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19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop

Walden; or

Walden; or, Life in the Woods

THOREAU, HENRY DAVID FIRST EDITION. A handsome copy of Walden, published in an edition of 2000 copies. The charm of its vignettes of nature was considered its most attractive feature at that time, but its telling satire of the American business economy, its advocacy of the virtues of simple life, and its Transcendentalist endorsement of sturdy individualism have won it an ever-increasing number of readers It has become one of the bestselling American nonfiction classics and has been translated into virtually every major modern language. The word Walden has become a universal synonym for a personal utopia (ANB). I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practice resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience, and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion (Thoreau). The image of the solitary Thoreau writing in his cabin at Walden Pond is firmly impressed on the American imagination. This book contains solid chunks of thought, in the midst of a solid chunk of nature For almost a hundred years an inspiration to nature lovers, to philosophers, to sociologists and to persons who love to read the English language written with clarity (Grolier 100 American Books 63). This is an especially handsome and unrestored copy. May 1854 ads (i.e. pre-publication, as desired). Map. Bookplate of Bela B. Metcalf; modern gift inscription on second blank. Original brown cloth. Minimal wear to spine ends, minor stains to front free endpaper. An excellent, tight copy. Half morocco case.
Calotype of Water Tower

Calotype of Water Tower

LANGENHEIM, WILLIAM AND FREDERICK This important survival of American photographic history is a very early calotype of a water tower in Philadelphia. Paper photography from this era is a rarity and the image was created by two of America s great photographic pioneers, the Langenheim brothers. A calotype (or talbotype) is a negative-positive photographic process in which a paper negative is produced and then used to make a positive print using exposure to light. It was introduced by William Henry Fox Talbot, from whom the brothers had obtained the rights to the process, soon after Daguerre s advancement in France. The Langenheim brothers were some of the first entrepreneurs to utilize the calotype process in America. They began creating their own photographic images and revolutionizing the field of American photography soon after the process s invention. In 1842 they made the first advertising photograph in history, a picture of the restaurant in the Exchange Building in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania Arts and Sciences Society, 1940) and [i]n 1845 the brothers traveled to Niagara Falls where they made the first ever photographs of the natural wonder (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2017). The pair were among the first to commercially produce stereoscopic images in America, helping introduce the American public to an immensely influential photographic media. The brothers were also responsible for the first photographs in America of a total solar eclipse. American paper photographs of this quality and early date are rare in private hands. This is an opportunity to obtain an important example of American photographic history. Calotype (5 3⁄8 x 8 3⁄8 in.), mounted (14 x 17 in.). Some fading. Captioned in negative below the image, Talbotype from Nature Aug 2 1849 by W. F. Langenheim Phila . Stamped below the inscription is a studio seal, Talbotype. H. Fox Talbot s U.S. Patent, June 26, 1847. W. & F. Langenheim Assignees. Philad a.
Large Format Camera from Mathew Brady s Studio

Large Format Camera from Mathew Brady s Studio

BRADY, MATHEW A major relic of photographic history, this camera was owned by Mathew Brady during his years as the leading figure in American photography. Brady was the preeminent American portrait photographer of his day. He gained his greatest fame with his studio s documentation of the events and figures of the Civil War. This camera s association with Brady and his studio, which produced hundreds of iconic portraits and thousands of Civil War photographs, makes it an important historical artifact. The camera s Brady provenance is well-documented. It is accompanied by photocopies of original bankruptcy court records signed by Brady during his bankruptcy proceedings in 1873. The document lists this lens and its serial number in an inventory of Brady possessions. The camera was featured in a September 23, 1957 Life article titled In Image of the Master, the Famous Photographs of Mathew Brady Are Matched Today with Pioneer s Own Camera. Life photographer Ed Clark used the camera offered here to make modern equivalents of Brady portraits. On page 124, Clark is shown using this camera to photograph President Eisenhower in a pose similar to a familiar Lincoln image taken by Brady during the Civil War. An original copy of this issue of Life accompanies the camera. This camera is also pictured on the inside back cover of Mathew Brady and His World, Produced by Time-Life Books from pictures in the Meserve Collection. The picture is identified: This camera was used by Brady in the 1860s. To make an exposure, a prepared collodion negative was placed in a light proof holder. The holder was placed in the camera and a panel removed to let the light in. Frederick Hill Meserve started his celebrated collection of Lincolniana and photography in 1897. In 1902, he made a large purchase of Civil War era Brady negatives. It is believed this camera was a part of that purchase. Virtually every significant public figure of the Civil War era passed through Mathew Brady s studio; it is thrilling to imagine that many of his iconic photographs were taken with this very camera. This camera merits a place in a major museum collection. This is an extremely rare, evidently integral Charles Harrison camera. Harrison, a prominent New York lens maker, received international acclaim for his lens designs at the World s Fair in London. He began his work in photography as a daguerreotypist, but his success in making camera lenses soon led him to abandon photography to concentrate on the manufacture of lenses. This wood camera is fitted with a Petzval-type brass barrel lens signed C.C. Harrison New York, with the serial number 1195. According to Eric Taubman, the president and founder of the Penumbra Foundation, the lens dates to 1849 1850. The camera features a black fabric bellows, rack and pinion focusing, with wooden knob on rear of back section, and wide casement to accommodate side-loading plates. The camera is mounted on an 11 x 15 in. base rail. It is accompanied by a ground glass plate (glass replaced) for focusing, which allowed 10 3⁄8 x 10 3⁄8 in. exposures, as well as a dark slide.
Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant

BRADY, MATHEW This Mathew Brady portrait of General Ulysses S. Grant is inscribed and signed by Brady to J.E. Kelly on the mount. Stamp of Brady Studio, Wash. D.C. and handwriting attributed to J.E. Kelly on verso. Brady was nearly blind during much of his photographic career as well as semi-literate throughout his life and so he rarely signed or inscribed photographs. Brady was the preeminent photographer of his generation, and he was particularly remembered for documentation of the American Civil War. Long before his fame from the war he made his mark in photographic history in portrait photography with his galleries of notable Americans in New York City and Washington, D.C. The galleries were widely acclaimed tourist attractions as well as social meeting places for all classes of citizens. The photograph features Grant wearing his military uniform, before his election to the White House. At the time of this photograph he was a four-star general, the highest rank normally attainable in the United States. So-called signed prints are occasionally offered in the trade or at auction; in almost all cases the photographs are in fact signed by assistants from Brady s studio. Brady s scrawl is unique and readily recognizable, as in this rare authentic example. The recipient, J.E. Kelly, was an American sculptor and illustrator who specialized in depictions of the peoples and events of the Civil War. The verso of the photograph bears a series of notations in what is apparently Kelly s hand. A very rare and important survival linking two of the greatest Americans of the Civil War era.
Coney Island Panorama

Coney Island Panorama

CONEY ISLAND.) STACY, CHARLES This is a splendid panorama of Coney Island taken in 1907. Beginning in 1824 Coney Island began to transition from carriage roads and steamship transport, with a relative lack of urban development, to a more vibrant touristic landscape. Due to its proximity to Manhattan, the island attracted a large number of visitors as early as the 1830s and 1840s. Between 1880 and WWII, Coney Island was the largest amusement area in the United States drawing millions of visitors a year. Dreamland dominates this tremendous panoramic view, which was taken from the Shoot-the-Chutes feature. Built in 1904, Dreamland was intend- ed to surpass Luna Park and Steeplechase Park. To the left of Dreamland Tower, Luna Park s central tower is visible in the distance. Dreamland was illuminated by one million lights and had a railway through a Swiss Alpine landscape, Venetian canals with gondolas, a recreation of the fall of Pompeii, a simulated submarine ride, the Fighting the Flames fire fighting exhibition carried out on a 250 ft. long, 6-story building, and countless other attractions and rides. Considered one of the greatest amusement parks ever built, Dreamland was destroyed by a fire in 1911. The fire started, surprisingly, at a water attraction which was perhaps appropriately named Hell s Gate. Dreamland s role in amusement park history and impact on the American notion of what a park should be is notable considering its brief existence. This panorama was taken at the zenith of that period. This is a rare opportunity to own a large format panorama of Coney Island during the golden age of American amusement parks. Gelatin silver print (9 x 48 in.). Light wear and fading. Framed.
The Psychological Portrait: Marcel Sternberger s Revelations in Photography. Foreword by Phillip Prodger.

The Psychological Portrait: Marcel Sternberger s Revelations in Photography. Foreword by Phillip Prodger.

LOEWENTHEIL, JACOB First edition, one of 100 copies of the Deluxe Estate Edition, signed and numbered by the author and accompanied by your choice of one of four 8 x 10 inch archival pigment photographs (Einstein, Freud, Shaw, or Kahlo). This new book is the definitive work on Marcel Sternberger, a neglected giant of 20th-century portrait photography. Few photographers matched Sternberger s determination to create what we might in retrospect call pathognomic portraits. Between the lively expressions he captured and the minimalist lighting he used to reveal them, one might argue that there is hardly a more recognizable portraitist in the history of photography (Philip Prodger, Head of Photographs, National Portrait Gallery, London). It was the golden age of photojournalism, but [Sternberger s] photographs including of some of the most celebrated political leaders, artists, and intellectuals of the time were meant not only to document, but to tease out and capture his subjects personalities: FDR looking elegant and determined (his image on the dime was produced from one of Sternberger s shots); a humorless Freud who, Loewentheil writes, could easily have discerned the psychology taking place on both sides of the lens, [still] even he was not immune to its effects ; Frida Kahlo smiling beatifically, a flower crown fixed to her hair and mystery behind her eyes; Albert Einstein looking impish (of his portrait, he wrote, It seems quite amazing to me that you could present this subject so appetizingly ). Sternberger s portraits revealed intimate, rarely- observed characteristics of these well-known figures, who were accustomed to managing their public personae; his image of father and daughter Jawaharlal Nehru and Indira Gandhi sitting together, for example, shows them emanating mutual love and respect (New York Review of Books). This brilliant monograph by art scholar Jacob Loewentheil is a welcome appreciation and analysis of the work of the great portrait photographer Marcel Sternberger, who died in a 1956 car crash while on his way to visit his legendary friends (and his camera s great subjects) Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Indeed, many of Sternberger s portraits have become part of our global sensibility the famed, darkly backgrounded images of Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, George Bernard Shaw, Kahlo and Rivera, Jawaharlal Nehru, Indira Gandhi and countless other European, Asian and American luminaries, who literally shaped their times (Matt Damsker, I Photo Central). This definitive monograph has 206 photographs, sketches, notes, and contact sheets along with a manual for portrait technique. More than just pictures, the book also tells the fascinating story of a Jewish refugee who defined modern portrait iconography way before his time (American Photo). In addition to containing Sternberger s extraordinary photographs, this volume presents descriptions of many of his interviews during portrait sessions with prominent figures including Albert Einstein, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Sigmund Freud, George Bernard Shaw, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Jawaharlal Nehru, and Indira Gandhi. This deluxe signed and numbered edition is accompanied by a choice of one of the following classic photographs by Marcel Sternberger, the Deluxe Estate Edition, with stamp of authenticity on the verso: Albert Einstein, New Jersey, 1950. 8 x 10 in. archival pigment print. Sigmund Freud, London, 1939. 8 x 10 in. archival pigment print. George Bernard Shaw, London, 1939. 8 x 10 in. archival pigment print. Frida Kahlo, Mexico, 1952. 8 x 10 in. archival pigment print. Original boards. 210 pages. 206 photographs. 8 1⁄4 x 10 1⁄4 in. Newly published.
Dog Woman Cheyenne (plate no. 668

Dog Woman Cheyenne (plate no. 668, Vol. 19)

CURTIS, EDWARD S. This stunning glass photograph, Dog Woman Cheyenne (plate no. 668), is an interpositive made for Curtis s The North American Indian, the greatest photographic work on Native Americans. Edward Curtis was one of the most important American artists of the nineteenth century and the most celebrated photographer of North American Indians. Over the course of thirty-five years, Curtis took tens of thousands of photographs of Indians from more than eighty tribes. Never before have we seen the Indians of North America so close to the origins of their humanity, their sense of themselves in the world, their innate dignity and self-possession (N. Scott Momaday). Curtis s photographs are an absolutely unmatched masterpiece of visual anthropology, and one of the most thorough, extensive and profound photograph works of all time (A. D. Coleman). Curtis printed 2200 of his images as photogravures in his magisterial The North American Indian, which was hailed as the most gigantic undertaking in the making of books since the King James Bible (New York Herald). These photogravures were printed from large- format photographic glass plates, the vast majority of which were subsequently destroyed. Curtis s lifelong project was inspired by his reflection that The passing of every old man or woman means the passage of some tradition, some knowledge of sacred rite possessed by no other; consequently, the information that is to be gathered, for the benefit of future generations, respecting the modes of life of one of the greatest races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost for all time. The present stunning example is one of the very few glass plate photographs that have survived. The image contains a wealth of detail that was lost in the photogravure process, and when shown in the accompanying lightbox, it is a dazzling photographic masterpiece. This is an exceptional opportunity to acquire one of the greatest monuments of photography in one of its rarest and most beautiful forms. Approx. 14 x 17 inches. Accompanied by a custom wall-mount light box. Excellent condition. A stunning display piece.
Outstanding autograph letter to Francis Horner

Outstanding autograph letter to Francis Horner

BENTHAM, JEREMY In this remarkable letter Jeremy Bentham presents the case for a significant reform in English legal procedure. He begins by thanking Horner, a leading MP, for sending the report of the Committee for Searching the Lord s Journals concerning the causes that retard the decision of suits in the High Court of Chancery. Bentham attacks the routine abuse of sham writs of error in which officials and lawyers lined their pockets by entertaining bogus writs of error. He observes, The number [and] relations of the sham writs of error (brought for the mere purpose of delay) which was the main, if not sole, object of our motion, is not given: and the circumstances are such as afford a sorry confirmation of the intentional supposition suspected before. Bentham goes on, for eight pages and hundreds of words, to meticulously analyze the reports, pointing out the curious circumstances he has uncovered. He demonstrates that the journals and the Lords proceedings have been manipulated to conceal the extent of the use of writs of error. Bentham s investigations resulted in the exposure of enormous fees and emoluments inappropriately received by the Lord High Chancellor, Lord Eldon. Bentham is one of the great thinkers and reformers in the history of English law and politics. Bentham attacked what he called the technical system of evidence and adjective law which was employed in England, and which, in his opinion, led to obscurity in the law and unnecessary expense, delay, and corruption. Bentham recommended the natural system of procedure where all parties were heard, all evidence admitted, cross-examination encouraged, and increased powers given to courts to obtain evidence (ODNB). To re-read Bentham now is to realize how much practical good he has done, as well as how much he advanced social and political thinking. Typically, his range is too great to be easily classified (he has left no school or followers) but much of what he taught has become part of the common thought not only of his own but of subsequent time: truths which had not found expression before they were pointed out by Bentham are now so universally accepted as to be thought common-place. Take Utilitarianism for example; although the concept was not wholly original, only Bentham could have summed it up in the succinct aphorism the greatest happiness of the greatest number , and only he could have coined the word utilitarianism to label it. (Bentham was a lively neologist: utilitarian , international , codification , all were invented by him (Printing and the Mind of Man). The recipient of the letter, Francis Horner, M.P. (1778-1817), was a leading figure in economics and finance in Parliament in the 1810s. In 1810 the House of Commons named him to chair the Committee on the High Price of Gold Bullion to investigate why the price had risen during the Napoleonic Wars. Horner maintained a close relationship with Jeremy Bentham. He first met Bentham in 1805 and afterwards corresponded with him on he subject of Scots judicature. Horner apparently called on Bentham frequently (The Horner Papers). This important, lengthy letter is apparently unpublished. 4to. 8 pages, densely written in Bentham s small script, not signed and perhaps incomplete. Some age-toning, but generally in very good condition.
Leaves of Grass

Leaves of Grass

WHITMAN, WALT This is the fourth Leaves of Grass. The failure of Thayer & Eldridge, publisher of the third edition (Boston, 1860), left Whitman in search of a publisher. The poet decided that the events of the Civil War called for another reimagining of Leaves of Grass. Whitman returned to his earlier practice and financed the publication himself, engaging the New York printer William E. Chapin. For the first time, the 1867 Leaves opened with the poem Inscription, which introduced the book in subsequent editions. In various permutations, Whitman circulated this fourth edition as four separately paginated books stitched together between two covers: a vastly re-edited version of the 1860 Leaves, a reissue of Drum-Taps, a reissue of the Sequel to Drum-Taps, and a striking coda called Songs Before Parting. This most chaotic of all six editions of Leaves contains only six new poems ( Inscription [later One s-Self I Sing and Small the Theme of My Chant ], The Runner, Leaves of Grass number 2 [later Tears ], Leaves of Grass number 3 [later Aboard at a Ship s Helm ], When I Read the Book, and The City Dead-House ), but its significance lies in its intriguing raggedness, which is embedded in the social upheaval in the immediate aftermath of the Civil War (Mancuso, Walt Whitman: An Encyclopedia). There are three issues, each with the same title-page: 1) containing Leaves of Grass, Drum-Taps, Sequel to Drum-Taps, and Songs before Parting; 2) as above but omitting Drum-Taps and Sequel to Drum-Taps [the present copy]; 3) containing Leaves of Grass only. The present copy is the second issue. Myerson A 2.4.a2. Original half black leather, marbled paper boards. Some restoration to binding. An attractive copy.
Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin

DARWIN, CHARLES.) Cameron, Julia Margaret. THE GREAT DARWIN PORTRAIT, Julia Margaret Cameron s 1868 portrait of Darwin is probably the most famous photograph of a 19th-century scientist. Darwin remarked, I like this photograph much better than any other which has been taken of me. In 1868, Darwin and his family traveled to the Isle of Wight, both for a long holiday and to aid in his recuperation from a recent illness. The Darwins rented a house from Cameron and were immediately charmed by the photographer: She received the whole family with open-hearted kindness and hospitality, and Darwin always retained a warm feeling of friendship for her. When they left she came to see them off, loading them with presents of photographs. Moved, Darwin said: Mrs. Cameron, there are sixteen people in this house, all in love with you. Darwin paid her for her portraits of him, and as the Camerons had by that time lost a great deal of money through the continued failure of the coffee crop, she gladly accepted payment and ran boasting to her husband, Look, Charles, what a lot of money! (Gernsheim, Julia Margaret Cameron) Cameron is now widely regarded as one of the most accomplished photographers of all time. Her portraits are easily recognized by dramatic lighting, soft focus, and feeling of character. This photogravure is likely from Cameron s Alfred, Lord Tennyson and his Friends (London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1893), a series of 25 portraits from Cameron s portraits. Photogravure, matted. Approx. 8 x 10½ in. Some surface wear, browning. Handsomely framed, with an early manuscript caption giving Darwin s birth and death dates on the mount.
Physikalischer Grundlagen einer Gravitationstheorie [and] MARCEL GROSSMANN. Mathematische Begriffsbildungen zur Gravitationstheorie. Offprint from Vierteljahrsschrift der Naturforschenden Gesellchaft in Zürich

Physikalischer Grundlagen einer Gravitationstheorie [and] MARCEL GROSSMANN. Mathematische Begriffsbildungen zur Gravitationstheorie. Offprint from Vierteljahrsschrift der Naturforschenden Gesellchaft in Zürich

EINSTEIN, ALBERT FIRST EDITION, the rare offprint with Überreicht von den Verfassern. printed on the front wrapper. In 1912 Einstein moved back to Zürich from Prague. Aware of the analogy between Gauss s surface theory and the space-time Einstein was introducing in his new theory of gravitation, he wished to find a four-dimensional version of Gauss s theory. Einstein recalled, With this problem in mind, I visited my old student friend Marcel Grossmann, who in the meantime had become Professor of Mathematics at the Swiss Polytechnic. He caught fire immediately, even though as a true mathematician he took a somewhat skeptical attitude to physics. [H]e was indeed quite ready to collaborate on the problem with me, but with the limitation that he would take no responsibility for any claims and interpretations of a physical nature. He reviewed the literature and soon discovered that the mathematical problem had already been solved, in particular by Riemann, Ricci and Levi-Cività (Einstein, 1955). Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro and Tullio Levi-Cività had developed a useful formalism, the absolute differential calculus (tensor calculus), which Einstein and Grossmann adopted. On 9 September 1913 the two presented their first lectures on this subject. These were published in the same year in the Vierteljahrsschrift der Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Zürich, vol. 58, under the titles: Physikalische Grundlagen einer Gravitationstheorie (pp. 284 290) and Mathematische Begriffsbildungen zur Gravitationstheorie (pp. 291 297). This is the rare author s presentation offprint of that joint publication. Their joint paper of 1913 came much nearer to the theory of gravity for which Einstein was still groping. He was dissatisfied with the paper, for its equations appeared to show that instead of a single solution to any particular set of gravitations circumstances there was an infinitude of solutions. Einstein believed that they were not comparable with experience . This, together with the conclusions that the results would not agree with the principle of causality, led him to believe that the theory was untenable. Yet the 1913 paper contained the clue to its own apparent discrepancy: what appeared to be an infinitely large number of solutions to one problem was really a single solution applicable to each of an infinitely large number of different frames of reference. Thus the cards of the General Theory of Relativity had been laid fact upwards on the table in 1913 (Alicke). In 1914 Einstein moved to Berlin and continued to work alone on general relativity until its definitive formulation at the end of 1915. Einstein praised Grossmann s contribution in his principal work on general relativity (1916): Grossmann supported me through his help, not only in sparing me the study of the relevant mathematical literature, but also in the search for the gravitational field equations. Weil 57. pp. (i), 284-297. Original wrappers. Near fine.
Of Population. An Enquiry Concerning the Power of Increase in the Numbers of Mankind. Being an Answer to Mr. Malthus s Essay on that Subject

Of Population. An Enquiry Concerning the Power of Increase in the Numbers of Mankind. Being an Answer to Mr. Malthus s Essay on that Subject

GODWIN, WILLIAM FIRST EDITION. In 1798 Thomas Robert Malthus published his Essay on the Principle of Population in response to William Godwin s ideas about the perfectibility of society advanced in Political Justice (1793). Godwin s beautiful system of perfect equality, Malthus wrote, would in theory end poverty, disease, and war, producing extraordinary encouragements to population. Because food production cannot keep up with population, poverty and misery would inevitably result. Godwin had acknowledged the population problem in 1793 but suggested that eclipsing the desire for sex by the development of intellectual pleasures could ease population growth. Malthus rejected Godwin s utopian vision. In 1820 Godwin rebutted Malthus s argument in the present book, Of Population. Godwin argued that reordering society would prevent the poverty cycle that Malthus posited. Accumulation of property in the hands of the few restricts the food supply. Changing this state of affairs would go far in feeding the poor. Moreover, by redistributing property for the benefit of the poor, they would acquire the habits of the middle classes, procreating less and thereby solving the Malthusian problem. Provenance: H. Bradley Martin, with bookplate. Original boards, paper spine label. Spine repaired. Some foxing. A fine copy.
The Speeches at Full Length of Mr. Van Ness

The Speeches at Full Length of Mr. Van Ness, Mr. Caines, the Attorney-General, Mr. Harrison, and General Hamilton, in the great cause of the people, against Harry Croswell, on an indictment for a libel on Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States

HAMILTON, ALEXANDER, et al. FIRST EDITION. Angered by attacks on his administration by Federalist newspapers, Thomas Jefferson decided to use the Sedition Act to restore the integrity of the press. (Jefferson had previously attacked the Adams administration s use of the Sedition Act to silence its enemies.) Jefferson encouraged selective prosecutions, one of which became a landmark in First Amendment history. Harry Croswell s The Wasp accused Jefferson of paying pamphleteer James Callender to charge Washington and Adams with various crimes and to refer to Adams as a hoary-headed incendiary and Washington as a traitor, robber, and perjurer. In Croswell s trial for seditious libel, the judge ruled that the truth was not a defense. Alexander Hamilton s six-hour appellate argument, his last and one of his finest speeches (Appleton), likened the trial to cases brought by the infamous Star Chamber in England. Hamilton argued that freedom of the press consists, in my idea, in publishing the truth, from good motives and for justifiable ends, though it reflect on government, on magistrates, or individuals. Hamilton s approach to liberty of the press was to be adopted in many state constitutions, making it a landmark of American law. This volume contains several other addresses, including a strong argument for truth as a defense by Hamilton s friend William Van Ness, who served as his second in the fatal duel with Aaron Burr later that year. 78 pp. Removed. Very good.
The War of the Worlds

The War of the Worlds

WELLS, H. G. FIRST EDITION IN BOOK FORM, FIRST ISSUE, with the 16 page publisher s catalogue dated Autumn 187 headed by New Letters of Napoleon I (later issues usually contain a 32pp undated catalogue with Illumination or a 32pp catalogue led by Conrad s Nigger of the Narcissus). The War of the Worlds, the great classic of interplanetary invasion (Bleiler), ensured the author s place as a father of science fiction. Wells s scientific romances (as they came to be called) remain unsurpassed for their imagination and visionary power (ODNB). This immensely popular Victorian novel presented a dark view of natural selection, showing the benefits the ancient Martian civilization had reaped through millennia of evolution. At the same time, it offered a critique of colonialism and imperialism. In the first chapter Wells warns, And before we judge them [the Martians] too harshly, we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished Bison and Dodo, but upon its own inferior races. The Tasmanians, in spite of their human likeness, were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space of fifty years. Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit? The War of the Worlds has spawned countless imitations and parodies as well as adaptations for stage, screen, and radio, most famously Orson Welles s radio broadcast of 1938, taken by credulous listeners to present real events as they happened. Original gray cloth. Some spotting. Fine. Half morocco case.
An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations the third edition

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations the third edition, with additions

SMITH, ADAM THIRD EDITION of the most important book in the history of economics. Only 1000 sets were printed. The third edition (following the 1776 and 1778 editions) contains a new chapter, numerous additions and corrections, and an index. This issue must be accepted as representing his final version as there is clear evidence that it was read several times in proof, with close attention to the pointing, the third edition can be regarded as supervening even the first in many of its formal aspects, and thus now serves as printers copies (William B. Todd). The first comprehensive treatment of the subject of political economy, The Wealth of Nations accepted the French physiocrats attacks on mercantilism but rejected their view that land is the whole source of wealth. Instead, Smith saw the labor of the nation as its lifeblood and identified the division of labor as the key to increased productivity. Labor, the standard of value, was the original determinant of price, which in advanced societies is also affected by wages, profit and rent, all treated in the first book. In the second book, Smith analyzes the nature, accumulation, and employment of capital, the growth of which brings an increase in productive labor. Smith concludes by attacking the mercantile system and advocating freedom of commerce and industry. Smith s Wealth of Nations has been the bible for generations of laissez-faire economists and political philosophers and is the cornerstone book of free-market theory. His individualistic view of political economy is neatly summarized in a famous quotation from the Wealth of Nations: It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interests. We address ourselves, not to their humanity, but to their self-interest. Where the political aspects of human rights had taken two centuries to explore, Smith s achievement was to bring the study of economic aspects to the same point in a single work. . . . The certainty of its criticism and its grasp of human nature have made it the first and greatest classic of modern economic thought (Printing and the Mind of Man 221). Three volumes. 8vo. Contemporary calf, rebacked in calf, maroon leather spine label. Later endpapers. A very good set.