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Atlas of the City of Toronto and Vicinity From Special Survey Founded On Registered Plans And Showing All Buildings And Lot Numbers Third Edition – 1910.

GOAD, Cha[rles] E. 3 Volumes. folio. [pp. 9; 5; 3]titles & street & registered plan indexes. 3 single-page & 119 double-page coloured maps numbered 1, 1[bis], 2-84, 101-133. some mounted correction slips. later half pigskin over original cloth sides (short splits in upper joints of Vol. I, remains of tabs on maps). Third Edition, first revision to May 1912 (Volume I), first revision to October 1923 (Volume III). The first edition, published in 1884, contained 40 maps, and the second, published in 1890, contained 50 maps. The third was greatly expanded to 2-3 single-page & 114-119 double-page maps in 1910. The maps in this atlas were revised to incorporate new information by means of mounted correction slips or by reprinting in 1912 and 1913. "What "Goad is to Canada, "Sanborn" is to the United States, a quasi-monopoly on municipal mapping for a century, and a companion to the insurance industry." (Maps & Data Library, University of Toronto website) Established in Montreal in 1875, the Charles E. Goad Company had by 1910 created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. These street atlases serve as important source materials for the progress of urban development, containing detailed maps showing and naming streets, lots, homes, businesses, churches, schools, parks, government buildings, hotels, banks, and stores. See Gentilcore & Head, Ontario’s History in Maps, pp. 264-65.
book (2)

Atlas of the City of Toronto and Vicinity From Special Survey Founded On Registered Plans And Showing All Buildings And Lot Numbers Second Edition.

GOAD, Cha[rles] E. folio. [ff. 3]title & index. 50 double-page coloured maps. modern half calf (scattered light foxing & soiling, remains of tabs on maps, a few tears - no loss). Second Edition. The first edition, published in 1884, contained 40 maps. A greatly enlarged third edition, with 115 maps, was published in three volumes in 1910. "What "Goad is to Canada, "Sanborn" is to the United States, a quasi-monopoly on municipal mapping for a century, and a companion to the insurance industry." (Maps & Data Library, University of Toronto website) Established in Montreal in 1875, the Charles E. Goad Company had by 1910 created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. These street atlases serve as important source materials for the progress of urban development, containing detailed maps showing and naming streets, lots, homes, businesses, churches, schools, parks, government buildings, hotels, banks, and stores. Bound in at front: 'Map of the City of Toronto showing original park lots 1 to 32 inclusive - boundary adopted in 1834 - dates of annexed portions to 15th Dec 1909 - 1st, 2nd & 3rd concessions from the bay - present boundary of the city - concessions 1 to 5 west York and 1 to 4 East York'. 46.5 x 70.5 cm. (slight loss to upper corners, few tears in lower edge). Toronto: The Ontario Directory & Map Company, [1909]. See Gentilcore & Head, Ontario’s History in Maps, pp. 264-65.
book (2)

1917 Commercial Directory Atlas Of The Townships Of Western Ontario Toronto District

GUIDAL, A[lbert] E. 5 sections with divisional titles: 1917 Commercial Directory Atlas Of The Townships Of Ontario County (Province of Ontario). oblong folio. title + 11 maps (10 in colour). [WITH:] 1917 Commercial Directory Atlas Of York County title + 10 coloured lithographed maps. [WITH:] 1917 Commercial Directory Atlas Of Halton County title + 6 lithographed maps (4 colour, 1 folding). [WITH:] 1917 Commercial Directory Atlas Of Peel County title + 6 coloured lithographed maps (5 in colour). [WITH:] 1917 Commercial Directory Atlas Of Wellington County title + 12 lithographed maps (11 in colour). original cloth binder, cloth ties (edgewear & a few small losses of cloth on sides, the Western Ontario key map partly defective & in tatters with cellotape repairs & stains, tears to edges of some maps - occasionally entering image but with no loss, tears in title with small section detached but present, some light soiling). This is the Toronto District section of the 1917 Commercial Directory Atlas Of The Townships of Western Ontario (4 other sections were published). The atlas includes a key map of Western Ontario, 6 county maps of Ontario County, York County, Halton County (2 - 1 folding, only 1 called for), Peel County, and Wellington County, and 38 township maps of Pickering, Whitby & East Whitby, Uxbridge, Reach, Brock, Scott, Thorah, Mara, Rama, Scugog (not called for on divisional title), York, Scarboro, Etobicoke, Markham & Whitchurch, Vaughan, King, East Gwillimbury, North Guillimbury, Georgina, Nelson, Trafalgar, Nassagaweya, Esquesing, Toronto, Chinguacousy, Caledon, Toronto Gore, Albion, Puslinch, Guelph, Pilkington & Nichol, Erin, Arthur, Minto, Eramosa, Maryborough, Garafraxa West, and West-Luther (not called for on divisional title). Each township map shows landowners' names, roads, towns, villages, lakes, streams, and railways. The Canadian National Union catalogue cites only the Toronto Public Library copy, which calls for 40 township maps. It is listed in Worldcat but no locations are given. Rare.
Vladimir Lenin Death Commemorative Medallion (portrait head of recumbent Lenin

Vladimir Lenin Death Commemorative Medallion (portrait head of recumbent Lenin, with decorative floral garlands, flags, and wreath dated “1870 23/IV – 1924 21/I”).

SOVIET RUSSIA/LENIN). TAYEZHNY, Piotr Ivanovich [1887-1952]. 7 ¼ inches in dia. cast white metal, single-sided, circular relief medallion (some casting cracks, remains of original bronzing). marked on verso: “Tuz No. 5 Москва”. “Single-Sided Medallion: Lenin on His Deathbed. USSR, 1924. Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, better known as Lenin, was born in Simbirsk on 10 (22) April 1870 and died on the estate of Gorki outside Moscow on 21 January 1924. His body was taken back to the capital. According to some calculations around half a million people came to take leave of the revolutionary leader as he lay in state. It was decided to have the body embalmed and a special medical commission was formed to monitor its condition. The body was placed in a specially designed sarcophagus within a masonry mausoleum. Piotr Ivanovich Tayezhny (Cheshuin) studied in the School of Art and Industry in Yeketerinburg before moving to Moscow, where he worked until 1917 in the jewellery workshop of the Fabergé company. After the revolution, he moved to the remote Altai and then returned, having adopted the pseudonym Tayezhny (“of the taiga”). In 1927 two more portrait medallions of Lenin created by Tayezhny were produced and in 1930 he participated in the design of the first insignia for the Order of Lenin, the Soviet Union’s highest civilian decoration.” [The Hermitage Museum website].