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Original glass plate photograph, Hopi Woman, prepared by Curtis for the printing of The North American Indian.

CURTIS, EDWARD S “From the time of the Conquistadores the Hopi have been commonly known as Moqui, an alien term of opprobrium originating probably in Zuni Amu-kwe The Hopi heartily dislike the designation, which, they believe, originated in the error of the first Spanish visitors, when they mistook the Hopi word moki, dead, for the tribal name.” — Edward Curtis This is a splendid original glass plate made for Curtis’s The North American Indian, the greatest photographic work on Native Americans. Edward Curtis was one of the most important American artists of the nineteenth century and the most celebrated photographer of North American Indians. Over the course of thirty-five years, Curtis took tens of thousands of photographs of Indians from more than eighty tribes. “Never before have we seen the Indians of North America so close to the origins of their humanity, their sense of themselves in the world, their innate dignity and self-possession” (N. Scott Momaday). Curtis’s photographs are “an absolutely unmatched masterpiece of visual anthropology, and one of the most thorough, extensive and profound photograph works of all time” (A. D. Coleman). Curtis printed 2200 of his images as photogravures in his magisterial The North American Indian, which was hailed as “the most gigantic undertaking in the making of books since the King James Bible” (New York Herald). These photogravures were printed from large- format photographic glass plates, the vast majority of which were subsequently destroyed. Curtis’s lifelong project was inspired by his reflection that “The passing of every old man or woman means the passage of some tradition, some knowledge of sacred rite possessed by no other; consequently, the information that is to be gathered, for the benefit of future generations, respecting the modes of life of one of the greatest races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost for all time.” The present stunning example is one of the very few glass plate photographs that have survived. The image contains a wealth of detail that was lost in the photogravure process, and when shown in the accompanying lightbox, it is a dazzling photographic masterpiece. This is an exceptional opportunity to acquire one of the greatest monuments of photography in one of its rarest and most beautiful forms. This portrait, titled Hopi Woman, was published as a photogravure in The North American Indian, volume 12, plate 411., Approx. 14 x 17 inches. Accompanied by a custom wall-mount light box. Excellent condition. A stunning display piece.
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Armstrong and Aldrin raising the U.S. flag on the Moon’s surface

Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin Signed by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, the first two men on the Moon. This image was taken by the Maurer Data Acquisition Camera (DAC, pronounced “dak”). The DAC made films through the Lunar Module Pilot’s window during the approach and landing of the LM and took stop motion photographs during the EVA at the rate of one frame per second. The photograph shows Armstrong and Aldrin raising the American flag on the Moon about 27 feet from the centerline of Eagle. Aldrin reported that the Apollo 11 flag was blown over by the blast of the rocket exhaust during takeoff. Congress subsequently passed a bill declaring that the placement of the flag on the Moon “is intended as a symbolic gesture of national pride in achievement and is not to be construed as a declaration of national appropriation by claim of sovereignty.” Signed photographs of Armstrong and Aldrin on the lunar surface are scarce. Armstrong operated the handheld camera on the Moon’s surface. Thus in signed Apollo 11 lunar surface photographs, Aldrin is almost invariably the only person shown (other than reflections catching glimpses of Armstrong). framed with: Signed by the Apollo 11 crew (ARMSTRONG, NEIL et al.) Apollo 11 First Day Cover signed by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. [Houston], 1969. 8-cent Apollo 8 “In the Beginning God ” postage stamp, Houston July 20, 1969 cancellation. NASA Manned Spacecraft Center Stamp Club with small mission emblem cachet. Fine condition. Signed by the crew of Apollo 11, the first manned mission to the Moon: Neil Armstrong (commander), Buzz Aldrin (lunar module pilot), and Michael Collins (command module pilot). 7 ½ x 9 ¼ in. visible dimensions. Color photographic print. Excellent condition. Archivally matted and framed with an Apollo 11 first day cover signed by the ap0ollo 11 crew (see below).
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De Maculis in Sole observatis, et apparente earum cum Sole conversione; Narratio cui Adjecta est de modo eductionis specierum visibilium dubitatio

Johann Fabricius FIRST EDITION of Fabricius s Account of Spots Observed on the Sun and of their Apparent Rotation with the Sun, the first printed work on sunspots. This volume is a landmark of the Copernican revolution in astronomy. Fabricius describes his observation of sunspots and correctly interprets them as part of the surface of the sun and as evidence of its rotation. This contrasts with the later publications by Scheiner (who saw the maculae as solar satellites) and Galileo (who considered them clouds above the surface of the sun). Kepler himself, having observed a sunspot using a camera obscura, interpreted the phenomenon as Mercury transiting the sun. Johann Fabricius was one of the first astronomers to observe sunspots with a telescope, and was the first person to publish an account of his observations. Fabricius was the eldest son of the famed astronomer, astrologer, and Lutheran Pastor David Fabricius (1564-1617), who was a friend of Johannes Kepler and correspondent of Tycho Brahe, Willem Blaeu, Simon Mayr and others. While in Leiden, sometime near the end of 1610, Fabricius acquired one or more telescopes, which he brought home to his father s house in Osteel, East Frisia. Already well aware of the astronomical potential of the telescope from Galileo Galilei s Sidereus Nuncius, the father-and-son team began telescopic observations, on the lookout for something new. Johann first noticed sunspots at sunrise on 9 March 1611 and for many weeks following was engaged with his father in daily observations whenever the weather permitted. Most of their observations were carried out via the camera obscura technique, which consists of forming a projected image of the Sun through a pinhole opening into a suitably darkened room. They had first observed the Sun directly through the telescope, a harrowing experience that Johann related in his this work (Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers). Fabricius correctly identified the spots as part of the sun itself. Changes in their apparent shape and speed as they moved across the solar disk indicated an axial rotation of the sun. Fabricius knew of this as a theoretical possibility from the writings of his father s friend Kepler. In his 1609 Astronomia Nova Kepler postulated solar rotation as the force responsible for planetary orbital motion. Fabricius had found the evidence Kepler lacked. Johannes correctly concluded that the spots were on the sun s surface, rather than being the result of clouds or planetary transits. His father, David, disagreed with his son s conclusion, still clinging to the old Ptolemaic cosmology While Kepler read the pamphlet and admired it, Galileo and Scheiner were mostly likely unaware of its existence when they published their own sunspot treatises in January and March 1612, respectively. All those sunspot sightings, combined with the moons of Jupiter and other mounting evidence, constituted a tipping point among astronomers, including Scheiner, who abandoned his earlier stance that sunspots were solar satellites within ten years. The Copernican model of the solar system replaced the old Ptolemaic model within a generation (American Physical Society News, March 2015). EXTREMELY RARE. No copy has appeared at auction in the past fifty years. Only three copies are located in the United States (Yale, Oklahoma History of Science Collection, and Tulane). This work is lacking from all of the great American astronomy collections including that of Harvard and the Harvard Observatory. Quarto. 22 unnumbered leaves, complete. Marbled wrappers. Lightly browned. Contemporary annotations in ink, some cropped. An excellent copy.
Typed letter signed to Michele Besso

Typed letter signed to Michele Besso

Albert Einstein In this fine letter Einstein reminisces with his lifelong friend Michele Besso about their days at the Swiss Patent Office where together they developed the theory of special relativity. He likens their scientific conversations at the office to the work of God creating the world. Einstein tells Besso, his friend of fifty years, that he has read with interest Besso s memoir about their time together in the Swiss Patent Office. He then addresses a remark by their patent office colleague Joseph Sauter about their office discussions of scientific subjects: I can t see anything bad in it if something rational was up for discussion at the office, even if the state had not meant to pay for it. It may be a consolation for him that for God, too, the creation of the world must have been a pointless luxury, yet He went ahead. Be that as it may, I have noticed that what people get paid for rarely is rational and most of the time not even respectable. Michele Besso was Einstein s closest friend and only acknowledged collaborator during the celebrated early years of Einstein s career. Besso helped get his friend a job at the patent office in Bern, where together the two developed the theory of special relativity. Einstein called Besso the best sounding board in Europe for scientific ideas. In his paper on special relativity Einstein wrote, In conclusion, let me note that my friend and colleague M. Besso steadfastly stood by me in my work on the problem here discussed, and that I am indebted to him for many a valuable suggestion. Einstein describes his postwar life and work writing, I have no influence anywhere due to the fact that I live very withdrawn, as a matter of fact I can barely do anything for people who, as far as I can tell, truly deserve it. The only person I deal with is my assistant with whom I work on the application of the relativity theory; it s rewarding and quiet work whose value is sure to become evident at some point. This is a wonderful Einstein letter looking back on his most valued scientific and personal collaboration, which he compares to the work of God creating the world. One page, in German. Einstein s address blind-stamped at the top. Original envelope. Fine.
The Holy Bible

The Holy Bible, Conteyning the Old Testament, and the New: Newly Translated

Robert Barker The Great “She” Bible, the “authorized version” or King James Bible, one of the greatest monuments of English literature. This edition is known as the “She” Bible for the reading “She went into the citie” in Ruth 3:15. In this copy he error “Judas” for “Jesus” in Matthew 26:36 is corrected with a pasted-on slip. Fry styles this the “first edition, second issue,” though it is more properly the second edition. “The general title is usually dated 1613, though the NT title bears the date 1611. Probably the greater part of the book was printed in 1611, but the publication, for some reason or other, was delayed till 1613. . . . Smith suggests [the delay resulted from] an accident in the printing-office which destroyed a large number of sheets” (Herbert). One of the masterpieces of the English language, the King James Bible is surely the greatest literary work ever created by committee. In the preface, Miles Smith, one of the dozens of translators, commented on the importance of the work: “Translation it is that openeth the window, to let in the light; that breaketh the shell, that we may eat the kernel; that putteth aside the curtain, that we may look into the most Holy place; that removeth the cover of the well, that we may come by the water.” “For every Englishman who had read Sidney or Spenser, or had seen Shakespeare acted at the Globe, there were hundreds who had read or heard the Bible with close attention as the words of God. The effect of the continual domestic study of the book upon the national character, imagination and intelligence for nearly three centuries to come, was greater than that of any literary movement in our annals, or any religious movement since the coming of St. Augustine” (G. M. Trevelyan). Complete copies of this Bible in early bindings are among the most sought-after books in the English language. Printing and the Mind of Man 114. Herbert 319. Folio. Some staining and edge wear. Preliminaries restored. Engraved map of the Holy Land, frayed at edges, supplied. Contemporary calf over oak boards, brass fittings, rebacked, leather worn, binding expertly restored. A very good copy.
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Magnificent Album of Mammoth Photographs of the American West, with other subjects

Watkins, Taber, Savage, and others This magnificent American West photograph album contains an astounding 21 mammoth photographs by leading photographers including Carleton Watkins, Charles R. Savage, and Isaiah West Taber, as well as other important photographs. Carleton Watkins and Yosemite Carleton Watkins was the greatest of the first generation of photographers of the American West. His early photographs of Yosemite and Utah have never been surpassed. For more than 150 years Watkins has retained his place as one of America s greatest photographic artists. Watkins s views are the finest landscape photographs produced by an American in the nineteenth century, and some of the most sophisticated and arresting images ever produced with a camera (Nickel). The album includes the following mammoth Watkins prints: Section of the Grizzly Giant with Galen Clark, Mariposa Grove (1865-1866); Yosemite Falls, from Glacier Point (1865-1866); Cathedral Spires, Yosemite (1865-1866); Grizzly Giant with a Group of Hunters at the Foot of the Tree, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite (1865-1866); The City from the Residence of Bishop Kip, Rincon Hill, San Francisco (1864-1865); Sugar Loaf Island and Seal Rocks, Farallon Islands (1868-1869); and Sentinel Rock, Down the Valley, from U. Point, Yosemite, Cal. (c. 1870). The last of these is not in Naef. Weston Naef reports that this is undoubtedly Watkins s Sentinel Rock, the long-sought negative 684. According to Naef, this may be the only extant print of this photograph. Yosemite and San Francisco by Isaiah W. Taber The album includes the following mammoth Taber prints: Royal Gorge and Hanging Bridge (Colorado); Chinatown, S.F. Cal. The Idol Kwang koong in the Holy of Holies (c. 1887); Glacier Point Rock (Yosemite); El Capitan in Clouds (Yosemite); The Bridal Veil Falls (Yosemite); Curecanti Needle and Gunnison River (Colorado); and Wawona in Winter (Yosemite). Several experts including Naef have hypothesized that the latter winter photograph was taken by Watkins and printed by Taber. The subject was a favorite of Watkins; the negative number may be that of Watkins (see Naef & Hult-Lewis, p. 538). The Taber photographs also include four medium format photographs from the famous Opium Den, Underground (San Francisco) series. Charles R. Savage. The album includes the following mammoth Savage prints: Mormon Tabernacle; Interior of Tabernacle; Mormon Temple, Salt Lake City; and Bathing at Garfield Landing. G.T. Salt Lake. The album also contains the following medium-format Savage prints: Gardo House; Ute Indians (c. 1870); Utah s Best Crop; Salt Lake Tabernacle Under Construction (c. 1865-66); Lion House; and Portrait of Brigham Young (c.1865-77). This superb volume, containing 21 mammoth photographs of iconic American sites, is one of the finest large-format landscape albums to appear for sale in many years. Large oblong folio. 39 albumen prints, on thick card mounts, recto and verso, comprising: 29 mammoth (approx. 20 x 16 in.), 4 large format (approx. 8 x 10 in.) and 6 medium format (approx. 5 x 8 in.) prints. Six of the mammoth photographs bear the Taber imprint and the Watkins negative number. Contemporary half red morocco gilt, gilt edges. Minimal wear, some fading to the handsome binding. Foxing to mounts. Minor fading. A splendid volume with the prints generally in excellent condition.
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Eureka: A Prose Poem

POE, EDGAR ALLAN FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE (i.e. without the review for Eureka on page 2 of the 16 pp catalogue). This is one of only 500 copies of Poe’s last book. “To the few who love me and whom I love–to those who seek rather than to those who think–to the dreamers and those who put faith in dreams as in the only realities–I offer this book of truths . . .” – Preface to Eureka Poe considered Eureka his magnum opus. Putnam recalled that Poe visited him “with a somewhat nervous and agitated manner” and proposed a first edition of 50,000 copies. Putnam agreed to publish 500 copies. Eureka has often been misunderstood, but it is in fact a remarkable precursor of several modern theories of physics and a powerful essay on the material and spiritual universe. For example, a March 19, 1991 New York Times article on the dark-sky or Olber’s paradox–the question of why the sky is dark at night–mentions Poe. According to Olber’s paradox, if one assumes that the stars are essentially infinite in number and distributed uniformly, then the night sky should be ablaze with light rather than shrouded in darkness. Today’s generally accepted explanation for this contradiction between logic and observation depends on two facts: the fixed speed of light, which implies that some light has yet to arrive here; and the aging of galaxies, with the implication that they can put out only a finite amount of light. Poe’s formulation was strikingly similar, for he hypothesized that the universe began at a set point in the past and was finite rather than infinite. In arguing that the Universe of Stars must be finite, he appeals to the evidence of observed experience. Poe wrote,  “Were the succession of stars endless, then the background of the sky would present us an uniform luminosity, like that displayed by the Galaxy–since there could be absolutely no point, in all that background, at which would not exist a star. The only mode, therefore, in which, under such a state of affairs, we could comprehend the voids which our telescopes find in innumerable directions, would be by supposing the distance of the invisible background so immense that no ray from it has yet been able to reach us at all. That this may be so, who shall venture to deny?  I maintain, simply, that we have not even the shadow of a reason for believing that it is so.” Original black cloth (binding A). Spine ends neatly restored, scar to upper board. Even browning to text. An attractive copy. Half morocco case.
Walden; or

Walden; or, Life in the Woods

THOREAU, HENRY DAVID FIRST EDITION. A handsome copy of Walden, published in an edition of 2000 copies. The charm of its vignettes of nature was considered its most attractive feature at that time, but its telling satire of the American business economy, its advocacy of the virtues of simple life, and its Transcendentalist endorsement of sturdy individualism have won it an ever-increasing number of readers It has become one of the bestselling American nonfiction classics and has been translated into virtually every major modern language. The word Walden has become a universal synonym for a personal utopia (ANB). I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practice resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience, and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion (Thoreau). The image of the solitary Thoreau writing in his cabin at Walden Pond is firmly impressed on the American imagination. This book contains solid chunks of thought, in the midst of a solid chunk of nature For almost a hundred years an inspiration to nature lovers, to philosophers, to sociologists and to persons who love to read the English language written with clarity (Grolier 100 American Books 63). This is an especially handsome and unrestored copy. May 1854 ads (i.e. pre-publication, as desired). Map. Bookplate of Bela B. Metcalf; modern gift inscription on second blank. Original brown cloth. Minimal wear to spine ends, minor stains to front free endpaper. An excellent, tight copy. Half morocco case.
Calotype of Water Tower

Calotype of Water Tower

LANGENHEIM, WILLIAM AND FREDERICK This important survival of American photographic history is a very early calotype of a water tower in Philadelphia. Paper photography from this era is a rarity and the image was created by two of America s great photographic pioneers, the Langenheim brothers. A calotype (or talbotype) is a negative-positive photographic process in which a paper negative is produced and then used to make a positive print using exposure to light. It was introduced by William Henry Fox Talbot, from whom the brothers had obtained the rights to the process, soon after Daguerre s advancement in France. The Langenheim brothers were some of the first entrepreneurs to utilize the calotype process in America. They began creating their own photographic images and revolutionizing the field of American photography soon after the process s invention. In 1842 they made the first advertising photograph in history, a picture of the restaurant in the Exchange Building in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania Arts and Sciences Society, 1940) and [i]n 1845 the brothers traveled to Niagara Falls where they made the first ever photographs of the natural wonder (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2017). The pair were among the first to commercially produce stereoscopic images in America, helping introduce the American public to an immensely influential photographic media. The brothers were also responsible for the first photographs in America of a total solar eclipse. American paper photographs of this quality and early date are rare in private hands. This is an opportunity to obtain an important example of American photographic history. Calotype (5 3⁄8 x 8 3⁄8 in.), mounted (14 x 17 in.). Some fading. Captioned in negative below the image, Talbotype from Nature Aug 2 1849 by W. F. Langenheim Phila . Stamped below the inscription is a studio seal, Talbotype. H. Fox Talbot s U.S. Patent, June 26, 1847. W. & F. Langenheim Assignees. Philad a.
Large Format Camera from Mathew Brady s Studio

Large Format Camera from Mathew Brady s Studio

BRADY, MATHEW A major relic of photographic history, this camera was owned by Mathew Brady during his years as the leading figure in American photography. Brady was the preeminent American portrait photographer of his day. He gained his greatest fame with his studio s documentation of the events and figures of the Civil War. This camera s association with Brady and his studio, which produced hundreds of iconic portraits and thousands of Civil War photographs, makes it an important historical artifact. The camera s Brady provenance is well-documented. It is accompanied by photocopies of original bankruptcy court records signed by Brady during his bankruptcy proceedings in 1873. The document lists this lens and its serial number in an inventory of Brady possessions. The camera was featured in a September 23, 1957 Life article titled In Image of the Master, the Famous Photographs of Mathew Brady Are Matched Today with Pioneer s Own Camera. Life photographer Ed Clark used the camera offered here to make modern equivalents of Brady portraits. On page 124, Clark is shown using this camera to photograph President Eisenhower in a pose similar to a familiar Lincoln image taken by Brady during the Civil War. An original copy of this issue of Life accompanies the camera. This camera is also pictured on the inside back cover of Mathew Brady and His World, Produced by Time-Life Books from pictures in the Meserve Collection. The picture is identified: This camera was used by Brady in the 1860s. To make an exposure, a prepared collodion negative was placed in a light proof holder. The holder was placed in the camera and a panel removed to let the light in. Frederick Hill Meserve started his celebrated collection of Lincolniana and photography in 1897. In 1902, he made a large purchase of Civil War era Brady negatives. It is believed this camera was a part of that purchase. Virtually every significant public figure of the Civil War era passed through Mathew Brady s studio; it is thrilling to imagine that many of his iconic photographs were taken with this very camera. This camera merits a place in a major museum collection. This is an extremely rare, evidently integral Charles Harrison camera. Harrison, a prominent New York lens maker, received international acclaim for his lens designs at the World s Fair in London. He began his work in photography as a daguerreotypist, but his success in making camera lenses soon led him to abandon photography to concentrate on the manufacture of lenses. This wood camera is fitted with a Petzval-type brass barrel lens signed C.C. Harrison New York, with the serial number 1195. According to Eric Taubman, the president and founder of the Penumbra Foundation, the lens dates to 1849 1850. The camera features a black fabric bellows, rack and pinion focusing, with wooden knob on rear of back section, and wide casement to accommodate side-loading plates. The camera is mounted on an 11 x 15 in. base rail. It is accompanied by a ground glass plate (glass replaced) for focusing, which allowed 10 3⁄8 x 10 3⁄8 in. exposures, as well as a dark slide.
Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant

BRADY, MATHEW This Mathew Brady portrait of General Ulysses S. Grant is inscribed and signed by Brady to J.E. Kelly on the mount. Stamp of Brady Studio, Wash. D.C. and handwriting attributed to J.E. Kelly on verso. Brady was nearly blind during much of his photographic career as well as semi-literate throughout his life and so he rarely signed or inscribed photographs. Brady was the preeminent photographer of his generation, and he was particularly remembered for documentation of the American Civil War. Long before his fame from the war he made his mark in photographic history in portrait photography with his galleries of notable Americans in New York City and Washington, D.C. The galleries were widely acclaimed tourist attractions as well as social meeting places for all classes of citizens. The photograph features Grant wearing his military uniform, before his election to the White House. At the time of this photograph he was a four-star general, the highest rank normally attainable in the United States. So-called signed prints are occasionally offered in the trade or at auction; in almost all cases the photographs are in fact signed by assistants from Brady s studio. Brady s scrawl is unique and readily recognizable, as in this rare authentic example. The recipient, J.E. Kelly, was an American sculptor and illustrator who specialized in depictions of the peoples and events of the Civil War. The verso of the photograph bears a series of notations in what is apparently Kelly s hand. A very rare and important survival linking two of the greatest Americans of the Civil War era.
Coney Island Panorama

Coney Island Panorama

CONEY ISLAND.) STACY, CHARLES This is a splendid panorama of Coney Island taken in 1907. Beginning in 1824 Coney Island began to transition from carriage roads and steamship transport, with a relative lack of urban development, to a more vibrant touristic landscape. Due to its proximity to Manhattan, the island attracted a large number of visitors as early as the 1830s and 1840s. Between 1880 and WWII, Coney Island was the largest amusement area in the United States drawing millions of visitors a year. Dreamland dominates this tremendous panoramic view, which was taken from the Shoot-the-Chutes feature. Built in 1904, Dreamland was intend- ed to surpass Luna Park and Steeplechase Park. To the left of Dreamland Tower, Luna Park s central tower is visible in the distance. Dreamland was illuminated by one million lights and had a railway through a Swiss Alpine landscape, Venetian canals with gondolas, a recreation of the fall of Pompeii, a simulated submarine ride, the Fighting the Flames fire fighting exhibition carried out on a 250 ft. long, 6-story building, and countless other attractions and rides. Considered one of the greatest amusement parks ever built, Dreamland was destroyed by a fire in 1911. The fire started, surprisingly, at a water attraction which was perhaps appropriately named Hell s Gate. Dreamland s role in amusement park history and impact on the American notion of what a park should be is notable considering its brief existence. This panorama was taken at the zenith of that period. This is a rare opportunity to own a large format panorama of Coney Island during the golden age of American amusement parks. Gelatin silver print (9 x 48 in.). Light wear and fading. Framed.
The Psychological Portrait: Marcel Sternberger s Revelations in Photography. Foreword by Phillip Prodger.

The Psychological Portrait: Marcel Sternberger s Revelations in Photography. Foreword by Phillip Prodger.

LOEWENTHEIL, JACOB First edition, one of 100 copies of the Deluxe Estate Edition, signed and numbered by the author and accompanied by your choice of one of four 8 x 10 inch archival pigment photographs (Einstein, Freud, Shaw, or Kahlo). This new book is the definitive work on Marcel Sternberger, a neglected giant of 20th-century portrait photography. Few photographers matched Sternberger s determination to create what we might in retrospect call pathognomic portraits. Between the lively expressions he captured and the minimalist lighting he used to reveal them, one might argue that there is hardly a more recognizable portraitist in the history of photography (Philip Prodger, Head of Photographs, National Portrait Gallery, London). It was the golden age of photojournalism, but [Sternberger s] photographs including of some of the most celebrated political leaders, artists, and intellectuals of the time were meant not only to document, but to tease out and capture his subjects personalities: FDR looking elegant and determined (his image on the dime was produced from one of Sternberger s shots); a humorless Freud who, Loewentheil writes, could easily have discerned the psychology taking place on both sides of the lens, [still] even he was not immune to its effects ; Frida Kahlo smiling beatifically, a flower crown fixed to her hair and mystery behind her eyes; Albert Einstein looking impish (of his portrait, he wrote, It seems quite amazing to me that you could present this subject so appetizingly ). Sternberger s portraits revealed intimate, rarely- observed characteristics of these well-known figures, who were accustomed to managing their public personae; his image of father and daughter Jawaharlal Nehru and Indira Gandhi sitting together, for example, shows them emanating mutual love and respect (New York Review of Books). This brilliant monograph by art scholar Jacob Loewentheil is a welcome appreciation and analysis of the work of the great portrait photographer Marcel Sternberger, who died in a 1956 car crash while on his way to visit his legendary friends (and his camera s great subjects) Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Indeed, many of Sternberger s portraits have become part of our global sensibility the famed, darkly backgrounded images of Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, George Bernard Shaw, Kahlo and Rivera, Jawaharlal Nehru, Indira Gandhi and countless other European, Asian and American luminaries, who literally shaped their times (Matt Damsker, I Photo Central). This definitive monograph has 206 photographs, sketches, notes, and contact sheets along with a manual for portrait technique. More than just pictures, the book also tells the fascinating story of a Jewish refugee who defined modern portrait iconography way before his time (American Photo). In addition to containing Sternberger s extraordinary photographs, this volume presents descriptions of many of his interviews during portrait sessions with prominent figures including Albert Einstein, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Sigmund Freud, George Bernard Shaw, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Jawaharlal Nehru, and Indira Gandhi. This deluxe signed and numbered edition is accompanied by a choice of one of the following classic photographs by Marcel Sternberger, the Deluxe Estate Edition, with stamp of authenticity on the verso: Albert Einstein, New Jersey, 1950. 8 x 10 in. archival pigment print. Sigmund Freud, London, 1939. 8 x 10 in. archival pigment print. George Bernard Shaw, London, 1939. 8 x 10 in. archival pigment print. Frida Kahlo, Mexico, 1952. 8 x 10 in. archival pigment print. Original boards. 210 pages. 206 photographs. 8 1⁄4 x 10 1⁄4 in. Newly published.
Dog Woman Cheyenne (plate no. 668

Dog Woman Cheyenne (plate no. 668, Vol. 19)

CURTIS, EDWARD S. This stunning glass photograph, Dog Woman Cheyenne (plate no. 668), is an interpositive made for Curtis s The North American Indian, the greatest photographic work on Native Americans. Edward Curtis was one of the most important American artists of the nineteenth century and the most celebrated photographer of North American Indians. Over the course of thirty-five years, Curtis took tens of thousands of photographs of Indians from more than eighty tribes. Never before have we seen the Indians of North America so close to the origins of their humanity, their sense of themselves in the world, their innate dignity and self-possession (N. Scott Momaday). Curtis s photographs are an absolutely unmatched masterpiece of visual anthropology, and one of the most thorough, extensive and profound photograph works of all time (A. D. Coleman). Curtis printed 2200 of his images as photogravures in his magisterial The North American Indian, which was hailed as the most gigantic undertaking in the making of books since the King James Bible (New York Herald). These photogravures were printed from large- format photographic glass plates, the vast majority of which were subsequently destroyed. Curtis s lifelong project was inspired by his reflection that The passing of every old man or woman means the passage of some tradition, some knowledge of sacred rite possessed by no other; consequently, the information that is to be gathered, for the benefit of future generations, respecting the modes of life of one of the greatest races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost for all time. The present stunning example is one of the very few glass plate photographs that have survived. The image contains a wealth of detail that was lost in the photogravure process, and when shown in the accompanying lightbox, it is a dazzling photographic masterpiece. This is an exceptional opportunity to acquire one of the greatest monuments of photography in one of its rarest and most beautiful forms. Approx. 14 x 17 inches. Accompanied by a custom wall-mount light box. Excellent condition. A stunning display piece.
Outstanding autograph letter to Francis Horner

Outstanding autograph letter to Francis Horner

BENTHAM, JEREMY In this remarkable letter Jeremy Bentham presents the case for a significant reform in English legal procedure. He begins by thanking Horner, a leading MP, for sending the report of the Committee for Searching the Lord s Journals concerning the causes that retard the decision of suits in the High Court of Chancery. Bentham attacks the routine abuse of sham writs of error in which officials and lawyers lined their pockets by entertaining bogus writs of error. He observes, The number [and] relations of the sham writs of error (brought for the mere purpose of delay) which was the main, if not sole, object of our motion, is not given: and the circumstances are such as afford a sorry confirmation of the intentional supposition suspected before. Bentham goes on, for eight pages and hundreds of words, to meticulously analyze the reports, pointing out the curious circumstances he has uncovered. He demonstrates that the journals and the Lords proceedings have been manipulated to conceal the extent of the use of writs of error. Bentham s investigations resulted in the exposure of enormous fees and emoluments inappropriately received by the Lord High Chancellor, Lord Eldon. Bentham is one of the great thinkers and reformers in the history of English law and politics. Bentham attacked what he called the technical system of evidence and adjective law which was employed in England, and which, in his opinion, led to obscurity in the law and unnecessary expense, delay, and corruption. Bentham recommended the natural system of procedure where all parties were heard, all evidence admitted, cross-examination encouraged, and increased powers given to courts to obtain evidence (ODNB). To re-read Bentham now is to realize how much practical good he has done, as well as how much he advanced social and political thinking. Typically, his range is too great to be easily classified (he has left no school or followers) but much of what he taught has become part of the common thought not only of his own but of subsequent time: truths which had not found expression before they were pointed out by Bentham are now so universally accepted as to be thought common-place. Take Utilitarianism for example; although the concept was not wholly original, only Bentham could have summed it up in the succinct aphorism the greatest happiness of the greatest number , and only he could have coined the word utilitarianism to label it. (Bentham was a lively neologist: utilitarian , international , codification , all were invented by him (Printing and the Mind of Man). The recipient of the letter, Francis Horner, M.P. (1778-1817), was a leading figure in economics and finance in Parliament in the 1810s. In 1810 the House of Commons named him to chair the Committee on the High Price of Gold Bullion to investigate why the price had risen during the Napoleonic Wars. Horner maintained a close relationship with Jeremy Bentham. He first met Bentham in 1805 and afterwards corresponded with him on he subject of Scots judicature. Horner apparently called on Bentham frequently (The Horner Papers). This important, lengthy letter is apparently unpublished. 4to. 8 pages, densely written in Bentham s small script, not signed and perhaps incomplete. Some age-toning, but generally in very good condition.
Leaves of Grass

Leaves of Grass

WHITMAN, WALT This is the fourth Leaves of Grass. The failure of Thayer & Eldridge, publisher of the third edition (Boston, 1860), left Whitman in search of a publisher. The poet decided that the events of the Civil War called for another reimagining of Leaves of Grass. Whitman returned to his earlier practice and financed the publication himself, engaging the New York printer William E. Chapin. For the first time, the 1867 Leaves opened with the poem Inscription, which introduced the book in subsequent editions. In various permutations, Whitman circulated this fourth edition as four separately paginated books stitched together between two covers: a vastly re-edited version of the 1860 Leaves, a reissue of Drum-Taps, a reissue of the Sequel to Drum-Taps, and a striking coda called Songs Before Parting. This most chaotic of all six editions of Leaves contains only six new poems ( Inscription [later One s-Self I Sing and Small the Theme of My Chant ], The Runner, Leaves of Grass number 2 [later Tears ], Leaves of Grass number 3 [later Aboard at a Ship s Helm ], When I Read the Book, and The City Dead-House ), but its significance lies in its intriguing raggedness, which is embedded in the social upheaval in the immediate aftermath of the Civil War (Mancuso, Walt Whitman: An Encyclopedia). There are three issues, each with the same title-page: 1) containing Leaves of Grass, Drum-Taps, Sequel to Drum-Taps, and Songs before Parting; 2) as above but omitting Drum-Taps and Sequel to Drum-Taps [the present copy]; 3) containing Leaves of Grass only. The present copy is the second issue. Myerson A 2.4.a2. Original half black leather, marbled paper boards. Some restoration to binding. An attractive copy.
Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin

DARWIN, CHARLES.) Cameron, Julia Margaret. THE GREAT DARWIN PORTRAIT, Julia Margaret Cameron s 1868 portrait of Darwin is probably the most famous photograph of a 19th-century scientist. Darwin remarked, I like this photograph much better than any other which has been taken of me. In 1868, Darwin and his family traveled to the Isle of Wight, both for a long holiday and to aid in his recuperation from a recent illness. The Darwins rented a house from Cameron and were immediately charmed by the photographer: She received the whole family with open-hearted kindness and hospitality, and Darwin always retained a warm feeling of friendship for her. When they left she came to see them off, loading them with presents of photographs. Moved, Darwin said: Mrs. Cameron, there are sixteen people in this house, all in love with you. Darwin paid her for her portraits of him, and as the Camerons had by that time lost a great deal of money through the continued failure of the coffee crop, she gladly accepted payment and ran boasting to her husband, Look, Charles, what a lot of money! (Gernsheim, Julia Margaret Cameron) Cameron is now widely regarded as one of the most accomplished photographers of all time. Her portraits are easily recognized by dramatic lighting, soft focus, and feeling of character. This photogravure is likely from Cameron s Alfred, Lord Tennyson and his Friends (London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1893), a series of 25 portraits from Cameron s portraits. Photogravure, matted. Approx. 8 x 10½ in. Some surface wear, browning. Handsomely framed, with an early manuscript caption giving Darwin s birth and death dates on the mount.
Physikalischer Grundlagen einer Gravitationstheorie [and] MARCEL GROSSMANN. Mathematische Begriffsbildungen zur Gravitationstheorie. Offprint from Vierteljahrsschrift der Naturforschenden Gesellchaft in Zürich

Physikalischer Grundlagen einer Gravitationstheorie [and] MARCEL GROSSMANN. Mathematische Begriffsbildungen zur Gravitationstheorie. Offprint from Vierteljahrsschrift der Naturforschenden Gesellchaft in Zürich

EINSTEIN, ALBERT FIRST EDITION, the rare offprint with Überreicht von den Verfassern. printed on the front wrapper. In 1912 Einstein moved back to Zürich from Prague. Aware of the analogy between Gauss s surface theory and the space-time Einstein was introducing in his new theory of gravitation, he wished to find a four-dimensional version of Gauss s theory. Einstein recalled, With this problem in mind, I visited my old student friend Marcel Grossmann, who in the meantime had become Professor of Mathematics at the Swiss Polytechnic. He caught fire immediately, even though as a true mathematician he took a somewhat skeptical attitude to physics. [H]e was indeed quite ready to collaborate on the problem with me, but with the limitation that he would take no responsibility for any claims and interpretations of a physical nature. He reviewed the literature and soon discovered that the mathematical problem had already been solved, in particular by Riemann, Ricci and Levi-Cività (Einstein, 1955). Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro and Tullio Levi-Cività had developed a useful formalism, the absolute differential calculus (tensor calculus), which Einstein and Grossmann adopted. On 9 September 1913 the two presented their first lectures on this subject. These were published in the same year in the Vierteljahrsschrift der Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Zürich, vol. 58, under the titles: Physikalische Grundlagen einer Gravitationstheorie (pp. 284 290) and Mathematische Begriffsbildungen zur Gravitationstheorie (pp. 291 297). This is the rare author s presentation offprint of that joint publication. Their joint paper of 1913 came much nearer to the theory of gravity for which Einstein was still groping. He was dissatisfied with the paper, for its equations appeared to show that instead of a single solution to any particular set of gravitations circumstances there was an infinitude of solutions. Einstein believed that they were not comparable with experience . This, together with the conclusions that the results would not agree with the principle of causality, led him to believe that the theory was untenable. Yet the 1913 paper contained the clue to its own apparent discrepancy: what appeared to be an infinitely large number of solutions to one problem was really a single solution applicable to each of an infinitely large number of different frames of reference. Thus the cards of the General Theory of Relativity had been laid fact upwards on the table in 1913 (Alicke). In 1914 Einstein moved to Berlin and continued to work alone on general relativity until its definitive formulation at the end of 1915. Einstein praised Grossmann s contribution in his principal work on general relativity (1916): Grossmann supported me through his help, not only in sparing me the study of the relevant mathematical literature, but also in the search for the gravitational field equations. Weil 57. pp. (i), 284-297. Original wrappers. Near fine.