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Effects of Slavery on Morals and Industry

Effects of Slavery on Morals and Industry

Webster, Noah Bound to style in modern quarter calf over marbled boards with morocco label to spine. Light scattered foxing, largely concentrated at the preliminaries. Small tear to the blank inner corner of A2. Contemporary inscription to the footer of title page: "Sold in London by Chas. Delly price 1/6." Charles Delly, a UK printer and bookseller active in the 1780s, was clearly importing American titles to sell in his shop. Collates complete [5], 6-56. An important and scarce work, the only other copy to appear at auction came up, disbound, at Swann in 1982. Best known as the lexicographer responsible for his American Dictionary of the English Language, Noah Webster has been called "the father of American scholarship and education" (Mason). He was also a committed abolitionist, helping to found the Connecticut Society for the Abolition of Slavery in 1791. In the present work, Webster argues that "slavery in all its forms and varieties is repugnant to private interest and public happiness of man." Providing a brief historical view of slavery, Webster shows that across time and place, the practice of enslaving people produces the same deleterious effects. "The actual produce of a country is nearly in an exact proportion to the degree of freedom enjoyed by its inhabitants." And he uses Ireland and Connecticut as examples that illustrate "the superior productiveness of the labor of freemen who work for their own benefit." Despite these progressive views, Webster's essay is also heavily marked with the systemic racism that has undercut the momentum of many American social movements; and he problematically asserts the "laziness of slaves" in America, commenting that "the blacks are so remarkable for their inaction, their want of fore-sight and their disinclination to improvement." Unable to imagine the rich social movements that would emerge from enslaved people's descendants, Webster places the responsibility for abolition on white Americans, both for economic and moral good. "If that nation is the happiest, which with industry enjoys a full supply of the comforts and conveniences of life, then the government and those institutions which distribute and secure." ESTC W31814. Evans 26448.
The Wife. By Mira

The Wife. By Mira, one of the authors of The Female Spectator and Epistles for Ladies

Haywood, Eliza] Contemporary sheep binding rebacked, with gilt to spine and boards. All edges speckled red. Hinges cracked but holding; some scuffing to rear board. Internally with some offsetting to preliminaries, but in all a clean and pleasing copy. Collates [4], v, [1], 282: complete, including half title and title page. Scarce at institutions, this conduct book is also rare in trade, having only appeared once at auction (likely the present copy). It is the only first edition on the market. "Eliza Haywood has been rightly called an emblematic early English woman writer, and a case study in the politics of literary history. The time in which she wrote was the moment when the novel was becoming the culture's chief vehicle for moral and social instruction, and her technical innovations were part of this foundation. She contributed substantially to making the form a serious site for political, moral, and social enquiry and a new hegemonic apparatus" (ODNB). Having lived a varied life as an actress and author, widowed early, she engaged in affairs with literary luminaries of Samuel Johnson's circle while also collaborating with these male writers. She published her first of fifty-five novels in 1719; and she developed a reputation for "combining a romance plot with shrewd modern political and social commentary" with focus on "how gender determines life experiences and possibilities" (Backscheider). Late in her career, Haywood turned to the conduct book form to convey her ideas, with The Wife being her best known example. What on the surface seems like a conservative advice-book to women, in fact, satirically represents the arc of a failed marriage. Beginning the book with a chapter on The First Weeks After Marriage, the next two chapters deal with key disagreements that emerge after the honeymoon (religion and politics). From here, she provides chapters on Detraction and Advice & Persuasion, Bearing the Passions and Petulancies of the Husband, Coquetry and Prudery, The Choice of Female Friends, Sleeping in Different Beds, among others. Notably, its concluding chapter is titled: How a Woman Ought to Behave When in a State of Separation from her Husband. The Wife's social commentary would go on to influence thinkers like Jane Austen and Mary Wollstonecraft, and it is increasingly garnering attention in the academy for its importance. "From the outset of her career, drawing on knowledge of the stage, Haywood was an innovator, mashing genres together, masking political commentary with sex, desire with morality, conduct advice with scandal. She refused categorization in ways that demonstrate her professionalism, skill, and self-awareness" (Jane Austen Society). Feminist Companion 505. ESTC T75406.
Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina

Tolstoi [Tolstoy], Count Lyof N. A Near Fine copy of the first translation into English. Minor wear at the spine ends (some fraying), but generally an attractive copy. With the generally accepted first issue points: no other titles by the same author listed, publisher's monogram on the title page and with five pages of ads in the rear, starting with "Crowell's Red Line Poets," no translations of any Russian books listed, and with the correct end-papers. "Anna Karenina" was originally published in parts in the "Russian Messenger" from 1873 to 1877. It first appeared in book form in 1878 with the English language translation coming out eight years later. Tolstoy himself thought that "Anna Karenina" - as opposed to "War and Peace" - was his first true novel. Anna Karenina's epic sweep encompasses Russian politics, philosophy and religion, and the challenges humans face as a result of their economic class. Yet what has earned the novel a lasting place in the literary canon is its complex representation of relationships between men and women. "Of all the nineteenth century novels written by men, Anna Karenina is the one most centrally concerned with women, the one which attempts most thoroughly and honestly to confront them in all aspects of their lives" (Greene). Regardless of their individual differences, Anna, Kitty, and Dolly are often punished for violating the contradictory expectations placed on them as wives, mothers, and lovers. "Tolstoy grasped that the same principles of behavior that shape men's characters apply to women as well.but that a women feels even more heavily than man the weight of social pressures which work on and warp her character" (Greene). A cornerstone of world literature. Christian Science Monitor Top 10 Books of All Time. Near Fine.
A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits.By a Friend to Youth

A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits.By a Friend to Youth

Hoare, Sarah] Original drab boards in almost Fine condition, excepting for a small nick to the center of the spine and some slight splitting to the joints near the foot of the spine. Original endpapers. Bookplate of J.O. Edwards to front pastedown. Contemporary annotated slips tipped in between pages 34-35 an 56-57 and in-text notations in the same hand to pages 54 and 124. Else internally clean, nearly unfoxed, and wide-margined. Collates xi, [1, blank], 134: complete including title. The only first edition on the market, OCLC locates this title at only 10 institutions. A charming survivor in boards of a scarce literary-scientific collaboration between two women. When Sarah Hoare's botanical poems first appeared, they accompanied the 1818 edition of Priscilla Wakefield's An Introduction to Botany. Appearing here separately for the first time, A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits was produced with the goal of encouraging young people and especially women toward the study of science. "To Wakefield's work I acknowledge myself much indebted: it was the first book of its kind that I had read on the subject; and I still feel grateful to the author for having rendered a study, which had before been considered abstruse and difficult, so pleasant and familiar," she writes in her introduction, continuing, "The hours passed.in pursuit of Botany I place among the most agreeable of my life." Indeed, when Wakefield's Botany first appeared in 1796, it broke new ground as the first elementary science book written by a woman; and Wakefield's own mission aligned with Hoare's here, in wanting to invite boys and girls equally into the study of science. A Quaker and a botany teacher, Hoare also urges her readers to take her book as a mere starting point -- something to ignite curiosity that drives them toward further study. And she particularly speaks to mothers, who gain a new opportunity to learn from books like these. "On the subject of education I would in a particular manner address you who are mothers. You are placed in a situation of awful responsibility.Daughters are for the most part considered the as the exclusive charge of the mother.It will be of great importance to them that you are worthy, sensible, and well informed." Containing the botanical and scientific poems, accompanied by a miscellany showcasing her authorial talents. Near Fine.
Poetical Weeds

Poetical Weeds

Hadfield, Elizabeth Green morocco with elaborate bright gilt to spine and boards. All edges gilt. Yellow endpapers. Gentle rubbing to extremities. Front hinge tender but holding. Early owner's bookplate to front pastedown; contemporary ownership signature of Emma Wrightson to front endpaper. Scattered foxing to chromolithic title page. Measures 76 x 114mm. Collates vi, [2], 149, [3]: complete including publisher's adverts to rear. Scarce in trade and at institutions, OCLC lists only 8 copies at libraries. While little is known about the author Elizabeth Hadfield, her small collection of verses participates in a larger poetry movement deploying horticultural imagery to express devotion and to justify their publications. "Well-tended gardens are horticultural signs of the presence of God among Christians. Women poets who are keen to remove the weeds from the garden of their soul mobilize green metaphors which function as powerful symbols of their moral and religious strength" (Moine). Drawing on religious constructions of nature, these women poets excuse their authorship by connecting it to devotion and self-deprecating their efforts. "The insistence on smallness is paradoxically one of the most prominent defining features of these women's natural verse.Women poets present themselves as undeserving amateurs and their poetical ambition as a futile activity, with their poems no more than artistic trifles. The parallel elaboration of a discourse centered on smallness and triviality functions to authorise and legitimize women who dare to write poems since their work is unchallenging in the eyes of their more legitimate male competitors.In Poetical Weeds by Elizabeth Hadfield, for example, the modest dimensions of which seem to echo the subject, and the author begins by establishing a metaphorical link between poems and weeds: 'The following Weeds have been gathered in the fields of imagination and are presented by the author to those kindred spirits who love the Muse. By some perhaps they will be considered humble even as weeds.perchance as background to the bouquet of choicer flowers supplied by the poets of England.' Hadfield presents herself as a humble contributor to English poetry whose verse mirrors her subject matter: illegitimate flowers that do not grow in the right place.It is precisely because her leaves (in both senses) are modest that they do not represent a threat to those in positions of cultural authority and, it is hoped, these gatekeepers will consequently offer no objection to her inclusion in the literary canon" (Moine). To this end, she uses her Invocation to beseech God's support and forgiveness as well: "My feeble efforts here be pleased to bless And grant at least a measure of success.And very watchful will my spirit be To write no thought inimical to Thee.as I pursue my cherished dream." Near Fine.
Original working copy of his abandoned Mariana poems

Original working copy of his abandoned Mariana poems

Stanford, Frank Titled in the author's hand at the foot of the first page: "All poems here From MARIANA" with a parenthetical note "the only good thing about these is where & circumstance written under). 11 white pages measuring 8.5 x 11" containing 9 poems and stapled on the upper left corner. With hand annotations on three pages in ink. Ultimately abandoned as a series, the Mariana poems are comprised of 8 unpublished works and one title that ultimately made its way into Arkansas Bench Stone: Village with the Dark Sun. This selection of poetry contains a number of shorter works which, like The Dream and Pictures, focus on idealized feminine bodies moving through moonlit landscapes with their lovers: "Everything was silent She sang In her sleep She was Bella He is Chagall." As a group, they are quieter overall, more contained and less free-flowing and gritty than much of Stanford's oeuvre. To some, like From, there is even a level of romance: "The bride Who leans Towards her Young groom Like hair Brushes you find In the space Behind mirrors." The collection is undated and unmarked with place, aside from the author's note that "where & circumstance written under" were both good -- even if he feels the poetry itself is not. Despite his dissatisfaction with the work, Stanford still labeled the work and left it with his publisher and long-time confidante, Irv Broughton; and he even annotated and corrected several poems in an attempt to improve them. A uniquely personal set of poems, and a departure from the typical Stanford.
Original typescripts for the Blue Yodels

Original typescripts for the Blue Yodels

Stanford, Frank Comprised of a total of 16 typed pages containing 10 poems. Of these, 14 are on onionskin, 2 on white paper, and 9 contain markings and annotations by Stanford. All pages measure 8.5 x 11" and are in clean condition with the exception of Blue Yodel the Many Evenings, which is a bit crumpled and has a rust mark to the upper left corner from a paperclip. In type or his hand, Stanford labels each poem at the foot "From Blue Yodels 1963-1973." Some poems are marked "Frank Stanford. Hotel New Orleans, Eureka Springs, Arkansas 72632" while others are marked "Frank Stanford, Subiaco Abbey, Subiaco, Arkansas 72865." Originally conceived as a series, Stanford worked on his Blue Yodels poems throughout his career. Some were eventually published separately in his major chapbooks; and the series never came to fruition in his lifetime. Yet the even when separated, the Blue Yodels speak to each other. "Stanford combines, in poems like this, the surreal, the local, the beautiful, and the mundane, building it all up to create a narrative of love that seems something out of a dream. The poem is a 'yodel,' a mountain song echoing.Stanford does not differentiate in them between the high and the low; rather, he sees poetry in everything and reveals it to the reader through inventive language and free-flowing form" (Hurter). Drained of the anger and violence present in some of his other works, the Yodels are tinged with sadness and nostalgia -- a sense of being in a moment and feeling its loss simultaneously. Present in this collection are the Blue Yodels of the Desperado, Where You Say Uncle, A Child Yelling on a Mountain for the Hell of It, Of Aromatic Spirits, The Many Evenings, Of One Poet With the Stars, A Prairie, Of Those Who Were Always Telling Me, Of Just Another Gigolo, and Of a Sentry Who Goes There.
The largest known collection of Frank Stanford letters

The largest known collection of Frank Stanford letters, with content on his poetic process, documentary film work, and publishing with Mill Mountain Press

Stanford, Frank The single largest known collection of correspondence by prolific American poet Frank Stanford. Comprised of 72 pages of Autograph and Typed Letters Signed, ranging in date from 1971-1976. All addressed to his long-time publisher and friend Irv Broughton, of the Mill Mountain Press, these letters provide an unprecedented look at Stanford's involvement not only in the artistic process, but in the practical business of creating material work for distribution. Within this extensive collection are never-before-published letters exchanged between Stanford and Irv Broughton. Beginning in January of 1971, soon after the two began collaborating and in the same year as Stanford's first poetry book The Singing Knives, these letters trace Stanford's development across five years. 1971-1976 were, in fact, the most productive of Stanford's short career. Within this space, he produced uncounted pages of poetry, from which emerged The Singing Knives, Ladies from Hell, Shade, Field Talk, Arkansas Bench Stone, and Constant Stranger. Most important of all, his magnum opus The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You was being composed and revised across these years and would be released in 1977. Stanford records the highs and lows of his work in these 72 pages with great candor. Early on, he tries to explain his methods to his new publisher, writing in one letter that "What I like to do after getting the feel of each poem, and then of the feel of the book, is to memorize some of them without writing them out" (March 4, 1971). These types of insights occur throughout, in the midst of practical correspondence about the cost of paper, the exchange of edited typescripts, the design of printed chapbooks, and the need for funding. It becomes clear often that Stanford is an artist ahead of his time. "Personally I don't think they'll risk any money on anything but a professionally controlled imagination," he writes to Broughton in August of 1974 regarding the American Film Institute. And he mentions in September of the same year his plans to submit work for the Walt Whitman Award, from which he was ultimately rejected for, ironically, being too experimental (this rejection letter is contained within the collection). Yet there were great successes for the writer during this time as well. He regularly reports "working and writing a blue streak," and he is excited in 1974 to announce that "the printing should be finished on [Ladies from Hell] by my birthday." He grows in maturity, committing to an intense revision process and refusing to publish unsatisfactory work: "They are my favorite and best and unpublished.I have to get them right' (May 25, N.Y.). The letters also document the movement of key figures into Stanford's professional and personal life, Eudora Welty, Carson McCullers, Flannery O'Connor, and possibly most influential of all, C. D. Wright, with whom he would found Lost Road Publishers and begin a relationship. "You will one day be glad you printed CD Wright," he tells Broughton in 1975, "She's as fine as they come." An exceptional, extensive, and revealing collection.
Children's Poetry

Children’s Poetry

Craik, Dinah Mulock] The Author of John Halifax Finely bound by J & JP Edmond & Spark of Aberdeen for S. Drostane's College. Full calf with gilt to spine and college crest in gilt to front board. All edges and endpapers marbled. Small bump to crown of spine; occasional light foxing largely confined to margins. Presentation inscription to front blank: "S. Drostane's College. John Patrick Cash, Prize for Writing -- Third Form. Midsummer 1887. Presented by Major Cash, Strathpeffer." A charming copy of this scarce book of poetry by a leading women's activist, it is the only first edition on the market and is held by only 10 institutions in the U.S. according to OCLC. A surreptitiously activist selection of poems designed for children by activist Dinah Mulock Craik. "Although she had the training to become a governess, she turned to writing as a profession. Her earliest work was in genres that could be quickly written and sold.consolidating Dinah Mulock's reputation as a popular writer who delineated complex emotional states with unusual power and understanding" (ODNB). Here, she draws on her educational background to present juvenile readers with a mixture of fanciful poems, throughout which she interweaves work on social justice. On the surface, the presence of titles like Violets, Young Dandelion, and The Midsummer Fairy suggest that the collection will be a run-of-the-mill batch of lyrics for the young. Every so often, however, a poem will jar the reader by bringing up serious subjects. The Young Governess, for example, draws attention to how family poverty can force young girls -- still children themselves -- into the workforce. "I mean to be a governess And earn my daily bread; For we have many mouths to feed -- And oh! They must be fed.Though I am but just fourteen, I'm big and stout and tall, And I can learn my lessons best, They say among us all." Other poems, like Our Black Brother on Board an English Ship, push children to see the injustices of racism and slavery, to find human commonality, and even to question the methods by which they're taught to assume superiority. "Bring him forward, to the light, Our black brother -- Knock his chains off, horrid sight!.His poor mother Thought him as he walked or ran, All that's beautiful in man." A scarce and important piece of educational activism, presented as a prize in a Scottish schoolroom. Near Fine.
Sex and Education

Sex and Education

Howe, Julia Ward (editor) Original brick publisher's cloth binding stamped in blind with gilt to spine. Shelfwear to crown and foot of spine with some loss to cloth; gentle rubbing to boards and corners. Joints cracked but still holding well. Coated brown endpapers. Previous ownership signature of Frank X. Henke on front endpaper. Bookseller's stamp and blue ink stain to inner margin of title page. Internally a clean and complete copy of this rare feminist work, which is the only copy on the market and and has never before appeared at auction. Bringing together eminent women educators, activists, and authors, Sex and Education is a take-down of Dr. E. H. Charles Clarke's book Sex in Education. In arguing that education caused female hysteria, sterility, and other physical disabilities, Dr. Clarke drew the anger and disdain of educated women throughout America. "Despite Dr. Clarke's prominent position in this community," Julia Ward Howe explains in the book's introduction," we do not feel compelled to regard him as the supreme authority on the subjects of which he treats." The present volume was, however, compiled by writers who are authorities -- educated women whose very existence undercuts Clarke's position. "Most of the writers are experience in the office of tuition, and in the observation of its effects. All of them have had occasion to form their own theories of what is desirable for the improvement of the condition of women. The facts and experience of their lives have led them far from Dr. Clarke's conclusions." Opening with essays from Howe, Elizabeth Phelps, and Mrs. Horace Mann, the collection concludes with a series of testimonials from renowned universities including Vassar, Oberlin, Michigan, and Antioch. Not in Krichmar. Very Good +.
The Men Who Talked to Turkeys original annotated typescript

The Men Who Talked to Turkeys original annotated typescript

Stanford, Frank 25 page typescript on 8.5 x 11" paper with handwritten title. Annotated throughout in ink and pencil by the author. Apparently incomplete, as the final sentence drops off as a fragment "He wound up his stay in the city" with no punctuation and appears at the start of a new paragraph. A scarce example of Stanford's prose work, we have been unable to locate evidence that the piece was published during or after his lifetime or whether he completed it. In his all-too-brief lifetime, Stanford established a reputation as an inventive and prolific poet. Lesser known are his prose works, which he mentioned occasionally in letters to his publisher and confidante, Irv Broughton. The present is an exceptional example of his prowess in short fiction; in this longer form, he still captures the Southern landscape and creates voices firmly tied to it. Indeed, The Men Who Talked to Turkeys connects in clear ways to themes of Stanford's poetry as well as his own life experiences in the South. "The best work is always done in the cool shade of a morning; the farmer knows this. It is a good work, too, like a sleepwalk where you milk and feed.A man can close half close his eyes, a forty acre cut of filthy, wet cotton before him, and dream.Without saying a word of farewell, a man may leave his family and never return. Without saying so, a man may be lonely as hell, like a deaf and dumb field hand on a land levelling rig, who imagines he is rolling over the dead lava of the moon." Beginning with a father and young boy starting morning farm chores, the narrative shifts perspectives between the two. An extremely unique opportunity to experience Stanford's writing outside his usual genre.
Author's mock up for the chapbook Arkansas Bench Stone

Author’s mock up for the chapbook Arkansas Bench Stone

Stanford, Frank Comprised of 18 pages total on white 8.5 x 11" paper. Of these, 16 pages are photocopied, 2 are typed. 9 pages bear the author's corrections in ink and one has several words covered in white-out. A mock-up for the publication of Arkansas Bench Stone, the present collection represents a near-final version of the work. All but one of the poems from the published volume are present (and, in its place exists a poem that was later dropped); Stanford has additionally updated page divisions and created space for artwork by his wife, Ginny Crouch. Stanford was one of the most recognized and prolific emerging poets of his generation until his suicide at the age of twenty-nine. Though all but two of his books remain out of print, his poems, which pitch startling and often surreal imagery against stark Southern landscapes, have sustained Stanford's reputation and influence" (Encyclopedia of Arkansas History). Arkansas Bench Stone was the fifth book in Stanford's oeuvre, all of which had been published by Irv Broughton of Mill Mountain Press. The present mock-up is a unique glimspe into the final stages of Stanford's process; and it shows the overlap of practical and creative contributions he made to the printing of this 16 poem volume. Falling in between his debut work The Singing Knives and his magnum opus The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You, Stanford's Arkansas Bench Stone shows the young poet gaining confidence in his own creativity, tapping into the deepest memories of his Southern identity, and developing his signature writing style. His annotations within the mock-up show his investment in using the space of the page and the division of pages to push people through the poetry and affect their experiences.
Original annotated typescripts for Field Talk

Original annotated typescripts for Field Talk

Stanford, Frank Comprised of 7 loose and 19 stapled onionskin pages measuring 8.5 x 11" and including a total of 22 poems. Representing the final version almost in its entirety, the typescript lacks only three poems that appeared in the first edition; instead, it contains an additional six poems that were ultimately cut. Within the collection, five of the loose poems bear Stanford's annotations and corrections; the stapled portion is clean, bearing only a label to the footer of each poem "from Field Talk: Some Poems 1957-1972." Drawing from a rich and immense oeuvre as he compiled his chapbooks with publisher Irv Broughton, Frank Stanford had a unique opportunity to cut and add poems that changed the tone of each collection. Considered an example of his maturing voice, Field Talk "dealt with tension between the narrative and the lyric, between the allegorical and the personal.by the time he reached his peak with Field Talk, he combined the two impulses into a unified voice" (Howell). The present gathering of typescripts is a revealing look at Stanford's process in developing this unity -- as he selects and combines poems from various moments across twenty years in his life, considering how they communicate with each other and shape a reader's experience. On several annotated pages, Stanford even shows the process of revising and cutting existing poems, removing lines and stanzas that no longer work, and striking out title markers for collections he had previously planned to use the pieces. An exceptional moment in his career, preserved on onion skin.