs's at Ramsgate" and "A Little Talk about Spring

The Tuggs’s at Ramsgate” and “A Little Talk about Spring, and the Sweeps,” by “Boz.” In: THE LIBRARY OF FICTION

Dickens, Charles] [monthly issues in wrappers] Family Story-Teller; consisting of Tales, Essays, and Sketches of Character, Original and Selected. London: Chapman and Hall, n.d. [1836]. Six issues (including everything Dickens contributed) of the original fourteen, in original printed wrappers. First Appearances of two of Dickens's very earliest stories. Dickens contributed only these two sketches (by "Boz") to this monthly literary periodical. The first issue, undated but April 1836, included his "The Tuggs's at Ramsgate"; also included are two plates by Robert Seymour illustrating this story. The third issue, two months later, included his "A Little Talk about Spring, and the Sweeps"; one of the two plates in this issue, by R.W. Buss, relates to this story. (In mid-1837 all fourteen of the monthly issues would be published as the two-volume anthology titled THE LIBRARY OF FICTION.) These were the only two "sketches by Boz" that appeared in this periodical, but many others appeared in half a dozen other periodicals. In February 1836, Dickens's first book, the two-volume SKETCHES BY BOZ, was published by John Macrone -- containing 37 "Sketches" but not, of course, these two (as they had not yet appeared). In December 1836, the "Second Series" of SKETCHES BY BOZ was published in one volume, 21 more which included "A Little Talk about Spring, and the Sweeps" but re-titled "The First of May." With the book publication of both Series of SKETCHES BY BOZ, all of Dickens's periodical appearances had been published -- with the sole exception of "The Tuggs's at Ramsgate." SKETCHES BY BOZ was issued in monthly parts after book publication, at which time this oversight was corrected -- as "The Tuggs's at Ramsgate" was added in (Parts XV-XVI). This is actually a group of six of the fourteen original issues -- the first four, plus the sixth and eighth ("Boz" is represented in only the first and third; other writers include G.P.R. James, Edward Mayhew and Douglas Jerrold). As an aside, the monthly issues of THE LIBRARY OF FICTION started up the same month as the serialization of Dickens's next book, PICKWICK PAPERS -- so the rear covers of these LIBRARY issues advertise that book, with its two initial illustrators Seymour and Buss (Seymour would soon be dead and Buss would soon be fired -- opening the door for Hablot K. Browne a.k.a. "Phiz"). Speaking of "Phiz," accompanying a Mayhew tale in the sixth monthly issue is his depiction of "that notorious and daring burglar, by name John Smith": Phiz's depiction of Smith, dressed in a striped waistcoat, has been identified as the visual prototype of the character about to join the cast of PICKWICK PAPERS -- Tony Weller -- who overnight would turn that serial from a dismal failure into a huge success (see Kitton, Dickens and His Illustrators, p. 62). Condition is very good to near-fine (minor edge-wear, spines slightly rolled, but the wrappers are clean and whole, and the plates -- two per issue -- are sharp and bright). Although the two-volume THE LIBRARY OF FICTION is not overly scarce, especially rebound, these individual wrappered issues are not just scarce but rare. Podeschi E121; see Smith I p. 15; Eckel pp 137-139 (who noted in 1932 "the excessive scarcity of a complete run of the original fourteen parts is well known"). This is the Sherwood / Davies / Drizen copy, housed in a handsome morocco-backed clamshell case with inner chemise, by The Chelsea Bindery.
A CURIOUS DANCE ROUND A CURIOUS TREE

A CURIOUS DANCE ROUND A CURIOUS TREE

Dickens, Charles [London: St. Luke's Hospital, 1860.] Original pale pink wrappers. First Edition, second and usual issue -- with the final paragraph in bold (not like the rest of the text), with the wrapper pink (not mauve -- though all are today faded), with the front cover title followed by a comma (not by a period), and with the front cover border decorative only at the corners (not all 'round). Dickens describes the wretched conditions inside St. Luke's Hospital ("established in 1751, for the treatment and care of lunatics"), and in particular the "very sad and touching spectacle" of the annual Christmas Ball there (dancing around the Christmas tree). He actually wrote the original piece in 1852, at which time it appeared in his Household Words (Dickens's authorship was questioned until 1913, when the original manuscript -- in his hand -- turned up). It is here published in book form for the first time, eight years later, when Dickens gave permission for the hospital to use it as a fundraising appeal. The hospital added two items to update the piece: an article about the 1860 Ball from the "Times," plus a brief article "Contrast between 1852 and 1860," in which the hospital asserts that many of the deficiencies cited by Dickens have since been addressed. (The results of the initial mailing were not good -- which is why for this second issue, the final paragraph, the actual appeal, was highlighted in bold.) This is a fine copy of this very fragile item, with scarcely any wear, soil, or foxing; as usual, the pink wrappers have faded. (Tipped to a corner of the inside front wrapper is an old but hyperbolic catalogue description.) As with almost all copies, there is a vertical crease, because the booklet was folded vertically when the fundraising appeal was mailed out in narrow envelopes. Uncommon in this condition. Podeschi (Yale) B216 (second copy); Carr (U of Texas) B465; Eckel pp 188-191. Housed in a cloth clamshell case lined with felt.
EVENINGS OF A WORKING MAN

EVENINGS OF A WORKING MAN

Dickens, Charles) Overs, John [a "probably unique" binding] being the Occupation of His Scanty Leisure: with a Preface relative to the Author, by Charles Dickens. London: T.C. Newby, 1844. 3 pp ads. Original blind-stamped olive green cloth, spine lettered in gilt. First Edition. Overs was a carpenter who "had shown some literary ability" [Eckel], but was now fatally ill with tuberculosis; Dickens assisted him in getting his writings published, as a financial aid for Overs's soon-to-be widow and children. (The book is dedicated to the doctor who was caring for Overs.) Dickens's nine-page Preface exhorts readers (a bit patronizingly) to accept "working men" into the class of literary aesthetes. The book itself undoubtedly was partly designed by Dickens, as both the red-and-blue-ink title page and the original embossed brown cloth and gilt page edges (for the standard cloth binding) bear a definite resemblance to his own A CHRISTMAS CAROL, then just published; it was also Dickens who recommended the publisher Newby [Carr A32]. (Incidentally, in 1844 the publisher T.C. Newby was an "unscrupulous. incorrigible rogue" [Lathbury] of little account; three years later, though still a rogue, he would hit it big with WUTHERING HEIGHTS and with Anthony Trollope's first novel.) As noted above, the standard binding for this book is brown cloth with gilt page edges; this copy, however, is in blind-stamped olive green cloth, with the page edges plain; one of the former owners (see list below) has penciled "uncut -- probably unique." Condition is very good-plus (some wear at the spine edges, a few marks and droplet-marks). Podeschi (Yale) B151; Carr (U of Texas) B606 (pink cloth); Eckel pp 146-147 (nobody cites this binding). The likely unique-ness of this copy accounts for the remarkable provenance of this copy: after the armorial bookplates of John Ashton and of C.E. Stewart, this volume went via Maggs Bros to Comte Alain de Suzannet (bookplate), then to Kenyon Starling (bookplate), then to William Self (bookplate), and finally to Lawrence Drizen (no bookplate).
A CURIOUS DANCE ROUND A CURIOUS TREE

A CURIOUS DANCE ROUND A CURIOUS TREE

Dickens, Charles [the very scarce first issue] [London: St. Luke's Hospital, 1860.] Original pale mauve wrappers. First Edition, first issue -- with the final paragraph in the same type as the rest of the text (and not in bold type), with the wrapper mauve (and not pink -- though all are today faded), with the front cover title followed by a period (not by a comma), and with the front cover border decorative on all sides (not just at the corners). Dickens describes the wretched conditions inside St. Luke's Hospital ("established in 1751, for the treatment and care of lunatics"), and in particular the "very sad and touching spectacle" of the annual Christmas Ball there (dancing around the Christmas tree). He actually wrote the original piece in 1852, at which time it appeared in his Household Words (Dickens's authorship was questioned until 1913, when the original manuscript -- in his hand -- turned up). It is here published in book form for the first time, eight years later, when Dickens gave permission for the hospital to use it as a fundraising appeal. The hospital added two items to update the piece: an article about the 1860 Ball from the "Times," plus a brief article "Contrast between 1852 and 1860," in which the hospital asserts that many of the deficiencies cited by Dickens have since been addressed. (The results of this initial mailing were not good -- which is why for the second issue, the final paragraph, the actual appeal, was highlighted in bold.) This is a near-fine copy of this very fragile item, with scarcely any wear but with a little faint soil and foxing; as usual, the mauve wrappers have faded. As with almost all copies, there is a vertical crease: the booklet was folded vertically when the fundraising appeal was mailed out in narrow envelopes. Quite an uncommon Dickens first edition -- much scarcer than the second issue. Podeschi (Yale) B216 (first copy); Carr (U of Texas) B465; Eckel pp 188-191 ("the [second] issue in pink [wrappers] is much more common than the [first] one in purple"). Housed in a morocco-backed clamshell case.
MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

Doyle, A. Conan Illustrated. New and Revised Edition. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1894. 4 pp undated ads. Original light blue cloth decorated in black. "New and Revised" American edition (-- which is to say the second issue of the first American edition). These eleven tales conclude with "The Final Problem," with Sherlock's apparent death in a struggle with Professor Moriarty at Reichenbach Falls (as shown in the frontispiece illustration by Sidney Paget). The London edition, published in December 1893, consisted of the same eleven memoirs that appear here -- "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box" having been excluded after its Strand Magazine appearance, due to its portrayal of either an illicit love affair or the mailing of two severed ears in a cardboard box. The first American edition, published in February 1894, did include this tale. This "new and revised edition," published in the same binding in September 1894, has this tale deleted, as in the London edition. Doyle so liked his Strand "Cardboard Box" beginning -- in which Holmes breaks into the thoughts of Watson -- that for this book he transferred it to "The Case of the Resident Patient." This is a near-fine copy, unusually clean for this light-colored binding, with quite minor wear at the ends of the spine (which as usual is slightly sunned); the front endpaper bears the ink-stamp of the Book Department of the Herz' Ladies Bazar in Terre Haute, as well as the signature of this book's probable first buyer, J.F.W. Harris, who was a mechanical engineer connected with the Rose Polytechnic Institute there in Terre Haute. Green & Gibson A14c.
MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

Doyle, A. Conan Illustrated. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1894. 6 pp undated ads. Original light blue mottled cloth decorated in black. First American Edition -- which includes one case excluded from the U.K. edition. In 1892, the first twelve Sherlock Holmes cases to have appeared in The Strand Magazine were published, by Newnes in the U.K. and by Harper in the U.S., as ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES. Two years later there were another twelve cases, so here are the MEMOIRS. Included are such renowned cases as "Silver Blaze," "The Yellow Face," "The Musgrave Ritual," "The Crooked Man" and "The Final Problem" -- this last one being the tale in which Doyle apparently killed off Holmes at Reichenbach Falls, at the hands of Professor Moriarty. (Doyle wanted to rid himself of Holmes so that he could revert to more serious subject matter -- but ultimately the public would not allow Holmes to remain dead.) The volume includes 27 illustrations -- 22 by W.H. Hyde and the other five (one of which is not listed) by Sidney Paget who had done the original Strand ones. Most important, however, is the presence of "The Cardboard Box" in this first American edition, for it had NOT appeared in the London edition seven weeks earlier, nor would it (and its three illustrations) appear in Harper's "New and Revised Edition" seven months later. "The Cardboard Box" was removed either because of its illicit love affair, because of its double murder, or because of the gruesomeness of a severed ear being mailed in a cardboard box. (Doyle so liked his beginning to "The Cardboard Box," in which Holmes breaks into Watson's thoughts, that he transferred that beginning to "The Resident Patient" for the London edition and the later American edition.) In any event the American edition of MEMOIRS is very highly sought-after, since it includes "The Cardboard Box," its three illustrations, and also Doyle's original beginning for "The Resident Patient." This copy is a bright, just-about-fine copy: there are a few minor wrinkles in the spine cloth and there is just a hint of a crack in the front endpaper gutter, but the cloth is clean, the gilt is bright, and the spine does not have any of the usual browning. These Harper volumes are tough to find in any better condition, due to the pale blue mottled cloth used. Green & Gibson A14b.
CAKES AND ALE

CAKES AND ALE

Maugham, W. Somerset Or The Skeleton in the Cupboard. London: William Heinemann, (1930). Original blue cloth, with dust jacket. First Edition of perhaps his [Maugham's] best novel, a witty and delicious comedy of literary England in the early decades of the 20th century, told in the first person by a novelist, Ashenden. The pushing and self-advertising novelist Alroy Kear wants to get at the details of the early life of Edward Driffield, an eminent novelist whose biography Kear has been commissioned to write. Ashenden had known Driffield and his first wife Rosie, a barmaid; Rosie, the skeleton in the cupboard of Driffield's life, is Kear's stumbling block -- he is not honest enough to be given the facts that Ashenden gives the reader. Rosie is a wonderful character -- affectionate, amoral, and generous. The narrator is obviously Maugham but he denied what so many readers were quick to conclude: that Alroy Kear was founded on Hugh Walpole and Edward Driffield on Thomas Hardy. [CGEL] This copy does have the "t" in "won't" on line 14 of p. 147, which is often regarded as the "later state"; however, as Toole Stott points out, this is merely a matter of type slippage during the print run (and the "t" could have dropped off during the run, or it could have been inserted during the run -- in either event, both "states" were then issued simultaneously to the public). This volume is in fine condition, bright and without wear -- withOUT the foxing common to this wove paper; the dust jacket is close to fine as well -- essentially no wear at all, but on its spine there is very faint soil and the red woman is a little faded. Toole Stott A40a.
THE CHILDREN OF THE SEA [C. W. Stoddard copy]

THE CHILDREN OF THE SEA [C. W. Stoddard copy]

Conrad, Joseph A Tale of the Forecastle. New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1897. Original pictorial light blue-grey mottled cloth. First Edition, first issue, of the tale subsequently published as THE NIGGER OF THE "NARCISSUS." Conrad wrote this story with the "Nigger" title, but consented to change the title for the American edition (which preceded the English); the publisher's argument was not that the "Nigger" title might be offensive, but rather that the white American book-buying public would not buy the book if they knew it was about a black man. Nonetheless, the original title was restored for all subsequent editions, making this variant-titled edition one of the more sought-after of Conrad's works. In late 1897, Dodd Mead had a first edition of 1000 copies printed; because the book was scheduled for publication late in the fall season, the printers were instructed to print both 1897 and 1898 title pages. The number printed with each date is not recorded. It was re-introduced in the spring and listed in Publisher's Weekly on March 12th among the spring publications. Copies of the spring issue were supplied with the 1898 title page [Cagle]. This copy is from the first issue, with an 1897 title page. It is in near-fine condition (spine slightly sunned, but there is scarcely any wear and the endpapers are atypically intact). Cagle A3b. Provenance: the front free endpaper bears the ownership inscription "Chas. Warren Stoddard | Washington D.C. | April/98." Stoddard (1843-1909) was an American author and editor, best known for his books about the people of the islands of Polynesia, throughout which he had traveled as a young man; in 1867 he converted to Catholicism, and subsequently served as chairman of the English literature department first at the University of Notre Dame and then (beginning in 1889) at Catholic University of America in Washington DC -- from which, four years after signing this book, he would resign in 1902 due to the Catholic Church's position on homosexuality.
A MESSAGE FROM THE SEA and THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER

A MESSAGE FROM THE SEA and THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER

Dickens, Charles ("Boz") Philadelphia: T.B. Peterson & Brothers, n.d. [1861]. Without original wrappers. First American Edition of THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER. "A Message from the Sea" was the All The Year Round Extra Christmas Number at the end of 1860; the pieces that formed THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELLER (so spelled in England) appeared there too, and were then published in book form in London in December 1860 (though dated 1861). In the U.S., Harper paid to have the pieces appear in Harper's Weekly, after which they conveyed the publishing rights to Peterson, who published the first American edition on 2 February 1861, advertised at 50 cents. As bibliographer Walter Smith indicates, Peterson was and is a bibliographer's nightmare -- as no volumes were dated, and multiple printings are differentiable only by their wrappers and ads; however, a general rule of thumb is that Peterson's first format was wrappers without illustrations, followed by cloth with separately-inserted plates, and then cloth with integral illustrations. This is a volume from Peterson's "Uniform Edition" of Dickens's works, initially bound in wrappers no longer present. This volume consists of a joint title page ([5]), a Contents page ([7]), and text continuously-paginated from p. 9 through p. 169 (THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER begins on p. 75). The ads printed on p. [170] (actually bearing the page number "(7)" at the foot) list other authors' books that were first published no later than 1860; this is the same ad page as appeared in Peterson's first American edition of GREAT EXPECTATIONS, which was published on 27 July 1861 -- and therefore this is not the very first printing of this edition. Smith lists five copies he examined -- this copy plus four in institutional collections -- and only two of them (at Kent State and at Wellesley) are in wrappers, but even those bear a price of 75 cents, and thus are not the very first printing; Smith was unable to locate a single copy in wrappers bearing the price of 50 cents. All of this means: this is a scarce book! Except for the fact that the original wrappers are lacking, this volume is in fine condition (spine overlaid with archival paper). Smith pp 121-125 (the "personal copy" of Note 2a is this one -- which Smith has signed in pencil); see Podeschi (Yale) D25. Housed in a simple paperboard folder.
THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD

Dickens, Charles New York: Harper & Brothers, 1870. 2 pp preliminary ads plus 4+4 pp terminal ads dated Oct 1870. Original yellow-brown pictorial wrappers. Early (second) American edition, published in late September, about three weeks after Fields Osgood's edition -- and about three months after Dickens's death in June left this tale unfinished. The front cover illustration, the same as appeared on the six UK parts, was the work of Charles A. Collins -- Dickens's son-in-law, and Wilkie's brother; the scenes shown formed the basis for the numerous attempts, after Dickens's death, to complete or "solve" the mystery. Harper had been serializing DROOD in parts, as a monthly Dickens supplement to their Harper's Weekly (but Fields Osgood had earlier paid Dickens an advance for book publication). The Harper serialization -- as well as the fact that this Harper edition came out only in wrappers -- probably explains why Harper's edition is so scarce today: many of their readers had already read the tale serially. This copy does bear the (earliest and usual) date October 1870 on both the ads and rear cover, and the preliminary list of titles properly ends with No. 349. This copy does NOT have the Dickens portrait leaf, which Smith notes is true with some copies. Copies without that leaf may be a later state, but possibly copies WITH it may be a later state; a third possibility is that some initial buyers removed that leaf (for framing?) in honor of the author who had just died. Condition is very good, with very little of the wrapper lacking but with a couple of dampstains affecting the front cover and first leaves. This Harper edition is MUCH scarcer than the Fields Osgood edition, for the reasons cited above; this is the first time in 40 years that we have offered it in original wrappers. Smith pp 417-418; curiously not in Podeschi (Yale); Carr (UTexas) B279.
THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD, and Some Uncollected Pieces

Dickens, Charles With Illustrations. Boston: Fields, Osgood, & Co., 1870. Original green cloth. First American Edition, second and usual issue with added material -- of the tale left unfinished at the time of Dickens's death in June 1870. The scarce earlier issue, withOUT the "Uncollected Pieces," was bound only in wrappers; furthermore, the subsequent additions are just that -- the text of DROOD is exactly the same in both issues. This has led some bibliographers to speculate that the two issues may be from the same printing, with only a change in the title page: Smith, noting that he could not find a publication date for the first issue, says "Perhaps such copies represent a prepublication state rather than an issue and were published simultaneously with copies which had the uncollected pieces.". The "Uncollected Pieces" consist of James T. Fields's introductory "Some Memories of Charles Dickens," plus Dickens's "George Silverman's Explanation," "Holiday Romance," "Sketches of Young Couples," and "New Uncommercial Samples," plus "The Will of Charles Dickens." Since 1867, Ticknor & Fields (and then Fields Osgood) had been Dickens's authorized publisher in America; they had serialized DROOD in their weekly Every Saturday, and then published this book in early September. (Ticknor & Fields had specifically commissioned Dickens to write "Holiday Romance," so that it could appear in their children's periodical Our Young Folks in 1868.) Harper also serialized DROOD in a monthly Dickens supplement to Harper's Weekly, but did not get their book edition out until late September. This copy is in the primary binding state with the FO&Co emblem on the covers and at the foot of the spine -- and it is green (one of three colors without priority). The volume is in near-fine condition (very minor wear at the spine ends). Smith pp 412-416; Podeschi (Yale) A156; Carr (UTexas) B278; Wilkins p. 35.
A CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND

A CHILD’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND

Dickens, Charles [the scarce first US edition] [In Two Volumes.] New York: Harper & Brothers, 1853/1854. Original blind-stamped red cloth with gilt-decorated spines. First American Edition, first printing (dated 1853 and 1854, and with a different publisher's address in each volume). As with the three volumes of the English edition, which were issued separately in December of 1851, 1852 and 1853, the two volumes of Harper's edition were obviously issued separately -- on 18 March 1853 and on 25 March 1854, according to bibliographer Walter Smith (from the Harper Archives). When Harper published the second volume, they also released a new printing of the first (with its date changed to 1854, and with their address changed to 82 Beekman Street). A two-volume edition was also published by Jenks, Hickling & Swan of Boston, but with both volumes dated 1854. This is a very good copy, the only significant defect being some chipping at the ends of the spines. In our experience this edition (especially the 1853-dated first volume) is scarce in original cloth -- much scarcer than the three-volume English edition; in fact this is the only such 1853/1854 copy we have had (twice) in our forty years in business. Smith pp 110-113 (with photographs of this copy); Podeschi (Yale) A129; not in Carr. Provenance: both volumes bear the penciled signature of bibliographer Walter Smith; also included is Sumner & Stillman's original 2012 description-slip for this copy, part of the Dan Calinescu Collection, purchased by Walter Smith -- with his penciled instructions to the printer regarding photography of this copy in his bibliography.
THE LUCK OF ROARING CAMP and Other Sketches

THE LUCK OF ROARING CAMP and Other Sketches

Harte, Francis Bret [Poker Flats & Roaring Camp] Boston: Fields, Osgood, & Co., 1870. Original green cloth. First Edition. This is Harte's third and best-known book, one which he spent the rest of his life unsuccessfully trying to equal. These tales had originally appeared in the Overland Monthly, of which he was the first editor; the title story had appeared in 1868 in its second issue ("under publisher's protest. The religious press called it 'immoral,' California papers thought it 'singular,' but Eastern critics went headlong into eulogies" [K&H]). The volume also includes such Harte throbs as "The Outcasts of Poker Flat," "Miggles" and "Mliss"; an additional tale, "Brown of Calaveras," would be added to the (later in 1870) second and subsequent editions. This copy is in green pebble-grain cloth; copies were also bound in terra-cotta or purple, with this grain or another (no priority). It is in near-fine condition (a touch of wear at the head of the spine, minor front cover crease, front endpaper barely cracking). This is an American classic, increasingly difficult to find in collectible condition. Blanck 7246; Zamarano 80 #40; Grolier American 76; a Johnson High Spot ("The first stories written by a westerner about the westerners in the western vernacular, the earlier western writers being so afraid of being called 'unliterary' that they ignored the crude but powerful material at hand"). Provenance: armorial bookplate of John Taylor Bottomley (1869-1925), prominent Boston surgeon and lecturer at Harvard Medical School.
THE CELEBRATED JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY

THE CELEBRATED JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY

Twain, Mark [Twain's first book] And other Sketches. Edited by John Paul. New-York: C.H. Webb, 1867. Original brown cloth, beveled, with gilt frog in lower left corner of front cover (and in blind on rear cover). First Edition, second printing, of Mark Twain's first book -- a collection of anecdotes and sketches that features the title story, a highly-anthologized milestone in American humor. The "editor," "John Paul," was actually the publisher Charles Henry Webb. Around this title still clings the romance of the great author and world-figure that was to be; the actual jump of the frog was to be measured in inches -- the leap of its historian was to be measured not merely on physical earth, but in spirit, fame and whatever we credit as the essence of human achievement [Johnson]. The first printing (1000 copies) is identifiable primarily by the presence of a preliminary ad leaf, here absent; there are also several instances where type is unbroken in the first issue but is broken in the second (this second printing of 552 more copies came just twenty days after the first). Copies were issued in seven different colors, without known precedence -- blue, brown, green, lavender, plum, red, and terra-cotta; also, on some copies the gilt frog is in the center, rather than the lower left corner, of the front cover ("The frog has a peculiar habit of jumping in various positions but it invariably faces the fore-edge" - Johnson). This copy, in brown cloth, is bright and near-fine, with only light wear at the binding extremities; atypically, the original chocolate-brown endpapers remain firm and uncracked. Copies in this condition but with the ad leaf now demand a five-figure price. Blanck 3310; McBride p. 2; Johnson pp 3-9; Zamarano 80 #17;.
SKETCHES OF YOUNG COUPLES

SKETCHES OF YOUNG COUPLES, YOUNG LADIES, YOUNG GENTLEMEN

Dickens, Charles] By Quiz [sic]. Illustrated by Phiz. London: Cassell, Petter, and Galpin; and 596 Broadway, New York, n.d. [1869]. 2 pp undated ads. Original bright green cloth decorated in gilt, black and red, beveled. First American Collected Edition of all three "Sketches" -- two of which actually were written by Charles Dickens. In 1837 SKETCHES OF YOUNG LADIES had been pseudonomously written by "Quiz" (actually Rev. Edward Caswall) -- classifying these "members of the animal kingdom" into such categories as "Lazy Young Ladies," "Stupid Young Ladies," "Petting Young Ladies" and "Manly Young Ladies." The following year Dickens wrote SKETCHES OF YOUNG GENTLEMEN (anonymously -- not even using his pseudonym "Boz") as a protest against the earlier book -- in fact urging women to read his book on men as the "antidote" for Caswall's earlier one. Finally, Dickens also wrote SKETCHES OF YOUNG COUPLES, published anonymously in 1840, and in England all three were published together in 1843. The first two titles (LADIES and GENTLEMEN) were in 1838 collected in one volume both by Carey Lea & Blanchard and by Wiley & Putnam, but this 1869 volume was the first American to collect all three -- albeit inaccurately ascribing them all to "Quiz." This copy, with the American address added to the title page, is what Smith calls a "subsidiary edition," or "the American issue of the English impression." This is a handsomely bound book, with binding design (initialed "WR") by the Scottish binding designer William Ralston. It is in very good-plus condition (minor wear at the extremities, endpapers cracked). Smith pp 5-8; Podeschi/Gimbel (Yale) D56; not in Carr (UTexas). Provenance: signed in pencil by Walter Smith, this is the copy described and photographed in his 2019 bibliography.