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Urban Planning

SCOTT, Giles Gilbert Large single sheet 560x760mm, thick stiff paper. Hand drawn architectural sketch of a large urban structure in pencil and red, grey and green watercolour. It comprises the plan, section and elevation of an unnamed design, with labels identifying scale and functional features, such as a slope for a pedestrian subway and direction of travel. Pencil autograph of Giles Gilbert Scott to lower right corner, dated April 1942. Several pencil drawings and sketches of chairs, some with red or green details, and a table to lower half of verso, as well as two architectural sketches of an arcade and entablature. Contemporary pencil mss. recording potential materials for furniture, scale and dimensions. Age yellowed with some marginal stains and fraying, pencil rulings and slight smudging still visible, old folds. The original architectural proposal for an elevated road system by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (1880-1960), complete with signature and date. The plan reveals an innovative intersection of two roads over two separate levels, complete with slip roads and a roundabout, paving the way for modern road systems. Scott created scaled plans for three structures around this time: at Bankside and Battersea in London, and the New Bodleian Library in Oxford. It corresponds most to his proposal for the Bankside development opposite St Paul's Cathedral, which also had a raised road and two intersections, but lacks the cooling tower. Scott belonged to a family of architects; his grandfather, George Gilbert Scott, designed the Albert memorial and St Pancras Station, while his father established the prominent architecture and design company Watts & Co. in 1874, where Scott became second chair after his father. 'A remarkable aspect of Scott's career was how he rose to the technological challenges of the 20th C, for which his training as a church architect could hardly have prepared him'. He designed both religious and secular structures, including Liverpool Cathedral, Battersea Power Station, Waterloo Bridge and the iconic Red Telephone Boxes still in use today. His style was an innovative blend of old a new, but he challenged the modernists by arguing against designs which lacked ornament due to their lack of functionality. He believed the 'contrast between plain surfaces and well-placed ornament can produce a charming effect'. The elevation of the walkway design conserves a sense of monumentality while referencing classical features in its use of pilasters to raise the structure above the ground. Despite his reservations about modernism more generally, Scott embraced the modern age unreservedly concerning transport and plans such as this reveal his acceptance of the dominance of the motorcar in the 1940s. The verso of the sheet bears a few furniture designs in different views, comprising several types of chair and on ovular table on an elaborate, curved stand. Scott has sketched the plan, elevation and section of the table, colouring the curved stand in red pencil and writing the proportions. Two different chairs have been drawn, both in their front and side view, one with a red seat and back, the other with a green seat and a crossed wooden back. In the lower right corner are the words 'English Beech', probably alluding to the type of material intended for the designs. There are also some unfinished architectural designs, including another chair, a sofa and the elevation of an arcade, with a more detailed sketch to its left. This sheet provides a glimpse into the mind of Scott, both in grand public architectural terms, but also on a smaller, more intimate scale. Catalogue of the Drawings Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects: Scott Family, by Geoffrey Fisher, Gavin Stamp & others, ed. Joanna Heseltine. Gregg International, 1981.
  • $4,346
  • $4,346
book (2)

The Anatomy of Melancholy.

BURTON, Robert. Folio pp. (x) 78 (vi) 723 (x) with two additional unnumbered ll. after 218. Roman letter, splendid engraved t-p by Christoffel le Blon (Johnson 35:1) depicting allegorical figures of solitude, jealousy, love, mania, superstition, hypochondria etc, with portraits of Democritus (in a garden) and the author, woodcut ornaments and initials. Fore edges of early ll. somewhat frayed (not affecting text or engraved title), some marginal yellowing, light browning in places. Contemp. autograph of William Feilder of Croundall on front bd. repeated, dated 1st August 1646 on fly, 'Charles Cranley' in same hand below. A good, clean copy in contemp. dark calf, rebacked, spine remounted. Fifth edition, 'corrected and augmented' in this case truly so as the author made corrections and additions to each edition published during his lifetime. The Anatomy is divided into three partitions, which are subdivided into sections, members, and subsections. Prefixed to each partition is an elaborate synopsis as a sort of index (there is a full index at the end), in humorous imitation of the practice common in books of scholastic divinity of the day. Part I deals with the causes and symptoms of melancholy, its species and kinds, part II with its cures, part III with the more frivolous kinds of melancholy and part IV with love melancholy and religious melancholy, with some moving sections on the 'Cure of Despair'. It was one of the first works in English to consider in depth human psychiatric problems, of which it shows considerable understanding, and was an immediate bestseller, encompassing all the charm, humour and learning of the age. As a work of literature it has something in common with More's 'Utopia', Rabelais and Montaigne and like these exercised a considerable influence on the thought of its own and later times. Dr Johnson said it was the only book that took him out of bed two hours earlier than he intended, 'Tristam Shandy' was penetrated with it, Charles Lamb modelled his style on it and Milton gathered hints from the verses prefixed to it. Although humorous, on every page is the impress of a deep and original mind. Burton never travelled abroad, and hardly outside Oxford, but he was fascinated by geography and cosmography and there are numerous references to foreign lands, especially the Americas. To live in the right part of the world for one's humours, Burton rightly held, was one of the best ways of avoiding melancholy. Burton was also a serious scholar and a great bibliophile; most of his collection is now in the Bodleian. Madan concludes that pp 1-346 was actually printed at Edinburgh but that the Scotish edition was suppressed at the insistence of the Oxford printers, who then agreed to incorporate the pirated pages in the present edn., though some 68 leaves, incorporating Burton's latest changes, were actually reprinted in London. STC 4162. Lowndes I 328. Pforzheimer I 119 'all early editions are of interest textually' and Printing and the Mind of Man 120 (1st edns). Madan I 204:3. Alden 632/24. Norman 381 (1st) 'the classic study on depression'. Osler 4625 'This edn. has the distinction - possibly unique for any book - of having been printed piecemeal in three cities.', 'A great medical treatise'. Heirs of Hippocrates 252 (2nd) 'Almost half of the thousand references to other authors are medical'.
  • $2,086
  • $2,086
Codex legum antiquarum

Codex legum antiquarum

LINDENBROG, Friedrich. FIRST EDITION. Folio. pp. [xxiv] 1570 [ii]. Roman letter. Engraved vignette incorporating the Imperial Eagle on title, printer's woodcut device at end, woodcut initials and headpieces. Some leaves a bit browned, a few rust spots. A very good, well-margined copy in contemporary Dutch vellum over boards, covers with central blindstamped arabesque, spine in 6 compartments, lacking ties. Acquisition note of Prof. L Van de Poll of Utrecht, 28 March 1692 in lower corner of title, 19th-c armorial bookplate of the Earls of Macclesfield at Shirburn castle inside upper cover, their armorial blindstamp to first two leaves. First edition of Lindenbrog's substantial juridical work. Lindenbrog (1573-1648) studied under Scaliger at Leiden. He travelled widely in England, France, and Italy, before returning to his native country to practice law. He was a prolific author and successful lawyer, and later also a canon of Hamburg Cathedral. The present work is a compendium of legal history focussing on the Holy Roman Empire and combines such sources as St. Ansegisus and Benedictus Levita. It covers diverse aspects of the law, including: the respective rights of men and women, marriage, inheritance, legitimate and bastard offspring, criminal law including homicide, laws affecting priests, bishops and the administration of the sacraments, Jews and conversion as well as more everyday provisions touching vicious dogs, animals, butchers and fishmongers, places of worship and court procedure. It incorporates the laws of the Visigoths and of Naples and several German principalities; and the edicts of Theodoric. An interesting compendium in a nice contemporary binding. BM Ger. L751; Brunet III, p. 1082 "Ouvrage estimé, et dont les exemplaires se trouvent difficilement"; Graesse IV, 213; Wellcome 3808; not in Adams.
  • $1,872
  • $1,872
book (2)

The English Physician Enlarged

CULPEPER, Nicholas A work of 'enormous scale' on herbal medicine by physician and astrologer Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1654, thought to be his 'magnum opus'. Born in London, he went to Cambridge to learn Latin and Greek, enabling his study of the ancient medical writers, which Cupleper refers to throughout the work. He was later apprenticed to an apothecary at St Helen's in Bishopsgate, continuing his medical practices even while fighting in the civil war, which helped him to develop a good reputation amongst patients in East London. The text lists 396 English Herbs and informs the reader of the various benefits of each plant. He suggests using garlic to treat rabid dog bites, treating worms, plague sores and ulcers. Culpeper goes beyond his medical predecessors by also cautioning the potential dangers of these plants. Continuing with the example of garlic, he warns of its ability to aggravate 'Chollerick men' and 'oppressed by Melancholly'. The compendium aimed to detail locally available herbal remedies which were accessible to the reader instead of the exotic and inaccessible plants often found in previous medical literature. Physical descriptions of certain plants, location and sprouting season are also included, making the text far more practical to its users. It was extremely successful due to Culpeper's astrological approach, which flourished over the Galenic approach at the time, as well as his straightforward and honest style, bearing 15 editions by 1700. Following the extensive horticultural survey, Culpeper provides directions for gathering different types of plant and making the necessary compounds, from the more usual distilled waters, syrups, juleps, oils, and ointments to the more exotic electuaries, lohochs, and troches. A guide to mixing medicines follows, dependent on the type of disease and area of the body afflicted. The reader is directed to the table of diseases, which lists the various remedies available in the text. The book concludes with a record of correspondence between a woman from Bedfordshire and Culpeper, whereby she seeks help for her neighbour's wife and presents a diagnosis based upon astrology, enclosing a scheme to support her medical conclusion. It is a fascinating testament to the symbiotic treatment of magic and medicine. 8vo. pp. [24] 173, 284-398 [16]. Roman and Italic letter. T-p slightly stained, within floral typographical double border, printed vertical title to C8, astrological diagram to Aa8, ornaments throughout. List of works by Culpeper, Mrs. Culpeper's testimony and reader's note, alphabetical table of plants, list of methods and authors used. Table of diseases at end of work. Light age browning, edges trimmed, C17th autograph of 'Katherine Ward' to ffep. A good copy in modern speckled calf over marbled boards. ESTC: R236837; Lowndes: Vol II 576 Henrey: 61; Pritzel: 2079; Heirs of Hippocrates: 322.
  • $2,340
  • $2,340
book (2)

Relation de ce qui s est passe en la Nouvelle France, en l anee 1635.

LE JEUNE, Paul; BREBEUF, Jean de; PERRAULT, Julien. FIRST EDITION. 8vo. pp. [2] 246 [2]. Roman letter, little italic. Printer's device with storks to t-p, woodcut ornaments and historiated initials. 3 separate reports of 17th C French Jesuits in Canada on poor quality, age browned paper, some foxing, edges trimmed. Ink stains to ffep and first three leaves from contemporary signature either side of printer's device, small marginal holes to first two. Contemporary vellum, title gilt to spine on morocco label, red sprinkled edges. A unique source for the early Jesuit missions to New France, an area which at its peak stretched from the Gulf of St Lawrence to Louisiana. 'This Relation contains three reports: the first by Le Jeune, dated 28th Aug. 1635, ending on p.112; the second from the Huron country by Brebeuf, pp.113-206; and the third from Cape Breton, by Perrault, pp.207-219'. It paints a picture of the French colonisation of New France, North America and Cape Breton, relations with the inhabitants, and local First Nation culture. The Society of Jesus was granted a monopoly over the proselytizing of local inhabitants and produced yearly written reports detailing their progress until 1672, which were sent to Quebec to be checked and subsequently published in Paris. 'The initial method of Jesuit missionaries like Paul Le Jeune was often to erect small, isolated, sedentary villages, or reductions, wherein the Montagnais would be instructed in the ways of agriculture, animal husbandry, and Christianity'. Le Jeune (1591-1664), writes the first and longest account of the present works dated August 28th 1635. He had ample experience with the indigenous people, having wintered with the Montagnais, the most southerly group of the Innu tribe, between 1633-34. He discusses Jesuit attempts to 'civilise' and convert the so called 'Sauvages', describes the effects of disease on the settlers and the locals, and lists some of the perceived advantages of colonisation, such as the banishment of famine and expansion of the French empire. At the end of the letter, he writes in addition to his own name a list of Jesuits who will have been living with him in Quebec. In the following two letters, Jean de Brebeuf (1593-1649) details his experiences with the Huron tribe in the Northeastern Woodlands of North America and Julien Perrault (1602-1647) discusses the Mi'kmaq culture in Nova Scotia. All three authors describe the situation, climate, resources and local people, their reports highly anticipated in the French homeland. The tumultuous relationship with the locals is highlighted in the capture and murder of Brebeuf by the Haudenosanee in 1649. Appended is a short reflection of the Jesuits in New France, which contains a number of more general remarks as to the Jesuits' experiences with the climate, the locals and their relationship with God. A remarkable insight into early first-hand impressions of the northern parts of the American continent and 17th C travel to America. USTC: 6034034; Church III: 434; 'The Lords of Our Lands: 17th C Jesuit Missions in Canada and Native Perspectives from First Encounters to Conversion' K. Exarhakos p.47'; Sabin: 39950; Alden: 636/40; not in Cox, LeClerck or Lande.
  • $32,931
  • $32,931
Americae pars quinta.

Americae pars quinta.

BENZONI, Girolamo; BRY, Theodor De. FIRST EDITION. Folio, pp [2] 72, ff. [1] 22. Two parts in one, separate t-p to each. Double page map of New Spain, lightly trimmed at foot, strengthened, 22 engravings by De Bry of European treatment of native Americans, in good impression. Plate 13 overlaps with text. T-ps within elaborate woodcut borders depicting the conquest of the New World, historiated initials, and ornaments throughout, 'Hia' engraved above fifth line of title. Pretty later hand colouring to first t-p, portrait of Christopher Columbus and first historiated large initial. Age browning, particularly to final leaves, poor paper, a few edges frayed. A good, well-margined copy in modern green quarter-calf over plain boards, a.e.g. The second or 'counterfeit' issue of the first edition of the fifth part of Theodore De Bry's 8-part series on the discovery of America, complete with map of New Spain, a territory covering the southwestern portion of North America, and extensive engravings based on eyewitness accounts, accompanying text from Girolamo Benzoni's second book of his 'Novae Novi Orbis Historiae'. We only know of 'two editions of the fifth part of the Great Voyages'; the second can be identified by the 'Hia' abbreviation on the t-p, by the 13 lines on the first page of the preface, instead of 11 and various typographical differences, including a smaller font the notes being in italics and the plates being numbered with Arabic figures instead of Roman numerals. It contains a three-part narrative spanning the years 1541-56, the work provided detailed descriptions of the native landscape, alongside accounts of Spanish exploits, including their methods of conquest and government. The present argumentum reveals the second book's focus on Spanish ventures into the American continent and the maltreatment of the local people, ultimately contributing to the propagation of the Spanish Black Legend. The 21 chapters of text discuss the enslavement of the local population, import of slaves from Africa, encounters with pirates, local customs including the preparation of food, sleeping habits, dances and architecture, and responses to Spanish occupation. This is followed by a series of spirited engravings by De Bry, accompanied by descriptions, each one corresponding to a chapter of the text. More often than not, the Spanish conquistadors are presented committing acts of gross violence against the defenceless natives. The scenes are graphic in their portrayal, placing the harsh criticism of the Spanish into more visual terms. While De Bry never personally left Europe, Benzoni set out for the Americas in 1541, at the age of 22, acquiring a great deal of wealth on his trip, before losing it in a shipwreck and waiting several months in Cuba for a ship back to Spain, arriving in Sanlucar in September 1556. During his travels, he visited the West Indies, Venezuela, Hispaniola, Colombia, Central America and Peru. No trace of him survives beyond his dedication for the 1572 edition of the text. USTC: 611196; Adams: B 2995; BM Catalogue (Dutch): p160; Sabin: Vol V p.38; Alden: 595/8; not in Cox
  • $15,148
  • $15,148
book (2)

A treatise of fruit trees

AUSTEN, Ralph FIRST EDITION. Small 4to. Pp. [26] 29, 32-97 [13], 32, 35-41 [1], complete. Roman and Italic letter. Two parts in one, separate t-p to each. First with engraved frontispiece bird's eye view of a walled orchard, surrounded by tools, by John Goddard, encircled by a verse from the Song of Solomon. Second title within typographical border, historiated first initial to each part, ornaments throughout. 19th C marginalia in pencil and earlier in ink, including names 'Thomas Clayton' and 'Oliver Cromwell'. Bookplate of Sir Robert Adair (1811-1886) to front pastedown. Occasional marginal ink stains and lightly age yellowed. A good copy in 19th C green half calf over marbled boards, title and date gilt to spine, a.e.r. An interesting work by a self-taught gardener, Ralph Austen (c.1612-1676), who 'devoted most of his time to gardening and the raising of fruit trees'. He was admitted to the public library in Oxford, where he sought materials for his book in 1652, publishing the following year. His method can be described as 'innovative, experimental, and sceptical of the authority of theorists'. The book contains two distinct parts, the first focusing on the practical aspects of gardening, such as preparation of the ground, sewing of seeds, protection from pests, grafting, and inoculation. It then conducts a survey of different trees, their fruits and optimal use in food, drink and medicine: walnuts are said to help digestion, mulberry juice stirs up one's appetite and sharp cherries are good for the blood and kidneys. In the second part, Austen takes a more spiritual approach, explaining in his preface that 'the world is a great library, and fruit trees are some of the books, wherein we may read and see plainly the attributes of God'. Referring amply to scripture, Austen uses the gardening of fruit trees as an extended metaphor for God's power and influence in the world, explaining the state of the world in terms of God as a gardener. He makes observations from nature and ties each point to a religious parallel. The frontispiece by John Goddard, an early English engraver, is emblematic of this point. The verse refers to the enclosed Garden of the Song of Solomon, but the image also shows gardening tools and a planting plan. The work brings together husbandry and religion in a unique way. ESTC: R12161, Pritzel: 357; Macdonald: p.203; Henrey: 4, 5.
  • $2,569
  • $2,569
book (2)

Augustarum imagines []

VICO, Enea FIRST EDITION THUS. 4to. [20] 192 [4]. Roman letter, t-p with Minerva holding owl and spear, and Saturn with child and scythe, on pedestals and sphinxes, set within ornamented architectural frame, historiated initials throughout. Engraved profile bust of Julius Caesar flanked by Venus and Mars, 63 numbered engraved plates in excellent impression of female members of the Roman imperial family set within architecture, and coins issued within their lifetimes, 38 engraved medals and coins in text. Cancel engravings pasted on G3 and G4 to correct transposition during printing, portraits of Cossutia and Servilia blank. Sightly age yellowed, t-p and prelims a bit browned, some old marginal water stains or ink splashes. A good, well-margined copy in 18th C French cat's paw marbled calf, repair to lower outer corner of upper cover, lower corners worn, spine gilt. Bookplate of renowned antiquarian Alain Moatti (1923-2023), a.e.r. The first edition of Natale Conti's (1520-1582) Latin translation of Vico's 1557 Le imagini delle donne avgvste, dedicated by the author (1523-67) to cardinal Otto Truchsess von Waldburg (1543-73). Vico was an Italian engraver from Parma, who specialised in grotesque engravings based on antique paintings. Here he breaks away to use coins as his source material, depicting the key female figures of the Roman imperial court, spanning the Julio-Claudian and Flavian dynasties, from the late 1st C BC until 96AD. Each portrait comprises a roundel, set in an elaborate classical architectural scene, bearing the side profile of each woman, accompanied by her title. Their hair is dressed in the contemporary fashion, following authentic Roman numismatic material, though the engravings are elevated to a higher degree of detail, as seen in the ornate plaits, thanks to the greater precision allowed by the medium as compared to coinage. A few roundels are blank, likely due to the lack of numismatic source material, including Cossutia, the first wife of Caesar, Servilia, the first wife of Augustus, and the daughters of Agrippa and Drusus, both named Julia. In addition to the portraits, there are also some engravings of other coins which were minted during their lifetime. Agrippina the Younger's apparition on the obverse of two coins, together with her son Nero, is particularly striking. Each engraving is accompanied by a corresponding biography, both by executed by Vico. The biographies differ largely in length, depending on the attention given to each individual in the ancient sources. At the beginning of the book, Vico lists his all his sources, looking to historians, poets, playwrights, satirists, and philosophers to retrieve biographical information. Livia, Messalina and both Agrippina the Elder and Younger are treated with particular attention. Furthermore, the women are categorised in various ways, for instance, Vico provides a list of those who achieved posthumous divine honours, equalling and sometimes surpassing the men who surrounded them. The translator, Conti, was an Italian mythographer, poet, humanist and historian, whose interest in the classical world is evident in his major work, the Mythologiae. Though born in Milan, he described himself as Venetian as he spent his life working in the city. USTC: 863206; Brunet V: 1175; Renouard: 176:18; Mortimer: II 533; Adams: V 634.
  • $4,281
  • $4,281
book (2)

Evangelicae Historiae Imagines []

NATALIS, Hieronymus Folio. Text engraved in italics. Frontispiece plus 153 numbered engraved plates, in excellent impression, of scenes from the Evangelists, drawn by B. Passer and Martin de Vos, engraved by Anton, Johann and Hieronymus Wierx, C. de Mallerij and Johann Collaert. Engravings centred on each leaf, with title and label, 1 blank between pl. 6 and 7, and 3 final blanks. Autograph of 'Robert Browne' 1707 and 'Mary Brown' to recto of ffep, early manuscript index to recto of first blank and ms. ex dono 1744 to verso, from Miss Browne of Barnet to Reverend Joseph Paire. Light age yellowing, a few marginal stains and a bit of darkening at edges. A crisp, well-margined copy in contemporary natural morocco, richly stamped and gilt foliate border, neatly rebacked, original spine remounted, boards a little scuffed, repair to a couple of corners, a.e.g. A beautiful and pioneering series of large, detailed engravings, amalgamated by the Jesuit Jerome Natalis, faithfully representing the life, death and resurrection of Christ as narrated in the gospels. A close follower of Ignatius of Loyola, he considered imagination to be a central part of meditative prayer and believed that images could serve as a stimulus for deeper religious contemplation. The engravings are by some of the most talented Flemish engravers, such as the Wierix family at Antwerp, reputed for their talents in printmaking, specialising in religious subject matter, Karel van Mallery (1571-1635?), a well-known engraver of religious subjects and portraits, and Jan Collaert the Elder (c.1525-1580), who helped to establish Antwerp as a leading centre of printmaking in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. They follow the drawings of Italian painter Bernardo Passari, whose work survives only as drawings used to illustrate books at Antwerp and Rome, and some by Maarten de Vos, best known for his history and allegorical paintings, as well as portraiture. The engravings are arranged according to their order in de Loyola's 'Exercitia Spiritualis' and were likely intended to be used with it as part of the devotional exercise. Nevertheless they demonstrate typical Renaissance artistic interest in perspective, anatomy, and humanism. The artists skilfully manipulate light and dark to highlight the key moment in the narrative, allowing for complex yet legible compositions. Multiple scenes unfold within a single frame, but are separated by elements of landscape or architecture, allowing for entire chapters of the Gospels to be captured in one image. Alphabetical labels are also present and correspond to a legend of short Latin captions. These help to guide the viewer through the continuous narrative composition. At the top of each engraving is a title identifying the main action of the scene, any corresponding passages from the Gospels and the date ascribed to the event by the Church. The index at the front summarises the corresponding scripture in table form.
  • $5,203
  • $5,203
book (2)

Pontificale Romanum

PONTIFICAL, Use of Rome Folio. ff. [4] 243, lacking final blank. Double column red and black Gothic letter, little roman to final leaf, typeset music, printed marginalia. Title woodcut of Pope Pius V enthroned with six bishops above legend 'EGO SUM PASTOR OVIUM', Giunta lily device in red to below, repeated on final leaf. Mss to t-p recording provenance from the monastery of Santa Marta in Florence and entry of archpriest Simon Fortuna. Full page woodcut of the Crucifixion, 162 smaller illustrations of ceremonies such as the consecration of a church or altar, the blessing of cemeteries, the consecration of prelates and coronations, historiated initials throughout. Two small woodblocks, one of the Entry into Jerusalem, woodcut Greek and Latin alphabets to O5. Bookplate of Whig MP George Venables-Vernon, 2nd Baron Vernon (1735-1813) and armorial blue leather bookplate to front pastedown. A very little, light water staining mainly to first ll. lower margin. An extremely good, clean, large copy in double panelled early morocco, boards just a bit scuffed, later title and date gilt to spine, small repair to foot and to 3 corners, edges gauffered in lozenge pattern, a.e.g. A crisp, beautifully illustrated early edition of a lovely pontifical from the papacy of Pope Pius V (1504-1572), known for his austere piety. It is a 'liturgical book which contains the rites for the performance of episcopal functions (e.g. the conferring of the Holy Orders), with the exception of Mass and Divine Office. It is practically an episcopal ritual, containing formularies and rubrics which existed in the Old Sacramentaries and 'Ordines Romani', and were gradually collected together to form one volume for the greater convenience' (Catholic encyclopaedia XII p.233). This edition reproduces the 1561 version page for page and is an example of the standard version of the text, first published under Clement VII (1478-1534) with the title Pontificale Romanum, intended for the use of the entire Roman Rite. The book is divided into two parts: the first concerns the blessing of people, with appropriate readings, prayers and songs, together with miniature woodcuts illustrating the high point of the ceremony. The pontiff is usually standing or sitting opposite an individual, often kneeling, or a small group, his hands are brought together in prayer, gesture for the appropriate blessing, or placing a headpiece or crown on the recipient, for instance in the act of coronation. The second part concerns the consecration of churches. The page with the Greek and Latin alphabets is paired with directions for the ceremony of marking the alphabets on the floor, an important part of the consecration rite. The inscription on the title page indicates that it belonged to a member of the Monastery of Santa Marta, situated on the Montughi Hill in Northern Florence. The monastery dates back to the 14th C and is closely connected with the wealthy Davanzati merchant family, as well as the Acciaioli, one of the leading noble Florentine families and founders of one of its banks. USTC:820684, Mortimer (Italy) II: 383, Catholic Encyclopedia XII.
  • $4,940
  • $4,940
book (2)

Commentaires de Jean Calvin sur la concordance ou Harmonie, compose des trois Evangelistes []

CALVIN, Jean Folio. pp. [16] 1-204, 209-850 [2]; 369 [21]. Roman letter, little italic. Large woodcut printer's device to t-p of plumed skull atop a scorpion, set within an architectural frame, t-p slightly dusty. Address to the nobles of Frankfurt, alphabetical table of contents and passages within the work and another on the bible more generally. Very slight age browning, occasional marks, some later leaves with light water stain to lower margin, paper flaw to lower outer corner of hh2 and *2 not affecting text. Mss chapter numbers to upper outer corners of N1. ff. A good, well-margined copy in contemporary mottled calf with gilt rules, slightly scuffed, corners worn. Spine richly gilt in floral geometric pattern and bands raised, edges sprinkled red. The second edition of theologian and Protestant reformer John Calvin's (1509-1564) commentary on the gospels and acts of the apostles. He began his career as lay administrator to a local bishop, before pursuing a career in law, studying at Orleans and Bourges. Here, he was introduced to the doctrine of humanism, with particular influence from Erasmus and Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples, which promoted the restructuring of the church and society based on classical and Christian antiquity. It also encouraged the study of the Bible in Greek, Hebrew and Latin. Calvin's work hugely influenced Protestantism in Europe and North America, leading to the creation of multiple Calvinist churches, particularly in the USA; he is 'the most perseveringly followed by his disciples of any Western writer on theology', his other work on the 'Institutes of the Christian religion' becoming a handbook of Protestant belief. Calvin produced a number of in-depth biblical commentaries, covering most of the Old and almost the entire New Testament, except for the Revelation to John. In this edition, he addresses the gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke in tandem, but dedicates entire commentaries to John and the Acts of the Apostles. Lines of Scripture are quoted in chunks, in a larger font, followed by references and detailed comments on various phrases in each text. These include explanations, clarifications, and personal opinions with the aim of identifying examples of Harmony within the passages. 'His manner is classical; he reasons on system, he has little humour; instead of striking with a cudgel he uses the weapon of a deadly logic and persuades by a teacher's authority, not by a demagogue's calling of names.'
  • $6,520
  • $6,520
Petri Mocenici Imperatoris gestorum

Petri Mocenici Imperatoris gestorum

CIPPICO, Coriolano. FIRST EDITION. 4to. a-g5, 54 unnumbered leaves. Roman letter, fine woodcut initials throughout, striking border with vine motif to a2. Some contemporary marginalia of place names in the Aegean, later inscription of Joseph Busera of Fabriano to recto of ffep. and dedicatory inscription to verso 'Bibliothecae Cathidialis Fabrianensis ex Dono Francis Prioris Busera A.D. 1766'. Pencil note of George Dunn sale at Sotheby's dated 23rd November 1917 to ffep. Marbled pastedowns with book plates of George Dunn, C. S. Ascherson and George Abrams. Light age yellowing, very light staining. A very good, very clean, well margined copy in 17th C vellum, spine wormed, a.e.r. In folding box. A handsome, crisp, large copy of a first-hand account of an early Venetian military expedition against the Ottomans, following the disastrous defeat at Negroponte on the island of Euboea, in a rivalry that would last until the 18th C, helping shape the religious and political landscape of modern Europe. The fall of the Byzantine Empire and Mehmet II's capture of Constantinople in 1453 initiated frequent clashes between East and the West, as they fought for supremacy over the Mediterranean. Cippico was a Dalmatian nobleman, humanist, and military commander from Trogir, in Dalmatia, who accompanied the future doge Pietro Mocenigo on campaign while he served as a galley captain between 1470-1474. He records the fleet's exploits in three books, beginning with the Venetian council's decision to face the Turks, following the deposition of Nicolo Canal, describing their travels through the Aegean with Thucydidean flair. The marginalia reveal particular interest in the various settlements mentioned, including Chius, Pergamus, Knidos, Samos, Atalia and Smyrna, all of which were highly significant in Antiquity and remained of great contemporary strategic importance. The author notes the Classical significance of these sites and highlights some of ancient ruins at Delos, recording the Greek inscription on a colossal statue, and marvelling at a monument to Homer in Smyrna. In highlighting the strong Western heritage of these sites, Cippico presents a more justified causa belli. Then next two books focus on Venetian attacks along the Turkish coastline, including the suppression of a political coup in Cyprus using the entire Venetian fleet, victory at the siege of Scutari, which had been surrounded by Ottoman troops in 1474, as well as the rescue of Catarina Corner, Queen of Cyprus. Cippico reveals the fleet's movements, specific naval manoeuvres and battle detail, and correspondence between Venetian and Ottoman forces. A detailed glimpse into Venetian war machine and the most serene republic's foreign policy in the late 15th C. USTC: 996107; Goff: C378; Essling 254; BMC: V 244; Blackmer Cat. p.235.
  • $52,031
  • $52,031
book (2)

Decisio consiliaris super dubio producto de indulgentiis.

ANTONINUS FLORENTINUS 4to. ff. [20]. Gothic letter, 1:110G. Initials and paragraph marks supplied in red ink (now oxidised into silver). First and last verso dusty, long clean tear (repaired) to lower edge of fol.6, touching couple of letters, faint small water stain to upper margin of last few ll., tiny scattered worm holes at lower blank gutter repaired. A very good, wide-margined copy in modern limp vellum. The fourth incunable edition of this important theological work concerning indulgences. Antoninus Florentinus (1389-1459) was Dominican Archbishop of Florence and author of influential works on moral theology. He advised the Pope during the Council of Florence (1431-49). Decisio is devoted to the pardon, in the form of indulgences, enacted for the fourth Jubilee of Indulgences, in 1450, known as the Golden Year . Princes from all over Europe and tens of thousands of pilgrims visited Rome in that year. Pope Nicholas V gave his solemn blessing every Sunday, and when the crisis [caused by the huge crowds] became more pressing, he proclaimed an edict that pilgrims would gain the Jubilee Indulgence by making a good confession and visiting the Basilicas in just three days (O Gorman, p.35). It was one of the most successful medieval Jubilees, and Nicholas V revived the indulgence in 1455 for those who had not been able to visit Rome in 1450. Decisio examines in detail all the technicalities of indulgencies: e.g, whether an indulgence enacted by a living person may apply to a dead person and remove them from Purgatory (a recently codified concept) or from mortal sin; what is the nature of an indulgence and its theological principles; the equivalence between days of indulgence and days of penitence; whether an indulgence may expire after the death of the religious who granted it; regulations concerning visits to specific places to obtain an indulgence; plenary indulgence earned fighting against the Ottomans; who can grant an indulgence and how to interpret the instructions provided in papal bulls in this matter; types of remission of sins, etc. The final few ll. focus on the 1450 Jubilee indulgence, which followed Clement VI s regulations. An interesting and curious work of theology and ecclesiastical policy. Only LC copy recorded in the US. Goff A864; GW 2180; ISTC ia00864000. E. O Gorman, Towards the Great Millennium Jubilee (1998).
  • $6,257
  • $6,257
book (2)

Tractatus de censuris ecclesiasticis.

ANTONINUS FLORENTINUS 8vo (146 x 97mm). ff. [124], last three ruled else blank, traces of pins. Gothic letter, approx. 31 lines per full page, double column. Rubricated chapter headings, initials and paragraph marks. Very occasional little marginal spot or finger mark. An excellent copy, on very high-quality, ultra-fine vellum, in C19 French morocco, covers gilt to a C16 style, marbled eps, vellum flyleaves, marbled edges. Couple of c.1500 ms annotations. Exceptionally neat and clean ms of this major canon law treatise dealing especially with excommunication, in an unusual pocket-size format for easy carrying and consultation. Antoninus Florentinus (1389-1459) was a Dominican writer of moral theology. He advised the Pope during the Council of Florence (1431-49) and became an important authority in the C15 and C16, especially after his works reached the press. He was appointed Archbishop of Florence in 1446, which sets a terminus post quem for this ms, where he is thus identified. The handwriting style, more influenced by the Gothic than humanist script, indicates a date of composition potentially within the author s lifetime and before the first printed ed. of c.1475, from which this ms text differs in some details. Part of Antoninus huge Summa Theologica , De censuris ecclesiasticis discusses excommunication beginning with its meaning the exclusion from communion and types: major (or anathema), minor and a deo , with a focus on clerics, as well as the difference between suspension and interdict. Each section is devoted to specific cases which may warrant excommunication, e.g., heresy, theft from and the desecration of holy places, bigamy, inquisitors who end up believing heretics, those who use violence to obtain an absolution, or divulge confidential issues concerning the election of a pope, those who enter monasteries unauthorised, or marry a spouse within the kinship degrees prohibited by canon law, and dozens of others. Especially interesting are the sections on the forgery of apostolic letters or the revision of papal documents without authorisation. The treatise also considers the cases where absolution may be granted by the pope alone. This little ms was still being used for reference c.1500, when a canonist added a couple of glosses to the first section, on those who assault or attack ecclesiastical figures. A most handsome, unusually fine and clean C15 legal ms. Provenance: Sotheby s, Western Manuscripts and Miniatures, 1987, lot 81 (Buyer: Thomas).
  • $38,859
  • $38,859
book (2)

BIBLE. Biblij Czeská.

Folio. 2 parts in 1 vol., ff. [8] + [10], 637, [18], A6 misbound, lacking 11 ll., i.e., *6 (woodcut title and prelims), 3C5, 3E6, V8, Z1 and *10; first 7 ll., including trimmed woodcut title and dedicatee's arms, from the very rare 1554 first ed. of Kozmograffia Czeska (the Czech translation of Münster's Cosmographia). Gothic letter, double column. Large woodcut border with scenes from the Old and New Testament and decorated border to A1; large woodcut arms of Prague and full-page woodcut with six scenes from the Creation, within roundels, to A6; 143 ¼-page or smaller woodcuts with Scriptural scenes; woodcut of St Matthew to second B1. Some browning (poor paper), marginal finger-soiling or ink marks, first 3 ll. trimmed with some loss and mounted, handful of initial ll. restored with Japanese paper, some margins trimmed, touching a few running titles or sidenotes, old repairs to fore-edge or (less frequently) to text in places, affecting a few words, occasional small light marginal water stains, second V2-3 supplied from a different ed. A well-preserved copy in later Czech calf, one brass clasp, remains of the other, single blind ruled with dentelles, upper cover: 8-pointed star design to central panel, blind-stamped IHS Jesuit device to centre; lower cover: blind-tooled double cross with IHS Jesuit devices, raised bands, blind-tooled fleurons to compartments, title and 1833 blind-stamped to spine, joints cracked but holding, extremities a bit worn, marbled eps, flyleaves with watermark from Czech papermill at Ledeč Occasional C17 or C18 ms notes in Czech and Latin, underlining in red crayon. A monumental, beautifully illustrated bible in Czech, in a peculiar and eerie Czech Jesuit binding a deluxe book, all eds scarce and very rarely found complete. This is the fourth edition by the Melantrich press, in the Utraquist version based on the Latin Vulgate, with the addition of the third book of the Maccabees. This ed. includes new woodcut illustrations by the German Florian Abel and the Italian Francesco Terzio. 'Thanks to Melantrich, the Czech Bible reached wide circles of people, and it was read in families during many generations' (Pecirkova, p.1177). Educated at Wittenberg and a humanist scholar, Melantrich (1511-80) represents 'the apex of C16 printing in the Czech Lands. [] when the Kingdom of Bohemia lost sovereignty in 1620, Melantrich's eds became a treasury of the Czech language and culture for centuries to come' (Ryznar, p.15). The superb design of the woodcuts - including the six days of creation - was inspired by the woodcuts of the Benátská Bible, the first Czech bible printed abroad, in Venice in 1506. Like the Benátská and the Severinova bibles that followed, all inspired by the C15 Venetian Malermi Bible, Melantrich's bible beautified the text with full-page and smaller woodcuts ('Česká kniha', 161-64). The style and hatching of the latter, traditionally influenced by the work of Dürer and Schön, show here the influence of Terzio's Italian training. 'The translation or modification of older versions was partially prepared by Sixt of Ottersdorf, a Reformation humanist and a well-known historian who prepared the translation of the Third Book of Maccabees [] and also took part in modification of the New Testament. The Melantrich Bibles represent the official and most widespread Czech translation of the second half of the C16' (Dittmann). The text of the Melantrich bible was produced across the years of the Council of Trent, and the printer did not have the means to revise the whole text according to the new regulations. This became a problem when Jesuit presence became stronger in Bohemia from the 1550s; the Czech Jesuit Vaclav Sturm called it the 'zmelantrichovani' ('entangled'), instead of 'Melantrichova', bible (Kyas, p.172).
  • $10,487
  • $10,487
book (2)

The Workes of that famous chirurgion Ambrose Parey

PARÉ, Ambroise FIRST EDITION THUS. Folio. pp. [14], 487, [1], 553-1083, [1], 1093-1173, [23]. Roman letter, little italic. Engraved t-p by Thomas Cecill with portrait of Ambrose Paré, scenes of surgeons at work, a skeleton and skinned man, surgical instruments and mythological creatures, minor repair to lower outer margin. Thomas Johnson's dedication to Edward Herbert and Paré's to Henry III of France, reader's note, preface and contents page, index at end. Medical woodcuts throughout of human anatomy, surgical instruments, animals and monsters, in good impression. Historiated initials and ornaments. A few marginal restorations and repaired tears, faint damp staining to foredge of first few signatures, small rust hole to 2D2, minorly affecting text. Bookplates of Le Roy Crummer (1871-1934) and Howard L. Updegraff to pastedown, embossed stamp of Brian Davies to ffep and ink stamp of Los Angeles County Medical Association in lower margin of t-p. A fine copy in later half-calf over marbled boards, rebacked, spine gilt and lemon edges. A crisp copy of the first English version of 16th C barber-surgeon and innovator Ambroise Paré's complete works, including translator Thomas Johnson's rarely surviving address to the reader. Comprising a total of 29 books, Paré wrote on a range of medical subjects, including anatomy, treatment of wounds, diseases, poisons, tumours, fractures, and childbirth. He notably also writes about monsters and prodigies, the embalming of the dead and distillation. 'Probably his best-known innovations were his discarding the use of boiling oil in gunshot wounds and the reintroduction of the simple ligature instead of red-hot cautery after amputation. He invented many surgical instruments and was especially adept at devising ingenious artificial limbs' (Heirs of Hippocrates, 163). As a result of his rising fame, he was named chirurgien ordinaire to King Henry II and continued to serve the French monarchy through the reigns of Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III, who appointed him premier chirurgien in 1562. The volume's illustrations are of very high quality, illustrating a range of surgical instruments, some of which Paré designed himself, such as the 'crow's beak', a tool used to tie ligatures on amputated limbs or open wounds, a precursor to the modern haemostat, and prosthetic limbs. Further included are vivid scenes of medical procedures, such as the removal of bladder stones and various dislocation procedures, and detailed anatomical illustrations due to Paré's frequent dissections. Images of mythological monsters are classed together with malformed and conjoined births, accompanied by recorded accounts of each example. While the collection is groundbreaking and very comprehensive, Paré's reliance on the popular theory of the four humours antiquates much of his work. Book 24, 'Concerning the Generation of Man' discusses early gynaecology and obstetrics, focussing on the female reproductive system, signs of conception and labour, birthing positions, and aftercare of the mother and child. His 'revival of the podalic version repopularised the procedure, which bad been described by Soranus of Ephesus', whereby the fetus is turned in the womb so that it emerges feet first. Once a child is born, Paré recommends that it is bathed in warm water and wine, before being anointed with oil. He also comments on the menstrual cycle, abortion, premature births and causes of infertility. This volume was owned by Le Roy Crummer, an expert on heart disease in the late 19th and earl 20th C, who was also a member of the Royal Society of Medicine and Professor of History of Medicine at the University of California. Subsequent owners have included the Californian reconstructive surgeon Howard L. Updegraff, who was based in Hollywood. ESTC: S115392; Wellcome: I 4825; Russell: 646; Cushing: P97; Waller: 7177; Doe: 51; Morton: 6140.
  • $36,276
  • $36,276
book (2)

The first part of Simboleography

WEST, William 4to, [8] A-2Q8, 2R6. Roman and Black letter, some Italic. Mainly English text, some Latin. Contemporary mss. on eps, by multiple hands, recording biographical dates and details of contemporary users such as admission to the Inns of Court, autograph of Martin Bishop 1626 Dedication to Edmund Anderson, alphabetical table of contents. Occasional woodcut floriated or historiated initials and ornaments. A bit age yellowed, t-p slightly dusty, small repair to one blank corner, occasional marginal thumbing. Small rust hole to D8, minorly affecting a couple of letters on verso. A good copy in contemporary calf, scratched, upper joint cracked but sound, edges worn, later red morocco label. Revised and expanded edition of this important and highly esteemed legal treatise on forms of fines which was used as a standard text in English legal practice. In encyclopaedic style, it contains explanations of legal terms followed by pro-forma precedents in both English and Latin, applicable to a range of agreements, procedures, and non-litigious situations. This made it a valuable tool for any aspiring or practising lawyer, providing specific wordings for them to copy into their own drafts. It was dedicated to Sir Edmund Anderson (1530-1605), Chief Justice of Common pleas under Elizabeth I, who acted as judge in the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots. Initially published in 1590, West's Simbolaeography, due to popular demand, was reworked, and split into two books, with the aim of making it easier to use. West was a renowned legal writer and lawyer, admitted a student at the Inner Temple in 1568. The notes on the fly record dates of admission to the Inns of court by owners of the book, for instance 'Tho: Lo:', who was admitted to the Inner Temple in 1599 and Antony Banebrigge to Clifford's Inn, as well as some more general notes 'And 1576 Easter day fell on the 22 of April'. The first 57 sections define legal terms and explains Symbolaeography as 'an art or cunning rightly to forme and make written Instruments', as well as some of the basics processes and conventions of drafting legal agreements. Latin terms are printed in the margin, referring to the title of each process, such as emptio and venditio, terms for buying and selling, pigus, the general term for a pledge, and hypotheca, which refers to a pledge of debt. The rest of the text includes precedents pertaining to covenants, bills and obligations, recognisances, statutes, feoffments, uses, grants, mortgages, trusts, licenses, wills and testaments. ESTC: S123386; STC: 25270; Winfield: p.144; not in Bridgman.
  • $3,166
  • $3,166
book (2)

The Workes

CHAUCER, Geoffrey. Folio. Ff [24] 376 [14]. Black letter, double column, Roman and some italic. Title within elaborate woodcut architectural border flanked by allegorical female figures, putti in the corners, grapes hanging from arch, a skull and bones with a snake in the central panel at bottom of page, light ink soiling to upper margin. Frontispiece with full page portrait of Chaucer and genealogical chart, in good impression, outer margin dusty and handsome woodcut of a mounted Knight to B1. Historiated initials and ornaments throughout. Very slightly age yellowed, a few marginal thumb marks, little ink stain to a few upper edges. Contemporary autograph of Samuel Harvey and motto spero meliora to t-p. Tear from lower margin of fol.47, not affecting text. A very good, clean, well-margined copy in contemporary calf, tooled and gilt, covers with central arms of Elizabeth I gilt, slightly worn, missing ties, rebacked, a.e.r. A good copy of Speght s second definitive edition of the complete works of Chaucer, with a handsome engraved full-length portrait of the poet and woodcut of a mounted knight at the start of the Canterbury Tales. This volume improves upon and adds to previous editions of Chaucer s works, published since 1542. It is the earliest edition in which thorough punctuation was attempted, and in many other ways it is a distinct improvement upon Speght s first edition . Included is an expanded biography, a newly edited version of the texts and two additional works, printed for the first time: La Priere de nostre Dame , an A.B.C. poem with alphabetically arranged verses, and the Treatise called Jacke Upland against the Friers , a polemic attacking mendicant orders, which was not by Chaucer. This volume is dedicated to Robert Cecil (1563-1612), the 1st Earl of Salisbury and chief minister of Queen Elizabeth I, but it retains the dedication to King Henry VIII present in earlier versions. Lauded by his contemporary Hoccleve (1368-1426) as the father of English literature , Chaucer (c.1340-1400) is one of the most influential names in English literary history, praised both for his eloquence and the way he 'illumined' the English language and for his 'sentence' (DNB). He transformed verse composition by writing in Middle English, the language of court, which had not often been employed in poetry, and using European decasyllabic meter, which developed into iambic pentameter, the meter of Shakespeare, Milton and Wordsworth. The biography comprises a number of sections about Chaucer s life, including his education, family and relationships, finances, work, and death. In addition to the genealogical plate, there is also a stemma with brief comments about the lives of his ancestors and descendants until the reign of Henry VII, followed by a more in-depth commentary. The account of his death contains the date, the location of his tomb at Westminster Abbey, as well as the original inscription on his epitaph. The volume closes with a useful glossary of Latin and French words untranslated in the verses, as well as difficult Middle English words, designed to support later readers of his poetry, and an alphabetical index of authors cited by Chaucer. A most learned early edition designed for later students of the great English wordsmith. ESTC: S107214, STC: 5081, Lowndes: 425, Grolier: 44; Pforzheimer: 178.
  • $15,829
  • $15,829
book (2)

Malleus Maleficarum.

KRAMER, Heinrich. 4to. a-q8, r10, [17] 137 numbered ll., final blank. Gothic letter, double column, 45 or 46 lines, rubricated initials, underlinings and embellishments in red throughout. Early mss. to t-p in two different hands: first recording Henrico(?) Institoris (Heinrich Kramer) and Iacobo Sprenger with their various titles as co-authors, and the record of gift from the Carthusians near Chemmingen (Hemmingen), in Northern Germany, to a library near Brandenburg. Contemporary marginalia, pages untrimmed. Slight age yellowing and occasional light browning on some leaves, a few small wormholes, largely marginal, mainly on first and last leaves. A very good, clean, well-margined copy in contemporary blind-stamped pig skin over boards, title inked to upper cover and brass clasps (upper partially missing), vellum ms stubs. Light water staining to covers, worming to lower, upper compartment of spine cracked. A splendid copy in original condition of an early edition of this first and radical handbook for the detection and destruction of witches, by the German Dominican inquisitor Heinrich Kramer (or Institor, 1430-1505) and possibly Jacob Sprenger (c.1436-1495), whose co-authorship is still debated. The Hammer of Witches was first printed in 1487, shortly following the 1484 Summis desiderantes affectibus, a famous bull on witchcraft by Pope Innocent VIII acknowledging its spread in Germany and authorising its extirpation. The document can be found at the beginning of this copy, following the author s apologia. The present text became the canon for future secular witch trials, despite its rejection by contemporary inquisitors for its extremism. Overall, 28 editions were produced between 1487 and 1600 and it was used by Protestant and Catholic courts alike. The inclusion of a contents page reveals its purpose as a reference guide and the annotations are evidence of active usage. It laid the foundations for our modern understanding of witches and witchcraft and likely contributed to the sharp rise in witch trials in the coming centuries. In keeping with the contemporary format of canon law and philosophical texts, the treatise is set out as a series of questions and answers, categorised into three distinct parts. The first two [] deal with the reality of witchcraft as established by the Bible, etc., as well as its nature and the horrors in dealing with it, while the third lays down practical rules of procedure whether the trial be conducted in an ecclesiastical or secular court (Catholic Encyclopedia). Torture and deception are encouraged as a means to extract confessions. The work stands out as highly misogynistic, condemning witchcraft as worse than heresy, and highlighting female propensity to this type of activity, with fervent interest in the sexual aspects of demonic activity. Among those explored are the sexual relations of incubi and succubae, as well witches ability to convince men of the loss of their genitals. A most important and influential text within the history of witchcraft in a particularly early edition. ISTC: ii00166000 ; Catholic Encyclopedia Vol XV: p.676; BMC: IA. 7468; Thorndike: IV p.330; not in Gay, or Caillet, or Duveen, or Erdman.
  • $125,316
  • $125,316
The Travels of Persiles and Sigismunda

The Travels of Persiles and Sigismunda

CERVANTES SAAVEDRA, Miguel de. FIRST EDITION THUS. 4to. pp. [6] 399 [1]. Roman letter, little italic. Woodcut ornaments and historiated initials at beginning of each book, dedication, and preface. Text within ruled borders, acquisition note to inner upper cover '1874 Leamington, Simmons' and bookplate of Kenneth Rapoport, various mss. scribbles to verso of final ep. Lightly age yellowed, very occasional marginal spot or mark, upper margin of t-p and dedication darkened, edges a little scuffed. Good, clean copy in contemporary English speckled calf, very ably rebacked, a.e.r. The first English version of Cervantes' (1547-1566) final work, by an anonymous translator. 'The French version from which the English was made was that of V. d'Audiguier, first published in 1618'. It is his final oeuvre, published posthumously in January 1617, completed only three days before the legendary author's death. Cervantes regarded it as his magnum opus, writing in his Exemplary Tales that it 'dared to compete with Heliodorus'. The antithesis of the more renowned and witty satire 'Don Quixote', this work combines the romantic with the picaresque, and Christianises the genre of the Byzantine novel, which often featured travels around the Mediterranean. The Nordic nobles travel to Rome to get married, changing their names to Periandro and Auristela. They overcome a range of obstacles and travel the length of Italy, meeting pirates and robbers, taking part in duels, attending a masquerade ball in Venice and festival in Rome. Eventually, freed from captivity at the hands of pirates, they escape to Cadiz, where they marry. This epic swashbuckling story reflects many real episodes in Cervantes' own life. He left Madrid in 1569, following a warrant for his arrest after he wounded Antonio de Sigura in a duel. Arriving in Rome, he served Cardinal Acquaviva. Much of his life was spent in the navy and he was sent to fight at the Battle of Lepanto in 1571, which aimed to contain the Ottoman advance into Western Europe, where he was seriously wounded, losing use of his left arm. Further, he suffered capture by Barbary pirates around 1575 and was held for ransom for 5 years, liberated by the Trinitarians, a Christian group who freed Christian slaves from North African imprisonment. He returned to Madrid in 1606 as a tax collector and later became a member of the Franciscan Third Order. ESTC: S107935; Lowndes II 402; Rius: 1012; A.F. Allison 'English translations from the Spanish and Portuguese to the year 1700' 36.
  • $46,169
  • $46,169
book (2)

Verbum Sempiternum (with) Salvator Mundi.

[TAYLOR, John] 64mo, 40mmx36.6mm, A-E16 (A1 stuck to upper cover), A-D16. Roman and Italic letter. Two parts in one, separate title pages with ornament. Reader's note, two printed verses to each page. Fine, clean copy in beautifully preserved contemporary dos-a-dos, silk over canvas. Covers and spine in coloured and silver thread with silver stumpwork. Floral pattern to upper cover, strawberries and leaves to lower, flower with yellow and blue stems to both spines. A thread or two loose, colours marginally faded, a.e.g. In folding box. A very rare and exquisitely bound miniature, containing an abridgement of the Protestant bible, set into verse by John Taylor (1580-1653). Floral design to upper cover on an off-white background, main stem in plaited silver stump work with large central pink flower, flanked by two twisting green and blue leaves, and two smaller pink flowers, all outlined in silver thread. Colour gradation is beautifully executed in silk shading. These techniques and colours also present on lower cover, with a raised plaited braid of silver and yellow thread with detailed strawberries with seeds, set on shorter stems of long, vertical single stitches, as well as green and blue spiked leaves, also outlined in silver. The spines are identical, comprising a central flower in pink and yellow silk shading with two yellow and blue swirls emanating from it along the length of the spine. "In the sixteenth century embroidered work was very popular with the Tudor princesses, gold and silver thread and pearls being largely used, often with very decorative effect. The simplest of these covers are also the bestbut great elaboration was often employed. Under the Stuarts the lighter featherstitch was preferred, and there seems to have been a regular trade in embroidered Bibles and Prayer-books of small size, sometimes with floral patterns, sometimes with portraits of the King, or Scriptural scenes" (Cyril Davenport, English Embroidered Bookbindings). English bindings of this types have become rare, with many lost due to looting for their precious metals or through destruction by disapproving Puritans during the Civil War. Thumb-bibles were accessible and digestible versions of holy scripture for children, mostly measuring two inches or less in size. Following the Reformation principle of sola scripturathe belief that the Bible was the supreme authority for Christian faith and practicethey summarised full bibles by paraphrasing its narratives, aiming to teach children (not yet old enough to read the Bible in its entirety) the fundamental basics of the text. The first known example dates from 1601 and they remained popular into the 18thC. The Old Testament is recast as the 'verbum sempiternum', while the 'salvator mundi' refers to the New. Likely to be a corrected issue of the first edition with Latin title amended from 'verbum sempiternae' to 'verbum sempiternum', which was retained in the later 1616 edition. The work is dedicated to Queen Anne of Denmark (1574-1619), a well-known contemporary patron of the arts, and her son prince Charles (1600-1649), later King Charles I, who would have been in his early years. Much of the Queen's time was focused on court entertainment, participating in masques, and commissioning leading architects to deliver fantastic set design. Among them was Inigo Jones (1573-1652), who also designed the Queen's House in Greenwich for Anne, begun in 1616. The poet behind this text, John Taylor, a 'generally forgotten early seventeenth century author [] who in his long life from 1580 to 1653 established himself as one of the most prolific writers of the English Renaissance', was known in his time as the 'Water Poet'. He was pioneering in his simplified and miniature versions of the Bible. Corrected 1614 edition unrecorded in ESTC or STC. The uncorrected 1614 edition is recorded only at University of Aberdeen, the corrected 1616 edition (the next after ours) is recorded only at the British Library and Huntington.
  • $112,125
  • $112,125
book (2)

The Joyfull Returne of the most illustrious Prince, Charles []

ALMANSA Y MENDOZA, Andres de FIRST EDITION. 4to. pp. [2] 46. Roman letter, little italic. English translation of Spanish original, index of ships and commanders, summary of Charles' stops between Madrid and Saint Andrea with distances in leagues. Contemporary mss. signature to verso of final leaf, bookplate of William Foyle to front pastedown. Age yellowing, extreme outer corners often slightly dog-eared and a bit dusty, t-p outer edges slightly darkened. A good, clean, well-margined copy in early morocco, gilt rulings to covers and spine. In folding box. The English translation of the report by Mendoza (16th C-1627) a Spanish journalistic writer, transmitted in his letters to his friend Alonso Nelli de Rivadeneyra (1601-1662) and pamphlets describing the conclusion of the 'Spanish Match' negotiation between Charles I (1600-1649) and Maria Anna of Spain (1606-1646), and the resulting exchange of gifts, horses with velvet coats and various silver objects, and the Prince's return to Britain. Six of the reports and letters penned by Mendoza between 1621-24 concern themselves with Charles' time in Spain. The work opens with an account of the strong love felt between the Spanish Princess and English Prince, in largely propagandic style, before providing historical details. Mendoza appears to have been an eyewitness, receiving 3000 Ryalls as a gift and personally congratulating Charles on his espousal. An engaging narration of Charles' journey back to Portsmouth ensues, following him over his terrestrial leg of the journey from Madrid until St Andrea, then his voyage by sea to Portsmouth. Whether propaganda or not, this text offers fascinating insight into the short-lived success of the negotiation. While a contract for the marriage had apparently been signed, it was overshadowed by a history of failed marital unions between the two countries. Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon's divorce, Mary and Philip II's failed betrothal, as well as recent memory of conflict with the Armada, all contributed to a lack of confidence in the plan. It was later rejected by the privy council, who did not support King James in his pro-Spanish foreign policy and had issues with the Princess's Catholic faith. This copy once belonged to the leading 20thC bookseller and collector William Foyle (1885-1963), founder of Foyles bookstores. The bookplate indicates that the book was at Beeleigh Abbey, a 12thC monastery, where he kept his personal collection. ESTC: S107749; STC: 5025; Goldsmith: 161; A. F. Allison 'English Translations from the Spanish and Portuguese to the year 1700': 9; not in Lowndes.
  • $4,287
  • $4,287
book (2)

Metamorphoses Ovidii argumentis quidem solute oratione Enarrationibus autem et allegoriis []

OVID, Publius; SPRENG, Johannes. 16mo. ff. [16] 178 [6]. Roman and italic letter. 178 lively ½ page woodcuts in excellent impression, one at the head of each story. Author's address to reader, one story per leaf, including title, summary of narrative and commentary. Printer's phoenix device and autograph of 'Hezeikiel Banaro cornus 1574' to t-p, index and verse by Spreng at end. Lightly age yellowed, pages slightly trimmed, well clear of text. Armorial bookplate of John Broadley to ffep. A very good, clean, crisp copy in handsome c.1800 red morocco, gilt floral garlands to corners of covers, gilt to spine, a.e.g. A finely adapted version of Ovid's Metamorphoses in images, accompanied by a prose ekphrasis, followed by Latin verse distichs, closely based on the Ovidian texts with a verse commentary, by Johannes Spreng, a translator and notary from Augsburg, who worked on a variety of Classics, including the Iliad and Aeneid, translating them into German verse. Completed around 8AD, and often hailed as Ovid's magnum opus, the original text serves as a poetic encyclopaedia of over 250 myths, beginning with the creation of the world and concluding with the deification of Julius Caesar, over 15 books. Although an abridgement, this version remains faithful to the original, and is no less complete. The Metamorphoses remain the authoritative text for most historical reception of the Classical myths in literature and art. This edition is dedicated to two members of the Habsburg family, Archdukes Rudolf (1552-1612) and Ernest (1553-1595) of Austria, sons of Maximilian II (1527-1576), whom Rudolf later succeeded as Holy Roman Emperor. The Habsburgs were known patrons of the arts, Philip II of Spain commissioned the painter Titian to create a series of artworks and was given complete creative freedom. He drew upon Ovid's Metamorphoses, producing paintings between 1551-1562, known as his poesie, representing the stories of Europa, Diana and Actaeon, Danaё, Venus and Adonis, Callisto, and Perseus and Andromeda. A Habsburg interest in the classical myths seems to emerge, the first edition of Spreng's text appearing in 1563, only a year after the completion of Titian's final painting. Spreng's native Augsburg was also one of the two places Philip met Titian face to face. The composition of the scenes which feature in Titian's poesie is strikingly similar to the illustrtations of this edition, pointing to the accurate visualisation of the original text. However, these differ from the first 1563 edition images by Virgil Solis (1514-1562), which employ more dramatic chiaroscuro, with weightier, more detailed figures. The present cuts are the same as the 1566 edition in that the composition is inverted and with less dramatic rendering of light and shade. Spreng's 'allegoria' reveal his interpretation of each story. For instance, 'in Apollo, who pursues Daphne, [he] sees Satan, who preys on the soul of man, and who reads from the death of Semele in Jupiter's arms only the harmful consequences of the libido'. Just as in Titian's poesie, the myths were viewed through a Christian lens, with the intention of moralising potentially scandalous classical subject matter, which was so popular during the Renaissance. A stunning interpretation of the quintessential lore of Classical mythology with an additional Renaissance flourish. USTC: 199775; Brunet: IV 276; Pettegree: 81419; GGB: p. 290; Graesse: V 76; edition unrecorded in Adams, not in BM catalogue or Mortimer.
  • $2,968
  • $2,968
book (2)

An exact and curious survey of all the East Indies, even to Canton []

FEYNES, Henri de; TOURVAL, Jean Loiseau de FIRST EDITION. Small 4to. pp. [10] 40 [2], final blank. Roman letter, little italic. Historiated woodcut initials and ornaments. Age yellowed, t-p lightly dusty, occasional marginal stain. Trimmed, with loss of much of imprint date, missing running title on some upper margins, lesser shaving to marginal notes, and signatures. Contemporary mss. 'est liber meus' to final leaf of text and 'Willi Aerton' to recto blank. A good copy in contemporary vellum. First edition of a pioneering first-hand account of explorer Henri de Feynes' voyage to the East Indies and China, the first Frenchman to visit them. It was translated by Jean Loiseau de Tourval, a Frenchman renowned at the time within English literary circles for his extensive translations, who came to London in 1603 and spied for King James I. In fact, this edition precedes the French original, which was not published until 1630. Until the late 16th century, travel to these parts of the world had been limited to a handful of European explorers such as Marco Polo (1254-1324) and Niccolo de' Conti (c.1395-1469) and missionary priests. De Feynes' journey marks the beginning of greater Western interest in the far East, as merchants increasingly followed in his footsteps. Setting out from Paris in 1608, possibly at the behest of King Henry IV, de Feynes spent three months travelling by land through the Middle East, joining the Baghdad caravan at Aleppo on the way to Isfahan, before advancing through Hormuz and onto India. He continues onto Goa and travels across India, touring Sri Lanka and the islands of Southern Asia, before settling briefly in Canton, modern Guangzhou, in early 1609. The city was the only place foreign merchants and travellers were allowed to stay, and it remains one of the world's busiest mercantile hubs. He returned via ship, by way of Mozambique, to Lisbon. On his travels, the author comments extensively on the size and beauty of each city, comparing their magnitude to cities in France, as well as local customs, religion, and exotic foods such as melon and pineapple. He makes one of the earliest references to coffee, which he calls 'caahiette'. Particular admiration is expressed for the Mogul palace, likely belonging to Jahangir (1569-1627), the fourth Mogul emperor. He also notes the extensive Dutch and Portuguese presence in many of the East Indian islands. Arriving in China, he describes the thriving silk industry and how silk is made, in addition to the traditional practice of female foot-binding and cormorant fishing, a technique whereby a loose snare is fastened to the bird, preventing him from swallowing larger fish, allowing fishermen to access to those that are regurgitated. A rare account of early travel and exploration in the Far East. ESTC: S102015; Cox: p.266; Lowndes: IV 1583; Cordier: 872; not in Blackmer.
  • $46,169
  • $46,169