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Whitmore Rare Books, Inc.

The Jungle Book & The Second Jungle Book

The Jungle Book & The Second Jungle Book

Kipling, Rudyard Original publisher's cloth bindings with gilt to spines and boards. All edges brightly gilt. Gently bumping to extremities. Spine of The Jungle Book the slightest bit rolled. Small cloth repair near the crown of spine on The Second Jungle Book. Dark green endpapers. Internally both copies bright and clean, with just a bit of scattered foxing to the second. An attractive pair of Kipling's most memorable works. Based on folk tales and legends that Kipling learned during his childhood in India but written while in Vermont. This work of several inter-related short stories met with huge success upon publication and continues to enthrall readers of all ages to this day. According to Professor Edwin L. Miller, their publication "caused even severe critics of [Kipling's] previous work to admit that he is a writer of inspired genius." Largely focused on man's relationship to nature, The Jungle Books in part narrate the tales of Mowgli, a human (man-cub) raised by wolves, as he tries to find his proper place in the world. As he struggles with his own identity, he finds allies and adversaries among the animal communities through which he travels. They also include the story of Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, the heroic mongoose who would later inspire an animated short voiced by Orson Welles. For contributions like these, Kipling became the first English-language writer, and the youngest ever, to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature. Near Fine.
Argument in the Case of Harriet Strong and Children

Argument in the Case of Harriet Strong and Children

Women's History] [Supreme Court] 1 folio sheet, folded. 7 pages measuring 165 x 240mm. Persistent dampstain extending from gutter to a quarter across the page with all text legible. Light scattered foxing.An early, important, and under-examined moment in American legal history, in which a widow who was party to contract disputes against the government reached the Supreme Court, and was ultimately awarded signifcant compensation through an Act of Congress. Scarce institutionally and in trade, OCLC reports only 6 known copies, this being the only one on the market. Widowed in 1819, Harriet Strong found herself heavily in debt. Before his death, Strong's husband Benjamin Wright Hopkins had been contracted by the Department of War to build a fort at Mobile Point, Alabama beginning in May 1818. In preparation for the project, Hopkins invested tens of thousands of dollars to hire staff and builders, move supplies, procure supplies, and other related expenses; and he relocated his wife and children from their home in Vermont to Alabama. In dire straits and with few other options for keeping her family afloat, Strong initiated a contract dispute against the Department of War to recover expenses owed. The ensuing legal battle would have major ramifications not only for Strong personally; they would also positively change laws and increase protections for women and children. The present pamphlet details the history of Hopkins' work on behalf of the Department of War. In it, his heirs claim that the contract "has been violated by the other contracting party in two respects. First, in not designating the site of the fort by the time stipulated; and secondly, in the construction put upon that part of the contract fixing the period of payment." Across a decade, Strong pursued compensation as hers and related contract disputes lumbered through the court system. In one such dispute, an unfavorable decision in the Circuit Court of the Southern District of New York in 1823 led to a successful appeal to the United States Supreme Court. In 1827, the heirs of Hopkins and later business partners who took over his contract won their case, United States v. Tillotson. In a decision written by Associate Justice Joseph Story, who also wrote and delivered the landmark majority decision in United States vs. The Amistad, the lower court's decision was overturned. Strong and advocates sought additional recognition and lobbied the Twenty First U.S. Congress, who ended up passing An Act for the Relief of the Widow and Children of Benjamin W. Hopkins on February 11, 1830. Congress awarded Strong $13,270, a large amount of money for anyone in the 1830s, to say nothing for a widowed woman and mother of two.Important and under-examined, Strong's case draws attention to the economic and legal vulnerability of American women at a time when the Women's Rights Movement had yet to begin. Not in NUC, AI, Sabin, BEAL, or Harvard Law Cat. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America (Vol 6, 404). The Federal Cases Comprising Cases Argued and Determined in the Circuit and District Court of the United States (Book 28, 180-190).
Handwritten letter helping a father locate his wounded son following the Siege of Petersburg

Handwritten letter helping a father locate his wounded son following the Siege of Petersburg

Women in Medicine] Dix, Dorothea 2 page Autograph Letter Signed on one sheet bearing the letterhead of the Office of Women Nurses, U.S. Hospital Service (measuring 5 x 8" folded). Soiling along main fold and original mailing folds to rear. Offsetting to second page from ink on page 3. Writing at the conclusion of a bloody nine-month campaign that foreshadowed modern trench warfare, medical activist and reformer Dorothea Dix gives comfort and support to a panicked father as he searches for his son missing in action. Dix writes in full: "Mr. Otto, I have rec'd your letter and have through the records of various offices traced your son to a General Hospital wounded at the last Battle before Petersburg. I hope in a few days to have other information. I should suppose that some Member of his Company or the Regimental surgeon might know something. I will do all I can to learn the facts & write again shortly. Dorothea Dix" Dix had begun her medical career before the Civil War, inspired by British prison reformer Elizabeth Fry to play a direct role in social welfare. The cause for which she became best known was related to American asylum reform, and for petitioning the U.S. government to ensure the humane and dignified treatment of the mentally ill. By the time war broke out in 1861, Dix had become a nationally known figure and was appointed Superintendent of Army Nurses to the Union Army -- a position for which Elizabeth Blackwell, the first female M.D., had also been considered. In this position, Dix implemented the Federal army nursing program, developing guidelines, training nurses, and ultimately overseeing over 3,000 women (Tsui). By August 1865, following the incredibly bloody Siege of Petersburg, Dix resigned her position. Thus, though she writes to Mr. Otto on her official letterhead, the assistance she is providing him was not mandatory or conducted in an official capacity; rather, she sees the grief and concern of a father whose son has gone missing, and she uses her resources to provide succor and information. The Siege of Petersburg, after all, lasted from the summer of 1864 to the spring of 1865, forcing men on both sides to fight in trenches and resulting in an estimated 28,000 dead and 42,000 wounded, one of whom was Mr. Otto's son (Calkins). A letter with activist content, capturing Dix's lifelong commitment to social activism regardless of her title or office.
Buildings

Buildings, Plans, and Designs

Wright, Frank Lloyd Based on the Taliesen Edition of 1910, which was printed out of Germany, the present American edition had a print run of 2,600. Of these, 2,500 were for sale (the present copy being 397B). Housed in the original elephant folio slip case (18 x 25"), with orange label to front board and ties still intact. Contains 100 loose architectural plates and the 32 page stapled booklet with a list of contents and explanations. Slip case with some general scuffing and rubbing, and occasional splits or fraying to cloth along extremities and hinges. Minimal offsetting to the booklet's front wrapper and to the internal wrapper of the case. Orange label and contents bright and clean. A pleasing copy overall. Recognized by the American Institute of Architects as "the greatest America architect of all time," Frank Lloyd Wright designed and built hundreds of structures throughout the United States. Wright pioneered what is now known as the Prarie School of architecture, which featured strong horizontal lines, flat and hipped roofs, and overhanging eaves that complemented the open and flat spaces of the midwestern United States. Wright believed that architectural design should integrate the natural environment and the built environment, a process that he called "organic architecture." The masterpiece of his work is Fallingwater, a home built partly over a waterfall on Bear Run. This Horizon Press publication contains 100 plates that feature the building plans and designs of Wright's career from 1893-1910, including such famous designs as the Robie House and Wright's studio in Oak Park. Very Good +.
A Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Johnson. Containing an Account of her Sufferings

A Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Johnson. Containing an Account of her Sufferings, During Four Years with the Indians and French

Women's History] [Captivity Narratives] Johnson, Susannah [Hastings] Contemporary roan over wood boards. Shelfwear causing loss of marbled paper front and rear, and approximately 1cm of loss to the foot of the rear board. Hinges cracked but holding well. Multiple early ownership signatures of Sally Goodwich and Henry Goodwich of Nottingham to front and rear pastedowns and endpapers. Gently toned throughout but otherwise unmarked. In all, a pleasing copy of a scarce captivity narrative that typically appears damaged or incomplete. Both the 1796 first edition and the 1807 second edition of this title are rare; the former has appeared only once at auction in the past 20 years, and the present only three times. While the first edition was largely composed by John C. Chamberlin based on Johnson's narration, this second edition was revised and amended by Johnson herself. "It is now a critical commonplace that Early American women's captivity narratives offer scholars and students alike rich material for our investigations into subjectivity and identity. The texts' representations of gender, ethnicity, and race conveniently dovetail with theoretical work that seeks to reinterpret and expand the canon of Early American texts" (Carroll). And yet scholars of the period also note that these books are marked by "the persistent problem of authorial attribution.did a captive woman actually write the text herself or dictate it (with interpolated 'improvements') to another, usually male, hand?" (Carroll). At 144 pages, the Susannah Johnson narrative is among of the longest and most detailed texts of the genre; and as a book that was first compiled and composed by John C. Chamberlin from Johnson's testimony, then revised and amended by Johnson herself, it has stood among one of the most important case studies for scholars. In both versions, the narrative details the Johnson family's 1754 capture by an indigenous tribe (during which Susannah gave birth to a daughter, named Captive), enslavement and sale to various tribe members and to the French, separation, and attempts to gain freedom and reunite. Johnson's first person voice lends credibility to both versions. But scholars now note that while Chamberlin's first edition positions Johnson as a symbol of early American white femininity that could assist in rallying men of the early nation against indigenous people and cultures, Johnson's own narrative emphasizes the gritty, painful, and real traumas experienced by an individual. Sabin 36327. Howes J153. Siebert 444. Ayer 12.
Home Nursing: Comprising Lectures Given to Detachments of the British Red Cross Society (First edition signed)

Home Nursing: Comprising Lectures Given to Detachments of the British Red Cross Society (First edition signed)

Women in Medicine] Newsome, Edith Scarce first edition of a Red Cross manual designed both for emergency workers and women in the home. Original publisher's cloth binding titled in red on spine and front board. Boards a bit rubbed and soiled, corners bumped. Faint offsetting to the endpapers. Inscribed by Edith Newsome on the front pastedown: "With the Author's Compliments, Edith Newsome." Another hand has added beneath it in pencil, "16. 10. 23," suggesting that this was presented in the year of publication. A scarce book institutionally and in trade, OCLC reports only 11 copies in libraries, this being the only one currently on the market. Edith Newsome's first major work on nursing, produced after she realized that her Red Cross lecture series could not provide complete enough information to train "those who have so nobly responded to the 'call of duty'; to do all that is in their power to tend and succour the brave men of our nation by proving themselves valuable and intelligent helpers." Indeed, Newsome's work was released two years into World War I -- the first modern war, which brought with it a horrifying number of previously unknown injuries and ailments. In addition to professional nurses, women enrolled to assist as Volunteer Aid Detachments (VADs) because there simply were not enough women with medical educations to serve the nation's need. The present work is a stirring acknowledgement of this. Comprehensive in training VADs and new nurses in field operations, it also contains information for women in the home, who confronted infection, illness, or injury and served as domestic caretakers for men returning from the front. Very Good +.
Richard Wright's Blues

Richard Wright’s Blues

Ellison, Ralph In The Antioch Review (V: Summer 1945: 2), pages 198-211. Original printed wrappers with title and selected contents to the front, and adverts to rear wrap. Spine soiled with some chipping to the paper; toning to edges of wraps. Front wrap chipped at upper corner with no paper loss; small closed tear and chipping to top rear wrapper. With the exception of offsetting to pages 198-199, internally clean and unmarked. The first appearance of Ellison's important review of Richard Wright's autobiography Black Boy; it was later re-released as an offprint that occasionally appears on the market. The present format is incredibly scarce. Currently the only copy on the market, it does not appear in the modern auction record. Pre-dating Invisible Man by seven years, Richard Wright's Blues holds an important place among Ellison's early works of literary and social criticism. As a review of Richard Wright's recently released autobiography, it placed Ellison's name in print alongside that of an established African American writer who had brought the post WWII world into contact with black experience. As a piece in the Antioch Review, a quarterly linked to a notoriously progressive and activist college, it positioned Ellison as a cutting edge voice for the rising generation. "As a writer, Richard Wright has outlined for himself a dual role: To discover and depict the meaning of Negro experience and to reveal to both Negroes and whites those problems of a psychological and emotional nature which arise between them when they strive for mutual understanding." With deep appreciation for Wright's mission, Ellison asserts that his literary predecessor's work weaves together influence from across the canon, recalling Joyce, Dostoyevsky, and Rousseau; yet Wright's work is different because it emphasizes a specifically African American experience, one which, like the blues, has "an impulse to keep the painful details and episodes of a brutal experience alive in one's aching consciousness, to finger its jagged grain and to transcend it.an autobiographical chronical of personal catastrophe expressed lyrically." In less than a decade, Ellison would rise up as one of the key voices of his own literary moment, capturing and laying bare in Invisible Man the anger and pain experienced in his community as the U.S. continued its battle over Civil Rights. Very Good.
Council Cook Book

Council Cook Book

Community Cookery] San Francisco Section of the Council of Jewish Women Original publisher's cloth binding. Fraying to corners and extremities of spine. General spotting to cloth. In a contemporary hand, several names and addresses of women from San Francisco and Atlantic City to the pastedowns and endpapers. Generally toned with occasional staining; in the same hand as the preliminaries, occasional additions, modifications, and annotations to recipes. Quite a scarce community cookery, particularly in such presentable condition, it has the distinction of being the first Jewish cookery published in California, and among the earliest west of the Mississippi. An excellent early example of women's use of the domestic space as a site for social activism. Organized in 1893 and based out of Chicago, the National Council of Jewish Women worked to "shape the destinies" of Jewish women and families by offering community support in the form of assisting immigrants with integration, advocating for women's rights, and providing support including financial assistance and job training. Under the leadership of Hannah Greenebaum Solomon, the women desired to carve out space for Jewish women's identities and contributions, operating on a model similar to other national figures such as Jane Addams and Susan B. Anthony. Within seven years, the San Francisco section was founded and ran under the leadership of Hattie Hecht Schloss, a philanthropist and the wife of a progressive associate justice of the California Supreme Court. With her guidance, "the Council established San Bruno Settlement House to aid newcomers to San Francisco with classes for boys and girls.Aiding immigrants and later veterans.these issues at the forefront then prompted petitioning for legislative reforms, such as immigration, equal suffrage, child labor, human trafficking, abolition, and health centers for women and children" (NCJWSF). The present text was published at a time when a number of women's groups were realizing that community cookeries were effective methods of fundraising and promotion. Drawing strength and authority from the expectation that they feed and nourish their families, the women of the Council could justify feeding, nourishing, and otherwise supporting the community at large; and the money from this cookery supported a number of their programs. Notably, this California chapter of the NCJW did include a chapter on Passover Dishes; yet they also include a range of dishes traditionally not considered Jewish or acceptable in Jewish households, including lobster and other shellfish dishes common to the region. An excellent opportunity to research Jewish women's contributions to California culture, and the extent to which regional foods shape Jewish households in the West.
The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2

The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman’s Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2

Women's Suffrage] Tilton, Theodore Original self-wraps with title to front. 17 pages measuring 102 x 160mm. Library label and stamp of Sheldon Art Museum to blank portion of title page; occasional foxing or staining, largely confined to the preliminaries. Bottom front corner a bit crumpled and chipped. Splitting at bottom of spine but altogether holding well. A rare survivor of suffrage ally Theodore Tilton's argument in support of women's citizenship and voting rights based in the 14th Amendment. OCLC reports only 12 institutionally held copies, with this being the sole copy on the market. As the U.S. centennial of 1876 approached, the National Woman Suffrage Association began a fresh campaign for women's equality. Rather than arguing for a new amendment granting women's suffrage, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and their cohort asserted that women already had the right to vote under the 14th Amendment. In the present pamphlet, Tilton -- an important journalist and abolitionist -- advocates on the women's behalf. "Women being citizens, what are their rights as citizens?" Tilton asks. Listing a number of rights and responsibilities falling to women as a result of their citizenship -- the ability to get passports, for example, or the duty to pay taxes -- he draws attention to the hypocrisy of denying other rights such as the vote to that same group. Voting is "one of the privileges and immunities of citizenship," and while the Constitution itself failed to define citizenship clearly, the 14th and 15th Amendments resolved this: "all persons born or naturalized in the United States." To wit, "I do not hesitate to say that when the slaves of our country became citizens, they took their place in the body politic as a component part of the people entitled to equal rights and under the protection of these two guardian principles; first, that all just government stands on the consent of the governed, and secondly that taxation without representation is tyranny.the doctrine which you have here applied to negroes, I ask that you apply to women." An important example of men's advocacy and alliance with the women's movement, and an early sample of the argument that Anthony and Stanton would ultimately articulate in the Declaration of Women's Rights five years later. Krichmar 2061.
Readings on Poetry

Readings on Poetry

Edgeworth, Maria [and Richard Lovell Edgeworth] Contemporary roan over marbled boards measuring 89 x 133mm. Spine rebacked and extremities bumped with some loss to upper rear corner, but in all a charming example. Early ownership signature of K. Isabella Carl to front pastedown. Collates complete: xxviii, 213, [11, publisher's adverts]. Light foxing throughout, largely limited to preliminaries; in all a pleasing copy of a scarce book, which is the only copy on the market. With the exception of the present copy (Bloomsbury Auctions, 2009), Readings on Poetry has only sold at auction on one other occasion since 1972. While the daughter-father duo responsible for this work consider the poetic educations of both sexes, Maria was largely responsible for the book's lessons and shaped it as a resource for mothers and daughters who hadn't the privilege of a literary education (Slade). Her mark can be seen in Readings on Poetry much as it can be in Practical Education. Yet here, eighteen years later, she makes a more overt argument for the personal and social need of educating women. "The same means which form a masculine understanding will give strength to the female judgement and should therefore be employed with the same steadiness in the education of young women." With an understanding for both parents' potential conservative objections, Maria also addresses these. "Nor need mothers feel any apprehension that thus strengthening the understandings of their daughters should injure that elegance and grace which are undoubtedly the charms of women.Men no longer desire that women should be kept in ignorance, and women no longer find it necessary to be, or to affect to be uninformed in order to fascinate." On the surface, her justification suggests that women's right to education is based on what men find attractive in possible mates. But below the surface, by allaying the concerns of parents that their intelligent and trained daughters will be unmarriageable, she opens the door to their studying a variety of fields not limited to the present study of poetry. The present copy, owned by a woman, shows meaningful evidence that girls and women were accessing this book for their own benefit.
Petition of the Ladies of London and Westminster to the Honourable House for Husbands

Petition of the Ladies of London and Westminster to the Honourable House for Husbands

Anonymous] [Querelle des femmes] Bound in modern marbled wrappers with paper label to front. Pages measure 152 x 203mm. Internally complete, including all four pages called for by ESTC and listing its imprint in the colophon. In all a clean, wide-margined and pleasing copy of this scarce pamphlet, and important part of the debate on women. ESTC lists only 8 extant copies, with only 3 listed in the modern auction record since 1940. The Querelle des Femmes (the Woman Question) was a debate on women's status that raged across Europe and England through the 16th to 18th century, depicted at times in drama and literature but most often enacted through broadsides and pamphlets. While early iterations of the debate focused on whether women were humans or indeed possessed souls, emphasis began shifting as an increasing number of women began printing responses of their own. Here, "Mary Want-man, the fore-maid of the petitioners" allegedly composing this pamphlet, draws attention to the negative impacts that misogynist bolster lectures have had on the general state of matrimony. By labeling women as natural harlots predestined to cuckold their husbands, the Petition alleges, polemicists endangered women and men alike: the former would lack economic and legal security without a spouse, and the former would turn to drink and debauchery. "Mary Want-man," in this sense, turns the tables on the terms of the debate. Men are morally weak without a helpmeet and need wives -- and women are placed at social disadvantage by the rules that define them as men's companions. To this end, the Petition sets out the demand that men be required to marry much as women have been, and that they meet five terms: "First, that all men of Quality and Degree soever shall be obliged to marry as soon as they are one and twenty and that those persons who decline so doing shall for their Liberty as they call it pay yearly to the State.Secondly, that no Excuse shall be admitted but that of natural Frigidity or Impotence.Thirdly, since it is found by experience that the generality of young men are such Idolators of the Bottle.that no person whatsoever shall be privileged to enter a Tavern who is not married.That every Poet or pretender to be a poet or anyone who is hired to write .to the derogation of the Matrimonial State shall be obliged to marry before Lady day ensuing.Lastly.every person of Quality pretending to keep a Miss.must dispose of her in Marriage to his Footman or Groom." Biting and witty, this feminist satire suggests that men must be corralled and that marriage is the means by which to do it, thus also ensuring stability for women. ESTC R235129.
An Humble Remonstrance of the Batchelors

An Humble Remonstrance of the Batchelors, in and about London.in Answer to the Late Paper , Intituled A Petition of the Ladies for Husbands

Anonymous] [Querelle des femmes] Bound in modern marbled wrappers with paper label to front. Pages measure 152 x 178mm. Internally complete, including all four pages called for by ESTC and listing its imprint in the colophon. Top margin shaved close, causing loss to page numbers; some creasing to lower quarter of leaves. In all a clean and neat copy of this scarce and important part of the debate on women. ESTC lists only 8 extant copies, with only 2 listed in the modern auction record. The Querelle des Femmes (the Woman Question) was a debate on women's status that raged across Europe and England through the 16th to 18th century, depicted at times in drama and literature but most often enacted through broadsides and pamphlets. While early iterations of the debate focused on whether women were humans or indeed possessed souls, emphasis began shifting as an increasing number of women began printing responses of their own. Earlier in this same year, an anonymous author called only "Mary Want-man" produced a pamphlet from the women's side of the debate. The Petition of the Ladies of London argued that if men were going to require women marry for financial and social stability, but at the same time were going to rail against the dangers of women and marriage, women had a right to petition for new social rules: namely, the requirement that all men marry by 21, with those refusing being required to pay a fine to the State. The present pamphlet engages that by Mary -- and in attempting to break down the Petition's satirical arguments, it relies on many of the misogynistic commonplaces that the Ladies decried. And in its conclusion, An Humble Remonstrance teases the possibility that women were right about men's current debauched tendencies, shifting The Petition's desire for social instability to one of bawdy fulfillment for men's benefit. "The Ladies are weary of lying alone, and so are we: They would fain be advantageously married, and so would your humble Servants. The Quarrel on their side is therefore unjustly begun.[but] because Jacob could serve two Apprenticeships for his Rachel they imagine that we must do the same; not considering that the Race of Methuselahs and Patriarchs is quite extinct."
A Million and One Nights (Signed Ltd. Edition)

A Million and One Nights (Signed Ltd. Edition)

Ramsaye, Terry and Thomas A. Edison (contributor) Limited to 327 copies (this is copy #90). Signed by Ramsaye and Thomas A. Edison. Quarto (9 x 6 1/2 inches; 241 x 168 mm). lxx, 400; 401-868 pp. Frontispiece portrait. Illustrated throughout text with black and white photographic reproductions. In half pigskin and Japanese paper covered boards. The bindings are clean, tight, and square with light scuffing to the spines and light wear to the board corners. Black titling still very legible. The interiors are clean. The text is white, clean and unmarked. A superb copy of this definitive set signed by the author and Edison. This first official history of cinema, written by film journalist Terry Ramsey, presets a clear and detailed picture of the early development of film as seen from the Edison camp. Dwelling specifically on Edison's early Kinetograph and his 'Black Maria (the first studio to be built specifically for making commercial films), Ramsey charts the development of the motion picture industry through 1925. While later critics downplayed Edison's importance, recent scholars have reinstated his preeminent position in the history of film. A lavish production, chronicling the history of the silver screen, with wonderful vintage photographs-as Edison states, "the first endeavor to set down the whole and true story of the motion picture.through his years of preparation.I am aware of [the author's] effort at exact fact. A high degree of detailed accuracy has been attained.". Near Fine.
The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae

The Baby’s Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae

Shinn, Miss Millicent W. Series II, No 52 of the association's serial. 11, [1, blank]: complete. Disbound but holding together well. Two stab-holes near the gutter of the document, affecting some text. Offsetting near spine and to lower margin of first leaf. Small closed tears to bottom margin of rear wrap. Previous ownership signature of Ellen P. Carson to top corner of first page. A scarce pamphlet on child psychology by the first woman PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, the only one copy of the present work is listed on OCLC. Millicent Shinn, the first woman to earn a PhD from Berkeley and the eleventh overall in the U.S., began her career as a child psychologist at home, after the birth of her daughter Ruth. Shinn compiled over three years of data on her child, in a frame similar to that of researcher Wilhelm Preyer, which she released. "As a result of this record Shinn was invited to speak at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.as a result of her presentation, Shinn received several invitations for graduate study at several prestigious schools," and she chose her alma mater of Berkeley in hopes that she could draw attention to their progressive program (Feminist Voices). Her cutting-edge work on child development dove-tailed with an increasing commitment to women's rights. During her time at Berkeley she both published influential work such as The Biography of a Baby, she also produced articles such as The Marriage Rate of College Women, which explained educated women's lower marriage rates as a result of increased financial independence and a greater ability to be discriminating in choice of a mate. The present lecture is a prime example of Shinn using her position in her academic field to carve out greater space for women; for while she discusses advances in studying child development, she also decries the barriers to women's entry into the field. "The great growth of graduate work in American universities and the large number of men in them looking eagerly for new chances of research make it sure than abundance of our trained workers will soon be in the field.Now what reason is there that women should not be among these?.The way is to open the first step, in the graduate courses now unavailable in biology and psychology.It is to the younger women of this Association that such a choice is open." Shinn acknowledges that many educated women did not have access to degrees, then became mothers whose domestic labor prevented continued education as doors began to open. To women capable of pursuing degrees and entering the psychology, Shinn makes a call to action and posits that their perspective and expertise will continue to improve the field.
Madame de Pompadour [Jeweled Cosway-style binding]

Madame de Pompadour [Jeweled Cosway-style binding]

Williams, H. Noel Finely bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe in full crushed turquoise morocco, with intricate gilt floral borders with inlaid red morocco flowers. Coat of arms of Louis XV on the front board, and Madame de Pompadour on the rear board. Spine with five raised bands and elaborate gilt floral designs with inlaid red morocco flowers. Blue silk-moire end papers and paste down (rear). Pink morocco doublure with gilt fluer de lis stamping. Set into the doublure is a fine circular portrait of Madame de Pompadour under glass, with four pearls and four rubies encircling the portrait. All edges gilt. Stamped by Sangorski and Sutcliffe on the rear turn-in, initials of Ohio collector B. C. Hoffman on the front doublure. Quarto (pages 237 x 185 mm), collating: xiv, 1-431, [432 blank]; complete with all sixteen inserted plates. Binding in Near Fine condition with only very slight wear at the upper spine joints and a bit of fraying to the edges of the silk end-papers. Internal contents in excellent condition. Housed in a full cloth clamshell case, lined with blue velvet. Remembered for her role as Louis XV's mistress, Pompadour also left lasting legacies in literature and art. Using the power and prestige of her position in the court, Pompadour set up and patronized the Royal Porcelain Factory at Sèvres. Her brother, hired at Pompadour's suggestion, managed the king's building projects that resulted in the Place de la Concorde and the École Militaire. Pompadour was a close friend a patron of Voltaire, whose Encyclopédie made significant contributions to Enlightenment and pre-French Revolution thought. In his biography of the Madame de Pompadour, Williams strives to correct "the writings of historians, who, while unsparing in their condemnation of her interference in affairs of State, for the most part entirely ignore the beneficial results of her influence in other directions." Williams sets out to emphasize her multifaceted contributions to French culture by writing "an adequate, and, at the same time, a strictly impartial, account of the life of this most remarkable woman.". Near Fine.
The Writings of George Eliot (in 25 vols)

The Writings of George Eliot (in 25 vols)

Eliot, George [Mary Ann Evans] Large Paper Edition limited to 750 of which this is 183. Finely bound in half crushed morocco over marbled boards with gilt to spines. Top edges brightly gilt. Remaining edges deckled. In all a beautiful and pleasing illustrated set of George Eliot's works, which helped define the novel as a genre and brought women's experiences and inner lives into public dialogue. "No writer, not even Milton, is so dense and ample in his range of intellectual reference as George Eliot" (Myers). Defying gender expectations, Mary Ann Evans, writing under the pseudonym George Eliot, became famous for being a prolific writer who shaped the modern novel. Works like The Mill on the Floss, Daniel Deronda, and Middlemarch not only proved Eliot's intellectual dexterity by weaving together cultural references from religion, art, politics, and economics to comment on communities in flux; they also placed in context the rich interior lives of women, and the often agonizing experiences of women torn between social duty and the pursuit of self knowledge. "The language in which George Eliot expresses the basic commitment of literary realism--the recording of many lives intersecting in the medium of historical circumstance" made her a crucial figure for the genre's development, and for presenting a vision of society where the margins are ever evolving (Coovadia). Here, in 25 lovely large-paper volumes, her works are drawn together in one place, with illustrations of key locations and figures bound in throughout. Fine.