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J & J LUBRANO MUSIC ANTIQUARIANS

Lithographic caricature by Charles Ramelet after the statue by Jean-Pierre Dantan

Lithographic caricature by Charles Ramelet after the statue by Jean-Pierre Dantan

ROSSINI, Gioachino 1792-1868 Image size 180 x 115 mm, sheet size 236 x 155 mm. On newsprint. Full length. Excerpted from a contemporary periodical. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934). Slightly worn and browned; some showthrough; hinge mount to verso. Müller: Hommage an Rossini, p. 60, 34. "No composer in the first half of the 19th century enjoyed the measure of prestige, wealth, popular acclaim or artistic influence that belonged to Rossini. His contemporaries recognized him as the greatest Italian composer of his time. His achievements cast into oblivion the operatic world of Cimarosa and Paisiello, creating new standards against which other composers were to be judged. That both Bellini and Donizetti carved out personal styles is undeniable; but they worked under Rossini's shadow, and their artistic personalities emerged in confrontation with his operas. Not until the advent of Verdi was Rossini replaced at the centre of Italian operatic life." Philip Gossett in Grove Music Online. In addition to his traditional work, French sculptor Jean-Pierre Dantan (1800-1869) is known as the creator of the sculptural caricacture. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Role portrait postcard photograph by Emil Schwab

Role portrait postcard photograph by Emil Schwab, Berlin, with autograph signature of the noted Austrian soprano as Ortrud in Wagner’s Lohengrin. Addressed to Walter Honig in Vienna

BAHR-MILDENBURG, Anna 1872-1947 Postmarked April 14, 1913. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934) Slightly worn and soiled. Anna Bahr-Mildenburg was a celebrated dramatic soprano most famous for her close artistic association with Mahler and for her excellent portrayals of the great Wagner roles. She made her professional debut as Brünnhilde in Die Walküre in Hamburg in 1895, a performance conducted by Mahler She performed frequently at Bayreuth and made her Covent Garden debut in 1906. In addition to her Wagnerian performances, she sang Norma, Leonore/Fidelio, Donna Anna, and Clytemnestra. In her later career, she began to trade in some of her heavier roles for Mozartean performances and undertook some of the administrative and directional work at Bayreuth. The Honig family emigrated from Vienna to England in September of 1938 and then to the United States in 1939. The family papers are held at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top . In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, and Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Large portrait engraving by Étienne Beisson after the painting by Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun

Large portrait engraving by Étienne Beisson after the painting by Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun

PAISIELLO, Giovanni 1740-1816 Image size 288 x 219 mm, sheet size 412 x 325 mm. Steel engraving on wove paper. Paisiello is depicted three-quarter length, seated at spinet. With "Peint par Madame Lebrun. Dessiné par Lefort. Gravé par E.tne Beisson." directly beneath image, and titling "Paisiello." in large engraved script. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934). Browned; slightly worn; minor paper loss to corners; light fraying, soiling, and small tears to left edge. IFF (après 1800) 2, p. 37, no. 14. Arrigoni & Bertarelli 3208. Hall III, p. 289, no. 1. "One of the most successful and influential opera composers of the late 18th century. [Paisiello's] popularity was at its height in the last two decades of the 18th century. During that period his dramatic works were as much in demand outside Italy as within it. In Vienna, for example, the Italian opera company installed by Joseph II performed during the 1780s more works by Paisiello than by any other single composer. Londoners too were particularly partial to his operas. The decline in the demand for his music, which became noticeable everywhere after about 1800, was a sign that taste had changed. The works that retained their popularity longest were his best comic operas, including Il barbiere di Siviglia, L'amor contrastato and Nina. Promoters have revived a few of his operas in the late 20th century, kindling a renewed flicker of public interest." Michael F. Robinson in Grove Music Online. French painter Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun (1755-1842), portraitist to Marie Antoinette, was one of the foremost French painters of her generation. She attended the 1791 premiere of Paisiello's Nina in Naples, shortly thereafter painting her portrait of the composer. Parisian engraver Étienne Beisson (1759-1820) published the present engraving following Paisiello's death. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Title-page for Ricordi's Nuova Compiuta Edizione di tutte le Opere Teatrali

Title-page for Ricordi’s Nuova Compiuta Edizione di tutte le Opere Teatrali

ROSSINI, Gioachino 1792-1868 244 x 332 mm. Bust-length portrait of Rossini ca. 67 x 60 mm after the 1843 painting by Ary Scheffer at center within decorative border incorporating the names and dates of the composer's operas. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934). Somewhat worn and foxed; minor paper loss to blank margins. "No composer in the first half of the 19th century enjoyed the measure of prestige, wealth, popular acclaim or artistic influence that belonged to Rossini. His contemporaries recognized him as the greatest Italian composer of his time. His achievements cast into oblivion the operatic world of Cimarosa and Paisiello, creating new standards against which other composers were to be judged. That both Bellini and Donizetti carved out personal styles is undeniable; but they worked under Rossini's shadow, and their artistic personalities emerged in confrontation with his operas. Not until the advent of Verdi was Rossini replaced at the centre of Italian operatic life." Philip Gossett in Grove Music Online. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Role portrait postcard photograph with autograph signature of the Austrian actors in Der verlorene Sohn dated May 1914. Addressed to Walter Honig in Vienna

Role portrait postcard photograph with autograph signature of the Austrian actors in Der verlorene Sohn dated May 1914. Addressed to Walter Honig in Vienna

SCHILDKRAUT, Rudolf 1862-1930 and Joseph SCHILDKRAUT 1895-1964 Studio of Hermann Leiser in Berlin. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934). Slightly worn; short crack to right margin, just affecting signature. Rudolf Shildkraut and his son Joseph were both actors and appeared together in numerous productions. After moving to the United States in 1920 they continued their careers on stage as well as in film, starring together in Cecil B. de Mille's King of Kings (1927). Joseph went on to win an Academy Award for his performance in The Life of Emile Zola (1937) as well as receiving acclaim as Otto Frank in The Diary of Anne Frank (1959). The Honig family emigrated from Vienna to England in September of 1938 and then to the United States in 1939. The family papers are held at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, and Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Postcard photograph with autograph signature of the Austrian poet and playwright dated February 2

Postcard photograph with autograph signature of the Austrian poet and playwright dated February 2, 1919

WILDGANS, Anton 1881-1932 With blindstamp of Magasin Metropole to lower left margin of recto. Incorrectly identified in another hand as Wolfgang Windgassen on verso. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934); previously in the collection of Walter Honig. Slightly worn. Anton Wildgans was a leading author in Vienna, nominated four times for the Nobel Prize in Literature. "Wildgans' plays, such as the trilogy Armut (1914; "Poverty"), Liebe (1916; "Love"), and Dies irae (1918), begin in a realistic world that becomes less and less comprehensible and more and more concerned with feeling as the play goes on, culminating in a mystical, symbolic sensing of truth. As a counterpart to this trilogy of Viennese middle-class family life, he planned another of a mythological or religious character; only the first part, Kain (1920; "Cain"), was published." Encyclopædia Britannica. The Honig family emigrated from Vienna to England in September of 1938 and then to the United States in 1939. The family papers are held at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, and Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Postcard photograph with autograph signature of the noted conductor dated November 27

Postcard photograph with autograph signature of the noted conductor dated November 27, 1913. Addressed to Walter Honig in Vienna

WALTER, Bruno 1876-1962 Studio of Pietzner in Vienna. Slightly worn; remnants of former mount to verso. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934). One of the most important conductors of the 20th century, Bruno Walter was born in Germany and emigrated to the United States in 1939, becoming an American citizen in 1946. A protégé of Gustav Mahler, he indefatigably championed his mentor's works in Europe and abroad. "During the 1940s and 50s Walter's principal orchestra was the New York PO, for which he served as musical adviser (1947-9); he also conducted other major orchestras throughout the USA, including those in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and Philadelphia. . Treating his players as colleagues, he drew a sensuous tone from the orchestra, employing rubato with consummate skill, juxtaposing fierce drama and warm lyricism. His sensitivity to contrapuntal texture and overall structure allowed him to bring out fine details without damaging a work's integrity. He sought to penetrate 'to the core' of a composition and, detesting 'routine' performances, continually endeavoured to present a piece 'as if it were receiving its world première'." Erik Ryding and Rebecca Pechefsky in Grove Music Online. The Honig family emigrated from Vienna to England in September of 1938 and then to the United States in 1939. The family papers are held at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, and Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Portrait engraving after Edme Quenedey

Portrait engraving after Edme Quenedey, ca. 1810-20

PAER, Ferdinando 1771-1839 Image size ca. 115 x 94 mm, sheet size 265 x 182 mm. On wove paper. Head and shoulders, in profile, oval. With "Paÿr" lightly pencilled beneath image. Without letters, thus a possible proof. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934). Slightly worn, browned, and foxed; dampstaining to lower blank margin; trimmed within platemark; small print collector's oval handstamp to verso ("Bowinkel"). Identified in pencil on verso as being engraved by Rosaspina and published by Bettoni; we have not, however, been able to verify this attribution. The image is based on that executed by Edme Quenedey in 1809. "[Paer] was one of the central figures in the development of opera semiseria during the first decade of the 19th century. . In his vocal writing Paer provided a link between late 18th-century composers (Cimarosa and Paisiello) and Rossini and his followers. Like those of his predecessors, Paer's works overflow with sweet, luminous italianate melodies organized in elegant phrases and supported by transparent harmonies. . Paer had a talent for inventing vocal filigree - his fioriture constitute a primary source of aesthetic and dramatic effect in many of his melodies - and the patterns that he devised show striking similarities to Rossini's repertory of ornaments." Scott L. Balthazart and Julian Budden in Grove Music Online. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Scene from "La Donna del Lago

Scene from “La Donna del Lago,” at the Royal Italian Opera, Covent-Garden. Published in The Illustrated London News, August 21, 1847

ROSSINI, Gioachino 1792-1868 Matted to 195 x 248 mm. On newsprint. Depicting singers Marietta Alboni and Giulia Grisi. Matted, framed and glazed, overall size 311 x 366 mm. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934). Scattered stains, not affecting image. La Donna del Lago premiered in Naples at the Teatro San Carlo on October 24, 1819. It opened in London in 1823 and was featured in the first season of the new Royal Italian Opera at Covent Garden in 1847, as depicted in the present illustration. Italian contralto Marietta Alboni appeared at La Scala, Vienna, Covent Garden, the Théâtre Italien, the Paris Opéra, among other important European opera houses. Rossini coached her in the principal contralto roles in his operas. Her voice "was considered a true contralto, rich and even from g to c?, though she also sang several soprano roles, including Anna Bolena, Norina in Don Pasquale and Amina in La sonnambula. Her singing was thought by some to lack fire; nevertheless, the beauty of her voice and the perfection of her technique made her one of the great representatives of classical Italian bel canto." Elizabeth Forbes in Grove Music Online. Soprano Giula Grisi was equally renowned: "[Her] voice, perfectly placed and even over a range of two octaves, c? to c?, easily made the transition from the florid writing of Rossini and Donizetti to the more forceful style of Verdi and Meyerbeer. If she lacked the interpretative genius of Pasta or Malibran, she was an impressive singing actress, magnificent in such roles as Donna Anna, Semiramis and Norma, where her passionate involvement was allowed full scope." Elizabeth Forbes in Grove Music Online. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Carte-de-visite portrait photograph by Etienne Carjat

Carte-de-visite portrait photograph by Etienne Carjat, 1867

ROSSINI, Gioachino 1792-1868 105 x 63 mm. Three-quarter length, seated. Mounted to board, with "ND. Phot." above image and "Rossini" below. With a note stating that the present photograph was given to Marilyn Horne by Igor Stravinsky. Together with two reproductions of carte-de-visite photographs: - 100 x 61 mm, three-quarter length, seated, with text "Dalla Regina del Canto l'amico Rossini Bona[?] a Teresa DeGiuli" - 95 x 57 mm, full-length, seated From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934). Lightly worn and browned. "No composer in the first half of the 19th century enjoyed the measure of prestige, wealth, popular acclaim or artistic influence that belonged to Rossini. His contemporaries recognized him as the greatest Italian composer of his time. His achievements cast into oblivion the operatic world of Cimarosa and Paisiello, creating new standards against which other composers were to be judged. That both Bellini and Donizetti carved out personal styles is undeniable; but they worked under Rossini's shadow, and their artistic personalities emerged in confrontation with his operas. Not until the advent of Verdi was Rossini replaced at the centre of Italian operatic life." Philip Gossett in Grove Music Online. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Role portrait photograph with autograph signature of the noted Danish tenor as Tristan

Role portrait photograph with autograph signature of the noted Danish tenor as Tristan

MELCHIOR, Lauritz 1890-1973 Image size 218 x 179 mm, with identification and date of April 26, 1947 in pencil to verso. A reproduction of the painting by Nikol Schattenstein. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934); previously in the collection of Walter Honig. "The heroic scale of his singing, even as experienced through recordings," marked Lauritz Melchior as the foremost Heldentenor of the twentieth century. "In his later years [he] sang little but Wagner, and concentrated on the heaviest roles, in each of which he appeared over 100 times (as Tristan, over 200). These figures suggest the stamina and endurance that enabled him to sound fresh in the last acts of Tristan and Götterdämmerung. A certain baritonal warmth remained a welcome characteristic, but there was no corresponding constriction in his top notes; Siegfried's lusty high C always rang thrillingly. These virtues were coupled with vivid and enunciation." Desmond Shawe-Taylor in Grove Music Online. The Honig family emigrated from Vienna to England in September of 1938 and then to the United States in 1939. The family papers are held at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, and Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.
Portrait photograph with autograph signature of the noted conductor

Portrait photograph with autograph signature of the noted conductor

WALTER, Bruno 1876-1962 175 x 122 mm. Bust-length. Inscribed "To Mr John Honig Cordially Bruno Walter May 1947" below image. Together with a typed letter to Honig signed in full by Walter. From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934); previously in the collection of John Honig. Slightly worn; letter creased at central fold. One of the most important conductors of the 20th century, Bruno Walter was born in Germany and emigrated to the United States in 1939, becoming an American citizen in 1946. A protégé of Gustav Mahler, he indefatigably championed his mentor's works in Europe and abroad. "During the 1940s and 50s Walter's principal orchestra was the New York PO, for which he served as musical adviser (1947-9); he also conducted other major orchestras throughout the USA, including those in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and Philadelphia. . Treating his players as colleagues, he drew a sensuous tone from the orchestra, employing rubato with consummate skill, juxtaposing fierce drama and warm lyricism. His sensitivity to contrapuntal texture and overall structure allowed him to bring out fine details without damaging a work's integrity. He sought to penetrate 'to the core' of a composition and, detesting 'routine' performances, continually endeavoured to present a piece 'as if it were receiving its world première'." Erik Ryding and Rebecca Pechefsky in Grove Music Online. The Honig family emigrated from Vienna to England in September of 1938 and then to the United States in 1939. The family papers are held at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top. In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, and Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online.