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Contractae ex veteribus medicinae tetrabiblos

AETIUS, Amidenus. Folio, pp. (xii) 916 (lvi). Roman letter, attractive woodcut historiated and floriated initials, typographical ornaments, printer’s device on t-p and verso of last. T-p a bit dusty, lightly spotted, age yellowing, browning to a few ll., minor mainly marginal foxing. A good, wide margined copy in C17 quarter calf with probably 18C blue patterned boards, edges worn, spine with raised bands a bit worn at extremities but firm, all edges sprinkled red. Unidentified early black circular stamp with small hole to t-p, autograph of Alessandro Volpi (1844-1857) to verso. A good copy of this medical encyclopaedia by the Greek Aetius. This is the second edition (first 1542) of the Latin translation by Janus Cornarius (c. 1500-1558), Saxon humanist, philologist and friend of Erasmus. A native of Amida in Mesopotamia (modern Diyarbakır, Turkey), Aetius was a Greek medical writer who lived about the end of the fifth and beginning of the sixth century. Very little is known of his life: he studied at Alexandria – at the most famous medical school of the time – and lived in Byzantium, where he became court physician to the Emperor Justinian I. Highly regarded by Renaissance physicians, he is defined here by Cornarius as the greatest of medical writers. Aetius’ ‘Tetrabiblos’ – so called because it comprises four books, each divided into four parts – is an extremely valuable and important medical treatise. In fact, it is a compilation from the writings of several authors, many from the great library at Alexandria, otherwise lost. In particular, we find the works of Ruphus of Ephesus and Leonides in surgery, Soranus and Philumenus in gynecology and obstetrics, but also Aetius’ own observations on diseases and treatments. An interesting feature of Aetius’ work is that of providing recipes for creating complex medical compounds composed of many ingredients, typical of the time. Among the most complicated concoctions, we find a plaster recommended for tumors, hard lumps and gout; among the most curious, there is one for contraception consisting of aloe, wallflower seed, pepper, and saffron. Interestingly, “Aetius [ ] introduced much of Egyptian pharmacy, and was particularly fond of external applications, as well as of charms and amulets so common in the same country. In composing a certain ointment he required that there should be repeated in a loud voice, “May the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob deign to accord virtues to this medicine” (Dunglison). However, “It was from Galen himself and not from the east that Aetius derived his most strikingly superstitious passages. [ ] for example, the use of an amulet of a Greek jasper suspended from the neck by a thread so as to touch the abdomen; the story of the reapers who found the dead viper in their wine and cured instead of killing the sufferer from elephantiasis to whom they gave the wine to drink” (Thorndike). Remarkably, appended at the end is also Coronarius’ translation of a short treatise on weights and measures by Paul of Egina. This copy belonged to Alessandro Volpi (1844-1857), an Italian veterinary physician and grandson of Antonio Volpi, professor of law and rector of the University of Pavia. He is the author of numerous scientific publications on veterinary medicine and zoology, but also wrote on history and politics. Other volumes from his library, bearing the same characteristic signature, are held in the collections of the Biblioteca Marciana in Venice. USTC 600293; Durling 48; Graesse I, p. 39. This ed not in Adams, BM STC Ger 16th century, Garrison-Morton, Welcome I, Heirs of Hippocrates. R. Dunglinson, History of Medicine from the Earliest Ages to the Commencement of the Nineteenth Century 916 (1872). L. Thorndike, A History of Magic and Experimental Science, Vol 1 (2003). L3810
  • $2,493
  • $2,493
book (2)

De universa mulierum medicina [ ] pars prima theorica – pars secunda, sive praxis.

CASTRO, Rodrigo de. FIRST EDITION. Folio, 2 parts in one, separate t-ps, pp. (xii) 135 (xxi); (viii) 333 (xxiii). Roman letter, woodcut floriated initials, typographical ornaments, headpieces, tailpieces. General light age browning (poor quality paper), intermittent foxing, mainly marginal, occasionally heavier, oil stain to inner margins of a couple of central gatherings, minor tear to one blank lower outer corner, narrow worm trail to outer blank margin of a few ll, flyleaf almost loose. A good copy in contemporary limp vellum, missing ties. Contemporary ms. “Ex libris Roberti Tullone” and slightly later “Ex libris M. Lebot” to first t-p. A good copy of the first edition of this very successful treatise in two volumes on female anatomy and diseases, by the Jewish physician de Castro. Remarkably, this is the first treatise on this topic ever written by a Portuguese author and it is “generally regarded as having laid the foundations of gynaecology as we know it to-day” (Roth). Rodrigo de Castro (c. 1546-1627), was born in Lisbon into a well-off family of ‘conversos’, meaning that its members had Jewish origins but converted to Catholicism. Several of his relatives were physicians of some reputation, and de Castro was the most distinguished. After completing his studies at the university of Salamanca, he practiced in Lisbon and then spent time in the East indies researching medical herbs. Due to growing inquisitorial pressure, de Castro later moved to Antwerp and finally to Hamburg in 1594, a significant refuge for Portuguese Jews. Here, his medical reputation grew, and his clientele included the king of Denmark, the landgrave of Hesse, the count of Holstein, and the archbishop of Bremen. It appears that De Castro eventually reconverted, or avowed himself a Jew, as in 1612 his name was included in the list of Hamburg’s Jewish community and was buried in the cemetery of the Jewish-Portuguese congregation at Altona. ‘De universa mulierum medicina’ is de Castro’s most famous and important work, possibly influenced by the premature loss of his first wife, who died in childbirth about 1602. De Castro “denounces the sixteenth century collections of medical texts on women ‘Gynaecea’ as ‘an amalgam of excellent doctrine and wild speculation which could easily mislead students of medicine’” (Maclean) and defines his new treatise as “useful to all scholars, but absolutely necessary to physicians”. It is composed of two volumes, both containing four books. The first, ‘pars prima theorica’, is theoretical in nature and deals the anatomy of the uterus and breasts, menses, conception and pregnancy, labour and breastfeeding. The second, ‘pars secunda, sive praxis’, is more practical, and it is dedicated to women’s diseases, starting from those common to all, moving on to those affecting widows and virgins in particular, those connected to pregnancy, and finally those wet nurses and women in childbirth may suffer from. “Evaluating the classical and Arabic heritage – Hippocrates, Aristotle, Pliny, Galen, Averroes, Avicenna – Castro established a complex dialogue between the traditional ideas of the past and the authors of his own time [ ] such as Amato Lusitano, Luis de Mercado, Martin Akakia, Ambroise Paré, François Rousset and Girolamo Mercuriale” (Pinheiro) “Robertus Tullone” might correspond to the French ‘Robert Tullon’. A certain Robert Tullon, Doctor in the Faculty of Medicine, is mentioned in two receipts dated 1664 and preserved in the Archives Nationales de France (Minutes et répertoires du notaire Jean Guillot, 28 février 1662 - 24 mai 1668, étude XCVII). USTC 211778 (pars prima) and 2117832 (pars secunda); VD17 12:186633M (pars prima) and 12:186637S (pars secunda); BM STC Ger. 17th century, C378; Krivatsy 2285; Wellcome I, 1361. Not in Durling, Heir of Hippocrates, Garrison-Morton or Erdmann. C. Roth, The Jewish Contribution to Civilization (1938). C.S. Pinheiro, in Davis and Loughran (eds), The Palgrave Handbook of Infertility in History (2017)
  • $5,342
  • $5,342
book (2)

Psalmi ad vespertinas omnium solemnitatum horas, Chorus Primus

ASOLA, Giovanni Matteo. FIRST EDITION. 4to, pp. 22. Roman letter, square music notation on a 5-line stave. T-p within typographical border, woodcut printer’s device, woodcut floriated initials. Light age yellowing, small ink burn to upper blank margin of two ll, lower outer corner of last two ll. repaired. A very good copy, in modern boards. Label of William Salloch (1906 – 1990) to rear pastedown. The sole known, unrecorded copy of the first edition of this musical score by Asola, containing a set of Vespers psalms for three voices. The 1602 and 1608 reprints are more common. This is the part of the ‘Chorus Primus’, the first choir, usually the most important, which in this case is ‘Altus’ (high). The part of the ‘chorus secundus’ was published for the first time in 1599, with the title “Cantus (Tenor, Bassus) Secundi Chori Vespertinae omnium Solemnitatum psalmodiae vocibus ternis paribus canendae (Venice, Amadino). Giovanni Matteo Asola (1524-1609) was an Italian priest and composer born in Verona. At a young age, he entered the congregation of secular canons of Alga di Venezia, and later received his musical education from the renown composer of masses Vincenzo Ruffo in Verona. He became ‘maestro di cappella’ at Treviso in 1578 and at Vicenza in 1581, then moved to Venice, where he lived until his death. An extremely productive composer, Asola wrote almost exclusively sacred music, including numerous masses, psalms and hymns, but also a series of madrigals – a type of secular composition that was particularly appreciated in the Renaissance. This attractive volume contains the words and music of psalms to be sung in the evening at Vespers, one of the most important services of the Roman rite, often celebrated more solemnly than the mass. At the time, Asola was one of the most prolific composers of Vespers settings, and his large and often reprinted corpus encompasses a great variety of styles. An exponent of the late Renaissance Venetian school, he frequently adopted the so called “Venetian polychoral style” (or ‘cori spezzati’), which involved spatially separate choirs singing in alternation. The choirs were usually different, high and low, and would sing successive, often contrasting phrases of the music creating spectacular stereo and echo effects. In addition to a selection of usual psalms, such as ‘Dixit Dominus’, ‘Confitebor tibi’, ‘Laudate pueri’, ‘In exitu’, this score also includes – at the end – the hymn ‘Magnificat’ and the antyphons ‘Salve Regina’ and ‘Regina Coeli’. Interestingly, ‘Magnificat’ is often included in Vespers’ music publications as in some churches it was sung in polyphony with the first psalm, ‘Dixit Dominus’. This ed. not in USTC, RISM, Worldcat, EDIT 16, Library Hub, Adams, BM STC 16th century, OPAC SBN Italy (Online Public Access Catalogue, National Library Services), unrecorded in the major libraries of Venice, Bologna, Milan, Rome, Florence. Not in ‘Catalogo della Biblioteca del Liceo musicale de Bologna’, Conservatorio G.B. Martini, where large collections of Asola’s music are held. L3871
  • $4,985
  • $4,985
book (2)

La bella e dotta difesa delle donne.

DARDANI, Alvise. FIRST EDITION. 8vo, 151 (v). Italic letter, large woodcut portrait of Dardani on t-p and verso of last. T-p a bit dusty, very slight age yellowing, upper outer corner of two margins cut away. A good, clean copy in contemporary limp vellum, covers soiled and worn, original ties. Modern ms. signature “D. L. Cumming” in blue ink pen to verso of fly, bibliographic annotation below. A good copy of the first edition of this fascinating defence of women in the Italian vernacular in the form of a trial. This is the only known work of the humanist and politician Alvise Dardani, published posthumously by the author’s grandson, Ippolito. Challenging the male structured historical discourse through his forceful female speakers, Dardano wrote a “splendidly incisive rereading of history” (Panizza). In the 16th century, literature celebrating the moral and intellectual integrity of women – written mostly by men – flourished in Italy, particularly in Venice. In the introduction to this work, the author states: “Both my verse and my prose intend to demonstrate with pretty clear arguments that, even if women’s virtues cannot be considered superior to that of men, at least they are not inferior. I consider this effort not only pleasant but also useful for readers, because nowadays the world is full of wicked men who, [ ] would like to stain the name of the courageous women [ ] They deserve not only repression but also harsh and severe punishment”. The work, in seven books, opens with a long poem in which Dardani urges his female audience to disregard male criticism and follow the example of heroic ancient women. The central section of the volume is the most interesting and captivating, ingeniously arranged as a series of orations: “the literary scene is set as a fictional court where an allegorical figure, Giustitia, and thiee judges – Traiano Imperatore, Carondo Prencipe and Selenco Dominator di Locrensi – will judge the role of men and women in the course of history. The conflict between the sexes is represented in a verbal combat between Hortensia, a known woman of Ancient Rome, and Fulvio Stello. [ ] In the fourth book Hortensia’s superiority becomes unchallengeable. Fulvio remains completely silent whereas Hortensia draws from mythology and history to slander men’s actions and praise women’s achievements. In the fifth book, Hortensia continues praising female deeds and simultaneously mocks Fulvio’s silence. In the sixth book, Hortensia uninterrupted comes to the conclusion that women have excelled in military arts, politics, religion, prophecy, inventions, arts and sciences [ ] When Fulvio attempts to counterattack by citing women from the Bible or mythology who were traditionally seen as negative figures, such as Eve, Bathsheba, Delilah, and lole, the author offers these women the opportunity to defend themselves. They appear before the court, protest their innocence and give a different version of the events”. (Dialeti). The final book contains a short treatise on the education of children, dealing also with conception and the astral influence on birth. A prominent member of the Scuola di San Marco, Alvise Dardani (often referred to as Luigi Dardano, c. 1429-1511) had a very successful political career in the Republic of Venice. As provveditore of Mirano, in 1509 he played a fundamental role in securing the allegiance of the city of Padua to the Republic during the Italian wars. The following year, he was elected Grand Chancellor, the highest office a ‘cittadino’ could achieve and one of the most prestigious. USTC 825480; Brunet II, p. 521: “cet ouvrage est rempli d’anecdotes et de petites narrations”; Graesse II, p. 335, Erdmann 28; D127. Not in BM STC Italy 16th century. A. Dialeti, The Debate about Women and its Socio-Cultural Background in Early Modern Venice (2004). L. Panizza, Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society (2017). L3883
  • $5,614
  • $5,614
book (2)

Opus aureum [ ] signa, causa et curas febrium

SANTA SOFIA, Marsilio, SANTA SOFIA, Galeazzo, PARISIENSIS, Richardus, DE GRADI, Antonio and BARZIZZA, Cristoforo. 4to, ff. (iv) 263 (xiii). Gothic letter, typographical ornaments, woodcut floriated initials. T-p in red, mostly light age browning, last two gatherings somewhat stained mainly to margins, minor repaired tear to blank outer margin of 5 ll. (just touching a few ms. marginalia), very small adhesion to two ll. affecting 4 words, some contemporary Latin marginalia. A good, well margined copy in contemporary Italian dark goatskin, covers blind and gilt ruled to a panel design, gilt ivy leaves to corners and ornated centrepiece, spine with raised bands, cross-hatched blind stamped decoration in compartments, spine and joints repaired, missing ties, a.e. black. C19 ms. ex libris ‘Ex Bibl: Casnacich’ to fly, faded purple autograph stamp to lower margin of t-p, early ink manuscript references to text. A very good copy of this rare collection of treatises on fevers, their causes and treatment, one in its FIRST EDITION. This is the second and enlarged edition of the collection, by Michel de Capella (first 1514). The decoration of the fine contemporary Italian binding – elegant and simple, with a single gilt rule border, delicate blind lines and ‘aldine’ leaves to corners – is typical of the Venetian bindings of the period (see De Marinis II, pl. cccxxxiii). In particular, the style is close to Aldine bindings made by Andrea di Lorenzo, or “Mendoza Binder” (Venice, c. 1518-1555), and a similar example with black edges is recorded by Davis (The Henry Davis Gift n. 261). The first two essays are by members of the renowned family of physicians ‘de Santa Sofia’, of Padua. Marsilio (c. 1338-1405), was the most illustrious: after graduating, he taught logic and medicine in Padua from 1367 to 1381; later, he became physician to Gian Galeazzo Visconti, first duke of Milan. He dedicated his life to teaching and writing medical commentaries. His ‘De febribus’, first published in 1507, deals with all the symptoms of fever and how to treat them, then presents a series of different types of fever, including tertian and quartan, and the ‘febris pestilentialis’, a term which often referred to plague. Interestingly, Marsilio worked in Venice in 1393, when an episode of plague broke out in the city. Galeazzo (d. 1427) was Marsilio’s nephew, who, after teaching medicine in Padova and Bologna, moved to Vienna as physician to Albert IV, duke of Austria. His treatise on fevers (first ed. 1514) is in two parts, the first concerns fever in general, how to treat acute fever, and it presents a series of ‘regimina’, or therapies to cure various symptoms; the second deals with the different fevers, including ‘febris pestilentialis’, ‘febris colericis’ and ‘febris flegmatice’. The third treatise in the collection by Richardus Parisiensis, specifically focuses on fever’s symptoms (signa). The author of the fourth treatise is Antonio de Gradi (fl.1458), a Milanese doctor mostly known for this particular essay on fevers. The last work, printed here for the first time, is by Cristoforo Barzizza (d. c. 1445). A native of Bergamo, he was a distinguished physician and a colleague of Galeazzo de Santa Sofia at the University of Padua. His ‘de intentionibus habendis in omni febre’ (here) considers synochal, syncopal, pestilential, quartan, quintan fevers, but also small pox and measles. Compared to the others, Barzizza devotes less attention to describing the symptoms of the illness and focuses more on treatment and cure. The manuscript ex libris most likely belongs to the Croatian physician and writer Ivan August Kaznačić (1817-1883), director of the Dubrovnik hospital for twenty years, literary critic and bibliographer. USTC 144786; Durling 2972; Wellcome I, 5750. Not in BM STC Fr. 16th century, Adams, Brunet, Graesse, Garrison-Morton or Stillwell. USTC and Worldcat record no copies in the US. L3693
  • $13,914
  • $13,914
book (2)

Parva naturalia

ALBERTUS MAGNUS. FIRST EDITION. Folio, ff. (vi) 233, lacking final blank. Double column, gothic letter, charming woodcut floriated and historiated initials, printer’s device to verso of last. T-p very slightly soiled with early ms. annotation, small wormholes to lower blank margin of last gathering, early repairs to a few lower outer edges, light age yellowing to first gathering, occasional light marginal waterstains, small ink splashes and mainly marginal soiling to a few ll. A good copy in C17 vellum, small hole to upper cover, yapp edges, gilt label to spine, a.e.r. A good copy of the first edition of this remarkable collection of treatises on natural science by Albertus Magnus, edited by the Italian philosopher and physician Marcantonio Zimara (c. 1470-1532). A German Dominican friar, bishop and philosopher, Albertus Magnus (c. 1200-1280) is regarded as the most learned and prolific scholar of the Middle Ages, the only one to whom the epithet ‘Magnus’ (‘The great’) was applied. Known by his contemporaries as the “Doctor universalis”, he was later beatified and proclaimed Doctor of the Church. Albertus was active in almost all departments of learning, and the influence of his writings and commentaries on theology, logic, metaphysics, psychology, and the natural sciences was immense. “He combined elements of Aristotelism, Neo-Platonism, Christian theology and Muslim and Jewish philosophy, which he formed into one great system; but his chief aim as a philosopher remained the reconciliation of Aristotelianism with Christian teaching.” (PMM 17). The 18 works included in this volume constitute an extremely interesting and valuable selection of Albertus’ studies on natural science and philosophy, which complement his best known ‘De animalibus’ and ‘De mineralibus’. Particularly outstanding is ‘De vegetabilibus et plantis’, a paraphrase in seven books of the pseudo-Aristotelian ‘De vegetabilibus’ on the morphology and physiology of plants, also including Albertus’ personal digressions based on his own botanical observations. Albert “succeeded in giving consistent, convincing explanations of the small details of plant life [ ] These books stand as a remarkable reconciliation of the curiosity of a naturalist, the temperament of a philosopher, and the responsibilities of a teacher — unique in the Middle Ages and rare enough in any period.” (Reeds) Also important is ‘Speculum astronomicum’, whose attribution to Albertus is disputed. Aimed at opposing superstition, it explains the distinction between descriptive and judicial astronomy, and it is fundamental for its bibliographical content: it lists numerous titles of astronomical and astrological writings available to Albert and his contemporaries, recommending their value in a Christian context. In the volume are also Albert’s treatises on sensation, discussed in regard to sleep and waking (‘De somno et vigilia’), the sense organs (‘De sensu et sensato’), imagination and memory (‘De memoria et reminiscenza). The motion of the living things is described in ‘De motibus animalium’ and ‘De spiritu et respiratione’, while ‘De juventute et senectute’ and ‘De morte et vita’ are concerned with the processes of ageing, living and dying. Physiological functioning is discussed in ‘De nutrimento et nutribili’, while intellect is the object of ‘De intellectu et intellegibili’, ‘De unitate intellectus’ and ‘De natura et origine animae’. Also notable are ‘De natura locorum’ discussing the geography of the earth and its climatic zones, as well as ‘De causis proprietatum elementorum’ on the properties of the elements and their position in the sublunar region. USTC 808374; USTC It. 16th p. 13; Graesse I, p. 55; Houzeau-Lancaster 1674. Not in Durling, Wellcome or Cantamessa. K. Reeds, ‘Albert on the Natural Philosophy of plant life’ in Albertus Magnus and the sciences (1980). Worldcat and USTC records only 5 copies in the US L3785
  • $13,557
  • $13,557
book (2)

An den Christlichen Adel Deutscher Nation: von des Christlichen Standes Besserung

LUTHER, Martin. FIRST EDITION. 4to, 47 unnumbered ll., lacking final blank. Gothic letter, woodcut floriated initial. T-p a little bit dusty, slight age yellowing, slender ink splash to lower outer corner of two gatherings, intermittent oil stain at gutter, occasional marginal fingermarks. Contemporary marginalia in Latin and German (a few slightly cropped), in different hands. A good copy in early paper boards, upper cover and spine slightly rubbed in a few places. Stamps of the Göttingen University Library ‘Ex Bibliotheca Acad. Georgiae Augustae’ and ‘Duplum Bibliothecae Gotting’ on verso of t-p. A good and very interesting copy of the first edition of this famous and influential pamphlet by Luther, the first of three great tracts which laid down the fundamental principles of the Reformation. The text, in the German vernacular, was published in August 1520 and four thousand copies were sold by the eighteenth of the month. A professor of theology and monk, Luther (1483-1546) was the initiator of the protestant Reformation. In July 1519, during a theological disputation with the counterreformer Johann Eck (professor of theology at Ingolstadt, 1486-1543) in Liepizig, Luther denied the divine origin of the papacy, condemned the sale of indulgences and declared that scripture alone was the basis of Christian belief. After this crucial debate, Leo X promulgated the papal bull ‘Exurge domine’, censoring the reformer’s views and threatening him with excommunication. ‘To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation concerning the reformation of the Christian Commonwealth’ here constitutes Luther’s answer to the bull, a formal act of secession from the Catholic Church in which he defined for the first time the doctrines of the universal priesthood and of the two kingdoms. The pamphlet attacks what Luther calls the ‘three walls of the Romanists’, metaphorical walls that the Church of Rome built in defence of its power. The first wall is that of the division between spiritual and temporal state, the second regards the authority to interpret scriptures, the third the authority to call a Council. Luther “claimed that spiritual power resided in the whole body of true believers, not in the ecclesiastical body alone; that Holy Scripture may be interpreted by all true Christians, not by Pope alone; and that the clergy are not a separate fraternity distinguished by some mystical ordination but are accountable to the worldly power. Luther advocated the complete abolition of the supremacy of the Pope over the State, attacking the theory of the two Estates and the two swords [.] He called for the creation of a National German Church with a national ecclesiastical council [.] ‘To the Christian Nobility’ [.] was shortly followed by the two other revolutionary tracts: ‘Concerning Christian liberty (on justification by faith alone) and ‘On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church’ (criticizing the sacramental system of the Church)” (PMM). USTC 632430; VD 16 L3758; Adams L1848; PMM 49; BM STC Ger. 16th century, p. 541. This ed. not in Graesse.
  • $70,385
  • $70,385
book (2)

Opusculum Raymundinum de Auditu Kabbalistico.

LULL, Ramon. 8vo. Pp. 117 (i). Roman letter. Woodcut of man in landscape to tp, woodcut diagrams within text. Ornamental woodcut head and tail pieces and initials. Label of Leo S. Olschki to pastedown, bookplate of Edward Sandford Burgess to fep, occasional contemp. marginalia, later numerals to rear ep. Light age browning, occasional marginal spot, intermittent foxing. A good copy in C1800 olive crushed morocco, triple fillet border, spine gilt, aeg. Born in the Kingdom of Majorca, Lull (or Raymond Lully or Raimundus Lullus, c.1232-c.1315) was a Franciscan tertiary, philosopher, and author of numerous works on theology, philosophy, astronomy and computation in Catalan, Latin and Arabic. Lullism developed from his philosophical approach, which examines ‘truth’ by deciphering and manipulating the letters of the alphabet. In fact, this complex philosophy anticipated work of elections and computational theory several centuries before their advent. Lull’s journey into mysticism began when he experienced a religious epiphany in which Jesus Christ appeared to him suspended in mid-air. Lull was a prolific missionary and preacher, especially in Northern Africa, but was beaten and stoned in Bougie, Algeria, dying the following year. He is one of the most important Spanish philosophical and religious figures in early modern history, the Ramon Lull University in Barcelona named in honour of his contributions to Spanish academia. "How successful was the thesis of 'De auditu kabbalistico' in the 16th and 17th centuries, could be shown by the impressive reception of this treatise, which ranges from about Giordano Bruno, Claude Duret, Johann Heinrich Alsted and Athanasius Kircher up to Leibniz" (G. Kurz [ed], Meditation und Erinnerung in der Frühen Neuzeit, p 115; trans.). This is the first book that deepens and broadens the ars combinatorial method invented by Lull through which, by using diagrams, figures, or words, one could connect information in each field to get closer to universal knowledge as well as to be able to memorize it.“The rarest and most sought-after of Raymond Lulle's works” (Biblioth. Stanislas de Guaita no. 530 and 1565, which only has the ed. of 1601). Interestingly, the total authorship of Lull has been contested, the work being also attributed to Pietro Mainardi (b. 1456). Mainardi was a prolific Kabbalist scholar and follower of Lull and Lullism. He did not sign the work, and therefore later editions like the present became ‘Opusculum Raymundinum’. Its success is attested by a number of documents and printed texts in which quotations from this work were combined with Lull’s own Kabbalistic texts. This is the third edition recorded in Palau, following 1518 and 1578 editions. “Le plus rare et le plus recherché des ouvrages de Raymond Lulle, avec une vignette naïvement gravée sur bois et des figures hors texte. Ad. Franck dans son ouvrage sur la Kabbale consacre un long article à R. Lulle et à cet opuscule.” (Caillet 6846). Palau 143.865; Kraus Duveen has the 1578 edition.
  • $3,962
  • $3,962
book (2)

Anatomia humani corporis

BIDLOO, Govert. FIRST EDITION. Large folio, 174 unnumbered ll. Roman letter, woodcut floriated initials and tailpieces. Beautifully engraved allegorical frontispiece, printer’s device to t-p, large oval portrait of Bidloo on fol. X7 signed ‘G. Lairesse pinx[it]’ and ‘A. Bloteling sculp[sit]’ with calligraphic caption and poem in elegiac couplets below, 105 engraved numbered anatomical plates in lovely clean clear impression (n. 23 folding, n. 10 in two parts). Intermittent very light foxing and ink marks mainly to margins, a few early repairs to lower edges and one corner of text without loss, very small tear to blank upper edge of frontispiece. An excellent wide-margined copy in contemporary Dutch calf, covers gilt ruled to a panel design, first border with gilt floral roll, second with gilt fleurons at corners and arabesque centrepiece, spine with raised bands and gilt ornaments at centres, rebacked,upper joint cracked but solid. Brass bosses to corners. Stunning first edition of this anatomical atlas by Bidloo, in a fine contemporary binding. It includes a set of impressive plates that depict anatomical specimens in nearly life-size proportions. Govert Bidloo (1649-1713) was a Dutch anatomist, professor and personal physician of William III of England. He was also a prolific opera librettist and playwright, author of the libretto for the first-ever Dutch opera in 1686. Credited with various medical discoveries, he studied anatomy in Amsterdam under the renowned Frederic Ruysch (1638-1731) and published ‘Anatomia humani corporis’ only three years after graduating. In this work, the human body is represented starting from the skin, moving on to the internal structures of the head, chest, and abdomen, the male and female reproductive organs (including stages of foetal development), muscles, and finally the skeletal bones of adults and children. The 105 splendidly engraved plates, frontispiece and portrait of the author were drawn by the famous Dutch painter Gerard de Lairesse (1641-1611). Highly successful in Amsterdam, Lairesse’s popularity surpassed even that of Rembrant at the end of the 17th century. Original in pattern and artistic in design, Bidloo’s plates break the idealistic tradition of Vesalian woodcuts for the first time: “Lairesse displayed the flayed corpses and the dissected parts in the most naturalistic way, including all the equipment such as the pins and the blocks that prop up the dissected parts [ ] The figures are artistically arranged with ordinary objects such as books, jars and cabinets placed in the same scene as cut-up torsos or limbs. In this work Lairesse brought the qualities of Dutch still-life painting to anatomical illustration” (Hagelin). In the title page, Bidloo proudly states that the plates were delineated “ad vivum” and it is possible that some of the dissections were especially done for the production of the atlas. Remarkably, detailed depictions of skin and hair were obtained thanks to the use of a microscope – Bidloo’s description of the papillary ridges of the thumb (plate 4) is a pioneering scientific observation that laid the foundation of forensic identification through fingerprints. “The plates are considered among the finest illustrations of the Baroque period” (Heirs of Hippocrates) and the engravings, possibly realised by the skilled engravers Abraham Bloteling or Peter and Philip VanGunst, are “elegantly done and artistically perfect” (Choulant). Though praised for their artistic merit, the plates have been criticised for being anatomically imprecise. Nonetheless, they were reprinted by the English surgeon William Cowper in his Anatomy of the Humane Bodies (1698), which gave no credit to Bidloo or Lairesse. This is one of the most famous acts of plagiarism in the history of medicine, which lead to an exchange of polemics between the two anatomists.
  • $36,018
  • $36,018
Bibliotheca Meadiana; sive Catalogus Librorum Richardi Mead

Bibliotheca Meadiana; sive Catalogus Librorum Richardi Mead, MD.

AUCTION CATALOGUE]. FIRST EDITION. 8vo. Pp. (iv) 242. Roman letter, some Italic. Pages ruled with contemp autograph of sale prices. Contemp autograph of Edward Aubery, 1774, to tp. Last page has ms sale totals. Yellowing, a few marks, small oil splash to foredge tp, a good clean copy in modern calf, title gilt on spine. Attractive copy of this important record of the 1754-1755 sale of Richard Mead’s impressive library. Mead (1673-1754) was an English physician and prolific book collector. He studied both classical literature and antiquities before completing his degree in medicine at the Universities of Leyden and Padua. His library reflects this dual-interest: it contains both medical books and early editions of the classics. Mead set up his medical of practice in the late 1690s in Stepney, and went on to publish a number of works describing various medical treatments and procedures. He achieved a number of honours at the College of Physicians and was appointed in 1727 as physician to King George II. Mead’s most popular published work was his 1744 ‘A Discourse on the Plague’, although all his works underwent several editions. On top of collecting books, Mead was an avid accumulator of pictures, coins and antiquities. His collection of these sold after his death for £10,550.17.10. This work contains a catalogue of his library and its sale. His library was stored during his later life in his Great Ormond Street home, and this catalogue lists a total of 6,827 items. These sold for £5,496.15.0 in this posthumous auction, which was attended by a number of notable scholars, medical figures and other important men from 18th century London. The majority of the works are multiple editions of important literature by classical authors including Euripides, Ovid, Horace, Virgil, Lucretius and Homer. The medical books in his collection are predominantly anatomical topics, and were mainly those published during Mead’s lifetime and probably presented to him. Mead also had a collection of older anatomical works by Bellini, Pacchioni, Peyer, Tarin, and others. The most notable volumes are those by Andreas Vesalius (1514-1565), known as the father of modern anatomy. This copy belonged to Rev. Edward Aubery of Middlesex who was rector of West Cammel, Somerset. He died in 1786 whereupon his library was auctioned by Benjamin White.
  • $1,378
  • $1,378
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VI Prognostica Von Verenderung und zufälligem Glück und Unglück der höchsten Potentaten im Römischen Reich

NEOTECHNUS, Henricus]. 4to, 76 unnumbered ll. German text in gothic letter and Latin in Roman, woodcut floriated initials, woodcut dragon device to t-p. Light age browning, small ink spots to t-p blank, a few margins a bit short in places (a few printed side notes slightly cropped), some deckle edges. Rare contemporary marginalia in Latin and underlining. A good copy in old marbled paper. Contemporary ms. Sum ex libris Davidis Tricenarii to t-p. A good copy of this rare collection of six prognostic texts from different authors, edited and commented by the otherwise unknown Henricus Neotechnus, medicus physicus (doctor and physician) from Naumburg, Saxony. This is the second edition, the first 1613. In this work, Neotechnus gathered a series of texts containing prophecies that were written in Latin and German during the XVI century. In particular, as specified in the title, the prognostications are concerned with the luck and misfortunes of the high potentates of the (Holy) Roman Empire, the Turks and the Pope . Throughout the volume, Neotechnus frequently includes his own comments and additions to the works of the authors that he quotes, entitling his paragraphs with Additio H.N. The first section contains the predictions of Johann Carion (1499-1537), court astrologer of Joachim I of Brandeburg and author of various prognostications based on the observation of the planets. His works were popular among the Lutheran circle of Melanchthon and he is famous for having predicted the Protestant Reformation, as well as various apocalyptic events. The second section includes an extract from the prophecies of Jacob Hartmann von Durlach, dated 1538. The third is concerned with a curious text entitled Prophecy and warning concerning Germany and the House of Saxony, written 300 years ago, found in the library of Nuremberg and sent by Veit Dietrich [German theologian, 1506-1549] to Philip Melanchthon . The fourth section is the largest and most important, as it comprises the famous Prognosticon Theophrasti Paracelsi . Theophrastus von Hohenheim (1493-1541), commonly known as Paracelsus, was a renowned Swiss physician, alchemist and theologian. This is a collection of 32 cryptic and allegorical prophecies extracted from his works on astrology and divination. Notably, in the pages of the Prognosticon , Paracelsus predicted a series of events which have been later associated with the Thirty Years War (1618-1648), contemporary to the time in which Neotechnus was writing. The fifth and sixth sections contain selected predictions by the Italian Antonio Torquato (or Arcoato, end of the XV century) concerning the Turks, and by an anonymous Mahometic priest concerning the Turkish Sultan Amurath I. The ex libris reads I come from the library of David Tricenarius . Tricenarius , rather than a surname, can be interpreted as an indication of age, meaning thirty years old or in his thirties . USTC 2044623; VD17 3: 316409H; Bibliographia Paracelsica (Berlin 1894) 316. Not in BM STC Ger. 17th century or Cantamessa. Worldcat records this edition in the US Harward, Univ. of Winsconsin and Washington Univ. in St. Louis and a sole copy of the 1st ed. at Harward. L3794
  • $25,381
  • $25,381
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Della tramutatione metallica sogni tre [ ] aggiuntovi di nuovo la Concordanza dei Filosofi

NAZARI, Giovanni Battista. FIRST EDITION of second work. 4to, (xvi) 231 (i). Roman and italic letter, woodcut floriated and historiated initials, headpieces and typographic ornaments. Aldine device to t-p and verso of last, 17 half to full-page woodcuts (some repeated) depicting the author, grotesque dragons and snakes with multiple heads, a donkey, Mercury, inscribed plinths, one table with letters in different alphabets. T-p a bit dusty, occasional fingermarks to margins, light age yellowing to a couple of central ll., small ink stain to upper margin of one fol. A good copy, crisp and clean, in contemporary vellum, covers triple gilt ruled with flower tools at corners and floral centrepiece, spine gilt ruled in compartments with square-shaped ornaments gilt at centres, all edges gilt and gauffered. Small label ‘696’ to front pastedown. A good copy of this fascinating alchemic treatise on the transmutation of metals, beautifully illustrated and in a contemporary binding. This is the third edition, the first to include the ‘Concordanza dei Filosofi’ at the end, here published for the first time. Giovanni Battista Nazari (XVI century) was an Italian humanist, historian and alchemist of Saiano, a small town in the province of Brescia (Lombardy, Italy). A scholar of the history and traditions of Brescia, he is most known for his philosophical-alchemical studies. “Du Fresnoy [French bibliographer, 1674-1755] says Nazari had read an infinity of authors, even those little known, and had worked on the subject [i.e. alchemy] for forty years” (Ferguson). ‘Three dreams on the transmutation of metals’, recounts three allegorical journeys, presented in the form of dreams, to the kingdoms of alchemy. The author is guided by Nymphs firstly to the sophist kingdom, based on false alchemical principles, then to the real kingdom, functioning in nature, and finally to the philosophical kingdom, which produces the true metamorphosis of the human into the divine. “The primary model for this work is an alchemical reinterpretation of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili (1499). The pilgrim-hero of Nazari’s story passes through forests, villages, lakes, tombs, gardens, labyrinths, arches, pyramids, places generally characterized by elaborate architectural constructions and decorated with statues and enigmatic inscriptions. He stops to look at ‘odd inventions’ and then ‘considers them and goes over them in his memory’. The reader is invited, even required, to do the same, as she/he turns the pages of the book and finds bizarre, hideous, and startling illustrations, such as a dragon with three heads, or an emasculated Mercury with no hands or feet, or a donkey playing a pipe surrounded by dancing monkeys” (Bolzoni). The author is represented sleeping in an oak-wood, or listening to the teachings of Count Bernardus Trevisanus, an Italian alchemist whose name is probably a pseudonym, and details of his life appear to be fictitious. Another curious woodcut depicts a table with 45 compartments, each containing the first letter of the alphabets of different languages. Appended at the end, we find ‘Concordanza dei Filosofi’, which the author presents as “extracts from the books of the philosophers, divided into theory and practice”. It contains a series of sections summarising and translating works ascribed to the alchemist Arnaldus de Villa Nova, mainly concerning the philosophers’ stone. These chapters are titled: ‘Rosario de Filosofi’, ‘Novo Lume’ and ‘Libro chiamato Magisterio’. Remarkably, this edition also includes a famous poem by Rigino Danielli on the philosopher’s stone: particularly appreciated by the Italian alchemists of the XV and XVI centuries, this poem is known in different versions and imitations. USTC 844354; BM STC It. 16th century, p. 463; Graesse IV, p. 652; Duveen p. 426; Wellcome I, 4517; Caillet 7937; Ferguson II, 131; Bibliotheca Esoterica 3232. Not in Brunet. L. Bolzoni, The Gallery of Memory (1995) L3809
  • $12,717
  • $12,717
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De cognoscendis et curandis præcipue internis humani corporis morbis libri tres [ ] Accessit eiusdem liber de febribus

LE POIS, Nicolas. 8vo, pp. (xxxii) 874 (iv) 875 – 968 (xxxii). ‘De febribus’ with separate t-p. Roman and italic letter, occasional Greek. Woodcut floriated initials, charming headpieces and tailpieces with foliage and grotesques. Printer’s mark on t-ps and verso of last, large oval portrait of Le Pois on verso of first t-p, with monogram of Pierre Woeiriot. First t-p a bit dusty, intermittent light browning and mainly marginal spotting, tiny wormhole to outer edge of 4 ll. A good copy in contemporary vellum, upper cover a bit stained at head, ms. title to spine, traces of ties. Acquisition note on fly reads “Emit sibi Claudantonius Buson [Gl?] Vesontinus 1595” A very good copy of the second edition of this bestselling treatise on diagnostics by Le Pois. The French Nicolas Le Pois (also known as Nicolaus Piso, 1527-1587) was born at Nancy, and he is regarded as one of the best physicians of the 16th century. After studying Medicine in Paris under the celebrated Jacobus Sylvius (1478-1555), he succeeded his brother Anthony as physician to Charles III, duke of Lorraine, in 1578. The beautiful oval portrait, depicting Le Pois at 52 years of age in 1579, was realised by the French engraver, painter, sculptor and Pierre Woeiriot de Bouzey (c. 1532–1596). “De cognoscendis et curandis praecipue internis humani corporis morbis” is Le Pois chief work, which he realised collecting information from the best medical books written from Hippocrates to his day and integrating his own personal experience. Interestingly, the list of his sources (at the beginning) includes the contemporary Parisian academics “Duretus, Pietreus, Gormelen, Rochon, Marescot” whose works were unpublished; Lepois states “we hope, God willing, that their numerous and diverse works will soon be published”. The author originally composed this treatise for his two sons, Christian and Charles, as a useful guide for their medical studies. However, after reading the manuscript, his friend and celebrated physician Anutius Foesius (1528-1595) convinced him to publish it. The first edition, printed in Frankfurt in 1580, was a great success. Le Pois dedicates special attention to the identification of symptoms (“cognoscendi”), followed by their appropriate cure (“curandi”). The work is divided into three books, in which diseases are presented for each body part from the head downwards. Particularly interesting are the chapters on insanity and melancholy, in which the author advises to resist the disease in the early stages, before it becomes too strong. “The French physician Nicolas Le Pois recommends a form of shock treatment to change false fixed mental habits: when a melancholic succumbs to false fears or strange ideas, he should ‘stop upon a sudden, curb himself in’, deliberately thinking of something opposite or doing something to distract himself” (Lund). A final section, with its own separate title page, contains a short work titled “De Febribus”, dedicated to describing different types of fever and how to treat them. The note on fly can be translated as “Claudantonius Buson of Besançon, bought [this book] for himself, 1595”. Born at Besançon in 1569, Claude-Antoine Buson, Lord of Fontain, Champdiver and Auxon, was a French nobleman and governor of the city from 1594 to 1627. A renowned jurist who obtained his degree in Law in 1590, he became adviser to the parliament of Dole in 1630. He is the author of various printed and manuscript works. USTC 677895; VD16 L 1279; Adams P1311; BM STC Ger. 16th century, p. 699; Durling 2799; Wellcome I 5055; Not in Brunet, Heirs of Hippocrates; this ed. not in Graesse. M.A. Lund, A User's Guide to Melancholy (2021)
  • $6,543
  • $6,543
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Policraticus de nugis curialium et vestigijs philosophorum continens libros octo

JOHN OF SALISBURY. 8vo. ff. [xii], CCCLXXV, [i]. Roman letter. Title page in red and black, charming white on black floriated woodcut initials in various sizes, Petri Jacobi A Pigati et amices in contemporary hand in lower margin of t-p, P. Moran in a later hand above. Light age yellowing, light waterstaining in places, a little heavier on one or two leaves, ink spots to external fore-edge. A good, crisp copy, in early boards, recently covered with reuse of an C18th printed antiphonal leaf in red and black. Third edition, based on the second published the same year by Jean Petit in quarto, both are textually distinct from the first of 1476. John of Salisbury, humanist and scholar of the middle ages was for thirty years the central figure of English learning and was the fullest representative of the best scholarly training which France had to give. (DNB). He was trained in scholastic theology and philosophy at Paris, and his writings are invaluable for summarising many of the metaphysical speculations of his time. This work the Statesman's Book was one of the most important medieval treatises on statecraft and political theory. John was employed by Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury and later by his successor Thomas à Beckett who he was accompanying at the latter s assassination. (William Tracy, Beckett s murderer, boasted of having broken John s arm before killing the Archbishop.) With the increased absence of King Henry II on the continent John became more and more indispensable in the running of Church affairs, the charge of all Britain as touching church matters, was laid upon me , he also gained considerable insight into the running of the state, and was involved in numerous missions in Europe trying to arbitrate between the Archbishop and the King. John fell into disfavour with Henry II over increasing taxation of the church in England, and it was in this period of enforced leisure that he wrote his Policraticus . Its eight books deal respectively with luck and devotion - to unsuitable goals, the distribution of duties according to the political constitution of the ancients; nature and mathematics; vice and virtue - pride as the root of all evil and passion as a leprosy; the differences between kings and tyrants - the moral characters of tyrants, the destruction of tyrants as lawful according to the Bible, the need for a ruler to always hold the law of Gods before all things; the republic - the arrangement of the republic as being alike to a hive of bees, the people as moulded by the strengths of the ruler and the government, the military and military skill - the hand of the republic as armed or unarmed, the formula of the oath of the soldier, the armed soldier as bound by God; academics, philosophers and religious, - academics as more modest than the others, and so less blinded to truth. Brunet states the Jean Petit edition of the same year on which this edition is based Ne paraissent pas être des réimpressions de la précédente . One of the most important political and secular philosophical works of the middle ages and certainly the most important by an Englishman, handsomely printed by Fradin in Lyon. BM STC. Fr. C16 p. 243. Brunet III 547. Graesse III 467. Adams J 302. Gültlingen. III p. 95: 4.
  • $3,271
  • $3,271
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Méthode universelle et très facile pour faire et descrire toutes sortes de quadrans & d horologes,.

HUME, James FIRST EDITION, second issue. 8vo. pp. [iv] 490 [ii]: [-]2, A-Z8, Aa-Gg8, Hh6, [last blank]. Roman letter some Italic. Title with Moreau s engraved printers device of a salamander in flames on t-p, woodcut initials and headpieces, over two hundred woodcut mathematical illustrations, some full page. Mostly light browning, a few woodcuts fractionally shaved at outer margin, sporadic worm holes and trails, mostly marginal but affecting a few letters in places, a few marginal paper flaws (the printer decided they were not problematic enough to warrant discarding the paper). Rust burn to one leaf affecting a few letters. A perfectly acceptable copy in calf c. 1800, covers bordered with a gilt scroll, spine git ruled in compartments, worn and rubbed. Rare work by the Scottish mathematician James Hume, a very complete treatise on the construction of sundials with over two hundred woodcut illustrations. It appears there was a pevious issue of this work with a slightly different title page; this edition uses the same sheets, omitting the dedication to the Marquis de Cinq-Mars. It is probable the dedication was abandoned as a consequence of the Marquis beheading, on Richelieu s orders, at Lyon in 1641 for rebellion, along with Francois-Auguste de Thou (son of Jacques the celebrated bibliophile) who was unlucky enough to be caught up in the conspiracy against the king. In this treatise on how to build sundials, Hume apologies in his preface for his French which is not his "natural language stating that he preferred to speak in a clear and scientifically precise language which was not always easy on the ear. He also remarks that he wanted to "give France what she had only seen in Latin, until now." Hume was a Scottish mathematician who spent most of his life in Paris. Most of his publications were on advanced mathematics and trigonometry and he is perhaps most remembered for his Une algèbre de Viète, d'une methode nouvelle, claire, et facile. published in 1636. In 1636 Hume (also) published at Paris 'Traité de la Trigonométric pour resoudre tous Triangles rectilignes et sphériques,' &c At the end of the latter volume appears a list of nine mathematical works which Hume had written in Latin There are besides 'De Horologiis' and 'Grammatica Hebræa,' proving that Hume's attainments were not purely mathematical. DNB. This work gives a theoretical and practical study of all the types of sundials then known: horizontal, equinoctial, vertical, southern and polar, but includes much additional mathematical material and what the author terms as beaucoup de chose, qui seront assez curieuse et utiles. It is in effect more a theoretical mathematical treatise than a work on sundials, introducing the reader to mathematical theory, including the use of algebra and trigonometry, via a practical work on sundials. USTC 6040503. Houzeau & Lancaster 11453.
  • $2,108
  • $2,108
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L’horographie curieuse. Contenant diuerses methodes, nouuelles & generales; pour faire promptement, . toutes sortes d’horologes.

BOBYNET, Pierre. 8vo. 2 vols. 1) pp. 14, [ii] 119 [i] 154 [viii]. 2) pp. (iv), 23 eng. pl. (1fldg.) pp. 24 (iv). Roman letter, some italic. Woodcut device on first title, woodcut initials, typographical ornaments, numerous woodcut tables, contemporary autograph of P. Trouard de Riolle on first title De Riolle on second, P. Riolle inscribed on top edge of both works. Light age yellowing, folding plate repaired along folds without loss, minor water staining on first and last few leaves of second volume, the odd mark, end leaves a little dust soiled. Very good, entirely unsophisticated copies, crisp and clean with plates in good dark impressions, in contemporary vellum, substantial remains of ties, vellum a little soiled. A lovely copy, remarkably preserved in two volumes in its original vellum, of this most interesting popular work on sundials by Pierre Bobynet, printed in the town of La Fleche undoubtedly for the students of the celebrated Jesuit college there. Indeed the approbation and permission, signed by Jean Filleau, provincial of the Society gives permission to print the work to George Griveau on behalf of the College Royal de La Fleche. The Jesuit father Pierre Bobynet [1593-1668] was a professor of philosophy and rector of La Flèche and several other Jesuit colleges. He was born in Montluçon to a relatively poor family, his father was a tanner, though he was recognised very young as having aptitude, and joined the Jesuits at the age of 12. He became rector of the Jesuit colleges at Moulins and Quimper before he moved to La Fleche, where he taught Philosophy, Theology, and Rhetoric for over 24 years. It seems, however, his passion was for mathematics. This was his first published work and he went on to publish two more on the subject and another on longimetry. The work is a very complete treatise on sundials with sections on the terminology used, the instruments required in their fabrication, and theoretical and practical gnomonics describing numerous wall, garden or pocket sundials. Bobynet s work was one of the first to discuss Dialing scales which were used to lay out the face of a sundial geometrically. They were first proposed by Samuel Foster in 1638, and later produced by George Serle and Anthony Thompson in 1658 on a ruler. There are two scales: the latitude scale and the hour scale. They were used to draw all gnomonic dials and reverse engineer existing dials to discover their original intended location. These scales remained virtually unchanged for 250 years. Most copies of this work were bound as a single volume or are found without the plates. This copy is remarkably preserved in its original vellum as a two volume set. We have not been able to discover the P. Trouard de Riolle but it seems probable that he was the first owner of the work and was probably a student at the Royal College at La Fleche. USTC 6810164 and 6810265. De Backer-Sommervogel I 1557. Houzeau-Lancaster 11458.
  • $4,725
  • $4,725
book (2)

De idolatria magica, dissertatio

FILESAC, Jean. FIRST EDITION. 8vo., ff. (viii) 73 (iii). Roman and italic letter. Printer’s device on t-p, woodcut floriated and historiated initials, headpieces with foliage, animals and putti. T-p dusty, age yellowing, some marginal spotting, tiny wormhole to outer blank margin of first 6 ll., slight waterstain to outer edge of last gathering. A good copy in contemporary limp vellum, covers a bit soiled, small hole to upper cover, missing ties. Early ms. note to front paste down, autograph “Samuel Hundius, Romae 1652, φρονεῖν εἰς τό σωφρονεῖν” to t-p. Rare first edition of this fascinating treatise against illicit magic. A Parisian theologian and priest, Jean Filesac (1550-1638) was rector of the Sorbonne in 1586 and as such was addressed by Giordano Bruno in his ‘Camoeracensis Acrotismus’. Afterwards, he became dean of the Faculty of Theology and later served as confessor of Ravaillac, the assassin of Henry IV. He was regarded as a pious and godly man. Announcing his death in a letter of April 7, 1638, Gui Patin (1601-1972) – doctor and dean of the Faculty of Medicine in Paris – described him as “more than an octogenarian, a man of great learning and eminent for many virtues”. ‘De idolatria magica dissertatio’ (Dissertation on magical idolatry) is aimed at demonstrating the diabolical character of magic, using a collection of quotations from ancient authors, church fathers and church councils. In the seven chapters, Filesac presents the Devil’s malefic powers and where they come from, he describes demons, the use of spells, magic words, exorcisms, sacrifices and rejects the use of magic in medicine. Interestingly, Numa Pompilius – the legendary king credited with introducing Rome’s most important religious institutions – is condemned as ‘artifex supersitionis’ (master of superstition) and used as an example to define magic as a form of idolatry. In this treatise, Filesac “asserted that the transportation of witches to nocturnal sabbats had been so thoroughly proved by the most erudite men of the age, that, if anyone any longer cherished any doubt about it, he should be judged not only a wanderer from the Christian faith and religion but as sadly deficient in reason and judgement. Filesac futher affirmed that magicians, sorcerers and witches in his time in the Christian world far surpassed in number all the brothels and houses of ill fame. These vehement declarations of Filesac were not, however, generally accepted, for he complains that these servants of Satan are held to be innocent and harmless, that evils for which they are responsible are attributed to chance or vulgar error, and that some men have become so insane as to deny boldly the existence of demons” (Thorndike). “Samuel Hundius” is almost certainly the German poet and historian Samuel Hund (1620 - after 1680). He wrote mainly in his youth, often using the pseudonym ‘Numa Sedulis’. Born in Bickau, close to Herzberg in Saxony, he studied jurisprudence in Helmstedt and later in Strasbourg. In 1657, Hund was appointed electoral councillor by the Saxon elector Johann Georg II. He travelled to Italy, France and the Netherlands, and owned a significant private library, which was auctioned after his death. The short Greek sentence ‘φρονεῖν εἰς τό σωφρονεῖν’ is a quotation from Paul’s Gospel (Romans 12:3), which can be literally translated as ‘so to think as to think soberly’ and it is an invitation to be modest, and think with proper moderation and judgement. USTC 6017101; Caillet 3934; Goldsmith F232. Not in Brunet or Graesse. L. Thorndike, A History of Magic and Experimental Science (1958), p. 540. On Hund, see: R. Jürgensen, Melos conspirant singuli in unum: Repertorium bio-bibliographicum zur Geschichte des Pegnesischen Blumenordens in Nürnberg (1644-1744) (2006), p. 102-103. Worldcat records only two copies in the US.
  • $3,998
  • $3,998
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Giardino di agricultura.

BUSSATO, Marco. FIRST EDITION. 4to, ff. (vi) 53 (iii). Roman and italic letter, printer’s device to t-p, woodcut floriated and historiated initials, typographical ornaments, two charming headpieces and one tailpiece with foliage and grotesques. 20 ¾ page woodcuts illustrating grafting techniques, gardening instruments and landscapes (one repeated 3 times), 12 ¼ page vignettes depicting monthly tasks. T-p a bit dusty, yellowing to one central gathering, occasional fingersoiling to outer blank margins, small stain from a wax drop to 6 ll. (affecting two words), small tear to lower outer corner of one fol. not affecting text. A good copy in contemporary vellum, covers a bit worn, small hole to spine, missing ties. Early ms. annotations indicating chapters and contents of the book to verso of fly, later ms. ex libris “D’Andrea Serafini” and “St. Maren(?)” to t-p. A good copy of the first edition of this successful work on horticulture. Marco Bussato (Bussati or Busatti, first half of the 16th century – after 1600) was born in Ravenna. Orphaned at an early age, he earned his living as an itinerant expert of arboreal grafting: he visited “many places in Italy” and Rome in particular, learning the agricultural practices of different regions. A manual based on his experience, ‘Giardino d’agricoltura’ presents horticulture as an art of which its readers will learn the ‘most beautiful secrets’. Bussato’s perspective is that of a vigilant and attentive landowner. A rather ‘aristocratic’ point of view evident in the distinction that he makes between useful and delightful agriculture, despising herbaceous plants that require "great effort and sweat" and concentrating on tree crops, that bring "joy to the eye". The latter are more ‘suitable’ for the gentleman, and indispensable elements of that taste for the landscape that dominates Renaissance agriculture. The 64 chapters focus on the growth of fruit trees, with a few excursions into the cultivation of cereals, the production of wine, breeding pigeons, and other country activities. “In spite of its title, Bussato’s main subject is fruit trees, from seedlings in their nursery to the careful pruning of mature trees, illustrated with some of the first accurate and detailed diagrams of methods of grafting. These illustrations first appeared in the author’s ‘Prattica historiata dell’inestare gli arbori’, a treatise on grafting alone, which was published in Ravenna in 1578. Its text was revised and included in the larger ‘Giardino’ in 1592, which was itself enlarged for later editions in 1593 and 1612. A monthly calendar of work to be done in the garden completes the book, each month with its own head-piece showing an occupation appropriate to the season. E.A. Bunyard, writing in 1923 in the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society about early Italian gardening books, said of Bussato that “The author was a poet, and the book is written in rather more literary style than usual in such treatises”. The elegance of its printing is equally unusual in books of this kind, though given the date and place of its publication that is perhaps less remarkable.” (Raphael) This volume includes a tailpiece with two winged figures with trumpets (fol. G5, recto) which, according to Mortimer (Harward Italian 95), does not appear on all copies. The manuscript ex-libris might belong to the Italian public land surveyor Andrea Serafini, active at the half of the 18th century in the Veneto region. His name is recorded in the archives of the State of Venice (ASVe, Provveditori sopra beni comunali, b. 232, neg. 1949), and various sources mention his work in measuring the extension of fields, wine-making estates and woods. A skilled illustrator, he realised several detailed drawings and maps of cities and lands as part of his job; these are particularly interesting nowadays for the study of the historical geography of north-eastern Italy. USTC 817291; Brunet p. 1419; Graesse I, p. 581; BM STC It.
  • $4,725
  • $4,725
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Contrafehe Der Herrn Fugger, und Frawen Fuggerin. [with] Manuscript biographies of the Fugger Family.

KILIAN, Lukas & KILIAN, Wolfgang [with] VON LIPOWSKY, Felix Joseph FIRST EDITION thus. 4to. 2 works in 1. Ff. (ii) 129 (i); Ff. (i) 229 (misnumbered 230). First work printed, second ms. First, Gothic letter, ornamental initials and tail pieces, engraved tp of Fugger family arms, 129 engraved portraits of Fugger family members by the Kilian brothers followed by 232 leaves of Felix Joseph von Lipowsky’s handwritten biographies of the Fugger family, red and black ink, borders red, some leaves left blank. Eps contain Lipowsky’s indexes of the family members on thick paper. Ms to tp ‘No 2 1683’, C18 stamp of Bavarian Royal Library to verso and margin of first two portraits. Slight age yellowing, tp repaired along gutter, marginal tears to a few leaves, slight water stain first few upper outer blank corners, minor marginal ink or oil spot. Manuscript on good quality, clean, thick paper. A unique volume in C18 half sheep over speckled boards, spine gilt with black and green morocco labels, monogram and insignia of the Bavarian Royal Library on spine, wear to corners and spine, all edges speckled green. Unique and exceptional collection of exquisite engravings of the famed Fugger family originally by Dominicus Custos, expanded and updated posthumously by his sons-in-law Lukas and Wolfgang Kilian, bound with extensive and meticulous handwritten biographies of the family by the Bavarian lawyer, historian and archivist Felix Joseph von Lipowsky (1764-1842). The German edition is rare. Celebrated portrait engraver Dominicus Custos (1560-1612) was first commissioned to produce an ambitious collection of likenesses of the enormously wealthy Fugger family in 1593. Following his death, his sons-in-law expanded and updated the first edition, adding new family members and redoing the original Fugger portraits in older age. This was published in Latin in 1618, expanded to include two more members in this 1620 vernacular edition. The Kilian additions are signed. Along with the wonderfully executed images are brief corresponding biographies in Gothic letter, giving their birth and death dates, offspring and spouse, and sometimes a longer account of their life. The engravings are exquisitely detailed and in excellent impression. The sheer wealth of the family is evoked through the stunning costume, meticulously wrought fur and silk, and carefully depicted beadwork and jewellery. It commences with Jacobus Fugger Senex and follows with male and female family members from the late fifteenth century up to the early seventeenth century, concluding with Juliana Fugger, daughter of Trajan Fugger (1604-). This copy has been delightfully augmented by the thoroughly researched and handwritten addenda of Felix Joseph von Lipowsky, which contains detailed accounts of family members; a treasure of biographical and geneological study. An example is Carl Graf von Fugger, where Lipowsky provides notes on dates, close family members and references to where information can be found on him in ancestral archives. Lipowsky was born in Wiesensteig from Bohemian nobility and studied law in Munich before the Napoleonic Wars when he was temporarily entrusted as city commander. Following the Wars, Lipowsky began to research Bavarian art and cultural history, publishing biographical encyclopaedias like the Baierische Musik- Lexikon and Baierische Künstler-Lexikon. He was appointed in 1819 as Archivar der bayerischen Ständeversammlung where he worked on an extensive publication cataloguing traditional Bavarian costume. His Geschichte der Jesuiten in Schwaben, Vol I, contains mention of the Fugger family, as do a number of his other publications. This volume provides a charming insight into the exceptional work of a dedicated archivist and Bavarian enthusiast.
  • $8,666
  • $8,666
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The Nevv Testament of Iesus Christ, translated faithfully into English, out of the authentical Latin

NEW TESTAMENT. FIRST EDITION. 4to. pp. [xxviii], 745, [xxvii]. a-c⁴, d², A-5D⁴, 5E². Roman letter, some italic, woodcut initials, woodcut and typographical head and tail pieces, title within ornate typographical border, floriated and historiated woodcut initials, wood and metal cut head and tail pieces, early mss. autograph crossed out on title. Mostly light age yellowing, title dusty, lower blank margin replaced, last two leaves of table re-margined and mounted, occasional light marginal waterstain, mark or spot. A good, unusually clean copy, with good margins, in C17th calf, covers with unidentified later monogram S. H over a cross gilt at centres, rebacked, raised bands a.e.r., brass clasps and catches, corners and edges restored. Rare first edition in English of the Roman Catholic version of the New Testament, with extensive commentary and notes. It remained the standard and virtually the only English Catholic bible for some four hundred years. (The Old Testament followed in 1609-10; although it was finished considerably earlier it was not published for lack of funds). The work of preparing such a version was undertaken by the members of the English College at Douai, in Flanders, founded by William Allen (afterwards cardinal) in 1568. The chief share of the translating was borne by Dr. Gregory Martin, formerly of St. John's College, Oxford. His text was revised by Thomas Worthington, Richard Bristowe, John Reynolds, and Allen himself all of them Oxford men. A series of notes was added, designed to answer the theological arguments of the Reformers; these were prepared by Allen, assisted by Bristowe and Worthington.The object of the work was, of course not limited to controversial purposes; in the case of the New Testament, especially, it was meant for pious use among Catholics. The fact however, that the primary end was controversial explains the course adopted by the translators. In the first place they translated directly, not from the original Hebrew or Greek, but from the Latin Vulgate of St. Jerome. This had been declared authoritative for Catholics by the Council of Trent; but it was also commonly admitted that the text was purer than in any manuscripts at that time extant in the original languages. Then, also, in the translation, many technical words were retained bodily, such as pasch, parasceve, azymes, etc. In some instances, also where it was found difficult or impossible to find a suitable English equivalent for a Latin word, the latter was retained in an anglicized form. Thus in Phil., ii, 8, we get "He exinanited himself", and in Hebrews 9:28, "Christ was offered once to exhaust the sins of many". It was considered that an ordinary reader, finding the word unintelligible, would pause and inquire its meaning and that this was preferable to satisfying him with an inadequate rendering. Catholic encyclopaedia. Following in the counter-Reformation tradition of Catholic polemical Bibles dating back to Luther s early Catholic opponents, this version of the New Testament included not just a vernacular translation from the Latin Vulgate but also copious annotations denouncing Protestant heresies, alleging that false and heretical corruptions had been deliberately made in Protestant English translations of the Bible. Torrance Kirby. Paul's Cross and the Culture of Persuasion in England, 1520-1640. "The appearance of a Catholic Bible in English undermined traditional protestant criticism that the Roman church kept scripture out of the hands of the laity. Instead protestant theologians such as Thomas Cartwright, William Whitaker, and William Fulke attacked the credentials of the translators and denounced their work as filled with error. Despite such criticism, revised versions of Martin's translation remained extremely popular throughout the English-speaking world for nearly four hundred years" (ODNB)
  • $13,803
  • $13,803
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Astronomica [with] Commentarius

MANILIUS, Marcus [with] SCALIGER, Joseph. 8vo. 2 parts in 1. Pp. (xii) 136 (viii); Pp. 292 (xii). Italic and Roman letter. Printer’s device to both tps, arms of the dedicatee Henri III to verso of first, ornamental head and tail pieces and initials. Astrological diagrams to 7 pages of second part, one shaved a little at fore edge. Age yellowing, two minor marginal worm holes to first tp, light marginal water stain to fore edge of first part, foxing and spotting, mainly to second. A good copy in C17 vellum, red morocco label, aeb. First edition published by Joseph Scaliger of this very early didactic poem on astrology by Roman poet Marcus Manilius (1st c. AD). Joseph Scaliger (1540-1609), a French Calvinist and humanist was the first to critically edit Manilius’s enigmatic work since the editio princeps published in Nuremberg in 1473 by the astronomer Regiomontanus. The poem is divided into five books and is accompanied by a second part containing Scaliger’s extensive commentary as well as astrological diagrams to seven pages. The poem itself demonstrates influence from Lucretius’s De rerum natura and describes the zodiac and Roman astrology. Manilius’s identity is shrouded in mystery, as is when he wrote the work. The only historical event explicitly mentioned is the Battle of the Teutoberg Forest, leading scholars to suggest a date in the early-mid 1st century AD. Volk (2009) states that the poem is the earliest surviving extensive and comprehensible work on astronomy and astrology. The five books commence with the origin of the universe and the nature and composition of earth and space. The orbit of planets is discussed in depth as well as each zodiacal sign and birth charts, horoscopes and ascendants. Following this classical myths are used as vehicles for considering celestial phenomena. Stoic, Platonic, Pythagorean and Epicurean views are all present and modern scholars consistently praise the complex and elegant writing style of the poem. Housman (1916) exclaimed that Manilius was “the one Latin poet who excelled even Ovid in verbal point and smartness”. Scaliger established himself as the preeminent Latin scholar and critic of his day through the publication of this 1579 critical edition. His commentary is essentially a treatise on ancient astronomy and it forms an introduction to his later publication ‘De emendation temporum’ (1583) which sought to expand the contemporary perception of ancient history from just Greeks and Romans to Persians, Babylonians and Egyptians. Indeed, Manilius’s identity as a Roman was much debated and questioned; he has been suggested to be an African or Asiatic Greek. Scaliger’s edition reintroduced Manilius to the scholarly world and led to many later editions including Boeckler’s, Bentley’s and Housman’s. Adams M361; Smitskamp, The Scaliger Coll., 97; Dibdin II 224; Ren 181:4; Houzeau & Lancaster 1037; Grassi p. 434.
  • $2,833
  • $2,833
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Portiforium seu breviarium pars hyemalis.

USE OF SARUM. 4to. 3 parts in one vol. Ff. (viii) cxx; cxviii; + 44 unnumbered leaves A-E8F4. Red and black letter, double column. Woodcut architectural border to general tp with printer’s device, repeated on verso of final leaf, title to each part within full page woodcut architectural border, surrounding elaborate cut of respectively the holy family, King David and Christ on the cross in remarkable detail, large woodcut initials in several series, criblé, historiated and others. C19 label of M. H. Bloxam, autograph of M. H. Bloxam to head of first tp, 1831, contemp. ex libris to foot ‘Liber Ste:Malthus & amic[o]r[um]’, occasional contemp. Latin marginalia to second part. Light age yellowing, slight browning to a few leaves, general tp repaired at fore edge, and last leaf in upper margin, very light water stain to lower outer corner of first few leaves, occasional light foxing, tiny marginal worm trails to a few leaves of second part, light splashes to fols. lxiiii-lxv of second part, repair to upper inner gutter of last few leaves, single worm hole below. In C18 blind stamped calf, rebacked, spine remounted, aer. This interesting volume contains the Use of Sarum or Sarum Rite which was developed at Salisbury Cathedral around the late eleventh century and was the principal liturgical rite in use in England until the Reformation. It is similar but by no means identical to the Roman rite, the main liturgical rite of the Latin or Western church. Salisbury Cathedral was a dominant influence on British liturgy from the Middle Ages until the English Reformation. The origins of the Sarum Rite can be traced to William the Conquerer’s religious policies in which he installed Norman nobleman into religious positions across England. Salisbury, where the bishop Osmund was appointed, used to be called Old Sarum. Osmund’s revisions to the liturgy resulted in the production of new and influential missals, breviaries and other manuals which became widely used. “The Sarum Missal, above all, was certainly in greater demand than any other single book in pre-Reformation England, for every mass-saying priest and every church or chapel in the land was obliged to own or share a copy for daily use .In a total of forty-eight editions of the Sarum Missal from 1501 to 1534 (the year when the final break with Rome was signalized by Henry VIII’s Statute of Supremacy) twenty-six were printed in Paris, sixteen at Rouen, two at Antwerp, and only four in London . After 1534, except for a brief reappearance in 1554-7 under Mary Tudor, when five editions were produced (two at Rouen, one in Paris, two in London), the Sarum Missal was printed no more. Existing copies seemed useless or even damnable, except to a clandestine few, their possession became dangerous to life or liberty, and nearly all were destroyed by fire, or neglect, or used as waste paper. In our time, when men value them again at last for their sanctity, or beauty, or as monuments of religious or printing history, or as bibliographical marvels, these missals are rare indeed.” George D. Painter. ‘Two Missals printed for Wynkyn de Worde.’ In the period when this missal was published, the Church of England had separated from the Roman Catholic Church, but despite this the Sarum Breviary remained under use for the canonical hours as decreed by the Canterbury Convocation. Under the reign of Edward VI the Use of Sarum provided foundational material for the Book of Common Prayer. It was also popularised during the reign of Mary I, when this work was produced. During the Reformation, the vast majority of copies of the Sarum Rite were destroyed. Mary had ordered the reprinting of the Sarum Rite; this was their swansong, they were never reissued again.
  • $7,234
  • $7,234
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In Somnium Scipionis Libri II.Eiusdem Conviviorum Saturnaliorum Libri VII.

MACROBIUS, AMBROSIUS THEODOSIUS. FIRST ESTIENNE EDITION. 8vo. Ff. (vii) 569 (xlii). Italic and Roman letter. Figurative head pieces and ornamental initials. Later shelf no. to fep, very occasional earlier marginalia. Slight age yellowing, some leaves lightly inked. A good clean copy in exquisite C18 vellum, gilt ornamental and floriated borders in the Neoclassical style, gilt fleurons to spine, morocco label, blue silk moiré pastedowns and endpapers with border gilt, dentelles gilt, aeg. Exquisitely bound Estienne edition of these two texts by the Roman author Macrobius. The first is a commentary on the Dream of Scipio narrated by Cicero at the end of the Republic in which the elder Scipio appears to his grandson, and describes the life of the good after death and the constitution of the universe from a Stoic and Neo-Platonic point of view; from this Macrobius discourses upon the nature of the cosmos, transmitting much classical philosophy to the later Middle Ages. The second work, Macrobius’ Saturnalia, with its idolisation of Rome’s pagan past, has been described as a pagan “machine de guerre”. It recounts the discussions held at the house of Vettius Agorius Praetextatus (c. 325-385) during the Saturnalia holiday and was written for the benefit of Macrobius’ son Eustachius. He covers a broad range of topics – mythological, astronomical and medical, tantalizingly citing numerous ancient texts, many of them now lost to history. This text was edited by the renowned printer Henri Estienne. Estienne apologised for the quality of the printing of this edition: some leaves are rather light, though the text remains clearly legible. This edition is important as it is based on manuscripts that had been recently viewed by Estienne himself. Upon its publication it was sent to the famed Frankfurt Fair. As well as the text and commentary, Estienne included an explanation of the process of examining ancient manuscripts in order to arrive at the most complete and definitive text possible, providing a fascinating insight into Renaissance textual transmission. BM STC Fr. P. 295; Ren 150:4; Adams M71; Not in Brunet.
  • $3,288
  • $3,288
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Reprobación de supersticiones y hechicerías

CIRUELO, Pedro. 4to, ff. 88. Gothic letter, woodcut floriated and historiated initials, typographical ornaments. T-p in red and black within charming architectural border with putti, foliage and heads. Two full page woodcuts, colophon printed in an hourglass shape within ornamental border. Light age yellowing, blank margins of t-p and last very slightly soiled, light fingersoiling intermittently to margins, light ink smudges to 3 pp, mostly marginal, light waterstain to four early ll. Rare contemporary ms. marginalia in Spanish. A good copy in modern half- calf, marbled boards, spine with raised bands, green silk bookmark. A very good copy of this fascinating bestseller treatise in defence of ‘true astrology’, against all forms of magical superstition, by the Spanish Pedro Ciruelo. First published in 1537, it was reprinted several times during the 16th century and widely disseminated in Spain. At the time, works on similar topics were commonly composed in Latin: this treatise, written in vernacular to reach a wider audience, is one of the few known examples in Spanish and the most famous of the early 16th century. A mathematician, astrologer and theologian, Pedro Sánchez Ciruelo (c. 1470-1548) was born in Daroca (Aragon). After obtaining his Master of Arts at the University of Salamanca, he moved to Paris in 1492, where he alternated the teaching of Mathematics with the study of theology. Most of his scholarly production is concerned with creating a corpus of astrological knowledge not in conflict with Christian doctrine: he presented himself as a valid authority on the subject by virtue of his training as a theologian combined with his knowledge of mathematics and astronomy. ‘Reprobation of superstitions and witchcraft’ is Ciruelo’s most famous work, defined in the title as a “book necessary for all good Christians”. Often mistakenly described as a manual of witchcraft, it is instead aimed to discredit magical practices from a theological and moral point of view. The author encourages proper Catholics and teaches the ‘ignorant’, who are attracted by the fascination of supernatural powers, to avoid superstition and sorcery. Ciruelo discusses all kinds of superstitions known and practiced in his time and talks about people who seek to obtain benefits through illicit means. Interestingly, however, he does not blame them, as the culprit indicated is always the devil. The first book briefly presents the concepts of superstition and witchcraft, while the second is dedicated to condemning all forms of divination, including necromancy, predictive astrology, augury, palmistry, and dream interpretation. In particular, Ciruelo explains the difference between ‘true’ and ‘false’ astrology’: the first, licit from the point of view of the Church, is based on the natural effects of the stars on air and water, which can affect weather and human health; the second, which tries to predicts human activities that are related to men’s free will and chance, is instead diabolic and superstitious. In the third book on sorcery, the author attacks the use of spoken or written curses, charms and superstitious prayers, denouncing the activities of unofficial healers. He states: “Las palabras no tienen virtud natural”, that is, ‘words have no natural powers’. A remarkable edition, beautifully printed and embellished with two charming illustrations. The first, on verso of title page, portrays the scene of the crucifixion and it is surrounded by the text of the antiphon ‘Nos autem gloriari’ (Galatians 6,14), within a decorative border. The second, on the last page, depicts St. Sebastian holding a ribbon banner with the phrase ‘aparta Señor tu ira de sobre tu pueblo’ and St. Roch with a guardian angel; below, the antiphon ‘Sancti per fidem vicerunt regna’ (Hebrew 11,33). USTC 340703; BM STC Spain 16th century, p. 54; Palau 54938; Cantamessa N. 1692. This ed. not in Adams. See Brunet II, 73-74 and Graesse II, p. 189. Non in Caillet.
  • $6,941
  • $6,941