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Hünersdorff Rare Books

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Istoria critica della vita civile. The 18th century debate on the education of women, marriage, the duties of family life, the liberal arts and sciences

Martinelli, Vincenzoo. Italian Enlightenment in England Martinelli, Vincenzio. Istoria critica della vita civile. London, George Woodfall, 1752. 4to. 12 + 311 + [1 blank] p. Woodcut floral vignette on title page. 2 blank leaves bound in at beginng and end; marbled endpapers. Contemporary red morocco, gilt, ornamental gilt border to sides, raised spine richly gilt with giltstamped green title label, inner gilt dentelles, edges gilt, traces of usage on covers. First edition of 19 critical essays on civil society as part of the 18th century reformist debate including the education of women, marriage, the duties of family life, the theatre, industry, the liberal arts and science, laws and state craft, poverty and liberty. Vincenzio Martinelli (1702-1785), a Tuscan from Montecatini with a degree in civil and canon law from Pisa University, met English noblemen in Florence, and came to England in 1748 to teach Italian. He had already written this work during his stay at the Bourbon Court at Naples. It was the first of three books to be published in England and it made his reputation as a man of letters. An impressive six-page list of 114 subscribers includes Charles Viscount Townshend (Commissioner of Trade & Plantations who ordered 10 sets), the poets Mark Akenside and Moses Mendez , Voltaire s friend, Everard Fawkener, the Earl of Chesterfield, the diplomat Horace Mann with whom the author corresponded, the art collector Horace Walpole, the traveller Edward Wortley Montague and the Anglo-Venetian authoress Giustiniana Wynne A handsome presentation copy with wide margins bound in contemporary red morocco; some light toning in places (29.4 x 24cm). Cf: E. H. Thorne, "Vincenzo Martinelli in England: 1748 - 1744," Italian Studies (1956).
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Records of manorial dues – primary sources for French pre-revolutionary land taxation

France. Nailloux. Manuscript land tax accounts & atlas of feudal tenancies France. Nailloux. Manuscript land tax accounts & atlas of feudal land tenancies relating to the seigneurie de Nailloux in the region of Haute Garonne, southwestern France, penned in ink in neat calligraphy on paper. a) Lieve des censives de Nailhoux et rentes locatairies due a [un]messire Dufaur d'Encun suivant les reconn[aissance]ce retenues par M.Auréjac no. Nailloux, dated 8 October 1788. Folio (36 x 34cm). 67 numbered leaves including 57 pages with original tax entries; 5 pages with an alphabetical name index of tax payers; 6 leaves with additional tax entries during the early 19th century by the Dufour family utilizing blank spaces throughout including the inside of frontcover; 5 leaves removed. Contemporary mottled sheep with title superlibro giltstamped on frontcover; remains of green silk ties; edges painted in red; spine defective, corners worn; some inner blank tailend margins with traces of light waterstaining; a few isolated traces of worming not affecting text. b) Plans des Nailhoux. Seven double-page manuscript maps (overall size : 57.2 x 84cm) showing precisely demarcated landed properties conceded to tenants, or 'censitaires', under the jurisdiction of Nailloux; each map is surrounded with a double-line border and incorporates a list of the respective tenants paying the 'cens', or manorial dues. Each commune is indicated in a small ink drawing of a house. [Nailloux, 1788]. Elephant folio (58 x 45.5cm). Contemporary mottled sheep with supralibro gilt-stamped on frontcover; worn with minor damage and abrasions on frontcover; edges in red; remains of green silk ties a) Official record of annual dues paid in money and in kind to one Dufour d'Encun, land- holder in the seigneurie of Nailloux, compiled by the accountant Auréjac on 8th October 1788, seven months before the outbreak of the French Revolution on 14 July 1789. The dues consisted mostly of 'censives', or annual manorial quit-rents and in 3 cases of 'rente fonçiere', or property tax. The annual 'cens' was a fixed token payment by the tenant or 'censitaire' made to the feudal land-holder who conceded the land in perpetuity in return for money or payment in kind. Among the tax payers here listed are a blacksmith, carpenters, a domestic, retired officers, a weaver and a cartwright; taxes in kind consisted mostly of grain, oats, 'gelinen', chicken, etc. The widespread destruction of the records of manorial dues during the peasant revolt of 17 July to 3 August 1789 provoked the abolition of feudalism at the beginning of the Revolution. b) The plans orientated to the left demarcate the extent of landed tenancies with the names of the tenants and number of parcels listed to the right : The commune of Pourquier has a total of 60 parcels of land; Capelle, Garaud & Moudoui have 39 tenancies; Bugain & Bisterne only 9 ; LeTambouret, Arnaud Guilhem & Plumat have 36 ; Campane, Randal & Labourdelle with 15 ; Pieusse & Combouil with 30; Gabachous & Nugoy have 17 tenancies. The verso of map 6 contains a history of the Dufour d'Encuns family added in neat 19th century manuscript by a descendant. The land atlas is generally in good condition considering heavy use; some traces of waterstaining in top outer margins; isolated worming in tailend blank margins; beginning & end of volume with some soiling and traces of waterstaining, but not affecting maps.
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Japanese horsemanship in handcoloured drawings

ILLUSTRATIONS OF HORSE TRAINING IN EDO JAPAN Japanese horsemanship. Emakimono manuscript paper scroll with 17 large multi-coloured drawings (up to 30cm in height) illustrating the art of riding, handling and training horses. Dated on stylistic grounds to mid or late Edo Period [Japan,18th or early 19th century]. Manuscript size : 37.5 x 752cm (overall size : 43 x 828cm). Final section of gilded scroll with decorative pattern on reverse, edges worn; remains of original title strip pasted on the outside. Preserved in Paulowna wood box with protective sliding carton. A striking series of well drawn large coloured images of horses and grooms in various stages of training. Manuscript on paper neatly mounted in 29 segments on later gilded textured paper forming a scroll. The drawings are coloured in white, blue, red, grey, light brown, green, beige and black; 11 figures contain neat calligraphic instructions by the draughtsman for completing the colouring of some the grooms' dresses which remain unfinished. The horses are shown in different exercise positions always controlled by their grooms with bits and bridles : four horses are standing with the groom dismounted, the others are all of mounted grooms riding without saddles, two riders are trotting, three are gallopping, seven are shown humorously as they attempt to restrain their horses who are valiantly struggling to throw them off in turbulant movements. An image represents a groom running, presumably after losing his horse. Twelve horsemen wear black tall cylindrical rounded hats suggesting a higher social rank, five are donning small peaked black caps, presumably stable boys. Indigenous horsemanship - bajutsu or military equestrianism- became very popular in Japan with the rise of the military class during the Edo period (1615-1868), when twenty different schools gradually developed. Horse- riding remained an elite art restricted to nobles and high-ranking samurai because of the relative scarcity of horses in Japan at the time. The manuscript is in remarkably good condition; only isolated traces of light soiling in 5 segments; neat repairs to segment 23 and 29 not affecting images; an abrasure in blank margin of first segment.
Osservazione fitologiche sopra alcune piante esotiche introdotte in Roma.

Osservazione fitologiche sopra alcune piante esotiche introdotte in Roma.

Gili, Filippo Luigi & Gapar Xúarez. 4to. 64 pages of text. With printer’s device (Romulus & Remus suckling a wolf) on title. 10 engraved plates by L. Maioli after C. & A. Maioli in contemporary hand-colouring. Ornamental woodcut head-piece on first text page. Contemporary quarter sheep, gilt; spine wormed; decorative boards. First issue of an annual review of exotic plants introduced into the Vatican gardens from Latin America, also from Africa, Asia, and the Orient. The present survey, for the year 1788, contains descriptions of ten plants including the Chinese Nettle, Tulip Tree, and Ground Nut, together with details of their successful cultivation in Rome. Among the plants described as flourishing, some originating, in pre- Columbian America are the Sweet Potato and Ground Nut (Mexico, Peru, Paraguay, and Brazil). Among the many medical applications discussed are the treatment of scurvy with papaya seeds, toothache using crushed laburnum leaves, and the use of ground nuts as an antidote for snake bites. Each description is accompanied by a hand-coloured illustration. A second and third part (each also treating 10 plants) was published for the years 1790 and 1792, none further were issued. Xúarez (1731-1804), the first Argentine botanist, was a Jesuit priest born in Tucuman, whom Palau cites as author of John Hill’s 'Decade di alberi curiosi' (1786) of which he was only the translator. Both works on the subject of newly-discovered plants would seem to be part of the same project introducing foreign species to Italy; they are published in a similar format and the same artist (P. Maioli) has drawn the plates. Gili (1756-1821), the director of the Vatican Observatory, attracted the attention of the celebrated Spanish botanists Ruiz & Pavon for his collaboration on this work, & who named a plant after him. A small spot in inner blank margin of first quire, otherwise a fresh copy in its first binding. Nissen BB, p67; Palau 101886; Pritzel 3332.