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Final Report of Gen. John J. Pershing

Final Report of Gen. John J. Pershing, Commander-in Chief, American Expeditionary Force

PERSHING, JOHN J. FIRST EDITION. An outstanding presentation copy inscribed by Pershing: “To M. le Maréchal Joffre with sincere esteem and affectionate regards, and with gratitude for his friendship and wise counsel. John J. Pershing Washington D.C.” Pershing, who led the American forces in World War I, presented this book to his counterpart in the French military. Joseph Joffre was commander-in-chief of the French forces on the Western Front from the start of World War I until the end of 1916. He is most famous for regrouping the retreating allied armies to defeat the Germans at the strategically decisive Battle of the Marne in September 1914. In late 1916 he was promoted to Marshal of France and moved to an advisory role. In April 1917 Joffre led the French mission to the United States to secure America’s entry into the war. He recommended that the Americans lead their own force in the conflict, as Pershing insisted, rather than being integrated into the existing commands. On the final day of the mission he met with Pershing, just named commander of the American Expeditionary Force, telling him that Pershing “can always count on me for anything in my power.” Joffre became head of the Supreme War Council in 1918, coordinating the Allied war effort from Versailles. This is Pershing’s Final Report to Secretary of War Newton Baker, presenting his summary account of the events of the Great War. The work is lavishly illustrated with graphics and maps describing military action and maneuvers, organizational structures, and orders of battle. This classic work, inscribed by Pershing to Joffre, is a pinnacle book in American military history. A better World War One association copy can scarcely be imagined. 96 pp, 16 folding color maps, charts, and diagrams. Original leather presentation binding, neatly rebacked, upper board gilt stamped with title, War Office seal, and Marshal Joffre. Wear to extremities. Half morocco case. Provenance: presentation inscription from Pershing to Joffre, with Joffre’s bookplate.
Principia Mathematica

Principia Mathematica

WHITEHEAD, ALFRED NORTH & BERTRAND RUSSELL Three volumes. Original navy cloth. Volumes 2-3 in the rare original dust jackets. Jacket spines browned with abrasion, front endpapers replaced in vol. 1. A very good set. FIRST EDITION of vol. 1, second editions of vols. 2-3, in the rare dust jackets. One of the most ambitious undertakings in the history of science, this work uses a complex new symbolic system in an attempt to prove the logical basis of mathematics from a small set of axioms and the principles of logic. The Principia Mathematica is “the greatest single contribution to logic that has appeared in the two thousand years since Aristotle” (DSB). In 1898 Alfred North Whitehead published the first volume of his Treatise on Universal Algebra and then turned his attention to a proposed second volume, a comparative study of algebras as symbolic structures. In 1900 Whitehead accompanied his star student, Bertrand Russell, to Paris, where they learned of Peano’s new ideography for symbolic logic and saw it as a way to reduce mathematics to its very foundations in philosophical logic. After Bertrand Russell published his Principles of Mathematics in 1903, he planned to give “a completely symbolic account of the assimilation of mathematics to logic in a second volume” (DSB). When Russell and Whitehead saw that their planned second books were practically identical in conception, they decided to collaborate. The magisterial Principia Mathematica was the result. This set comprises the first edition of vol. 1 (one of only 750 copies) and the second editions of vols. 2-3. “The revisions were done by Russell, although Whitehead was given the opportunity to advise. In addition to the correction of minor errors throughout the original text, changes to the new edition included the inclusion of a new Introduction and three new appendices. (The appendices discuss the theory of quantification, mathematical induction and the axiom of reducibility, and the principle of extensionality respectively)” (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy). A set of first editions is now a six-figure book. This set, with the first edition of vol. 1 and the second edition of vols. 2-3 in the rare dust jackets, is a worthy alternative.
An important manuscript collection including 16 long

An important manuscript collection including 16 long, closely written letters written from Alabama

South.) Lalouette, Antoine Prudence (1777-1855) Dozens of items comprising scores of pages. Very good condition, the letters neatly penned and legible. A detailed inventory follows. This tremendous manuscript collection documents in great detail a pioneering French settler’s ambitious struggles to establish a home in the new state of Alabama in the early 1820s. In 1821, Antoine Prudence Lalouette, formerly a lieutenant of infantry under Napoleon Bonaparte, left Burgundy to establish a new home in America. He sailed from Le Havre and arrived in New Orleans in June 1821. Lalouette immediately set out for Mobile, where he acquired a prime 1240-acre parcel of land near Mobile Bay on Riviere aux Poissons (present-day Fish River). Over the course of the next two years Lalouette worked to clear the land, equip himself, build a home and slave quarters, and cultivate the land, while surviving in a harsh, wild environment. Lalouette’s extremely long letters to his wife, closely but legibly written, begin with accounts of his eventful travels including his ship’s arrival in the Gulf of Mexico pursued by a corsair, his stay in New Orleans, where streets were just beginning to be paved, and his journey to Mobile in search of property. He finally bought the 1240-acre parcel at the junction of the Fish River near Mobile Bay. In these densely written letters, the extremely observant French settler analyzes the state of agriculture in the deep South and the prospects for making his fortune there. He describes Mobile, its population, and its markets. Lalouette visits a neighbor who has already made a fortune and has twenty slaves and a brickyard. He makes calculations of expected profits taking into account the number of animals and the cost of slaves, makes an inventory of the woods of his property, and details what he has managed to grow. There remains a little time for reading, and so he lists for his wife the books he has brought to America, including Montesquieu’s works, Say’s political economy, Volney’s work on natural law, and more. Lalouette writes to his wife in warm terms, but he also assigns her countless tasks to help meet the enterprise’s endless needs. He asks her to obtain and ship specific wines which he plans to resell, to collect vines and seeds for cultivation in America, and to send tools, textiles, and furniture. To accomplish this, as well as her planned move to the new land, he explains the steps required to ship their belongings in Rouen, and he refers her to his friend Louis-Augustin Bosc d’Antic, naturalist of the Paris Museum, to send him plants and fruit trees from the King’s Nursery. The letters reflect an undercurrent of the torments Lalouette must endure. He gets lost in the jungle for twenty-four hours, sleeping in the open with wild animals all around. An insect stings him, causing a fever that he says lasts for months. A three-colored snake attacks his animals, and his dog is eaten by a caiman as he tried to swim to their canoe. Finally, having endured constant trials and faced with his wife’s refusal to join him, Lalouette abandoned the propject and returned to France in August 1823. He and his heirs kept the land, contesting efforts to wrest it from them, culminating in a successful lawsuit in 1884. Unpublished archives of this interest, quality, and extent from the deep South at this early date are rare in the market. A detailed inventory is available.
An album of early New Zealand photographs

An album of early New Zealand photographs, watercolors, manuscript verse, and ephemera assembled by Miss Flaxman

NEW ZEALAND Original red morocco gilt extra. 72 leaves. 21 albumen photographs, 3 of them CDVs, most of the others approx. 5 x 6 inches. 7 delicate watercolor and pencil landscapes and views of houses. Very good condition. See below for detailed inventory of contents. This delightful photograph and autograph album chronicles the world of young Miss Flaxman in New Zealand in the 1860s. Albums and scrapbooks assembled by women in the Victorian era have come under increasing scholarly scrutiny for the insights they provide into women’s public and private lives and thoughts. This 1860s New Zealand album, with dozens of photographs, original watercolors, manuscript poems, and printed ephemera, is a rare survival and a valuable resource for women’s studies. The album is highlighted by its splendid early New Zealand photographs. Three carte-de-visite photographs depict identified Maori: one is a portrait of two identified Maori women, the other two are of Paora Parau, a Maori chief from Poverty Bay who served in the native contingent of the military. The portrait of two Maori women has the backstamp of J. D. Wrigglesworth, Wellington. The album also contains twelve photographs of towns, landscapes, and buildings, including views of the town of Nelson, Maitai Valley, Te Ore Ore in Wairapa, and a house in St. Kilda. Several photographs are by Burton Brothers, the leading New Zealand photographer of the day. This charming album also contains six delicate watercolor landscapes and views of houses, presumably by Miss Flaxman, dozens of pieces of Victorian chromolithography, and numerous manuscript poems including a “Maori acrostic,” lines by Miss Flaxman’s friends, and poems by Poe, Browning, Tennyson, and others. Study of this album of photographs, manuscripts, drawings, and ephemera will yield valuable information of women’s lives in the 1860s. The album is especially noteworthy for its photographs. New Zealand photographs of this vintage, particularly portraits of identified Maori, are rare in the market. Provenance: Miss Flaxman, signed gift inscription to her dated 1867 (many of the photographs are inscribed and dated on the verso with the compliments of Capt. Underwood, her future husband); inscribed by Mrs. Underwood (“née Flaxman”) to her daughter and dated Bairnsdale, 1899.
Coney Island Panorama

Coney Island Panorama

CONEY ISLAND.) STACY, CHARLES. Gelatin silver print (9 x 48 in.). Light wear and fading. Framed. This is a splendid panorama of Coney Island taken in 1907. Beginning in 1824 Coney Island began to transition from carriage roads and steamship transport, with a relative lack of urban development, to a more vibrant touristic landscape. Due to its proximity to Manhattan, the island attracted a large number of visitors as early as the 1830s and 1840s. Between 1880 and WWII, Coney Island was the largest amusement area in the United States drawing millions of visitors a year. Dreamland dominates this tremendous panoramic view, which was taken from the Shoot-the-Chutes feature. Built in 1904, Dreamland was intend- ed to surpass Luna Park and Steeplechase Park. To the left of Dreamland Tower, Luna Park’s central tower is visible in the distance. Dreamland was illuminated by one million lights and had a railway through a Swiss Alpine landscape, Venetian canals with gondolas, a recreation of the fall of Pompeii, a simulated submarine ride, the Fighting the Flames fire fighting exhibition carried out on a 250 ft. long, 6-story building, and countless other attractions and rides. Considered one of the greatest amusement parks ever built, Dreamland was destroyed by a fire in 1911. The fire started, surprisingly, at a water attraction which was perhaps appropriately named Hell’s Gate. Dreamland’s role in amusement park history and impact on the American notion of what a park should be is notable considering its brief existence. This panorama was taken at the zenith of that period. This is a rare opportunity to own a large format panorama of Coney Island during the golden age of American amusement parks.
An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West

An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West

WATKINS, Carleton, Isaiah TABER &c. 32 albumen prints (sizes vary; see list below) of Yosemite and selected other scenes in the American West, on light gray card mounts. All but four signed in the negative by Taber of San Francisco. Contemporary dark blue morocco (measuring approx. 18 x 12 in.), upper board stamped in gilt “AMERIKA,” rebacked, brass fittings, lacking clasp. Silk patterned endpapers. Mounts foxed, slight staining, occasional foxing or fading to images. An outstanding album with beautiful, rich prints. Giants of American West photography. This beautiful album contains many splendid views of the scenic wonders of Yosemite including splendid Watkins and Taber views. Subjects include the many magnificent falls, the Mariposa Grove of sequoias, and the great geological formations. At least two, and likely many more, of the views in this collection were taken by Carleton Watkins. Those for which attribution to Watkins has been confirmed are singled out below, but this collection merits further investigation to identify Watkins photographs. Isaiah Taber was a dominant figure in Western photography after the Civil War. In 1864 he came to San Francisco, founding his gallery in 1871. In the winter of 1875-76, Taber acquired Carleton Watkins’s collection of Pacific Coast Views negatives and Yosemite Gallery in the aftermath of Watkins’s bankruptcy. “Once he had acquired Watkins’s gallery and negatives, Taber began his bid for the exalted position of premier photographer of the west coast.” Many of Watkins’s prints were released with Taber’s imprint. Over the next three decades Taber became the dominant figure in photography in the Far West. In 1906 the San Francisco earthquake ended his career, destroying his premises and an estimated twenty tons of view negatives and eighty tons of portrait negatives. Please inquire for details.
Collection of papers of John M. Bailey

Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention

DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968 More than 50 items. Good condition, organized in plastic sheets in an old red vinyl three-ring binder. The 1968 Democratic National Convention of 1968, held in Chicago, was a landmark event in American political history. John M. Bailey of Connecticut, who had helped to orchestrate Johnson’s landslide victory in 1964, oversaw the contentious presidential campaign of 1968, in which Robert Kennedy, Hubert Humphrey, Eugene McCarthy, and others sought the Democratic nomination. This collection of papers to and by longtime Democratic National Committee Chairman John M. Bailey includes: • Eugene McCarthy, 3-page telegram requesting an opportunity appear before the Committee to present his argument that “the administration’s course in Vietnam is dangerous and wrong.” • Various papers by the McCarthy campaign concerning its goals and requesting information concerning officers, seating, and other logistical matters at the convention. In the end the party was less than helpful to the McCarthy campaign, instead unifying behind Humphrey. These papers help to reveal the struggles of the McCarthy campaign to present its dissenting views. • Convention press kit containing biographies, maps, flyers, and a poster. • Correspondence concerning credentials and passes. • Correspondence and press releases concerning the status of the campaign, ranging from state delegates voicing their concerns to a copy of Bailey’s memorandum to the White House reporting on developments state-by-state. • Copies of a letter signed by Kennedy two weeks before his assassination with a note stating that his family agreed to its distribution. The 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago saw protests and riots outside the convention and a bitterly contested fight inside the convention hall ultimately leading to the nomination of Hubert Humphrey, who lost to Nixon in November.
An enormous run of Goodspeed’s rare book and manuscript catalogues. Vols. 1-360 and 391-575

An enormous run of Goodspeed’s rare book and manuscript catalogues. Vols. 1-360 and 391-575

GOODSPEED’S BOOK SHOP 545 volumes, neatly bound in 51 volumes in red and blue buckram, preserving original wrappers. Very good condition. Founded in 1898, Goodspeed’s published its first catalogue in 1899. For decades to come the firm would be a dominant force in American bookselling. These catalogues are a witness to that golden age. “Goodspeed’s was unquestionably the dominant firm on the scene. Its prominence, both locally and internationally, coupled with the fact that the shop, in good Yankee tradition, kept its secrets to itself, made Goodspeed’s the subject of frequent rumors and speculations in the local trade, many of them unfounded and not all of them kind. Indeed, the shop, had a kind of mystique which lured me strongly, as it had countless others” (David Holmes, preface to Goodspeed, The Bookseller’s Apprentice). The following passage from Goodspeed’s memoir gives a taste of the treasures to be found in these volumes: “But I think that the prize offering of the period by Goodspeed’s was in Catalogue No. 6 (April, 1901), where an immaculate copy of the first edition of Emerson’s Nature, with a presentation inscription from Thoreau incorporating a quotation from Burns, was priced at $100. Mr. Wakeman bought this volume and it seems to have been one of the bargains at the sale of his library twenty-three years later, when it realized only $160.”
Grandmaster Flash

Grandmaster Flash

HIP HOP.) Barboza, Anthony Gelatin silver print. 10 x 10 in. on 11 x 14 in. sheet. Light wear. Signed and inscribed by the photographer: “Grandmaster Flash 1984 A. Barboza.” This portrait captures Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five at the height of their fame. The pioneering group broke through to mainstream success with the 1982 single “The Message,” which made the top 100 pop charts. “’The Message’ was [the first record] to prove that rap could become the inner city’s voice, as well as its choice” (Rolling Stone). In 2007 Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five became the first hip hop group to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. In 2012 Rolling Stone declared “The Message” (with the refrain “Don’t push me, ’cause I’m close to the edge, I’m tryin’ not to lose my head ”) the #1 hip hop song of all time. Anthony Barboza (b. 1944) is most famous for photographs of jazz musicians in the 1970s and 1980s. His work has been exhibited in countless solo and group shows and is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Cornell University, the Brooklyn Museum, the Schomburg Center – NYPL, and the National Portrait Gallery, among others. “When I do a portrait, I’m doing a photograph of how that person feels to me; how I feel about the person, not how they look. I find that in order for the portraits to work, they have to make a mental connection as well as an emotional one. When they do that, I know I have it” (Anthony Barboza).
Important Pair of Daguerreotypes: Black Nurse with White Baby and the Child s Parents

Important Pair of Daguerreotypes: Black Nurse with White Baby and the Child s Parents

SLAVERY, AMERICAN Two sixth-plate daguerreotypes, cased together. Left: nurse and child (Bradford & Ellen Sherwood his nurse), right: parents (Jonathan P. Harrison & his wife Caroline Denny Harrison). White family s cheeks are hand-tinted and the baby s dress is hand-colored. Some spots, edges tarnished. A tremendous pair. Jonathan P. Harrison (born 23 December 1829) and his wife Caroline Denny Harrison (born c. 1834) are in one portrait, while their son Bradford (born c. 1853) and his black nurse Ellen Sherwood are in the other. The Harrison family moved from Talbot County on Maryland s Eastern Shore to Texas in the 1850s to pursue ranching and farming opportunities. According to the U.S. Census, in 1860 the family lived in Corpus Christi, Texas, with Jonathan reported as 29 years old, Caroline 26, and Bradford 7, indicating a date of 1853 for this photograph. The Harrisons and Dennys were prominent Maryland and Texas families. Jonathan served with the 1st Texas Cavalry during the Civil War. Identified daguerreotype portraits of slaves are rare, and linked pairs such as this set are very rare. It is conceivable that Ellen Sherwood was a free black, but given the status of the Harrison and Denny families, it seems probable that she was a slave. This splendid pair of photographs vividly demonstrates the complexity of black-white relationships in the antebellum South. Provenance: Jonathan P. Harrison & his wife Caroline Denny Harrison / Their child Bradford & Ellen Sherwood his nurse, identified in a manuscript note, beneath the right daguerreotype, in the hand of Jonathan s niece Patty Belle Tilghman (1851-1931). See Hanson, Old Kent: The Eastern Shore of Maryland, p. 96.
Mammoth Portrait of Abraham Lincoln

Mammoth Portrait of Abraham Lincoln

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.) Gardner, Alexander Albumen print (18 1⁄2 x 15 in.), gold-ruled mount (22 x 18 in.) with Gardner’s imprint. Mount and print with minor soiling and foxing. A rare survival. A classic mammoth portrait of Abraham Lincoln, showing the President just days before he delivered the Gettysburg Address. A giant of American photography, Alexander Gardner is credited with introducing the large-format Imperial portrait to the United States while working as a staff photographer for Mathew Brady. Gardner left Brady’s employ in early 1863, and his studio quickly rivaled Brady’s for the quality and extent of its war and portrait photography. Gardner first photographed Lincoln as president-elect while working for Brady, and he went on to take Lincoln’s portrait more than any other photographer. Lincoln sat for Gardner on several occasions, usually visiting his studio on Sunday to avoid crowds. Lincoln sat for this splendid large-format portrait on Sunday, November 8, 1863. His private secretaries John Hay and John Nicolay joined him. Hay noted in his diary that “We had a great many pictures taken some of the Prest. the best I have seen.” Ostendorf notes that this portrait, one of five made that day, “emphasized Lincoln’s long, lanky legs.” Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863, just eleven days after this portrait was made. The large-format Gardner portrait is rare and much sought-after. Another example was sold at Sotheby’s on October 5, 2011, lot 43, for $98,500. Only a handful of copies survive, several of which are trimmed and cropped. We are not aware of any other uncropped example in private hands. This mammoth photograph, in original condition with the Gardner mount and imprint, is a rare and important survival. Provenance: descended in the family of Colonel Oliver Perry Taylor, of the 161st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, sold Cowan’s, 4-5 December 2008. Early inscription on verso with erroneous final sentence: “Abraham Lincoln. Sunday Morning Febry 26th 1865. Presented to O. P. Taylor by Dr. Chas. Gentrick then residing at Washington). The last photograph of Lincoln – only six copies were printed when the negative was accidentally broken.” Ostendorf, Lincoln’s Photographs O-79.
The Taber Photographic Album of Principal Business Houses

The Taber Photographic Album of Principal Business Houses, Residences and Persons

SAN FRANCISCO.) TABER, ISAIAH WEST The Taber Photographic Album is the most important photographically illustrated book of 19th-century American business and commerce. “In 1880 Taber issued The Taber Photographic Album of Principal Business Houses, Residences and Persons, a promotional folio containing between 98 and 103 [ours has 108] original albumen prints on stiff boards. Copies of the book, which varied in the number of pages and contents, were placed in the best east and west coast hotels and steamships, and they had the desired effect of publicizing both Taber’s gallery and the commerce of San Francisco” (Palmquist, Pioneer Photographers of the Far West). The album dramatically illustrates the rich diversity of San Francisco’s economic activity. Many of the photographs illustrate commercial buildings and blocks, dense with business signs and often showing street activity. Surrounding these large mounted albumen prints are printed advertisements for the businesses occupying the illustrated blocks. These views include firms of every kind and size, from corset-makers to heavy industry. Taber’s own photographic studio and Levi Strauss & Co. are shown. Railroads, newspapers, hotels, wineries, breweries, carriage makers, undertakers, insurance companies, iron works, gun dealers, rope manufacturers, lead paint makers and dealers, dressmakers, hatters, milliners, piano dealers, bookbinders, jewelers, foundries, furniture dealers, druggists, and picture framers all have their place in this astounding volume. There are a number of wonderful interiors including Taber’s photography gallery, a Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad dining car, the Japanese Art Repository, Bunker’s pork packing counter, Louis Dampf & Co.’s frame shop, the Palace Hotel decorated for the 1880 visit of President Rutherford B. Hayes, and countless others. Taber’s album was printed in very limited numbers, and only a handful survives. Examples vary in the numbers and subjects of photographs. This volume contains more photographs than any other extant example. 108 albumen photographs, various sizes, mounted, each mount containing extensive printed advertising matter for the businesses pictured. Folio (17 ¼ x 12 ¼ in.). Original quarter brown morocco and cloth, title gilt-stamped on both covers. Some wear to binding, inner hinges restored. Occasional fading to photographs, but in general they have strong tones and good contrast. Fine condition. A detailed description is available on request.
Nicholas Machiavel’s Prince. Translated out of Italian into English; By E[dward]. D[acres].

Nicholas Machiavel’s Prince. Translated out of Italian into English; By E[dward]. D[acres].

MACHIAVELLI, NICCOLO Contemporary English gilt-ruled sheep. Some contemporary marginalia and highlighting. Some wear to spine. Fine. A RARE UNRESTORED COPY. First edition in English of one of the great books of the Renaissance and a classic of political philosophy. Machiavelli, long a diplomat for the Florentine Republic, was personally acquainted with many of the great leaders of the Renaissance including Lorenzo de Medici (the dedicatee of Il Principe), Louis XII of France, Emperor Maximilian, Catherine Sforza, and Piero Soderini. In 1502 he was sent as the Florentine envoy to the court of Cesare Borgia, duke of Valentinois. In Borgia he found an audacious and strong willed leader capable of deception and violence to achieve his ends, yet a man who appeared at all times both controlled and diplomatically prudent. Borgia provided the model for Machiavelli’s ideal prince, Valentino. His book addressed the problem of the unification of a self-reliant Italy. “It was Machiavelli’s intense preoccupation with this problem– what a state is and how to found one in existing circumstances– which caused the many riddles of his speculative writings He was by no means indifferent to private virtue but in the realm of politics he postponed morals to political expediency” (Britannica 11th ed.). “The Prince is far more than a book of directions to any one of the many Italian princelings. Machiavelli founded the science of modern politics on the study of mankind. Politics was a science to be divorced entirely from ethics, and nothing must stand in the way of its machinery. Many of the remedies he proposed for the rescue of Italy were eventually applied. His concept of the qualities demanded from a ruler and the absolute need of a national militia came to fruition in the monarchies of the seventeenth century and their national armies” (Printing and the Mind of Man 63). Machiavelli is universally regarded as one of the great thinkers in political philosophy. At the same time, Machiavelli’s name has entered everyday usage, connoting sinister machinations and the dark side of politics and power. His name was a familiar part of the English language even in Shakespeare’s time, for Hamlet says “I’ll put the murderous Machiavel to school.” Macaulay wrote, “Out of his [Niccolo Machiavelli’s] surname they have coined an epithet for a knave, and out of his Christian name a synonym for the devil.”
Animal Farm

Animal Farm

ORWELL, GEORGE Original cloth and black dust jacket. Very minor wear to price-clipped jacket. Near fine. Cloth case. FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. The American edition omits the sub-title “A Fairy Story.” This is the most famous political satire of the 20th century. “Animal Farm, which owes something to Swift and Defoe, is [Orwell’s] masterpiece” (Connolly 93) In his essay “Why I Write,” Orwell wrote that Animal Farm was the first book in which he attempted consciously “to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole.” The allegorical novel critiques the events leading up to the 1917 Revolution and the Stalinist era. In the preface of a 1947 Ukrainian edition of Animal Farm, he explained how escaping the communist purges in Spain in the 1930s taught him “how easily totalitarian propaganda can control the opinion of enlightened people in democratic countries.” Orwell wrote Animal Farm between November 1943 and February 1944, but he had difficulty securing a publisher because of the wartime alliance with the USSR. With the end of the war it became clear that the Soviet Union would be the principal adversary of the West, and Orwell convinced Secker and Warburg to publish the book. The book remained on the forbidden list in the USSR until 1989. Orwell wrote in a letter in 1946, “Of course I intended it primarily as a satire on the Russian revolution [and] that kind of revolution (violent conspiratorial revolution, led by unconsciously power hungry people) can only lead to a change of masters revolutions only effect a radical improvement when the masses are alert.” Connolly, The Modern Movement 93 (London edition).
Animal Farm

Animal Farm

ORWELL, GEORGE Original wrappers with stamp. Fine. Cloth case. FIRST AMERICAN EDITION. The American edition omits the sub-title A Fairy Story. This is an advance review copy with the ink stamp on the upper cover: Review copy publication date Aug 26 1946 Price $175. The front cover bears the quotation All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others, presumably to call it to the attention of reviewers. The ploy worked, and the phrase has become Orwell s most quoted line. This is the most famous political satire of the 20th century. Animal Farm, which owes something to Swift and Defoe, is [Orwell s] masterpiece (Connolly 93) In his essay Why I Write, Orwell wrote that Animal Farm was the first book in which he attempted consciously to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole. The allegorical novel critiques the events leading up to the 1917 Revolution and the Stalinist era. In the preface of a 1947 Ukrainian edition of Animal Farm, he explained how escaping the communist purges in Spain in the 1930s taught him how easily totalitarian propaganda can control the opinion of enlightened people in democratic countries. Orwell wrote Animal Farm between November 1943 and February 1944, but he had difficulty securing a publisher because of the wartime alliance with the USSR. With the end of the war it became clear that the Soviet Union would be the principal adversary of the West, and Orwell convinced Secker and Warburg to publish the book. The book remained on the forbidden list in the USSR until 1989. Orwell wrote in a letter in 1946, Of course I intended it primarily as a satire on the Russian revolution [and] that kind of revolution (violent conspiratorial revolution, led by unconsciously power hungry people) can only lead to a change of masters revolutions only effect a radical improvement when the masses are alert. Connolly, The Modern Movement 93 (London edition).
The Foundations of the Origin of Species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844

The Foundations of the Origin of Species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844

DARWIN, CHARLES 263 pp. Frontispiece photorgavure portrait of Darwin after the 1854 Maull & Polyblank portrait. Original olive buckram. Some rubbing and tanning. Very good. This volume, published on 100th anniversary of Darwin’s birth and the 50th anniverary of On the Origin of Species, prints Darwin’s unpublished essays from the 1840s in which he first formulated his ideas about natural selection. The short 1842 essay was also issued in a limited edition earlier in 1909. This volume uses that same setting of type and adds the much longer 1844 essay. In the 1844 essay Darwin laid out the arguments for evolution based upon natural selection, sharing it with a few friends, notably Charles Lyell and Joseph Hooker. He continued to gather evidence until 1858, when the appearance of Wallace’s paper forced Darwin to publish. “When Francis Darwin put together Life and letters he did not know that the sketch of his father’s evolutionary ideas, which was written in 1842, had survived. The pencil manuscript was discovered in 1896, after the death of his mother, in a cupboard under the stairs at Down House. Its dating is discussed in the preface to the first printing in 1909, and in that of 1958. The first, dated June 23, 1909, was not published but was printed for presentation to delegates to the Cambridge festivities in commemoration of the centenary of Darwin’s birth and the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of The origin of species. I have seen a copy of it with the table plan, musical background and menu loosely inserted. Leaf a4 has a printed presentation note on the recto; this has been removed in some copies which were perhaps available outside the presentation issue. Later in the same year it was reprinted and published together with the sketch of 1844, and in this printing most of the introduction, repaginated, and the whole of the sketch of 1842 are from the standing type of the first issue; the rest is new” (Freeman 1556). $1,200
Ambrotype Portrait of John D. Rockefeller

Ambrotype Portrait of John D. Rockefeller

ROCKEFELLER, JOHN D. ixth-plate ambrotype (3 3⁄4 x 3 1⁄4 in.), with Rockefeller’s cheeks hand-tinted. Oval brass mat and ornate brass retainers in decorated thermoplastic case with hidden single clasp; decorated red velvet lining. Old manuscript note reading “J. D. Rockefeller Born July 8, 1839 at Richford, N. Y.” Engraved on the retainer is the photographer’s imprint: “Wm. C. North Cleveland, O.” Minor specking to painted black areas; lacking seal; one large chip and several minor chips to case. Very good condition. This famous portrait of John D. Rockefeller is the earliest known photograph of the greatest titan of American business and industry. When he sat for this photograph in 1857 or 1858, the 18-year-old Rockefeller was working as a bookkeeper in Cleveland. He began his own business in 1859, built his first oil refinery in 1863, and established Standard Oil in 1870, revolutionizing the nascent petroleum industry. Rockefeller was the wealthiest man in history and the first great modern philanthropist. As a percentage of the United States economy, no other American fortune has ever come close to that of Rockefeller. Apart from the immense fortune his amassed (perhaps $1 billion at the turn of the century) and the national economy he helped fuel with Standard Oil and its descendants, Rockefeller established the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research and the Rockefeller Foundation, which for almost a century have been leaders in their fields. “The rise of the Standard Oil men to great wealth was not from poverty. It was not meteor-like, but accomplished over a quarter of a century by courageous venturing in a field so risky that most large capitalists avoided it, by arduous labors, and by more sagacious and farsighted planning than had been applied to any other American industry” (Allan Nevins). Rockefeller chose this photograph to be the frontispiece to his autobiography, Random Reminiscences of Men and Events, published in 1909 when he seventy. In that book the portrait appeared with the caption: “Mr. John D. Rockefeller at the age of eighteen.” The Rockefeller Archive Center holds a copy of this image printed on paper (presumably created when the ambrotype was unsealed in order to create the frontispiece for Random Reminiscences). This is one of the most valuable 19th-century American photographic portraits and a centerpiece of any collection of capitalism. Provenance: Rockefeller’s daughter Alta Rockefeller Prentice (1871-1962) and her husband, noted New York Republican Party official Ezra Parmelee Prentice (1863-1955), with a cut business card bearing a partial inscription: “ [PARME]LEE PRENTICE / 5 West 53rd Street.” Prentice married Rockefeller’s daughter Alta Rockefeller Prentice in 1901, and this photograph descended to their daughter Mary Adeline Prentice Gilbert (1907 – 1981) and her husband Benjamin Davis Gilbert (1907 – 1992).