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Churchill Book Collector

A Fresh Station: T. E. Lawrence writing and riding at Cranwell

A Fresh Station: T. E. Lawrence writing and riding at Cranwell

T. E. Lawrence, Richard Knowles, and Marc Kuritz This is the first, limited, and hand-numbered edition of an essay presenting a previously unrecorded letter by T. E. Lawrence. In 2018, the subject letter, penned in 1925 entirely in T. E. Lawrence’s hand, was discovered laid into copy "50" of the 1935 British limited issue of Seven Pillars of Wisdom. Lawrence wrote this letter while posted to the Royal Air Force RAF Cadet College at Cranwell, where he completed the famous 1926 "Subscribers'" or "Cranwell" edition of Seven Pillars of Wisdom. This letter consists of 22 lines written by Lawrence on the blank verso of an RAF "Application for Mechanical Transport." Lawrence remains a remarkably enigmatic figure. We investigate his character and his exploits though his published works - which span the WWI Arab revolt and life inside the inter-war RAF to crusader castles and ancient Greek translation to technical manuals on high speed boats - but it may be that Lawrence’s letters offer some of the clearest views. As this letter and the enfolding essay A Fresh Station suggest, the fragmentary candor and verities of Lawrence’s correspondence may best enable us to approach the animating spirit of this singular, complex, and multi-faceted person. The letter is addressed to Captain Raymond Goslett M.C. (1885-1961), "the supply wizard of Al Wajh and Al Aquabah," a key figure in the Arab Revolt and wartime friend of Lawrence who inadvertently played a role in facilitating his fame. The letter also references Arthur Dayer Makins, D.F.C., R.R.G.S., F.I.M.T. (1885-1974), a Royal Flying Corps flight lieutenant with X Flight in Arabia who after the war was associated with the motor trade. Lawrence cited both men by name in his acknowledgements for the 1926 subscribers' edition of Seven Pillars and each was gifted a copy. Also referenced, pejoratively, is Lowell Thomas, to whom Lawrence owed the discomfort of both his fame and famous sobriquet. A remarkable First World War odyssey as instigator, organizer, hero, and tragic figure of the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Empire transformed Thomas Edward Lawrence (1888-1935) from an eccentric junior intelligence officer into "Lawrence of Arabia". He spent the rest of his short life struggling to reconcile and reject, to recount and repress this indelible experience and celebrity. Integral to and emblematic of that struggle were both the writing of Seven Pillars of Wisdom and Lawrence’s retreat into the ranks of the RAF – both of course central to this compelling letter. In the short span of 164 words Lawrence references many of the disparate, competing threads that skeined his life – personal conflict about publication of his literary masterpiece, the famous 1926 Subscribers' edition, love of motorcycles, the sensibility for comradeship that made him, however reluctantly, a leader of men, and even a glimpse of the personal peace he always seemed to want but seldom seemed to find. A Fresh Station publishes an essay sketching Lawrence’s life writing and riding at Cranwell specifically through the prism of this letter. The title is taken from Lawrence’s own reference in the letter to Cranwell as " a fresh station, where I have no leisure after the day’s work." Of an edition of 150 hand-numbered copies, 149 are bound thus by the Fine Book Bindery in quarter cloth featuring navy spine and blue-grey boards evoking RAF colours, the spine printed in silver, the front cover bearing the initials Lawrence was wont to use at the time. The illustrated contents are printed by The Logan Press on 150 gm Logan Book Wove paper and include a full facsimile of Lawrence’s letter, as well as images of Lawrence, Goslett, and Makins. These new, hand-numbered copies are offered exclusively by the authors, proprietors respectively of Rickaro Books of England and Churchill Book Collector of America.
Amid These Storms

Amid These Storms

Winston S. Churchill This is a strikingly clean, jacketed example of the U.S. first edition, only printing. Churchill's collection of 23 engaging essays on an incredibly wide variety of subjects has been called "The broadest range of Churchill's thought between hard covers" and reflects the two qualities that so characterize Churchill's life - a remarkable breadth of both mind and life experience. The content ranges from personal and political musings to prescient speculation on the future. The original front flap blurb encapsulates – as far as is possible – the wide range of the chapters within: "These true stories concern such things as the tides that make a politician change his mind; the domination of chance in human lives; the cartoonists who mocked Churchill; the chances and events that occurred while he was in the trenches; phases of the war seen from intimate participation with the high commands; flying experiences in 1912; the Irish; the future; and contemporary change." In a 31 May 1932 letter to his publisher about the book, Churchill characterized his book thus: ".although there is no one single theme, it has some of the best things in it I have ever written." Published in the Britain as Thoughts and Adventures, this is one of the few Churchill first editions for which the U.S. edition bears a different title than the British. The U.S. first edition text was photo-reproduced from the British first edition, but everything else about the edition differs markedly from its British counterpart. The bright red-orange coarse cloth binding of Amid These Storms matches the style of the 1930 U.S. first edition of A Roving Commission but the dust jacket for Amid These Storms is strikingly unique. It bears a full length photo of Churchill in Flanders in 1916, wearing his French Poilu's helmet. This image appears on both the spine and front face. The orange color on the dust jacket and the red-orange binding proved exceptionally prone to sunning. Further, both the coarse cloth binding and the white fields of the dust jacket proved quite susceptible to soiling. Jacketed copies are scarce and truly bright copies are a rarity; most copies look like they spent time in the trenches with Churchill. Here is a remarkably clean, fine copy in a very good dust jacket. The red-orange cloth binding is not only immaculate and vividly bright, but also square and tight with sharp corners. There is no appreciable wear or soiling. Searching for flaws, we note only a mild hint of toning to the bottom edge of the spine. The contents are equally impressive, strikingly clean and bright with no spotting and no previous ownership marks. Even the untrimmed fore edges are virtually pristine, with just a hint of trivial dust soiling to the top edge. The unclipped dust jacket retains the original $3.50 front flap price. There is light wear to extremities, fractional loss to the corners, and modest spine toning. Nonetheless, the white portions of the jacket are far cleaner than we usually see and shelf presentation is quite respectable. The dust jacket is protected with a removable, clear, archival cover. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A95.2, Woods/ICS A39(ba), Langworth p.158.
My African Journey

My African Journey

Winston S. Churchill This is a compellingly clean copy of the British first edition, only printing of My African Journey, Churchill's travelogue on Britain's possessions in East Africa, written while he was serving as Undersecretary of State for the Colonies. The first edition is striking, with a vivid red binding and a prominent front cover bearing a woodcut illustration in blue, grey, and black of Churchill with his bagged white rhinoceros.This book is notable, among other things, for being the only one of his many books to contain photographs apparently taken by the author.The red cloth spine proved exceptionally vulnerable to sunning and the lovely books seem to have attracted handling, making wear and soiling the norm.Spotting is also endemic.Bright and clean copies are scarce. We conservatively grade this copy as very good plus; it is notably clean (within and without), complete, and unrestored. The red cloth binding is clean and tight with sharp corners. We note only the slightest shelf wear to extremities and minor scuffs to the upper right of the front cover, and mild forward lean. Shelf presentation is quite good for the edition, the spine lightly sunned, but evenly so and showing no appreciable soiling, the gilt bright and clearly legible. The contents are likewise quite unusually clean for the edition, bright with a crisp, unread feel. We find no previous ownership marks. Spotting is quite mild for the edition, mostly confined to the page edges with just a few minor instances within to the preliminaries and advertisements. Both front free endpapers show transfer browning from the facing pastedowns, a chemical byproduct of the pastedown glue. The 61 photographs of this edition were tipped in rather than bound, so copies should always be carefully checked to ensure the presence of all illustrations and maps. All illustrations and maps are present here, as is the tissue cover at the frontispiece. In the summer of 1907 Churchill left England for five months, making his way after working stops in southern Europe to Africa for "a tour of the east African domains." In early November, Churchill would kill a rhinoceros, the basis of the striking illustration on the front cover of the British first edition of his eventual book. By now a seasoned and financially shrewd author, Churchill arranged to profit doubly from the trip, first by serializing articles in The Strand Magazine and then by publishing a book based substantially upon them. In November 1908 Hodder and Stoughton published My African Journey as a book, which was a substantial 10,000 words longer than the serialized articles. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A27.1, Woods/ICS A12(aa), Langworth p.81
The River War

The River War, An Historical Account of the Reconquest of the Soudan

Winston S. Churchill This is the first edition, first printing of Churchill's second published work, an unrestored, fully intact set in the striking, original bindings. The Mahdi, Mohammed Ahmed, was a messianic Islamic leader in central and northern Sudan in the final decades of the 19th century. In 1885, General Gordon famously lost his life in a doomed defense of the capitol, Khartoum. Though the Mahdi died in 1895, his theocracy continued until 1898, when General Kitchener reoccupied the Sudan. With Kitchener was a young Winston Churchill, who participated in decisive defeat of the Mahdist forces and the last "genuine" cavalry charge of the British army during the battle of Omdurman in September 1898. In this book, Churchill - a young officer in a colonial British army - is unusually sympathetic to the Mahdist forces and critical of Imperial cynicism and cruelty. This work offers the young Churchill’s candid perspective from the distinctly 19th century battlefields where he learned to write and earned his early fame long before he became a 20th century icon. This first edition is not only compellingly written, but also beautiful and bibliographically important. The two large, lavish volumes are decorated with gilt representations of the Mahdi's tomb on the spines and a gunboat on the front covers. Each volume is printed on heavy paper with a profusion of illustrations, maps, and plans. They are also scarce; there were 2,000 copies of this first edition, first printing. Moreover, this is one of the few Churchill books for which there was no concurrent U.S. first edition. Bibliographically it is notable that the first edition is the only unabridged edition to this day. In 1902 Churchill (then a new Member of Parliament) revised and abridged his text, excising much of his criticism of Kitchener for political reasons.All subsequent editions of The River War are based on this 1902 abridged and revised text. This first edition, first printing set approaches very good condition. The publisher’s illustrated cloth bindings are scuffed with modest superficial wear. Nonetheless, the bindings remain tight and the color and gilt are quite good on both the covers and spine. Likewise, the contents are quite good for the edition. The original black endpapers are intact, as are all of the extensive maps and plans, as well as the frontispiece portraits and tissue guards. Spotting, common in the edition, is modest, intermittent throughout but substantially confined to prelims and page edges. Two features further distinguish this set – provenance and content. Volume I of first edition, first printing sets often contains a publisher’s catalogue bound in at the rear. Churchill’s bibliographer, Ron Cohen, speculates that copies lacking the catalogue were likely "destined for sale in either the American or other overseas markets." This set lacks the rear catalogue, but nonetheless was evidently sold in Britain. Identical illustrated bookplates affixed to each front pastedown are those of William Robert Hood Rochfort (1847-1940), who lived in Ireland and served as a Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery. His interest in the books may be explained by the fact that his brother, Alexander Nelson Rochfort (1850-1916) served in the Royal Artillery, as an aide de camp to the Viceroy of India, and later took part in the Second Boer War, during which he was both wounded and decorated. Kitchener described Rochfort as "fearless of responsibility, never makes difficulties, and has all the qualifications for a leader in the field." (London Gazette, July 1902). The only other previous ownership marks are the same inked owner surname and date of "1941" on the recto of each blank sheet preceding the half title (additionally in pencil on the Volume I half title). The timing is of note; William Rochfort died childless in 1940 and Churchill was of course wartime premier in 1941. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A2.1.b, Woods/ICS A2(a.1), Langworth p.29
London to Ladysmith via Pretoria

London to Ladysmith via Pretoria

Winston S. Churchill This is a superior copy of British first edition, first printing of Churchill's fourth published book, noteworthy for both condition and provenance. London to Ladysmith via Pretoria is the first of Churchill's two books based on his newspaper despatches sent from the front in South Africa. The British first edition is striking, bound in tan cloth with an illustration of an armoured train on the front cover accompanied by the author's facsimile signature and with the Union flag and Transvaal flag in gilt on the spine beneath a red subtitle. The binding is visually arresting, but the first edition proved notoriously fragile and prone to wear, soiling, and spotting. Truly fine copies are virtually a chimera. This first edition, first printing is nearly as good as we encounter - not fine but nonetheless unusually clean and bright, approaching near fine condition. The binding remains square and tight, with sharp corners and just the slightest shelf wear, confined to hinges and extremities. Shelf presentation is quite compelling for the edition, the gilt lettering and flags bright, the red subtitle clearly visible, no appreciable soiling, and only modest wrinkling which does not substantively detract from the appearance. Of particular note is the lack of toning; we find no discernible color shift between the covers and spine. The illustrated front cover is likewise strikingly bright with only minor soiling to it and the blank rear cover. The contents are bright with a crisp feel, despite spotting primarily confined to the prelims and page edges. The original black endpapers are intact with no sign of cracking at the gutters. All maps and plans are present, with the folding maps at the title page and p.366 fully intact. The sole previous ownership mark is the armorial bookplate of "Bangor" affixed to the front pastedown bearing the family crest and motto. The bookplate is almost certainly that of Maxwell Ward, 6th Viscount Bangor (1868-1950). Like Churchill, Bangor was educated at Harrow. He later joined the Royal Artillery. After his father’s death in 1911, he succeeded to the title of Viscount Bangor and retired from active duty in 1912, though he was recommissioned in 1914 after the start of the first World War. Following the war, Bangor was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the 1919 New Years Honours. He was a representative peer in the House of Lords from 1913 to 1950, and an Ulster Unionist member of the Senate of Northern Ireland from 1921-1950, serving for two decades as its speaker. In October 1899, the second Boer War erupted between the descendants of Dutch settlers in South Africa and the British. Churchill, an adventure-seeking young cavalry officer and war correspondent, swiftly found himself in South Africa with the 21st Lancers and an assignment as press correspondent to the Morning Post. Not long thereafter, on 15 November 1899, Churchill was captured during a Boer ambush of an armored train. His daring and dramatic escape less than a month later made him a celebrity and helped launch his political career. London to Ladysmith via Pretoria contains 27 letters and telegrams to the Morning Post written between 26 October 1899 and 10 March 1900. It was published in England in mid-May 1900 and sold well. Churchill returned from South Africa in July 1900 and spent the summer campaigning hard in Oldham. Churchill had lost the Oldham by-election – his first attempt at Parliament – in July 1899. Since then, as Arthur Balfour (who became Prime Minister in 1902) put it in a 30 August 1900 letter, the young Churchill had had "fresh opportunities - admirably taken advantage of – for shewing the public of what stuff you are made." Indeed; Churchill won his first seat in Parliament on 1 October 1900 in the so-called "khaki election". Bibliographic reference: Cohen A4.1.a, Woods/ICS A4(a.1), Langworth p.53.
Great Contemporaries

Great Contemporaries

Winston S. Churchill This is the British first edition, first printing, increasingly elusive thus in the first printing dust jacket. Great Contemporaries is Churchill's much-praised collection of insightful essays about 21 leading personalities of the day - including the likes of Lawrence, Shaw, and, most famously, Hitler. This copy is very good in a very good dust jacket. The blue cloth binding remains square, clean, and tight with sharp corners and bright gilt, marred only by minor surface delamination of the buckram, possibly due to brief moisture exposure, mostly confined to the bottom of the rear cover with smaller spots on the front cover at the bottom edge and just below and to the left of the author’s name. The contents are bright and clean with no previous ownership marks. Minor spotting is almost entirely confined to the otherwise clean fore and bottom edges. The blue stained top edge is only mildly sunned, retaining respectable color. While there were six printings of the first edition between October and December of 1937, but from the second printing on there are differences to the dust jackets, rendering the first printing dust jacket unique. This is the first printing dust jacket, which retains its striking orange color with no sunning to the spine. The jacket is unclipped, retaining the original lower front flap price, and substantially complete. We note light overall soiling and short closed tears and minor loss to the spine ends and flap fold corners, as well as a tiny hole along the lower rear hinge. Nonetheless, this is a bright and nearly complete example of an increasingly elusive 1930s dust jacket. The dust jacket is protected beneath a removable, clear, archival cover. The character sketches herein offer remarkable portraits of both their subjects and the author. Churchill's piece about Hitler can be a shock to the modern ear, as it underscores his ability to write a balanced appraisal of his subject while expressing his earnest desire to avoid the war that he would fight with such ferocious resolve only a few years later. There is a reason this book is still in print today. It was written with what has been called "penetrating evaluation, humor, and understanding." Churchill's balanced and nuanced perspectives provide salutary contrast to many of today's more polemic writers. And naturally, in the course of sketching the character of his contemporaries Churchill necessarily reveals some of his own character and perspective. Churchill's portrait of T.E. Lawrence, published here just a few years before the Second World War, might well have been written about the author rather than by him: "The impression of the personality of Lawrence remains living and vivid upon the minds of his friends, and the sense of his loss is in no way dimmed among his countrymen. All feel the poorer that he has gone from us. In these days dangers and difficulties gather upon Britain and her Empire, and we are also conscious of a lack of outstanding figures with which to overcome them. Here was a man in whom there existed not only an immense capacity for service, but that touch of genius which everyone recognizes and no one can define." (Great Contemporaries, p.164) While some of the subjects of Churchill's sketches have receded into history, many remain well-known and all remain compellingly drawn. Bibliographic Reference: Cohen A105.1.a, Woods/ICS A43(a.1), Langworth p.178.
New Hampshire: A Poem with Notes and Grace Notes

New Hampshire: A Poem with Notes and Grace Notes

Robert Frost, with four woodcut illustrations by J. J. Lankes This is a particularly clean copy of the first trade edition, first printing of the book that won Robert Frost his first Pulitzer Prize. The first edition is a lovely production, bound in quarter dark green linen cloth over dark green paper-covered boards, with a gold paper label on the front cover illustrated and printed in black, and gilt print and decoration on the spine. The contents are printed on untrimmed white wove paper with gilt top edge, illustrated with four woodcuts by J. J. Lankes (1884-1960), and bound with mottled tan endpapers and yellow and green head and foot bands. Condition of this copy is near-fine, among the best unjacketed copies we have seen, unusually clean both inside and out. The lovely but fragile publisher’s binding is square and tight with no fading or appreciable soiling, beautifully bright gilt spine print, sharp corners, and handsome shelf presentation. We note only incidental scuffing to the paper-covered boards and negligible shelf wear to the bottom edges. The contents are excellent, notably bright and clean with no appreciable age-toning and no previous ownership marks. A trivial few instances of spotting seem entirely confined to the otherwise clean untrimmed fore edges. Iconic American poet Robert Lee Frost (1874-1963), the quintessential poetic voice of New England, was actually born in San Francisco and first published in England. When Frost was eleven, his newly widowed mother moved east to Salem, New Hampshire, to resume a teaching career. There Frost swiftly found his poetic voice, infused by New England scenes and sensibilities. Promising as both a student and writer, Frost nonetheless dropped out of both Dartmouth and Harvard, supporting himself and a young family by teaching and farming. A 1912 move to England with his wife and children – "the place to be poor and to write poems" – finally catalyzed his recognition as a noteworthy American poet. There A Boy’s Will was published in 1913. A convocation of critical recognition, introduction to other writers, and creative energy supported the English publication of Frost’s second book, North of Boston, in 1914, after which "Frost’s reputation as a leading poet had been firmly established in England, and Henry Holt of New York had agreed to publish his books in America." Accolades met his return to America at the end of 1914 and by 1917 a move to Amherst "launched him on the twofold career he would lead for the rest of his life: teaching whatever "subjects" he pleased at a congenial college and "barding around," his term for "saying" poems in a conversational performance." (ANB) New Hampshire was published in November 1923 (contrary to the "October, 1923" statement on the title page verso) and, in 1924, won Frost the Pulitzer Prize "For the best volume of verse published during the year by an American author". It was to be the first of his eventual four Pulitzer Prizes for poetry (1931, 1937, and 1943). In an honor accorded few poets, Frost achieved significant fame and recognition in his lifetime. Frost spent the final decade and a half of his life as "the most highly esteemed American poet of the twentieth century" with a host of academic and civic honors to his credit. Two years before his death he became the first poet to read in the program of a U.S. Presidential inauguration (Kennedy, January 1961). Bibliographic reference: Crane A6
Dedication

Dedication, The Gift Outright, The Inaugural Address, Washington, D.C., January the Twentieth 1961, copy #426

Robert Frost & John F. Kennedy This is a fine press limited and hand-numbered edition printed for friends of The Spiral Press in March of 1961 commemorating Robert Frost’s participation in the January 20, 1961 Inauguration of President John F. Kennedy. The book measures 11.5 x 7.75 inches, bound in grey paper-covered boards with the Seal of the President of the United States on the front cover. The contents are printed black and red with gilt and gray illustrations on laid paper with untrimmed fore edges. Included are the poems "Dedication" and "The Gift Outright" as well as President Kennedy’s inaugural address. The presidential eagle was cut in wood especially for this publication by illustrator Fritz Kredel (1900-1973). The typography is credited to printer, publisher, typographer and Spiral Press founder Joseph Blumenthal (1897-1990). This copy is hand-numbered "426" of five hundred copies on the limitation page. Condition is very good. The gray paper-covered binding remains square and tight with sharp corners. Doubtless, the overall excellent condition of the fragile binding owes to the presence of the tattered original, plain glassine dust wrapper. The glassine has done its job taking the brunt of age and wear and as a consequence is toned, fully separated along the spine, and chipped at all extremities. The contents remain bright with no previous ownership marks. Spotting is primarily confined to the endpapers, which also show offsetting from the dust jacket flaps. Spotting is light and intermittent throughout. On January 20th, 1961, iconic American poet and four-time Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Lee Frost (1874-1963) became the first poet to read in the program of a U.S. Presidential inauguration. Frost composed a new poem - "Dedication" - for the ceremony, but glare from the sun and snow famously prevented him from reading the sheet on which his poem was typed, so Frost instead recited "The Gift Outright" from memory. The new President, John F. Kennedy, would say: "I've never taken the view the world of politics and the world of poetry are so far apart." In the case of his relationship with Frost, this was more than just sentiment. In March of 1959, at a New York City press conference preceding a gala to celebrate his 85th birthday, Frost was asked about the alleged decline of New England and replied: "The next President of the United States will be from Boston. Does that sound as if New England is decaying?" Frost repeated the endorsement in the months to come, a boon to the junior Senator from Massachusetts. Kennedy wrote to Frost and quoted his poetry in his speeches. When Kennedy telegraphed Frost to ask him to speak at his Inauguration, Frost responded: "If you can bear at your age the honor of being made President of the United States, I ought to be able at my age to bear the honor of taking some part in your inauguration. I may not be equal to it but I can accept it for my cause – the arts, poetry, now for the first time taken into the affairs of statesmen."
New Hampshire: A Poem with Notes and Grace Notes

New Hampshire: A Poem with Notes and Grace Notes

Robert Frost, with four woodcut illustrations by J. J. Lankes This is the first English edition of the book that won Robert Frost his first Pulitzer Prize. This English edition was bound from U.S. first edition sheets with a cancel title leaf. Only 150 copies were issued, making this edition scarce, and particularly so in the original dust jacket. The first edition is both handsome and fragile, bound in quarter tan linen cloth over light grey paper-covered boards with black spine print. The contents are printed on untrimmed white wove paper illustrated with woodcuts by J. J. Lankes (1884-1960), and bound with mottled tan endpapers and a dull brown topstain. The pleasingly simple dust jacket is printed on a heavy, light brown paper impressed with a "linen" pattern and lettered in black on the front cover and spine. Condition of this copy is very good in a very good dust jacket. The binding is square and tight, with light toning to the extremities of the paper-covered boards and the spine, a bumped upper rear corner, and trivial shelf wear to extremities. The contents are notably clean with no spotting, though mildly age-toned. Differential toning to the endpapers corresponds to the dust jacket flaps, confirming that this copy has spent life jacketed. The sole previous ownership mark is a neatly and diminutively inked name and date of "November 1930" on the upper front free endpaper. The quite scarce dust jacket is notably intact, with only fractional chipping to the spine head. The jacket spine is toned and the jacket shows modest overall soiling. The jacket is now protected beneath a clear, removable, archival cover. Iconic American poet Robert Lee Frost (1874-1963), the quintessential poetic voice of New England, was actually born in San Francisco and first published in England. When Frost was eleven, his newly widowed mother moved east to Salem, New Hampshire, to resume a teaching career. There Frost swiftly found his poetic voice, infused by New England scenes and sensibilities. Promising as both a student and writer, Frost nonetheless dropped out of both Dartmouth and Harvard, supporting himself and a young family by teaching and farming. A 1912 move to England with his wife and children – "the place to be poor and to write poems" – finally catalyzed his recognition as a noteworthy American poet. There A Boy’s Will was published in 1913. A convocation of critical recognition, introduction to other writers, and creative energy supported the English publication of Frost’s second book, North of Boston, in 1914, after which "Frost’s reputation as a leading poet had been firmly established in England, and Henry Holt of New York had agreed to publish his books in America." Hence, after his first two books, American editions preceded the English. Accolades met his return to America at the end of 1914 and by 1917 a move to Amherst "launched him on the twofold career he would lead for the rest of his life: teaching whatever "subjects" he pleased at a congenial college and "barding around," his term for "saying" poems in a conversational performance." (ANB) New Hampshire was published in the U.S. in October 1923 and, in 1924, the year this first English edition was issued, Frost won the Pulitzer Prize "For the best volume of verse published during the year by an American author". It was to be the first of Frost’s eventual four Pulitzer Prizes for poetry (1931, 1937, and 1943). In an honor accorded few poets, Frost would achieve significant fame and recognition in his lifetime. Frost spent the final decade and a half of his life as "the most highly esteemed American poet of the twentieth century" with a host of academic and civic honors to his credit. Two years before his death he became the first poet to read in the program of a U.S. Presidential inauguration (Kennedy, January 1961). Bibliographic reference: Crane A6.1
New Hampshire: A Poem with Notes and Grace Notes Signed and dated by Frost in Amherst in the month of publication

New Hampshire: A Poem with Notes and Grace Notes Signed and dated by Frost in Amherst in the month of publication

Robert Frost, with four woodcut illustrations by J. J. Lankes This is the first edition, first printing of the book that won Robert Frost his first Pulitzer Prize, signed by the author in the month of publication. Frost inked this copy in black in two lines on the front free endpaper: "Robert Frost | Amherst November 1923". Frost's bibliographer (Crane, A6, p.29) clarifies "Though the date of the first printing is given on the copyright page as October 1923, the publisher’s records state that the first edition was published on 15 November 1923". This means that Frost inscribed this copy within two weeks of publication. This U.S. first edition is a lovely production, bound in quarter dark green linen cloth over dark green paper-covered boards, with a gold paper label on the front cover illustrated and printed in black, and gilt print and decoration on the spine. The contents are printed on untrimmed white wove paper with gilt top edge, illustrated with four woodcuts by J. J. Lankes (1884-1960), and bound with mottled tan endpapers and yellow and green head and foot bands. This signed first edition approaches very good minus condition. The lovely but fragile publisher’s binding is square and tight, though worn at the corners and showing a touch of fraying at the spine ends. The contents show no spotting or previous ownership marks other than the author’s dated signature. Moderate age-toning is most evident to the page edges. Iconic American poet and four-time Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Lee Frost (1874-1963), the quintessential poetic voice of New England, was actually born in San Francisco and first published in England. When Frost was eleven, his newly widowed mother moved east to Salem, New Hampshire, to resume a teaching career. There Frost swiftly found his poetic voice, infused by New England scenes and sensibilities. Promising as both a student and writer, Frost nonetheless dropped out of both Dartmouth and Harvard, supporting himself and a young family by teaching and farming. Ironically, it was a 1912 move to England with his wife and children – "the place to be poor and to write poems" – that finally catalyzed his recognition as a noteworthy American poet. There, publication of A Boy’s Will (1913) and North of Boston (1914) led to critical recognition. Accolades met his return to America at the end of 1914 and by 1917 a move to Amherst "launched him on the twofold career he would lead for the rest of his life: teaching whatever "subjects" he pleased at a congenial college and "barding around," his term for "saying" poems in a conversational performance." (ANB) Amherst College was home to Frost for the better part of two decades over a span of more than three. He joined the faculty in 1917 and received an honorary M.A. from Amherst the following year. He left Amherst in 1920, but returned in 1923 – the year New Hampshire was published – for another two years. Frost would return yet again to Amherst College in 1926 and remain until 1938. Following Frost’s death in 1963, his public service was held at Amherst’s Johnson Chapel. In 1924, New Hampshire won Frost the Pulitzer Prize "For the best volume of verse published during the year by an American author". It was to be the first of his eventual four Pulitzer Prizes for poetry (1931, 1937, and 1943). In an honor accorded few poets, Frost would achieve significant fame and recognition in his lifetime. Frost spent the final decade and a half of his life as "the most highly esteemed American poet of the twentieth century" with a host of academic and civic honors to his credit. Two years before his death he became the first poet to read in the program of a U.S. Presidential inauguration (Kennedy, January 1961). Bibliographic reference: Crane A6
North of Boston

North of Boston, an association copy belonging to the author’s friend and fellow poet David McCord, featuring both McCord’s dated ownership signature and a 28 April 1924 autograph letter from Frost to McCord

Robert Frost This association copy of the first American edition, second printing of Frost’s second published book belonged to the author’s friend and fellow poet, David Thompson Watson McCord (1897-1997). On the front free endpaper, McCord wrote "McCord | Cambridge | May 13, 1926." More significant, to the same front free endpaper McCord affixed a letter from Frost. The letter, written entirely in Frost’s hand, filling both sides of a single sheet of blank, laid paper stationery twice folded, reads: Amherst Mass | April 28 1924 | Dear Mr McCord: | You were kept | from ever sending me your | Transcript article by what I | said about wanting to live in a | fools paradise. You shouldn’t | have taken me quite so at | my word. All I meant was I | hated to be too feelingly | persuaded what I was. | I have just ordered you | from Ward a couple of | photographs to choose between. | Perhaps they had better come | round by way of me for my | autograph. | Your wanting my picture | is very friendly and shows | you must have forgiven me | any sins. If I spoke too | warily that night instead of | jumping at your article with | thanks it was because you | caught me at a moment when | I was oversensitive from just | having been too public | Sincerely yours | Robert Frost. McCord was 26 when the 50-year-old Frost wrote him this letter. Both men found poetic voice through fortuitous displacement during adolescence – Frost when his widowed mother moved him from San Francisco to Massachusetts, McCord when he moved from New Jersey to Oregon to live on a remote farm with his uncle. McCord would serve for 38 years as director of the Harvard Fund, retiring in 1963 – the year Frost died. McCord became a valuable personal friend to Frost, but his praise of Frost preceded friendship. As a 25-year-old Harvard chemist, McCord wrote a review of New Hampshire published in the Boston Evening Transcript on 8 December 1923. McCord’s review – both insightful and eloquent – is preserved on the Pulitzer website. In early 1924 Frost was read and regarded, but his fame was not yet fully fledged. Frost lectured in a number of cities in March and April 1924. We can infer that at some public event the younger poet offered a copy of his review and Frost declined with a glib "fools paradise" remark invoking Shakespeare. We assume that Frost later read the review and, chagrined, reached out to McCord, offering both explanation and a signed photograph. If this was not the first correspondence between the two men, it was certainly very early in their relationship. Validating both Frost’s work and McCord’s review thereof, on 12 May 1924, two weeks after this letter was written, it was announced that Frost had been awarded the Pulitzer for New Hampshire. Both Frost’s fame and his relationship with McCord grew. When Frost’s wife, Elinor, died in 1938, McCord served as one of Elinor’s pall bearers. McCord chaired the committee that established the Emerson-Thoreau Medal, which was bestowed in 1958 on its first recipient, Robert Frost. And in 1962 McCord played a critical part in Harvard’s role in the resolution conferring the Congressional Gold Medal on Frost. Like Frost, McCord earned a host of honors and honorary degrees in his lifetime, authoring and editing more than 50 books and 500 children’s poems. Frost’s letter to McCord is clean and complete, though in two pieces, neatly split along the horizontal fold. The volume is in good plus condition, square and tight though with sunning to the spine and modest wear to extremities. The contents are bright with no spotting. Cosmetic endpaper gutter splits do not affect binding integrity but expose the intact mull beneath. The copyright page erroneously designates this copy as "Third edition, 1915". It is actually the second printing of the first American edition printed and published by Holt in 1915, with binding and contents the same as those of the first printing of the same year.
The Letters of Gertrude Bell

The Letters of Gertrude Bell

Gertrude Bell, selected and edited and with a Prefatory Note and Conclusion by Lady Florence Bell This is a finely bound two-volume first edition, first printing of The Letters of Gertrude Bell. The binding features half dark green calf with raised spine bands and twin black calf spine labels over green cloth boards with generous calf corners and double blind rules at all transitions. The contents are bound with head and foot bands and fine stock endpapers. Condition of the bindings is fine, with no wear or flaws to report. The contents remain bright and complete and, although spotted intermittently throughout and on the page edges, show no previous ownership marks. The original Volume I dust jacket front face, partial spine, and flap blurb is tipped-in at the end of Volume I. The letters in these two volumes span 1874 to a few days prior to her death in July 1926. The volumes are generously illustrated. The letters were "selected and edited" with Prefatory Note by Gertrude Bell’s stepmother, Lady Florence Bell (1851-1930). As testimony to Gertrude Bell’s influence, the Volume II Conclusion includes a message from King George V to Lady Florence: "The Queen and I are grieved to hear of the death of your distinguished and gifted daughter The nation will with us mourn the loss of one who by her intellectual powers, force of character, and personal courage rendered important and what I trust will prove lasting benefit to the country and to those regions where she worked with such devotion and self-sacrifice." Gertrude Margaret Lowthian Bell, CBE (1868-1926) was the intriguing and influential adventurer, scholar, writer, and diplomat who, like her contemporary T. E. "Lawrence of Arabia" did much to frame and shape the Middle East during and after the First World War. Raised amid industrialist family wealth, Bell lost her mother at age three, increasing a "sense of independence and self-reliance" perhaps already inherent to the "physically restless and intellectually gifted" child.By her mid-twenties the unmarried Bell discovered intellectual and emotional fascination with the Middle East. "Outstanding literary and linguistic skills" coupled with "determination, bravery, physical strength, and endurance" invigorated contributions to travel literature, translation, archaeology, and architecture, eventually evolving into engagement in the region’s socio-political currents.By the First World War, Bell became "a voluntary agent of Britain’s interests in the Middle East" and assumed her defining role – as "a woman trying to break one of the most challenging barriers of her time: the physical conquest of the desert and the decoding of the moral and ethical code of its inhabitants."(ODNB) Bell’s linguistic and tribal knowledge made her indispensable to the Arab Bureau - the Cairo intelligence office of the British government during the First World War, contributing articles to the Arabian Report and the famous Arab Bulletin. After the First World War, Bell remained an influential figure, helping persuade Colonial Secretary Winston Churchill to maintain a British presence in Iraq, helping secure the throne for the King of Iraq, and facilitating the Anglo-Iraqi treaty. One of her last accomplishments was to gather funds for a national museum in Baghdad, which was inaugurated in 1923 and installed in a permanent building in 1926, the year she died. Like the contemporary figure to whom she is often compared, Lawrence of Arabia, Bell was disappointed in some of her hopes for the region and died comparatively young. Bell was played by actress Nicole Kidman in the 2015 film Queen of the Desert. From the original dust jacket blurb: "Gertrude Bell will live in the public memory most largely as the uncrowned Queen of Arabia The letters published in this book, from her girlhood until the end of her life, show an amazing range of many-sided ability Her genius found its best expression in the intimate study, comprehension and mastery of Arab life and politics showing herself time and again the indispensable intermediary between East and West."
The Palestine Exploration Fund 1914-1915 Annual. Double Volume. Including The Wilderness of Zin

The Palestine Exploration Fund 1914-1915 Annual. Double Volume. Including The Wilderness of Zin, the first work by T. E. Lawrence published in volume form In the original, first issue binding, not the nearly identical 1935 reissue

T. E. Lawrence This first edition, first issue is the first work published in book form of the man who would a few short years later be transformed from an eccentric junior intelligence officer into "Lawrence of Arabia". During the First World War Thomas Edward Lawrence (1888-1935), just out of Oxford on an archaeology expedition with the British Museum, was summoned to Cairo where his experience in the language and geography of the region was put to use by the Foreign Office. There began his remarkable odyssey as instigator, organizer, hero, and tragic figure of the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Empire. This time defined Lawrence with indelible experience and celebrity which he spent the rest of his famously short life struggling to reconcile and reject, to recount and repress. Lawrence’s initial engagement in the Middle East was entirely academic. "From 1911-1914 Lawrence was employed by the British Museum at an archaeological dig in northern Syria. The site, on the Euphrates, was known as Carchemish, a major Hittite centre. D. G. Hogarth, Lawrence's mentor, was instrumental in obtaining the position for Lawrence, who worked along with C. Leonard Woolley and P.L.O. Guy." It may be somewhat of an understatement to say that "The three summers Lawrence spent here were very influential in his later activities." (O’Brien, p.4) "During January and February 1914, Lawrence and Woolley, in the company of a British Army surveying detachment led by Capt. Newcombe, under the guise of an archaeological survey, mapped the Negev region of the Sinai Peninsula, then under Turkish suzerainty. The British sought updated maps for the war they felt was coming. To complete the fiction of the archaeological work, Woolley and Lawrence wrote The Wilderness of Zin, the first of Lawrence's works to appear in book form. "K [Kitchener] (the only begetter of the survey) insisted on the Palestine Exploration Funds's bringing out its record of our archaeological researching, p.d.q. as whitewash. Woolley and I had instructions to get it done instanter." (Letters, p.181) Hence this publication. Collectors will note that "part of the original printing was left in sheets and bound for sale at a later date, probably upon Lawrence's death." The nearly identical 1935 reissue variant binding lacks the full stop after "1914-1915" on the spine. Additionally, Cape in England and Scribner's in America published the book in 1936 (the second English and First American editions, respectively) when many of Lawrence's publications were published or reissued. (O’Brien, A004, pp.6-9) This copy is the First (English) edition, in the first (1914) issue binding. Condition approaches very good, sound, complete, clean within, and free of any repair or restoration. The original quarter cloth and printed, paper-covered boards binding remains square and tight. The boards are lightly scuffed with wear to extremities the spine lightly sunned. The contents are clean and complete, all of the extensive illustrated plates and accompanying tissue guards, as well as the maps, are intact and perfectly preserved. Minor spotting is confined to the endpapers and adjacent prelims and final index leaves. The sole previous ownership mark is the ink stamp of "Ian S. Pettman" on the upper front free endpaper recto, with his private library corrected ink notation directly above. Lawrence’s contributions are identified in the Prefatory Note: "Mr. Lawrence is chiefly responsible for the second half of Chapter I (on Akaba); the first part of Chapter II; the account of the Darb el Shur in Chapter III; most of Chapter IV; and the concluding section only (Akaba) on Chapter V. The maps in the book were compiled by Mr. Lawrence The plates are from photographs taken by both authors." Lawrence’s contributions regarding "Akaba" are of particular note given his remarkable victory with the forces of the Arab Revolt in the Battle of Aqaba a few short years later in July 1917. Bibliographic reference: O’Brien A004 First English Edition, first issue binding.
Seven Pillars of Wisdom: a triumph

Seven Pillars of Wisdom: a triumph, the complete 1922 ‘Oxford’ text, the publisher’s hand-numbered limited edition of 1997, one of 80 sets bound thus in full morocco, accompanied by both the finely bound Illustrations volume and the publisher’s portfolio of proofs of the Seven Pillars portraits, all housed in the publisher’s slipcase

T. E. Lawrence This is the first Castle Hill Press limited edition of the full 1922 "Oxford" text. Only 80 sets were issued in full morocco with a supplemental illustrations and text volume (in quarter morocco with cloth sides) and housed in the publisher’s white cloth-covered slipcase. The text volumes were magnificently bound by The Fine Bindery, featuring hubbed spines and rounded corners, the contents bound with strikingly lovely hand-marbled endpapers by Ann Muir framed by elaborately gilt-tooled turn ins, blue and white head and foot bands and all gilt page edges. Rendering this particular set scarcer still is inclusion of a cloth-bound portfolio of proofs of the Seven Pillars portraits, interleaved with Japanese paper. This portfolio was available only to select subscribers with a custom wider slipcase to accommodate both the three volumes and the portfolio. This set is hand-numbered "66" on both the Editor’s Acknowledgments page and on the verso of each portfolio illustration. Condition of the main text volumes, illustrations volume, and portfolio is magnificently fine, immaculate inside and out. The only sign of previous ownership is a one-inch square decorative device stamped gilt on navy leather affixed to the Volume I front pastedown; had we not examined other sets, it would be easy to attribute the device to the binder. Only the publisher’s white cloth slipcase betrays the passage of time; it is without appreciable wear, but inevitably soiled given the material and color. Seven Pillars of Wisdom is the story of T. E. Lawrence's (1888-1935) remarkable odyssey as instigator, organizer, hero, and tragic figure of the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Empire during the First World War, which he began as an eccentric junior intelligence officer and ended as "Lawrence of Arabia." This time defined Lawrence with indelible experience and celebrity, which he spent the rest of his short life struggling to reconcile and reject, to recount and repress. Lawrence famously resisted publication of his magnum opus for the general public during his lifetime. The saga is remarkable. He nearly completed a massive first draft in 1919, only to lose it when his briefcase was mislaid at a train station. This first draft was never recovered. At a fever pitch, Lawrence wrote a new 400,000 word draft in 1920. This punishing burst of writing was followed by an equally brutal process of editing by Lawrence. In 1922, a 335,000 word version was carefully circulated to select friends and literary critics - the famous "Oxford Text". George Bernard Shaw called it "a masterpiece". Nonetheless, Lawrence was unready to see it distributed to the public. In 1926, a further edited 250,000 word "Subscriber's Edition" was produced by Lawrence - but fewer than 200 copies were made, each lavishly and uniquely bound. The process cost Lawrence far more than he made in subscriptions. To recover the loss, Lawrence finally authorized an edition for the general public - but one even further abridged, titled Revolt in the Desert. It was only in the summer of 1935, in the weeks following Lawrence's death, that the text of the Subscribers' Edition was finally published for circulation to the general public. But the text released to the world as "Complete and Unabridged" in 1935 and which became so famous is, in fact, a significantly abridged version. The 1922 "Oxford Text" - a third longer - would not be published in an edition available to the public until this 1997 edition. Castle Hill Press, headed by Lawrence’s official biographer, Jeremy Wilson (1944-2017), took this text from the manuscript in the Bodleian Library and T. E. Lawrence's annotated copy of the 1922 Oxford Times printing. Castle Hill first published a three-volume limited edition of 752 sets of this Oxford Text. The 80 bound thus in full goatskin are quite scarce today, doubly so in such condition and accompanied by the portfolio of portrait proofs. Finely bound, limited, hand-numbered edition.
Seven Pillars of Wisdom

Seven Pillars of Wisdom

T. E. Lawrence This is the British first trade edition, first printing in dust jacket. This copy is approaches very good in a good dust jacket and is notable for particularly clean contents. First printing is confirmed by the illustration on pages 304-5 incorrectly specified in the list of Illustrations at p.20 as being on pages 302-3, an error corrected in the second printing. The brown buckram binding is square and tight. The spine gilt is bright and distinct despite very mild, uniform spine toning. There is mild scuffing to the boards with blemishes to the lower left and upper right of the front cover. The contents are strikingly bright and clean for the edition. We note absolutely no spotting or previous ownership marks. Moreover, the book is substantially unread; there are many uncut signatures, beginning at p.45 and frequent after p.93. Even the untrimmed fore and bottom edges are notably clean, the top edge likewise clean with even topstain. The dust jacket is unclipped, retaining the original publisher price on the lower front flap and only mildly spine toned, though with overall soiling, wear to extremities, and modest loss to the spine ends and corners. The dust jacket is protected beneath a removable, clear, archival cover. Seven Pillars of Wisdom is the story of T. E. Lawrence's (1888-1935) remarkable odyssey as instigator, organizer, hero, and tragic figure of the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Empire during the First World War, which he began as an eccentric junior intelligence officer and ended as "Lawrence of Arabia." This time defined Lawrence with indelible experience and celebrity which he would spend the rest of his famously short life struggling to reconcile and reject, to recount and repress. Lawrence famously resisted publication of his masterwork for the general public during his lifetime. The saga is remarkable. He nearly completed a massive first draft in 1919, only to famously lose it when his briefcase was mislaid at a train station. This first draft was never recovered. At a fever pitch, Lawrence wrote a new 400,000 word draft in 1920. This punishing burst of writing was followed by an equally brutal process of editing. In 1922, a 335,000 word version was carefully circulated to select friends and literary critics - the famous "Oxford Text". George Bernard Shaw called it "a masterpiece". Nonetheless, Lawrence was unready to see it distributed to the public. Finally, in 1926, a further edited 250,000 word "Subscribers' Edition" was produced by Lawrence - but fewer than 200 copies were made, each lavishly and uniquely bound. The process cost Lawrence far more than he made in subscriptions. To recover the loss, Lawrence finally authorized an edition for the general public - but one even further abridged and entitled "Revolt in the Desert". It was only in the summer of 1935, in the weeks following Lawrence's death, that the text of the Subscribers' Edition was finally published for circulation to the general public in the form of a British first trade edition. Winston Churchill was among Lawrence's original subscribers to the 1926 edition, though Lawrence refused to allow Churchill to pay for his copy, as a token for his esteem for the work he and Churchill had done together in the Colonial Office after the First World War. Of this text, Winston Churchill wrote: "It ranks with the greatest books ever written in the English language. If Lawrence had never done anything except write this book as a mere work of the imagination his fame would last. But it is fact, not fiction. An epic, a prodigy, a tale of torment, and in the heart of it - A Man." Bibliographic reference: O'Brien A042.
Seven Pillars of Wisdom: a triumph

Seven Pillars of Wisdom: a triumph, the complete 1922 ‘Oxford’ text, first and limited one-volume edition, copy #123 of 180 copies issued thus in quarter Nigerian goatskin, accompanied by an inscribed, limited, out-of-series edition of Publishing the Oxford Text of Seven Pillars of Wisdom by Jeremy Wilson

T. E. Lawrence and Jeremy Wilson This is the finely bound, first one-volume limited edition of the full 1922 'Oxford' text from Castle Hill Press, the premier editors and fine press publishers of material by and about T. E. Lawrence, founded by Lawrence’s official biographer, Jeremy Wilson (1944-2017). Of 1,225 total copies, the publisher issued just 180 thus, in quarter Nigerian goatskin, bound by The Fine Bindery and featuring raised spine bands, blind ruled compartments and transitions, cloth sides, top edge gilt, ribbon place marker, brown endpapers with adjacent color maps, and head and tail bands. Quarter goatskin copies were numbered 46-225. This copy is hand-numbered "123" by the publisher on the title page verso limitation.This copy is rendered notionally unique in being accompanied by an inscribed, out of series copy of the excellent and elusive 31-page essay by Jeremy Wilson, Publishing the Oxford Text of Seven Pillars of Wisdom. Copies of this essay were made available only with the 45 copies of this edition bound in full goatskin. This worthwhile essay provides a history of the 1922 text of Seven Pillars and its eventual publication, as well as an appraisal of the different texts.This particular copy, unnumbered, is inscribed by Wilson "For Rollin [indecipherable surname] | – A spare set of sheets after the edition | had been bound | Jeremy Wilson" Moreover, the essay is handsomely string-bound in green laid paper and both volume and essay are housed in a slipcase covered in the same paper. Volume, essay, and slipcase are all pristine, with no discernible wear or flaws. This handsome first one-volume edition features text that was "re-checked against copies of the two source documents" leading to "a number of small improvements from the preceding 1997 edition." This edition also added a scholarly index by Hazel K. Bell (which won the Wheatley Medal, Britain’s major indexing award), as well as 16 pages of black-and-white photographs taken by Lawrence and others during the Arab Revolt. Seven Pillars is the story of Thomas Edward Lawrence's (1888-1935) remarkable odyssey as instigator, organizer, hero, and tragic figure of the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Empire during the First World War, which he began as an eccentric junior intelligence officer and ended as "Lawrence of Arabia." Though compelled to write (and rewrite) the story, Lawrence famously resisted broad publication of any full version of Seven Pillars during his lifetime. When Lawrence died in 1935 following a motorcycle crash, his opus was rushed into print in the only version readily available - the 1926 "Subscribers" abridgement. Few realize that the text released to the world as "Complete and Unabridged" in 1935 and which has become so celebrated is, in fact, a significantly abridged version. Even more remarkable, the full 1922 "Oxford Text" – a third longer – was not published until 1997, with the text in a two-volume edition, followed by this one-volume limited edition in 2003. Wilson’s Castle Hill Press took this text from the manuscript in the Bodleian Library and T. E. Lawrence's annotated copy of the 1922 Oxford Times printing. Beyond the more subjective questions of literature, in terms of both autobiography and history, "the 1922 text is, without question, superior to that of 1926. In the process of ‘literary’ abridgement, Lawrence cut out numerous personal reflections, some of which were important." For example, the 1926 text excised Lawrence’s "confession that the flogging at Deraa left him with a masochistic longing and his recollection of this event a few weeks later when he was present at Allenby’s official entry into Jerusalem. The historical record likewise often fell victim to abridgement because of the cuts, [the narrative] does not always account for Lawrence’s time or seem to square with independent records. Worse still, the frustrations and abandoned plans of 1917-18 were largely suppressed in the 1926 text " Bibliographic reference: see O'Brien A034a.
Britain’s Part In Lend-Lease and Mutual Aid

Britain’s Part In Lend-Lease and Mutual Aid

British Library of Information This original Second World War pamphlet was part of Britain’s effort to communicate to Americans that "Lend-Lease is not a one-way street" by sharing "Examples of British aid to the United States". This wartime survivor printed on brittle, acidic paper is only in good minus condition. The 18-page, wire-stitched pamphlet in self-wrappers is evenly browned throughout. The pamphlet text is complete, despite chipping to the blank margin extremities of every page. The Lend-Lease Act, signed on 11 March, 1941, authorized President Roosevelt to transfer arms or any other defense materials for which Congress appropriated money to "the government of any country whose defense the President deems vital to the defense of the United States." It was no less than a lifeline for Great Britain. Before passage of the Lend-Lease Bill, Churchill had told U.S. Ambassador Winant – arguably without hyperbole - that without the Lend-Lease Act "we should be unable to carry on and win the war". (Roberts, Walking with Destiny, p.639) Soon after enacting Lend-Lease, the U.S. also extended its naval security zone several thousand miles into the Atlantic, effectively shielding much of the Atlantic convoy route. Lend-Lease material support allowed Britain to fight on. In accordance with the vital importance of the deal to Britain’s survival, Churchill gave hyperbolic praise. In a 12 November 1941 speech to the House of Commons he said: "The Lend and Lease Bill must be regarded without question as the most unsordid act in the whole of recorded history." British Information Services was the information department of the British Consulate in New York. This pamphlet represents the efforts of the British government to sway and inform the American public, continuously seeking to strengthen the bonds of the "special relationship" that had proven vital to Britain’s survival in the early years of the war and now, in 1944, was the crucial factor in securing victory.
Commencement Address by The Honourable Winston S. Churchill

Commencement Address by The Honourable Winston S. Churchill, M.P. A program containing an address by Winston S. Churchill, M.P., namesake grandson of the wartime Prime Minster, delivered on 21 May 1972 at Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri, where two-and-a-half decades prior his grandfather delivered his famous Iron Curtain speech

Winston S. Churchill Just eight months after Labour outpaced Winston Churchill’s Conservatives in the 1945 general election, ousting Churchill from 10 Downing Street and ending his five years of wartime leadership, Churchill was invited to deliver a speech at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri on 5 March 1946. There he coined the phrase that described the division between the Soviet Union's sphere of influence and the West. This speech incisively framed the Cold War that would dominate the second half of the Twentieth Century: "From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the Continent. I repulse the idea that a new war is inevitable; still more that it is imminent. If we adhere faithfully to the Charter of the United Nations and walk forward in sedate and sober strength seeking no one's land or treasure, seeking to lay no arbitrary control upon the thoughts of men. the high-roads of the future will be clear, not only for us but for all, not only for our time, but for a century to come." Twenty-five years later Churchill’s namesake grandson was invited to deliver a commencement address in memory of that historic occasion. Condition of the 14 page wire-stitched pamphlet in self-wrappers is very good. The textured paper is crisp and bright and the staples are free of corrosion. There is some minor soiling and handling wear to the covers. This pamphlet reproduces the college Ambassador’s introduction of the Prime Minister’s namesake grandson, his address, and several photographs of the occasion.
Wartime pitcher featuring an image of and quotes by Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill

Wartime pitcher featuring an image of and quotes by Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill

This is a handsome piece of Churchilliana, an illustrated jug produced by Copeland/Spode in 1941. (See Douglas Hall, pp.146-7) A large jug at 7.5 inches tall, it was produced under wartime restrictions. This is a particularly clean example. We conservatively grade condition as near fine, notably clean inside and out with no appreciable soiling (apart from the bottom edges), no chips, and only faint crazing visible under raking light (though no discernible cracking of the glaze). One side of the pitcher features a cameo of Churchill with a warship to his left, a tank to his right, and a fighter aircraft above him. In an arc above the aircraft – slightly misquoted – is a line from Churchill’s 13 May 1940 speech: "ALL I CAN OFFER IS BLOOD, TOIL, TEARS, AND SWEAT.". Below Churchill’s image is a ribbon bearing a quote from his speech of 20 August 1940: "NEVER IN THE FIELD OF HUMAN CONFLICT WAS SO MUCH OWED BY SO MANY TO SO FEW". The pitcher was likely created by the company’s own designers, since noparticular artist is credited with it in Spode’s records. There were various iterations of the pitcher, with the side described above constant but the other side of the pitcher varying significantly in appearance. This pitcher is Pattern F448, identified by a bulldog on a Union Flag bestriding a globe with theBritish Empire shown in dark color. Over and under the design is the February 1941 exchange of quotes between President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill. In a ribbon below the globe, Roosevelt quotes Longfellow: "SAIL ON, O SHIP OF STATE! | SAIL ON O UNION STRONG AND GREAT | HUMANITY WITH ALL ITS FEARS | WITH ALL THE HOPES OF FUTURE YEARS | IS HANGING BREATHLESS ON THY FATE!" Churchill’s reply appears above and to the left of the globe: "GIVE US THE TOOLS. | AND WE WILL FINISH THE JOB!" (See Max Edward Hertwig’s article in Finest Hour, Issue 116, Autumn 2002, Page 36) Please anticipate that packing and shipping this item with care may incur additional shipping cost.
Punch

Punch, or The London Charivari, No. 4147, Volume CLIX, December 29, 1920 Containing a political cartoon of Winston Churchill and other British political luminaries

This original 29 December 1920 issue of Punch magazine contains a political cartoon featuring Winston Churchill at p.512. Titled "ESSENCE OF PARLIAMENT", the cartoon features Churchill in the company of "Mr. Bonar Law, Mr. Lloyd George, Mr. Shortt, Mr. Chamberlain, Mr. Neal, Sir Eric Geddes, Sir Robert Horne". Churchill is at the left, leaning forward with clasped hands. Then-Prime Minister David Lloyd George is shown pontificating, Shortt, Chamberlain, Neal, Gedes, Horne and Churchill attentive to Lloyd George’s right, Bonar Law contemplating behind him. The cartoon is captioned "Mr. Lloyd George (Chairman). ‘You’ve worked splendidly up to Christmas, and if you’ll put your backs into it for the New Year trade I’ll see if I can’t give you a good long holiday in the autumn.’ Mr. Bonar Law (Manager). ‘Or some other time.’" At the time, Churchill was Secretary of State for War and Air. It is remarkable to consider that nearly two decades, a change in political party, scores of political issues and fights, and nearly a decade of political isolation lay between the Churchill in this cartoon and the Churchill who became wartime Prime Minister in May 1940. Condition of the magazine approaches very good, particularly considering the age and inherent fragility. The illustrated paper wraps are firmly attached and fully intact, though moderately toned and lightly soiled. The contents are clean and bright. Both original binding staples show only slight surface corrosion. Punch or The London Charivari was a weekly British magazine of humour and satire established in 1841. Renowned for wit and irreverence, Punch was known for its cartoons and is credited with introducing the term ‘cartoon’ as we know it today. ".Winston Churchill undoubtedly became the most caricatured and cartooned politician of all time." For more than half a century, from his first election to Parliament in 1900 through his retirement as prime minister in April 1955, "Churchill was taken to task by cartoonists at every available opportunity." (Churchill in Caricature, 2005) So much so that Churchill embraced all the artistic attention with customary humor and resolve and wrote an article about being caricatured in which he asserted that "politicians get used to being caricatured. In fact, by a strange trait in human nature they even get to like it." ("Cartoons and Cartoonists", Strand Magazine, June 1931)
Bulletins from Britain

Bulletins from Britain, Number 49, Week Ending August 6 1941

Wing Commander L. V. Fraser and others This early wartime pamphlet, published in August 1941, is both aesthetically striking and testimony to the vital British effort to court the American public. This 8-page, wire-stitched pamphlet has a front cover printed in blue, red, and black, with a prominent "V" ("For Victory") trisecting the printed text. The stated purpose, printed in blue on the upper front cover, reads in part "British officials in posts throughout the world receive from London and from other British sources a regular service of information, by cable, and mail, intended to give an intimate knowledge of Britain's fighting forces, of the Empire's war effort and of the impact of the war upon the daily lives of its peoples. The Bulletins printed herein are selected from this service." Condition is very good, particularly so considering the pamphlet’s inherent fragility and ephemeral nature. The 8-page wire-stitched pamphlet in self-wrappers is crisp and bright with only very minor handling wear to the bottom edge of the interior pages. Bulletins from Britain was a series of news pamphlets presenting a picture "of the Empire’s war effort and of the impact of the war upon the daily lives of its peoples" for the American audience. The British Library of Information was a branch of the British Foreign Office created in 1919 as a means of both monitoring and cultivating the relationship between the United States and Great Britain. The agency produced dozens of pamphlets, leaflets, posters, and other pieces of propaganda to distribute in America with the intent to "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the prime minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513) Although Churchill would secure significant American material aid and forge a vital bond with President Roosevelt, America would not formally enter the war until after the 7 December 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. When Churchill became Prime Minister on 10 May 1940, the war for Britain was not so much a struggle for victory as a struggle to survive. Churchill’s first year in office saw, among other near-calamities, the Battle of the Atlantic, the fall of France, evacuation at Dunkirk, and the Battle of Britain. Engaging the sympathy and comity of the American people was not mere propaganda, but a dire necessity. In 1942, following America’s formal entry into the war, The British Library of Information was absorbed by British Information Services (BIS), the information department of the British Consulate in New York.
Arms and the Covenant

Arms and the Covenant

Winston S. Churchill This book is the precursor to Churchill’s great war speeches, the first edition, only printing. This particular copy is increasingly scarce thus, near fine in a very good first issue dust jacket. The navy cloth binding is square, clean, tight, and uncommonly bright, with sharp corners, vivid spine gilt, and no sunning. We note only trivial wrinkling to the spine ends and incidental shelf wear to the bottom edges. The contents are likewise uncommonly clean for the edition, with no spotting and no previous ownership marks and retaining a crisp feel, as if unread. The blue topstain is unfaded and the fore and bottom edges clean. Mild differential toning to the half-title and to the first and final leaves corresponds to the dust jacket flaps, confirming what the marvelously bright binding already testifies – that this copy has spent life jacketed. The pale blue first state dust jacket is unclipped with trivial losses confined to the spine ends and corners, light soiling to the faces and moderate soiling to the spine. The jacket is now protected beneath a removable, clear archival quality cover. Arms and the Covenant has been called " the permanent record of one man’s unceasing struggle in the face of resentment, apathy, and complacency" and "probably the most crucial volume of speeches that he ever published." (Frederick Woods) The book contains text from 41 Churchill speeches spanning 25 October 1928 to 24 March 1938. These criticize British foreign policy and warn prophetically of the coming danger. The world remembers the resolute war leader to whom the British turned, but it is easy to forget the years leading up to the war, which Churchill spent persistent, eloquent, and largely unheeded. The speeches were compiled by Churchill's son, Randolph, who contributed a preface and is credited with compilation. Randolph would do the same for his father's first volume of war speeches, Into Battle, published in an almost unrecognizable world less than three years later. The "Covenant" in the title of Arms and the Covenant refers to the League of Nations Covenant, the instrument that was to maintain peace in the wake of the First World War. As testimony to the book's importance, a copy of the U.S. edition lay on "President Roosevelt's bedside table, with key passages, including an analysis of the president's peace initiative, underscored" (William Manchester's The Last Lion, Volume II, p.305). The British first edition saw only a single printing of 5,000 copies published on 24 June 1938 and of these, perhaps as few as 3,381 were issued in the distinctive pale blue dust jacket. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A107.1. Woods/ICS A44(a), Langworth p.191.
The Second World War

The Second World War, full set of six British first editions

Winston S. Churchill This is a full, jacketed set of British first editions of The Second World War, Churchill's history of the epic 20th Century struggle that was so indelibly stamped by his leadership. This is a superior set. Jacketed British first edition sets in marginal condition are not uncommon. However, the coarse cloth bindings of this edition proved susceptible to soiling and mildew, the contents (printed on post-war "Economy Standards" paper) proved highly prone to spotting, the red-stained top edges are most often severely faded, and the dust jackets proved exceptionally vulnerable to pronounced spine toning. This set suffers few of the typical deficiencies, comprised of near fine or better first edition, first printing volumes in dust jackets ranging from from very good plus to fine. We find it increasingly difficult to offer sets thus. The black cloth bindings are uniformly square, clean, and tight with bright spine gilt. We note only a few gently bumped corners. The contents are nearly as good as we ever see – bright and clean with no previous ownership marks and only a few, trivial instances of spotting confined to the otherwise clean fore edges. The red-stained top edges retain strong color across the set, with just a touch of sunning to the earlier volumes. The jackets are entirely complete, with no loss or tears. All six jackets are unclipped, retaining their original front flap prices. Typical spine toning is quite mild, appreciably affecting only the red subtitles, which remain legible on all six dust jacket spines, even when faded. Of note, the red subtitle on the first volume, "The Gathering Storm", is remarkably bright and unfaded. The dust jackets are protected beneath removable, clear, archival covers. Seldom, if ever, has history endowed a statesman with both singular ability to make history, and singular ability to write it. As with so much of what Churchill wrote, The Second World War is not "history" in the strictly academic, objectivist sense, but rather Churchill's perspective on history. In his March 1948 introduction to the first volume, Churchill himself made the disclaimer, "I do not describe it as history. it is a contribution to history." Nonetheless the compelling fact remains, as stated by Churchill himself, "I am perhaps the only man who has passed through both the two supreme cataclysms of recorded history in high Cabinet office. I was for more than five years in this second struggle with Germany the Head of His Majesty's government. I write, therefore, from a different standpoint and with more authority than was possible in my earlier books." Certainly The Second World War may be regarded as an intensely personal and inherently biased history. Nonetheless, Churchill's work remains essential, iconic, and a vital part of the historical record. Richard Langworth calls the six-volume epic "indispensable reading for anyone who seeks a true understanding of the war that made us what we are today." Please note that this set may require additional postage depending on destination. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A240.4(I-VI).a, Woods/ICS A123(ba), Langworth p.264.
Air Raid Precautions

Air Raid Precautions

British Library of Information This Second World War leaflet describes Britain’s air raid procedures as part of the British Library of Information’s continued attempt to inform and sway the American people. Though no publication date is stated, WorldCat lists this as a 1941 publication, produced before America entered the war. The text is printed on both sides of a single piece of paper that was folded in half to create a large, four-page leaflet. Condition is very good given the age, size, and inherent fragility. The paper is bright and crisp with some browning to the edges of the first page, some light soiling to the rear cover, two short closed tears to the fore-edge, and a horizontal crease through the center. The rear cover is a secondary bit of history, advertising other British Library of Information publications "Available upon Request" including "Women’s War Work", "Britain in Time of War", "Britain’s Blockade", "The British System of Social Security", "Compulsory Military Service in Great Britain", and a number of "Speeches by the Prime Minister Winston Churchill". Late 1940 or early 1941 publication is substantiated by the fact that the final Churchill speech publication offered is that of 5 November 1940. The British Library of Information was a branch of the British Foreign Office created in 1919 as a means of both monitoring and cultivating the relationship between the United States and Great Britain. During the Second World War, the agency produced dozens of pamphlets, leaflets, posters, and other pieces of propaganda to distribute in America with the intent to "reveal the political determination of the British government to bring the inspiration and steadfastness of the prime minister and the British nation to an American nation not yet engaged in the war." (Cohen, Volume I, p.513) Although Churchill would secure significant American material aid and forge a vital bond with President Roosevelt, America would not formally enter the war until after the 7 December 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. When Churchill became Prime Minister on 10 May 1940, the war for Britain was not so much a struggle for victory as a struggle to survive. Churchill’s first year in office saw, among other near-calamities, the Battle of the Atlantic, the fall of France, evacuation at Dunkirk, and the Battle of Britain. Engaging the sympathy and comity of the American people was not mere propaganda, but a dire necessity. In 1942, following America’s formal entry into the war, The British Library of Information was absorbed by British Information Services (BIS), the information department of the British Consulate in New York.
A Speech by The Prime Minister The Right Honourable Winston Churchill in the House of Commons August 20th

A Speech by The Prime Minister The Right Honourable Winston Churchill in the House of Commons August 20th, 1940

Winston S. Churchill This is the first edition of one of Churchill's most famous speeches. Churchill's speech to Parliament of August 20th, 1940 was occasioned by the Battle of Britain and famously honored the RAF pilots who almost single-handedly prevented Nazi invasion of England. Churchill encapsulated and immortalized the struggle when he uttered the words: "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few." Of Churchill, Edward R. Murrow said: "He mobilized the English language and sent it into battle." This speech, from the early and fraught months of Churchill’s wartime premiership, typifies the soaring and defiant oratory that sustained his countrymen and inspired the free world. It also demonstrates why, when Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, it was partly " for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values." The famous bibliographic reference Printing and the Mind of Man, which surveys the impact of the printed word on Western Civilization, singles out this edition of this speech. Printed deep red on light gray paper wraps and wire stitched, this speech pamphlet measures 9.75 inches x 6 inches and is 16 pages in length. Prices of this edition have soared in recent years. Given the fragility of the edition, most copies understandably suffer from significant wear, soiling, tanning, and spotting. Here is a good copy, complete and intact, but showing some customary age and wear. The gray wraps are complete with light overall soiling and spotting and minor wear to extremities. Both binding staples are intact and secure and the covers remain firmly attached, although the staples show rust which has stained the gutters immediately adjacent to the staples. The contents remain otherwise clean, evenly age-toned but with no previous ownership marks and no spotting. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A131.1, Woods A60(a), Printing and the Mind of Man (PMM) 424.