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Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Co.

Thus shalt thou live. Hints and advices for the healthy and the sick on a simple and rational mode of life and a natural method of cure.

Thus shalt thou live. Hints and advices for the healthy and the sick on a simple and rational mode of life and a natural method of cure.

Kneipp, Sebastian. Kepten, Bavaria: Jos. Koesel, 1897. 12mo (18.3 cm, 7.125"). Frontis., [2], xv, [1], 389, [1], [14 (pub. adv.)] pp.; illus. Bavarian priest Sebastian Kneipp (1821–97) became an advocate of hydrotherapy after contracting tuberculosis and experimenting with alternate cures to traditional hospital medicine. He continued to experiment after his illness and expanded his ideology — which was directly linked to his religion and the belief that God has provided remedies in nature — to encompass all aspects of life. In this volume, Kneipp suggests "hints and advices" for living one's best life through => natural methods in diet, housing, exercise, medicine, and even fashion. Kneipp also gives natural remedies for specific diseases and ailments such as arthritis, tumors, ear infections, weak eyes, and others.     Several small engravings, frequently at the end and beginning of each chapter, feature quaint scenes, primarily of children at play. The publisher's advertisements in the back are printed on blue paper.     Third edition: First was 1894. Brown morocco shelfback with gilt lettering, paper-covered red cloth boards, edges marbled; overall rubbing, some damage to spine-ends with minor loss to spine-head. Interior browned, title-page pulling slightly from binding, a bit fragile but still very readable.
Il Decamerone ... nvovamente corretto. et con diligentia stampato.

Il Decamerone … nvovamente corretto. et con diligentia stampato.

Boccaccio, Giovanni. [colophon: Firenze {i.e., Venice}: Li heredi di Philippo di Giunta {i.e,, Angiolo Pasinello for Stefano Orlandelli}, 1527 {i.e, 1729}]. 4to (24 cm, 9.5"). [16] pp, 284 ff. In 1527 the heirs of Filippo di Giunta printed the definitive Renaissance edition of The Decameron; it immediately became the basis for all subsequent interpretations. By the 18th century the Giunta edition of 1527 had achieved the state of being a rarity to be sought after, and demand led to supply — of this forgery. It is well done and passes the "first blush" test, i.e., it does not immediately look wrong. Pasinello, who printed it for Stefano Orlandelli "at the request of the English consul [Joseph] Smith" (Petras), did a good job of matching types and even reproducing the printer's device, which appears on the title-page and on the verso of the last leaf. Closer examination, however, shows that the paper is wrong, the typesetting is different, and the measurements of the text block are incorrect.     Adams, in his catalogue of 16th-century books in the Cambridge University libraries, gives a handy litmus test for determining fakes of the Giunta 1527 edition: Folios 42, 102, and 108 are correctly numbered in the forgeries, but in the true 16th-century copies the numbers are 24, 101, and 168. => Brunet says the forgery consisted of 300 copies.     Provenance: Hevdholm Bibliothek stamp on title-page; acquired by PRB&M at an auction at Freeman's in Philadelphia in 1992; sold to a private collector the same year; reacquired by PRB&M at a Swann auction over 25 years later. (Jokes about "bad pennies returning" occur to one; but this is too nice a "counterfeit" to permit fair indulgence in them!)          Pettas, The Giunti of Florence (2013 ed.), 217; Adams B2147; Gamba 172; Zambrini, Bibliotheca Boccaccesca, p. 36; Edit16 CNCE 24078; I Giunti tipografi editori di Firenze, I, p. 133; Renouard, Annali delle editione aldine; pp. 1–11; Brunet, I, p. 999. 18th-century mottled calf with round spine, raised bands, and gilt spine extra, with later endpapers; all edges carmine. Front joint (outside) abraded and opening from top, rear one just starting at bottom; front cover with two wormholes and old worm action contributing to the startings. Text is unwormed, clean, and white save for a display of foxing on the title-page and occasionally a very limited spot of soil, staining, or foxing elsewhere. => Sound, handsome, and a most interesting production.
Bysh's edition of nursery rhymes. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

Bysh's edition of nursery rhymes. Embellished with eight coloured engravings.

(Nursery Rhymes). London: Pr. by T. Richardson for J. Bysh, [ca. 1825]. 12mo (14.5 cm, 5.7"). 36 pp.; 6 col. plts. Chapbook of poetry for children, illustrated with hand-colored wood engravings. In addition to the better-known nursery rhymes that have stayed in modern circulation, present here are some grimmer verses about carrion crows, penknives to the heart, little ducks shot through the head, etc., along with a separate section of longer "select pieces" including "The Blind Boy," "The Beggar's Petition," and "Winter Reflections." Each plate offers a pair of images, for a total of 12 illustrations; both the cartoonish engravings and the very bright coloring are vigorously done.     Although the WorldCat entry for this undated edition suggests a publication ca. 1840, John Bysh's peak publishing dates (between 1810 and 1825) and the address given here — as well as the inscription (see below) — indicate an earlier printing. Only two U.S. institutions report holdings via WorldCat (Morgan Library, Princeton).     Provenance: Frontispiece recto with inked ownership inscription of S.G. Rolls, dated 1828. Later in the children's book collection of Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear.          This ed. not in Opie (see N 953 & N 954 for other Bysh eds.); not in Osborne Collection. 19th-century marbled paper–covered boards, housed in a dark purple cloth–covered clamshell case; binding rubbed, case with remnants of now-absent paper label on spine. Original printed paper wrappers bound in, front with upper and lower margins trimmed. Wrappers darkened and spotted, pages lightly age-toned with scattered small spots of foxing; last leaf with outer margin ragged and with lower portion torn away resulting in loss to the sentimental "Winter Reflections" of about eight lines on each side, neatly repaired some time ago with plain paper. => Uncommon and intriguing, with more than a little by way of unexpected content..
La civilité puerile et honneste pour l'instruction des enfans.

La civilité puerile et honneste pour l'instruction des enfans.

Pibrac, Guy du Faur, seigneur de. Troyes: Jean Garnier, [ca. 1750]. 16mo (16 cm, 6.29"). 87, [1], 8 pp. Uncommon edition: a popular, widely used primer inspired by Erasmus's De civilitate morum puerilium, here in an 18th-century French version "de nouveau corrigé, & augmentée à la fin d'un très-beau Traité pour bien apprendre l'Ortographe." Sometimes attributed to Mathurin Cordier, the work covers appropriate modes of conduct at church, in school, at the dining table, etc.; also present are a multiplication table and the 126 "Quatrains," four-line instructive verse maxims written by Pibrac. Almost all of the text — which is decorated with ornamental capitals and headpieces — is set in => the famous typeface modelled after 16th-century cursive letters and nicknamed "caractères de civilité" in honor of the present work, making the book pedagogically useful both as a guide to good manners and as a pattern for formal handwriting.     While the various approbations and permissions are dated 1714, 1735, and 1736, Jean Garnier did not succeed his father Pierre in the publishing business until the early 1750s — and the family members who followed Pierre (including Jean's mother, the Veuve Garnier; Jean himself; and his sons Jean-Antoine and Etienne) had a documented habit of stretching royal permissions past their originally intended spans. Whatever year it was when Jean reprinted this textbook from Pierre's stock, => both the original and this version are now scarce: WorldCat finds no institutional locations anywhere reporting holding the edition with Jean Garnier's imprint, and only one holding each of the printings from Pierre Garnier and the Veuve Garnier.     Provenance: From the children's book collection of Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear.          This ed. not in Brunet, Graesse, Gumuchian, WorldCat. Later plain paper–covered light boards; spine and joints lightly worn. Some leaves trimmed closely, occasionally touching first or last letters or headers; a few pages with minor staining. One page unevenly inked by printer, with about a dozen words only faintly legible. Overall an unusually clean, fresh copy of this seldom-seen edition, clearly untouched by youthful hands.
The inner tympan: The collected verse and prose of Harry Duncan [compiled by Juan Pascoe].

The inner tympan: The collected verse and prose of Harry Duncan [compiled by Juan Pascoe].

Duncan, Harry; Juan Pascoe, comp. & ed. Tacámbaro: Taller Martín Pescador, 2015. 8vo (23.5 cm, 9.25"). 305 pp., illus., ports. From the book's rear cover, extensively: "Harry Duncan was a major Master Printer, from whom many younger workers learned enough that legions of poets can be forever grateful to have had their work presented so appropriately that the material particulars, text and all, will melt way, vanish into thin air, leaving the work — the POEM — imprinted in the reader's brain, as if an electronic chip had been implanted: as some crafty publisher might attempt some day, hoping to equal the impact of a Harry Duncan book.     "Harry Duncan was also a distinctive though not prolific poet and translator; a stylist as eloquent and elegant in prose as in speech and bearing; a fine italic penman; and husband of Nancy, whose genius, separate but equal, was of the theater, though still imprinted in the memories of fellow actors and audiences, especially children.     "The Inner Tympan brings together every published piece of Duncan's writing that could be found, and constitutes thus a self-portrait; not one consciously planned, certainly not one he helped to gather, but neither is it one he would have rejected."     Duncan (1916–97) is "considered the father of the post-World War II private-press movement" (Ray Anello, "Reading the Fine Print," Newsweek, August 16, 1982, p. 64). He operated the Cummington Press beginning in 1939 in Cummington, MA, later at Iowa City after becoming director in 1956 of the typographical laboratory at the University of Iowa's School of Journalism, and later still in 1972 in Omaha, NB, where he created the University of Nebraska's fine arts press, Abattoir Editions.     The first edition of The Inner Tympan was printed in 2005 in an edition of 30 copies by Juan Pascoe — Duncan's last apprentice, then and now a master hand-printer in Mexico — for his friends and those of Harry and Nancy Duncan, the Cummington Press, and the Taller Martín Pescador. This second edition "was set in Enrico, a digital version of the 12-point type cut and cast in 1600 by Enrico Martinez in Mexico City, and drawn by Gonzalo Garcia Barcha in the final years of the twentieth century" (colophon). Publisher's illustrated hardcover binding. New. With a four-page pamphlet of "Some memories of the Cummington Press" by Gloria Goldsmith Gowdy, printed by Juan Pascoe in 100 copies "with HD's pressmark & PWW's drawing for The Winter Sea," laid in.
Short tales in short words: About the lame boy; the sea shore; the cross boy; and

Short tales in short words: About the lame boy; the sea shore; the cross boy; and, the stray child.

Burden, Mrs. London: Thomas Dean & Son, [1855]. 12mo (15.2 cm, 5.98"). 59, [5 (4 adv.)] pp. (lacking 4 pp.); 7 col. plts. (incl. in pagination). Chapbook containing four short stories for children, emphasizing the virtues of kindness, patience, hard work, and caution. The tales are => embellished with seven hand-colored wood engravings, done by Whatman after T.H. Jones and featuring what the publisher advertised as "fanciful borders." The first story offers an interesting insight into 19th-century book production, with one child taking up work cutting small prints from a large sheet, to be bound into books.     This is the stated sixth edition, with the publication date suggested by the Bodleian; it is notably uncommon, with WorldCat finding => only one U.S. institution (Wayne State) reporting an actual hard copy rather than microform.     Provenance: From the children's book collection of Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear.          Opie A 188; Osborne Collection, p. 973. Publisher's brown cloth, ribbon-embossed in a staggered ripple pattern, front cover with gilt-stamped title framed in blind-stamped arabesques; neatly rebacked with buckram, edges faded, corners rubbed. Two leaves of text lacking from final story; one plate bound in the wrong story but all plates present. Pages gently age-toned, otherwise clean.
method-draw-image (23)

News from the invisible world; or interesting anecdotes of the dead; containing a particular survey of remarkable and well authenticated accounts of apparitions, ghosts, spectres, and visions, together with some remarkable dreams, impulses, and other ominous circumstances which have led to the most remarkable discoveries, some of which has been extracted from the works of the Rev. John Wesley, and other eminent divines.

[Tregortha, John]. York: C. Croshaw, [1810]. 8vo (18.2 cm, 7.16"). Col. frontis., 34, [2] pp. Shocking tales of frightful figures, distressing but accurate premonitions, and foul murders — interspersed with dire warnings against "putting off religion to another day" (p. 35). The work opens with => a hand-colored wood-engraved frontispiece depicting a family reacting to a glowing specter in the woods.     This little pamphlet was extracted from a longer (and also more specifically Christian) collection of ghost stories originally published ca. 1806 by Tregortha, an itinerant Methodist preacher who later became a printer and bookseller. The present York printing is extremely scarce, with WorldCat and NSTC both finding => only one reported location (the British Library). Our suggested publication date is based on that listing.     Provenance: From the library of American collector Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear.          NSTC N860. Later red leather–covered boards, front cover with gilt-stamped title; lightly worn, with a few small scuffs. Pages age-toned with scattered light spots, some upper outer corners bumped. One lower outer corner torn away, not touching text; final leaf with upper two-thirds torn away and repaired with blank paper with significant loss of text, though the verso does show the printer's "finis" vignette as almost entirely preserved. => Unusual, intriguing, and priced with an eye more on its faults than on its fascinations.
method-draw-image (23)

Collection of Bodoni editions of 30 works by Turchi.

Turchi, Adeodati. [Parma: Dalla Stamperia Reale], 1788–96. 12mo & 8vo. In 3 vols. 30 different, very short works by Turchi, a Capuchin friar who rose to be Bishop of Parma, plus six duplicates of which two are incomplete. All are prime examples of job printing, executed in the same small elegant font, each page with the same border of type ornaments and a small composed ornament above that; present as below are expositions of faith and doctrine, pastoral letters, remissions and pardons, and many, many homilies. Some entries have, on their first page, a crisply neat rendering of the bishop's coat of arms. => Sermons, pastoral letters, and homilies are among the types of job printing that have provided necessary cash flow for all presses throughout time. And because of their ephemeral and narrow-interest nature combined with their short print runs, they tend to be among the scarcest productions of the Bodoni Press.     VOLUME 1: Epostola. 21 Septembris 1788 (Sallander No. 46); Indulto. 18 February 1789 (Sallander No. 51); Lettera pastorale. No date. (Brooks 1348); Omelia recitata al popolo. 1789, (Sallander No. 54); Indulto. 1790. (Sallander No. 55);Omelia. Recitata nel giorno di Pentecoste, 1790 (Sallander No. 56); Omelia. Recitata nel giorno dell' Assunzione di Maria Vergine. 1790 (Sallander No. 57); Omelia. Recitata al popolo nel giorno si San Bernardo. 1790 (Sallander No. 58); Indulto pubblicato. 1791 (Sallander No. 59); Omelia. Recitata nel giorno di Pentecoste, 1791 (Brooks 432); Omelia. Recitata nel giorni di Tutti li Santi. 1791 (Brooks 433); Omelia. Recitata nel giorno di San Bernardo, 1791 (Sallander No. 61); Indulto. Per la Quaresima. 1792 (Sallander No. 65).     VOLUME 2: Indulto. Per la Quaresima. 1792 (Sallander No. 65; second copy); Omelia. Recitara nel giorno di Pentecoste, 1792 (Sallander No. 66); Omelia. Recitata al suopopolo nel giorno di Tutti I Santi, 1792 (Brooks 498); Omelia. Detta al suo popolo nel giorno di San Bernardo, 1792 (Sallander No. 67); Indulto. La Quaresima. 1793 (Sallander No. 70); Omelia. Diretta al suo popolo nel giorno di Pentecoste. 1793 (Sallander No. 72); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di Tutti I Santi, 1793 (Sallander No. 73); Omelia. Detta al suo popolo nel giorno di San Bernardo, 1793 (Sallander No. 74); Indulto. La Quaresima. 1794 (Sallander No. 76); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di Pentecoste. 1794 (Sallander No. 77); Omelia. Recitata dopo la messa pontificale in lode del B. Bartolommeo di Breganze.1794 (Brooks 582); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di Tutti I Santi, 1794 (Sallander No. 79); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di San Bernardo, 1794 (Sallander No. 80); Indulto. La Quaresima. 1795 (Sallander No. 81).     VOLUME 3: Indulto. La Quaresima. 1793 (Sallander No. 70; second copy); Omelia. Detta al suo popolo nel Giorno di San Bernardo, 1793 (Sallander No. 74; second copy – incomplete, lacking two leaves containing pages 29 to 32); Indulto. La Quaresima. 1794 (Sallander No. 76; second copy – incomplete, lacking two leaves consisting of first blank leaf and title); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di Pentecoste. 1794 (Sallander No. 77; second copy); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di Tutti I Santi, 1794 (Sallander No. 79; second copy); Omelia. Recitata dopo la messa pontificale in lode del B. Bartolommeo di Breganze. 1794 (Brooks 582; second copy); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di San Bernardo, 1794 (Sallander No. 80; second copy); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di Pentecoste. 1795 (Sallander No. 82); Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di Tutti I Santi, 1795 (Sallander No. 83). Omelia. Recitata al suo popolo nel giorno di San Bernardo, 1794 (Sallander No. 84); Indulto. La Quaresima. 1796 (Sallander No. 86). Two volumes in contemporary marbled boards, and one volume in boards with repurposed antique marbled paper, that volume with top edge gilt. Some pages are trimmed at foremargins, most not; vol. II retains a silk placemarker. => All volumes are clean, sound, and attractive.
The looking-glass for the mind; or intellectual mirror: Being an elegant collection of the most delightful little stories

The looking-glass for the mind; or intellectual mirror: Being an elegant collection of the most delightful little stories, and interesting tales: Chiefly translated from that much admired work, L'ami des enfans.

Berquin, Arnaud; John Bewick, illus. London: Pr. for J. Harris et al. by J. Crowder & E. Hemsted, 1803. 12mo (17.5 cm, 6.89"). [8], 271, [1] pp.; illus. Morally instructive children's stories, featuring 74 wood engravings by John Bewick. This is the stated ninth edition, following the 1792 printing, that having been the first to use these illustrations — which Hugo calls "some of the most beautiful examples" of John Bewick's skill. Each story opens with a wood-engraved vignette and closes with a tailpiece (often unrelated to the story, and generally an animal).     Provenance: Front fly-leaf with inked inscription noting gift to Betty Shipp from Madame Brown, dated 1808; and with pencilled inscription reading simply "Burch." Later in the children's book collection of Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear.          On earlier eds., see: Hugo, Bewick Collector, 66 & Osborne Collection, pp. 861/62. Contemporary mottled sheep, neatly and simply rebacked with lighter speckled sheep; original leather with small scuffs and extremities lightly rubbed. New endpapers. Inscriptions as above. Interior age-toned; a very few pages with small ink smears, pages otherwise completely free of any signs of juvenile handling. => A solid and pleasing copy, offering some of the younger Bewick's most appealing work.
Daddy Darwin's dovecot: A country tale.

Daddy Darwin's dovecot: A country tale.

Ewing, Juliana Horatia; Randolph Caldecott, illus. London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (engraved & printed by Edmund Evans), [1884]. 8vo (20.7 cm, 8.15"). Col. frontis., 52 pp.; illus. First edition: Sweet story of an orphaned lad who, with the support of a parson's daughter and a workhouse schoolmistress, steadily improves his life through his dedication to caring for old man Darwin's precious "house-doves," a.k.a. tumbler pigeons. Randolph Caldecott illustrated the text with a total of 17 images: six delightful full-page country scenes (including the color-printed frontispiece) and a number of in-text vignettes, printed in sepia to match the text. Ewing and Caldecott had previously collaborated on the well-received Jackanapes, and the present work was likewise beloved by both children and critics, with the Ecclesiastical Gazette calling it "one of the most charming stories we have met with for years."     Provenance: From the children's book collection of Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear.          Desmarais, Randolph Caldecott: His Books and Illustrations for Young Readers, 21; Finlay, Randolph Caldecott, p. 27; NSTC 0235860. Publisher's color-printed paper–covered boards; moderately worn and darkened overall, joints and extremities rubbed, back cover dust-soiled. Front free endpaper with early pencilled inscription, back pastedown with label as above. Endpapers with offsetting; half-title with tear from lower margin. => A nice example of both the author's and the artist's accomplishments.
Prediche de frate Roberto vulgare.

Prediche de frate Roberto vulgare.

Caracciolo, Roberto (Robertus Caracciolus). [colophon: Mediolani:: per Iohanne[m] Angelu[m] Scinzenzeler, 1509 (die xxviiii nouemb.). 4to (20.5 cm, 8"). [1], 73 ff. Roberto Caracciolo (1425–95, a.k.a. Fra Roberto Da Lezze) was a Franciscan friar and "is considered, along with Giovanni da Capistrano (c. 1425–1495) and Giacomo dalla Marca (1393–1476), one of the most popular preachers of the so-called 'second wave' of fifteenth-century Franciscan preachers" (McMichael, p. 328). His sermons were in Latin as well as Italian, were published beginning in the 1470s, and were immensely popular because of their (sometimes criticized) theatricality. Well into the 16th century, compilations of them such as this one provided preachers of less skill with ready-made sermons on topics, as here, such as the fear of God, envy, charity, the nature of Hell, abstinence, and the Grace of God.     This volume begins with a title-page inviting the reader in via => a wonderful large Italian Renaissance woodcut of a preacher in the pulpit addressing parishioners (men standing, women seated). The text is in a dense roman with many three-line woodcut initials. Regarding those initials, there is one curious anomaly: The printer apparently did not have a small woodcut "F" and so used a lower case "f," thus creating the appearance of a "guide-letter" setting of type.     Binding: A mid-15th-century bifolium from an Italian manuscript copy of Alexander de Villa-Dei's Doctrinale puerorum has been used as limp wrappers. Accented at each line with red, the text of approximately 140 lines is embellished with => two two-line red initials and another, five-line red initial accented in green and blue. A very popular versified treatise on grammar, the Doctrinale puerorum was written sometime around 1200–25(ish); it remained popular throughout the Middle Ages and well into the age of print. (We thank Eric Johnson of the Special Collections Department of the Ohio State University Library for help identifying the leaf.)     EDIT16 locates only one copy of this edition of Caracciolo's work and WorldCat, COPAC, and KVK find => none.          EDIT16 CNCE 74448. This edition not in Index Aurel. On Caracciolo, see: Steven J. McMichael, "Roberto Caracciolo da Lecce and His Sermons on Muhammad and the Muslims (C. 1480)," in Franciscans and Preaching (Leiden: Brill, 2012); and Contemporaries of Erasmus, I, pp. 295–96. Bound as above, with a 2.5" tear in vellum of front wrapper without loss and without touching ink; wrapper and text with a line of old pencilling each, old waterstaining (generally light), and signs of arrested mildew. Two small holes in lower margin of title-leaf touching one word on its verso; a few pin-hole type wormholes in inner margins and a few in text. => A survivor within another survivor.