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The Sphinx

The Sphinx

WILDE, OSCAR THE DELUXE LIMITED EDITION, one of only 25 deluxe large paper copies, a masterpiece of Victorian book design. The Sphinx “remains a prime example of many aspects of the English literary Decadence, an extravagant example in both style and subject matter of the ornate become outré, the esoteric entering the forbidden, the luxurious growing lascivious” (Jerome Buckley). The poem is often considered the first poem in Which Wilde alluded to the illicit sexual practices that would lead to his trial and imprisonment. “The Sphinx, begun when he was an Oxford undergraduate, substantially worked upon in Paris in 1883, eventually published in 1894, is Wilde's most Baudelairean poem. It amounts to an anthropological archive, a gathering of images as exotic as any in the Louvre, with the poet as curator” (Stokes, “Wilde and Paris” in Oscar Wilde in Context). The Sphinx is a masterpiece of late Victorian book design and illustration. It is the first book over which Charles Ricketts had complete control, from the illustrations to the layout to the binding design. The Sphinx “is his best book. No illustrated book was ever more thoroughly planned. The result is a perfect whole, as harmonious as it is dazzling" (Ray, The Illustrator and the Book 262). The Pall Mall Budget hailed the edition, noting that “the monsters of the Egyptian room at the British Museum live again in its weird, sometimes repulsive, but art all times stately and impressive lines.” Printed in green, red and black 10 large illustrations and other decorations by Charles Ricketts. Original pictorial vellum gilt, designed by Ricketts, yapp edges, ties. Fine. Half morocco case. Provenance: English novelist Anthony Powell, with his bookplate.
Julius Caesar. A Tragedy

Julius Caesar. A Tragedy

SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM FIRST QUARTO EDITION of Julius Caesar, the first separate edition of one of Shakespeare’s best-known and most-performed plays. Quarto. Dark red morocco gilt by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, all edges gilt. Some browning and staining, lower corner of C3 torn not affecting printing. Very good condition. “Something extraordinary was beginning to happen as Shakespeare wrote Julius Caesar in the spring of 1599 as if all his energies were self-consciously focused on a new and different kind of invention The result was a significant breakthrough,” one expressed in “the extraordinary lines of Brutus, deep in thought, as he sets in motion one of the most consequential events in Western history. It is one of Shakespeare’s first great soliloquies and conveys a sense of inwardness new to the stage” (Shapiro, Year in the Life). Julius Caesar was first performed in 1599 at the Globe Theatre. After the theaters re-opened at the start of the Restoration era, it became a favorite. “There was no more potent story for seventeenth-century Englishmen than that of Julius Caesar, and it spoke to people across the political spectrum, whether republicans, royalists, or constitutional monarchs” (Roberts, Thomas Betterton). Six quarto editions appeared between 1684 and 1700, an indication of the play’s great popularity in the wake of the 1684 production starring Thomas Betterton as Brutus. Julius Caesar was one of the few Shakespearean plays that was not extensively modified or adapted during the Restoration period and the eighteenth century. The play has been a touchstone of popular culture for centuries. One of the earliest cultural references was in Shakespeare’s own Hamlet. When Hamlet asks Polonius about his career as an actor at university, Polonius replies “I did enact Julius Caesar. I was killed i’ th’ Capitol. Brutus killed me.” This line would have resonated with the Globe audience: Richard Burbage is generally accepted to have played the lead roles Brutus and Hamlet, and John Heminges is thought to have played both Caesar and Polonius. Countless lines from Julius Caesar are heard to this day in conversation and in references on stage and screen: “Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears” (Antony), “The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones” (Antony), “Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look: He thinks too much: such men are dangerous” (Caesar), “Et tu, Brute?” (Caesar), “This was the most unkindest cut of all” (Antony), “Beware the Ides of March” (the Soothsayer), “There is a tide in the affairs of men. Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune” (Brutus), “the fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves” (Cassius), and many more. The first quarto editions of Shakespeare’s plays are among the most sought-after books in English literature.
A Collection of Three Reports on the Treasury’s Receipts and Expenditures

A Collection of Three Reports on the Treasury’s Receipts and Expenditures

TREASURY.) Meredith, Samuel, Treasurer of the U.S. Three volumes. Folio. Generally in very good condition (details below). Three rare Treasury reports as follows: 1. An Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of the United States, commencing with the establishment of the Treasury Department . . . ending on the thirty-first Day of December One Thousand Seven Hundred and Ninety-one. Philadelphia: Childs and Swaine, 1793. Folio, 61 pp., folding table. Removed. Very good. FIRST EDITION. This is a highly detailed report of the federal government’s receipts and expenditures during the crucial first two years of the new government, 1790-91. Locations: AAS, Library Company, Brown, Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. Evans 26341. 2. The Treasurer of the United States’ Accounts of Payments and Receipts of Public Monies from 1st October, 1790, to 30th June, 1791. [Philadelphia:] Childs and Swaine, [1791]. Folio. Original front wrapper. First few leaves stained. 52 pp. FIRST EDITION. Samuel Meredith was first Treasurer of the United States. This is a detailed report of the expenditures and receipts of the federal government in 1790-1. Evans 23923. 3. The Treasurer of the United States’ Accounts of Payments and Receipts of Public Monies from 1st of January to the 30th of September 1792. [Philadelphia: Childs and Swaine, 1793]. Folio. Removed. Untrimmed. 67 pp. Very good. FIRST EDITION. This is a detailed report of the expenditures and receipts of the federal government in 1792. Evans 24939.
Liquid-Propellant Rocket Development

Liquid-Propellant Rocket Development

GODDARD, ROBERT CARL SAGAN'S COPY. FIRST EDITION. Robert Goddard, the father of modern rocket propulsion, launched the world’s first liquid-propellant rocket in 1926, a “feat as epochal in history as that of the Wright brothers at Kitty Hawk” (NASA). This is one of only two papers published by the secretive Goddard on his rocket research. This illustrated report was published by the Smithsonian, which first provided financial assistance to Goddard in 1917. This is Carl Sagan’s copy, with his bookplate. Goddard was an intellectual hero to Sagan, who himself was the most famous American astronomer of the 20th century. Sagan wrote of Goddard, whose big thinking and enthusiasm rivaled his own: “He conceived of a space vehicle passing 1,000 miles above the surface of Mars – by a curious historical accident just the low point in the orbits of the Mariner 9 and Viking spacecraft. Goddard calculated that a reasonably sized telescope at such a vantage point would be able to photograph features tens of meters across on the surface of the Red Planet, which is the resolution of the Viking orbiter cameras. He conceived of slow interstellar flight at velocities and time scales just equivalent to that of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft, our first interstellar emissaries. “Goddard’s spirit soared higher still. He conceived, not casually but quite seriously, of solar-powered spacecraft, and in a time when any practical application of nuclear energy was publicly ridiculed, nuclear propulsion for spacecraft over vast interstellar distances. Goddard imagined a time in the far distant future when the Sun has grown cold and the solar system become uninhabitable, when manned interstellar spacecraft would be outfitted by our remote descendants, to visit the stars – not merely the nearby stars, but also remote star clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy. He could not imagine relativistic spaceflight and so hypothesized a method of suspended animation of the human crew or – even more imaginative – a means of sending the genetic material of human beings which would automatically, at some very distant time, be allowed to recombine and produce a new generation of people “These final speculations, entitled ‘The Last Migration,’ were sealed in an envelope with instructions to be read ‘only by an optimist.’ And that he surely was – not a Pollyanna who chooses to ignore the problems and evils of our times, but rather, a man committed to the improvement of the human condition and the creation of a vast prospect for the future of our species” (Sagan, Broca’s Brain). Provenance: 1. Royal Canadian Institute for Science, stamp on upper cover dated March 7, 1936. 2. Carl Sagan, with his bookplate reproducing the famous extraterrestrial instructions for playing the golden record sent on the Voyager spacecraft.
Principia Mathematica

Principia Mathematica

WHITEHEAD, ALFRED NORTH & BERTRAND RUSSELL FIRST EDITION of vol. 1, second editions of vols. 2-3, in the rare dust jackets. One of the most ambitious undertakings in the history of science, this work uses a complex new symbolic system in an attempt to prove the logical basis of mathematics from a small set of axioms and the principles of logic. The Principia Mathematica is “the greatest single contribution to logic that has appeared in the two thousand years since Aristotle” (DSB). In 1898 Alfred North Whitehead published the first volume of his Treatise on Universal Algebra and then turned his attention to a proposed second volume, a comparative study of algebras as symbolic structures. In 1900 Whitehead accompanied his star student, Bertrand Russell, to Paris, where they learned of Peano’s new ideography for symbolic logic and saw it as a way to reduce mathematics to its very foundations in philosophical logic. After Bertrand Russell published his Principles of Mathematics in 1903, he planned to give “a completely symbolic account of the assimilation of mathematics to logic in a second volume” (DSB). When Russell and Whitehead saw that their planned second books were practically identical in conception, they decided to collaborate. The magisterial Principia Mathematica was the result. This set comprises the first edition of vol. 1 (one of only 750 copies) and the second editions of vols. 2-3. “The revisions were done by Russell, although Whitehead was given the opportunity to advise. In addition to the correction of minor errors throughout the original text, changes to the new edition included the inclusion of a new Introduction and three new appendices. (The appendices discuss the theory of quantification, mathematical induction and the axiom of reducibility, and the principle of extensionality respectively)” (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy). A set of first editions is now a six-figure book. This set, with the first edition of vol. 1 and the second edition of vols. 2-3 in the rare dust jackets, is a worthy alternative. Three volumes. Original navy cloth. Volumes 2-3 in the rare original dust jackets. Jacket spines browned with abrasion, front endpapers replaced in vol. 1. A very good set.
Collection of 5 items relating to the Suez Canal

Collection of 5 items relating to the Suez Canal

Suez Canal. Lesseps, Ferdinand de The construction of the Suez Canal was one of the great engineering and commercial feats of the 19th century. In the 1850s Ferdinand de Lesseps obtained permission from the Viceroy of Egypt to construct a canal connecting the Mediterranean Sea to the Red Sea through the Isthmus of Suez. The work, which began in 1859, involved 1.5 million workers and claimed more than 100,000 lives. Finally, in November 1869, the Suez Canal officially opened. It reduced the journey from the Arabian Sea to London by more than 5000 miles. The collection comprises: 1. Lesseps, Ferdinand de. Percement de l isthme de Suez Expose et documents officiels. Paris: Plon, 1855. (ix), 280, (1) pp. Folding map. Contemporary quarter green cloth and marbled boards. First edition. In this treatise of nearly three hundred pages, with maps The Piercing of the Isthmus of Suez de Lesseps set out the whole case for the canal and his proposed method of building it (Printing and the Mind of Man 339). En Français dans le Texte, 274. 2. Actes Constitutifs de la Compagnie Universelle du Suez Canal. Paris: Plon, 1866. 147, (1) pp. 5 large folding color plans and maps. Original wrappers, untrimmed. Fine. A splendid survival in original wrappers and with 5 large folding plans and maps. 3. Statuts de la Compagnie Universelle du Canal Maritime de Suez. Paris: Plon, n.d. [1860s]. 4 pp. 4. Arnoux, Hippolyte. Album du Canal du Suez. Port-Said, c. 1870. Original maroon cloth, 12 albumen photographs mounted accordion-style. This splendid album contains 12 original mounted albumen photographs (4 x 5 ½ in.) documenting the the canal. 5. Lesseps, Ferdinand de. Souvenirs de Quarante Ans. Paris: Nouvelle Revue, 1887. 549; 768 pp. Two volumes. Contemporary half black leather. First edition of Lesseps s memoir.
Über einen der Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes betreffenden heuristischen Gesichtpunkt” in Annalen der Physik

Über einen der Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes betreffenden heuristischen Gesichtpunkt” in Annalen der Physik, 4. Folge, 17 Band, No. 6

EINSTEIN, ALBERT FIRST EDITION. This Nobel prize award winning paper on the photon and the photoelectric effect is one of the three great papers from 1905, Einstein annus mirabilis. “On a heuristic point of view about the creation and conversion of light” (appearing here on pp. 132-148) was the only one of his works that Einstein himself called “revolutionary.” “The heuristic viewpoint of the title was nothing less than the suggestion that light be considered a collection of independent particles of energy . Einstein had his reasons for advancing such a bold suggestion, one that seemed to dismiss a century of evidence supporting the wave theory of light. First among these was a negative result: The combination of the electromagnetic theory of light with the (statistical) mechanics of particles was incapable of dealing with the problem of black-body radiation. It predicted that radiation in thermodynamic equilibrium within an enclosure would have a frequency distribution corresponding to an infinite amount of energy at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. This was incompatible with the experimental results, but, worse than that, it meant that the theory did not give an acceptable answer to the problem . Einstein showed that his strange proposal of light quanta could immediately account for several puzzling properties of fluorescence, photoionization, and especially of the photoelectric effect” (DSB). “He determined that a massless quantum of light, the photon, would have to impart the energy required according to Planck’s radiation law to break the attractive forces holding the electrons in the metal. This theory was one of the milestones in the development of quantum mechanics, making Einstein the foremost pioneer in the field and opening the world of quantum physics” (Calaprice, The Einstein Almanac). Provenance: Battelle Institut, Frankfurt, with its stamp.
Über einen der Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes betreffenden heuristischen Gesichtpunkt” in Annalen der Physik

Über einen der Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes betreffenden heuristischen Gesichtpunkt” in Annalen der Physik, 4. Folge, 17 Band, No. 6

EINSTEIN, ALBERT Complete issue removed from bound volume. Very good. FIRST EDITION. This Nobel prize award winning paper on the photon and the photoelectric effect is one of the three great papers from 1905, Einstein annus mirabilis. “On a heuristic point of view about the creation and conversion of light” (appearing here on pp. 132-148) was the only one of his works that Einstein himself called “revolutionary.” “The heuristic viewpoint of the title was nothing less than the suggestion that light be considered a collection of independent particles of energy . Einstein had his reasons for advancing such a bold suggestion, one that seemed to dismiss a century of evidence supporting the wave theory of light. First among these was a negative result: The combination of the electromagnetic theory of light with the (statistical) mechanics of particles was incapable of dealing with the problem of black-body radiation. It predicted that radiation in thermodynamic equilibrium within an enclosure would have a frequency distribution corresponding to an infinite amount of energy at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. This was incompatible with the experimental results, but, worse than that, it meant that the theory did not give an acceptable answer to the problem . Einstein showed that his strange proposal of light quanta could immediately account for several puzzling properties of fluorescence, photoionization, and especially of the photoelectric effect” (DSB). “He determined that a massless quantum of light, the photon, would have to impart the energy required according to Planck’s radiation law to break the attractive forces holding the electrons in the metal. This theory was one of the milestones in the development of quantum mechanics, making Einstein the foremost pioneer in the field and opening the world of quantum physics” (Calaprice, The Einstein Almanac). Provenance: Battelle Institut, Frankfurt, with its stamp.
The Frugal Housewife

The Frugal Housewife

CARTER, SUSANNAH FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. This is the second cookbook printed in America, preceded only by the similarly rare The Compleat Housewife printed in Williamsburg in 1742. 12mo. [12], 166 of 168 pp., final leaf O6 in facsimile. 2 engraved plates. 18th-century sheep. Spine rubbed, front hinge starting at top. Light toning, small tear without loss to title. Generally in excellent condition, a remarkable survival, especially given the subject matter. Carter’s Frugal Housewife was one of the “enduring classics in the American marketplace, reprinted in American cities into the 1830s” (Snell). Printed from the London edition with alterations, The Frugal Housewife strongly influenced the first cookery book by an American author, Amelia Simmons’s American Cookery (1796). Simmons copied entire passages almost word for word from Carter. This first American edition of The Frugal Housewife, printed without a date, was advertised by Edes & Gill in the Boston Gazette as “this day Published” on 2 March 1772. Edes & Gill are best remembered as the most important printers in Boston during the American Revolution. In 1773, one year after publishing this cookbook, they and their newspaper, the Boston Gazette, played a crucial role in sparking the Boston Tea Party. For this cookbook they turned to another patriot, Paul Revere, famed as a silversmith and engraver. Paul Revere engraved two plates on copper to illustrate this work. Revere referred to his work in his Day Book on January 20, 1772, where he wrote: “Mesr. Edes & Gill Dr. To Engraving a Copper plate for coocrey [sic] Book & 500 prints 2-14-0.” Revere evidently engraved a single plate of copper with both illustrations. A FABULOUS PROVENANCE. This book bears the apparently otherwise unknown book label of Sally Parsons dated 1774. Women’s book labels on American books of this interest and period are of the greatest rarity. VERY RARE. No copy appears in the book auction records of the past 100 years, apart from an example lacking nine leaves including the title. In 1954 Goodspeed’s offered a copy with a portion of the title in facsimile—the only copy we have traced in the trade. Only four research libraries have copies (Library of Congress, Harvard, Brown, and American Antiquarian Society) and the 1772
Theorie der Lichterzeugung und Lichtabsorption” [and] “Prinzip von der Erhaltung der Schwerpunktsbewegung und die Trägheit der Energie” in Annalen der Physik

Theorie der Lichterzeugung und Lichtabsorption” [and] “Prinzip von der Erhaltung der Schwerpunktsbewegung und die Trägheit der Energie” in Annalen der Physik, 4. Folge, Band 20

EINSTEIN, ALBERT Contemporary half dark green roan. Rubbed, some chipping, separation at upper joint. Library markings. FIRST EDITION of “On the Theory of Light Production and Light Absorption” (pp. 199-206). This classic in the history of physics is Einstein’s second paper on the photoelectric effect. Einstein reconciles his and Planck’s independent derivations of the blackbody formula E=hν Planck’s derivation of this formula ascribed it to a restriction on the energy changes possible when radiation is produced or absorbed by matter, which implied no restriction on the energies of either matter or radiation. Einstein’s 1905 derivation ascribed it to a restriction on the energy of radiation alone, but in this paper, he proposes the modern idea that the energies of both matter and radiation are quantized, which led to his work on quantum specific heats. [and] FIRST EDITION of “The Principle of Conservation of Motion of the Center of Gravity and the Inertia of Energy” (pp. 627-633). In this “ingenious thought experiment involving energy transport in a hollow cylinder, Einstein returned to the relationship between inertial mass and energy, giving more general arguments for their complete equivalence” (Calaprice, The Einstein Almanac). This is the first statement that the conservation of mass is a special case of the conservation of energy.
The Constitution of the United States of America 6th ed

The Constitution of the United States of America 6th ed

Constitution This lovely volume contains essential documents of American history including the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the Declaration of independence, the Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents, and much more. Presentation copy inscribed by the editor, William Hickey: “Presented to Edward Stabler Esq. With the kind regards and best respects of the author and compiler, and of his friend, W. Hickey Senate Office March 9, 1854.” In the 1840s William Hickey, a member of the Senate’s clerical staff, found that printed copies of the Constitution contained numerous inaccuracies. He prepared “a copy of the Constitution from which he had taken pains to banish every error. He placed this Constitution at the front of a 225-page manual of the national government that he had produced, which in the course of several editions he expanded to 521 pages. “The book contained a certificate by Secretary of State James Buchanan, declaring that Hickey’s printed Constitution “has been critically compared with the originals in this Department & found to be correct, in text, letter, & punctuation. It may, therefore, be relied upon as a standard edition.” (Buchanan’s original was the engrossed, signed original of 1787, in the custody of the Department of the State.) “Hickey published several editions of his manual, with the Constitution at the front, during the 1850s. After his death, the administrator of his estate published new editions in 1878 and 1879, with a certification by another secretary of state (Hamilton Fish) attesting to the accuracy of a Constitution that now included the three Civil War amendments. “With his careful work and the wide dissemination of his print, William Hickey struck a mighty blow for error-free reproduction of the Constitution. His work was carried forward during the late 19th century and afterward by the Government Printing Office. A modern pamphlet edition of the Constitution, printed by the GPO for a congressional committee, bears a close resemblance to Hickey’s print” (National Archives website). This lovely handsome volume is in the deluxe binding with extensive gilt stamping, offered at a premium.
History of the Expedition under the command of Captains Lewis and Clark

History of the Expedition under the command of Captains Lewis and Clark, to the sources of the Missouri, thence across the Rocky Mountains and down the River Columbia to the Pacific Ocean, performed during the years 1804-5-6

LEWIS, MERIWETHER & WILLIAM CLARK Large folding map, one closed tear, some restoration; five other engraved maps or charts. Two volumes. Original calf boards, expertly rebacked and recornered, red leather labels. Browned with occasional stains. A very good copy. FIRST EDITION of “the definitive account of the most important exploration of the North American continent” (Wagner-Camp-Becker). This is “the most important of all overland narratives. . . . American explorers had for the first time spanned the continental United States and driven the first wedge in the settlement of our new far western frontier” (Grolier 100 American Books). Only 1417 copies were printed. This copy has the important folding map, which was available at a premium and thus was not issued with all copies. Engraved from Clark’s manuscript, this map showing the 8000-mile trek is one of the greatest landmarks American cartographic history. “More accurate than any previous western map, it rapidly became the source for a new generation of western maps” (Schwartz and Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, p. 227). Thomas Jefferson had begun the planning of a western expedition even before his inauguration. Early in 1801 he appointed Meriwether Lewis as his secretary, in part, as he wrote the army officer, because of “your knowledge of the Western country.” Early in 1803 Jefferson proposed the expedition to Congress, and soon thereafter the Louisiana Purchase removed the major obstacles blocking not only the expedition, but also westward expansion. This book includes the first printing of Thomas Jefferson’s biography of Meriwether Lewis, who had served as Jefferson’s private secretary at the White House. Lewis had been killed (or had killed himself, as Jefferson later thought) under mysterious circumstances in Tennessee in 1809. The expedition took place in 1804-6, but the publication of the official account was delayed until 1814. Printing and the Mind of Man 272. Grolier 100 American Books 30.
Common Sense; Addressed to the Inhabitants of America . . . the third edition [bound with:] Large Additions to Common Sense

Common Sense; Addressed to the Inhabitants of America . . . the third edition [bound with:] Large Additions to Common Sense

PAINE, THOMAS FIRST EDITION, FIRST PRINTING sheets of Common Sense, here with the third edition title page and prefatory leaf. Richard Gimbel s definitive study identifies points in every gathering distinguishing the three editions that Bell printed in early 1776. This copy of Common Sense contains all of the points of the first printing, save the two-leaf gathering [A]2 (title and preface). Bound in at the end is Paine s Large Additions to Common Sense, which Bell pirated from a competitor and offered separately for one shilling to buyers of Common Sense. Paine s Common Sense, published anonymously in January 1776, was the first vigorous attack on King George and the first public appeal for an American Republic. It is not too much to say that the Declaration of Independence of July 4, 1776, was due more to Paine s Common Sense than to any other single piece of writing (Streeter). Together with the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and The Federalist, Common Sense is one of the fundamental documents of the birth of our nation. The most recent census of Common Sense locates seventeen complete first editions. Only two of these remain in private hands, and neither is likely to appear for sale. The present volume, containing the first edition sheets, is the most desirable available copy of Common Sense, perhaps the most influential book in American history.Two volumes in one. Disbound, original stabholes visible. Some staining, foxing and wear, old inscription on verso of title. Half morocco case.
Sketches of the Life

Sketches of the Life, Writings, and Opinions of Thomas Jefferson, Selections of Private Correspondence.

JEFFERSON, THOMAS--VAN BUREN, MARTIN.) Rayner, B.L. FIRST EDITION. An outstanding Democratic Party association copy. Inscribed and signed as president by Martin Van Buren to Mr. & Mrs. O Neil, dated Oct 30, 1838. Van Buren served as president from 1837 to 1841 following his terms as vice president (1833-37) and secretary of state (1829-31) under Andrew Jackson. The most influential figure in the Democratic Party after Jackson, Van Buren built the modern Democratic Party, leading it to dominance in the Second Party system era. This is the first full-length biography of Thomas Jefferson. Rayner published this laudatory biography, which includes selections from Jefferson s correspondence and other writings, just six years after Jefferson s death. A revised edition was published as The Life of Thomas Jefferson (Boston, 1834). Jefferson was one of the founders of the Democratic-Republican party, the forerunner of the modern Democratic party which Van Buren led to dominance a generation later. 556 pp. Engraved portrait of Jefferson; engraved view of Monticello. Contemporary or original sheep, rebacked and recornered preserving spine. Foxed, Some staining and wear. A rare association copy of the first biography of Jefferson. Books signed by Martin Van Buren are rarely seen in the market. This biography of Thomas Jefferson, signed by Van Buren as president, must be considered one of the most desirable Van Buren books to appear for sale in many years.
Execution of Capt. Henry Wirz

Execution of Capt. Henry Wirz

GARDNER, ALEXANDER Albumen print (7 ½ x 9 in.), mounted. Contemporary manuscript title on verso: “#7752 Execution of Capt Henry Wirz keeper of the Anderson Prison Pen, Reading the death warrant.” Very good condition. This famous photograph by renowned Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner documents the execution of Andersonville prison commandant Henry Wirz. The event took place on November 10, 1865 in the courtyard of the Old Capitol Prison, now the site of the U.S. Supreme Court. 120 soldiers guarded the crowd of 200 spectators, while more onlookers clung to trees outside the prison yard. Gardner, who had photographed the execution of the Lincoln assassination conspirators in July, documented the event. At its peak Andersonville held 32,000 men, making it larger than all but four cities in the South. Inhumane conditions and overcrowding led to a staggering death rate. 13,000 of the 45,000 men imprisoned there died. An outraged public demanded punishment, and after the war Wirz was tried and convicted for conspiracy and murder. This view shows the death warrant being read atop the scaffold. “Wirz himself is almost completely obscured in this image, sitting on a stool with only part of his right shoe visible, right center. The Annapolis Gazette of November 16, 1865 identifies most of those present on the scaffold. As Major G. B. Russell, Provost Marshal of the District of Columbia, reads the death warrant, Wirz’ spiritual advisers, Rev. Frs. Boyle and Wiggett (or Wiget), minister to the condemned man. At left, Captain G. R. Walbridge, in command of the Old Capitol Prison, confers with a taller man in civilian clothes, presumably Sylvester Ballou, a military detective assigned to act as Wirz’ executioner. The bareheaded man at right is not mentioned in the account. The guards are part of the Veteran Reserve Corps, assigned to the Old Capitol Prison. The time is about 10:20 a.m.” (Andy Hall, Dead Confederates). This Alexander Gardner photograph presents rare documentation of the resolution of a landmark war crimes trial.
An enormous run of Goodspeed’s rare book and manuscript catalogues. Vols. 1-360 and 391-575

An enormous run of Goodspeed’s rare book and manuscript catalogues. Vols. 1-360 and 391-575

GOODSPEED’S BOOK SHOP. 545 volumes, neatly bound in 51 volumes in red and blue buckram, preserving original wrappers. Very good condition. Founded in 1898, Goodspeed’s published its first catalogue in 1899. For decades to come the firm would be a dominant force in American bookselling. These catalogues are a witness to that golden age. “Goodspeed’s was unquestionably the dominant firm on the scene. Its prominence, both locally and internationally, coupled with the fact that the shop, in good Yankee tradition, kept its secrets to itself, made Goodspeed’s the subject of frequent rumors and speculations in the local trade, many of them unfounded and not all of them kind. Indeed, the shop, had a kind of mystique which lured me strongly, as it had countless others” (David Holmes, preface to Goodspeed, The Bookseller’s Apprentice). The following passage from Goodspeed’s memoir gives a taste of the treasures to be found in these volumes: “But I think that the prize offering of the period by Goodspeed’s was in Catalogue No. 6 (April, 1901), where an immaculate copy of the first edition of Emerson’s Nature, with a presentation inscription from Thoreau incorporating a quotation from Burns, was priced at $100. Mr. Wakeman bought this volume and it seems to have been one of the bargains at the sale of his library twenty-three years later, when it realized only $160.”