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Late 1880's misc. type and printer periodicals

Late 1880’s misc. type and printer periodicals

Type, Printing] Misc. lot of printing periodicals and specimens relating to type and printing. 1. The Printer Artisan. Vol. 3. No. 1. January, 1875. Printed and Published by C. C. Child, Boston. 8 pages. Approx. 13.5" x 11". Paper unfolds to a single sheet. Paper is split at folds, damp-stained on the front page, and has some edge wear to the paper. Fair to good condition. 2. The American Art Printer. Vol. 1. No. 1. January and February, 1887. New York. C. E. Bartholomew, Proprietor and Publisher. P. S. M. Munro, Editor. Issue measures approx. 14" x 11". Frontispiece lithograph specimen "Haight & Dudley Fine Printers." 12 pages, 4 pages of illustrated advertisements. Illustrated advertisements on the verso of the front cover and both sides of the back cover. Color engraved front cover. Front cover is starting to detach. Light toning to the front cover. Good condition. 3. The American Art Printer. Vol. 1. No. 2. March and April, 1887. New York. C. E. Bartholomew, Proprietor and Publisher. P. S. M. Munro, Editor. Approx. 14" x 11". Color lithograph frontispiece specimen of an Egyptian vase with a color advertisement on the verso. A second black and white frontispiece is followed by 12 pages of text and 4 pages of illustrated advertisements. A couple of illustrations in the text. Advertisements on the verso of the front cover and both sides of the back cover. Color engraved front cover. Light edge wear and toning to the front cover. Very good condition. 4. The American Art Printer. Vol. 1. No. 3. May and June, 1887. New York. C. E. Bartholomew, Proprietor and Publisher. P. S. M. Munro, Editor. Approx. 14" x 11". Color lithograph frontispiece titled "Scroll and Banner", color advertisement by the editor on the verso of the frontispiece. A second frontispiece, in black and white, precedes 18 pages of text and illustrated advertisements. Pages 17 and 18 is approx. half the size of the rest of the contents. Color engraved front cover. Front cover, both frontispieces, and pages 1 and 2 are detached from the rest of the issue. Light toning and edge wear to the front cover. Fair to good condition. 5. American Model Printer. Vol. II. No. I. October, 1882. Wm. J. Kelley, Editor and Publisher. Approx. 14" x 11". [1] page black and white "Supplement To The American Model Printer, No. 1, 1882", [1] page of 3 color engraved printer advertisements, and 18 pages of text and illustrated advertisements. Illustrated advertisements on the verso of the front cover and both sides of the back cover. Color engraved front cover. A few pages have small closed edge tears. Edge wear to the spine. Good or better condition. 6. American Model Printer. Vol. II. No. II. December 1882 and January 1883. Wm. J. Kelley, Editor and Publisher. approx. Approx. 14" x 11". [1] page black and white advertisements by the publisher, [1] page of 3 color engraved printer advertisements, pages 21-38 (text and illustrated advertisements). Illustrated advertisements on the verso of the front cover and both sides of the back cover. A few spots on the front cover. Edge wear to the spine. Good to very good condition. 7. American Model Printer. Vol. II. No. III. September and October, 1883. Wm. J. Kelley, Editor and Publisher. Issues measures approx. Approx. 14" x 11". Color engraved frontispiece advertisement plate for 3 printers, second color frontispiece engraved plate advertisement for the "Earhart Printing Co. Columbus, Ohio", pages 40-60 (text and illustrated advertisements). Illustrated advertisements on the verso of the front cover and both sides of the back cover. Both covers mostly detached. Light edge wear to the covers. Spine is edge worn. Good condition. 8. Typographic Advertiser. Year XXXIV. No. 130. Holiday Number 1888-'89. Printed and Published by The MacKellar, Smiths, & Jordan Co., Philadelphia. Approx. 13.5" x 11". Pages 905-916. One page of text with illustrated portrait (front cover) followed by examples of type specimens. Three stab pinholes on the left margins. Issue is not stapled or stitched. 2 large folded pages laid together. Light horizontal crease front cover. Contents in very good condition. 9. Typographic Advertiser. Year XXXVII. No. 134. Springtime, 1891. Printed and Published by The MacKellar, Smiths, & Jordan Co., Philadelphia. Approx. 13.5" x 11". Pages 949-956. One page of text with illustrated portrait (front cover) followed by examples of type specimens. Three stab pinholes on the left margins. Uncut. Folds out into a single sheet. Very good condition. 10. Typographic Advertiser. Year XXXVII. No. 135. Falltime, 1891. Printed and Published by The MacKellar, Smiths, & Jordan Co., Philadelphia. Approx. 13.5" x 11". Pages 957-964. One page of text (front cover). Examples of type specimens. Three stab pinholes on the left margins. Uncut. Folds out into a single sheet. Approx. 2" closed tear upper left edge front cover. Pages separating between pages 960 and 961. Fair to good condition. 11. Typographic Advertiser. Year XXXVIII. No. 136. Springtime, 1892. Printed and Published by The MacKellar, Smiths, & Jordan Co., Philadelphia. Approx. 13.5" x 11". Pages 965-972. One page of text with illustration (front cover) followed by examples of type illustrations. Three stab pinholes on the left margins. Very good condition. 12. The Electrotype Journal. Published by A. Zeese & Co. Chicago. Worlds Fair Number. Copyright 1892. 18 pages including the tinted front cover. Approx. 13" x 10.5". Birds-Eye View of the World's Columbian Exposition on the front cover. Black and white frontispiece illustration. Illustrated with half tone Columbian illustrations, vignettes, card designs, almanac plate samples, State and Foreign building cuts, and zinc-etching process from pen drawings. All illustrations relating to the exposition. Three stab holes on the left margins. Very good condition. [8] various color specimen engraved advertisement plates by various printers. All measure approx. 13.5" x 9". Supplemental and removed plates from journals. Light
1943 War Time Domestic Woman's Diary: A (First) Year in the (Married) Life.

1943 War Time Domestic Woman’s Diary: A (First) Year in the (Married) Life.

Richardia Wilson] Octavo. 8" x 5-1/2" black journal for 1943 of Richardia Wilson (Nov. 4, 1917-Jan. 28, 2006), wife of Lt. Thomas Keith Wilson, stationed at Camp Crowder, Missouri. Cover stamped with "National Surety Corporation 1943 | Pryor, Love, Oliphant & Lewis | 933 Chattanooga Bank Bldg. | Chattanooga, Tennessee." Unpaginated, but in a one-page-per-day format (Saturdays/Sundays combined), i.e., [313] pages plus front and rear matter (including [7] blank pages for memoranda and [16] pages of tables of weights and measures, postal rates, household hints, and much more). All but 3 days of the year with entries in blue or black ink, in a small, clear, even hand. Plus several newspaper clippings (society pages mentioning the Wilsons, etc.) and a letter from Keith to Richardia dated October 25, 1943. This journal has been repaired with a new black mulberry paper spine. A scuffed lower portion of the back cover has also been repaired with the same black mulberry paper. The interior contents and binding are in very good condition. The diary begins on the first day of 1943 with the entry: January 1, 1943: "I just can't realize that here it is 1943 and here I am married and keeping home in Carthage, Mo. Who would have believed it this time last year. I'm still so thrilled over our house -- and Keith is grand -- just don't see how I could be happier! . the year is started, hope we'll be together all year and that this will be the happiest year of our lives!" Bubbly, effusive, social, Richardia Wilson (née Martin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Collin Martin of Rivermont, Chattanooga, TN) takes us on a wild, madcap romp through her first full year of marriage. Very few days pass in which Richardia does not go visiting, or to the Red Cross to cut and roll bandages, or the Officers' Wives Club, the Kosmos Club, on Welcome Wagon visits, to Church work, attend choir practice, or Sunday School. Afternoons are filled with bridge games, knitting with friends, listening to the radio and preparing (and eating) tea and cakes, candy and cokes. She and the other wives plant Victory Gardens, exchange ration coupons, serve as one another's matrons of honor, organize parties and games, place their Sears orders, make bedroom slippers, and sew shag rugs (among much else). Evenings often include a trip to the "pictures" (films the Wilsons see in the course of the year include Now, Voyager ("odd, but real good" and "3rd time for Keith"), Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch, Happy Go Lucky (with Mary Martin), The Phantom of the Opera, Watch on the Rhine, Road to Morocco, White Cargo, China Girl, George Washington Slept Here (with Jack Benny), Commander Strike at Dawn (with Paul Muni), We Go Fast, Palm Beach Story, Yankee Doodle Dandy (with James Cagney), Andy Hardy's Double Life, and Once Upon a Honeymoon with Cary Grant and Ginger Rodgers.) Weekends, the Wilsons like to go fishing and shooting, visit the Officers' Club, and just laze about: September 5: "Keith and I were the laziest ever this morning -- just stayed in bed -- didn't get up until 10:30, had baths and breakfast -- brunch at 12:30!" And Keith is deeply involved with raising pigeons (to shoot and eat) and parakeets (as pets). There are, in addition, jaunts into the countryside (see June 13 and others -- Aunt Jessie's farm - - no electricity! milking the cows!) and road trips home to see Mother and Daddy: June 30: "Keith took the car today so I stayed home all day -- really worked and just enjoyed it so much -- it's fun, when there is an object in view -- and leaving tonight was my big object. I cleaned kitchen good -- and rest of house pretty good -- cleaned oven and scrubbed refrigerator -- gave butter and parsley to [Idaree] and visited a few minutes. When Keith got home I was practically ready. He took a bath and I fixed fingernails and added other things. Then Keith packed and we put things in car. Left Carthage at 10 till 9 -- ate supper at Billy Baker's then drove on and on -- finally were almost out of gas & oil at Birch [Tree?], Mo. so were afraid to go on -- had looked and looked for an open station. Stopped there in a station & I got in back & Keith in front & surprisingly enough, we both slept -- Cool, so turned on heater. I slept until it started getting cool, so awakened K. & he turned on the heater again -- at 6 o'clock [?] no one at that station -- Had waited so long were disgusted, so drove on to another place." And there's romance! January 17: "Didn't get up in time for S.S. [Sunday School]. Went to church. Knew we would be razzed -- and we were! . Very cold -- decided to go home and go to bed, so we did -- had a lot of fun. Keith was really feeling good and romantic and I was too -- also feeling mischievous, so we had a time. He is really a sight. After we got up we kept cutting up -- had a regular circus." And death! March 6: Grandmother died about 9 o'clock pm. At 9:10 the telephone rang -- Daddy -- he said that Grandma had died at 15 until 9. I was stunned -- just didn't know what to say -- so Keith finished conversation. We talked of me going to Chatta. Decided to do so. I couldn't help but break down for a few minutes, and cried." And kittens! November 6 and 7 (and others): "Sassy would scamper ahead, then see something -- that would demand investigation so he'd stop and smell, it was windy and when he'd chase ahead with his tail straight up like an antenna and three and a half inches wide at base it looked like a sail pushing him along. He is precious! . We ate lunch I had packed -- tasted so good -- Sassy had several bites. Then he went to sleep on my upper arm and back of seat." And tragedy. November 7: "Went to barn for milking -- Sassy served as a muff and drank warm milk with barn cats. Walked back to house. Sassy didn't come in with us. I called -- but so cold, didn't bother to get him -- (wish I had!). When Ted and K. came they asked where he was -- I went out, but couldn't find him. Back and packed and took flashlight to look, oh gee. My feeling