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A Biographical Sketch of the Most Distinguished Writers of Ancient and Modern Times. Intended for the Use of Schools and private Education

A Biographical Sketch of the Most Distinguished Writers of Ancient and Modern Times. Intended for the Use of Schools and private Education

Rowden, Frances Arabella Contemporary half roan over marbled boards. Extremities rubbed and joints cracking but holding firm. Light scattered foxing to preliminary and terminal contents, with majority of textblock unmarked and clean. Faint ownership signature in pencil of Miss Fartham to front endpaper. Early pen corrections to pages 35, 81, 149, 166. Measuring approximately 110 x 180mm and collating [10], xiv, 180: complete, including engraved frontis, title, note to parents, dedication, and subscribers. A scarce little volume designed to assist in girls' educations, OCLC records 6 copies (1 of those in the US); and the present is the only copy on the market. This slender volume was designed for the use of schools and governesses, and Rowden drew on her own experiences educating girls in both spaces. The daughter of an educated clergyman, she served as the governess to the family of Lord Bessborough, was the private tutor to Mary Russell Mitford, and taught at St. Quintan's School where her students included Lady Caroline Lamb and Letitia Elizabeth Landon (later known as the poet L.E.L.). An insert to this text addresses "To the Parents and Guardians" announces further that "Mrs. Rowden has formed an establishment in Paris, where the elegant accomplishments are combined with every useful attainment." A Biographical Sketch provided "young scholars," in compact form, "with a general idea of the rise and progress of classical learning, and the connexion between ancient and modern literature." Knowing the past is the key to understanding the present and shaping the future; and so Rowden urges her young readers to familiarize themselves seriously with books across those boundaries. Short biographies are arranged in sections ancient and modern, and within those sections by nation (Greece and Rome; England, France, Germany, Spain and Portugal). Following the biographies, Rowden provides a Reflection on how the writers' works tie together thematically, or how the authors have influenced each other. Progressive in some senses -- particularly the inclusion of non-English literatures -- Rowden's compilation reflects a conservatism necessary to court the type of subscribers and clients she needs. To this end, classical, English, and French works are praised above all others for their level of advanced skill, while authors from countries like Spain are described as "little known across Europe." Additionally, despite educating girls and including a majority of women among her subscribers, not a single female writer appears within the pages. A telling reminder that not all female educators were overtly promoting intellectual equality to the girls in their charge.
Poetic selections reflecting the realities of Victorian women's lives

Poetic selections reflecting the realities of Victorian women’s lives

Commonplace] Julia E. Cloud Vernacular binding of drab wraps sewn at spine. Measuring 8 x 10 inches and comprised of 48 pages in a single cursive hand with calligraphic titles for each selection. Census and marriage records from New Jersey's Gloucester and Somerset Counties suggest the compiler Julia E. Cloud, whose ownership signature appears multiple times throughout, was the daughter of Charles and Lavinia Cloud, whose names also appear in the manuscript. Wed to David Shivers in 1861, she would have brought together the present poetic selection in her young womanhood ten years prior. While some of the selections touch on popular fairytale and natural themes, the lion's share reveal a young woman using literature to prepare for and process the realities faced by many Victorian women: preparations for love and marriage, loss of family members, and separation from children. The beginning and end of Julia's manuscript includes her own name multiple times, as well as those of family members. Indeed, the ideas of marriage and family loom large in the young woman's collection. Christian Love (1848), The Old Arm Chair (1849), What Shall I bring Thee Mother? (1850) and The Happiest Time (1850) tie together divine love and family unity, depicting the domestic space as one of childhood happiness and filial love. Still a decade away from her own wedding, Julia is taking in Victorian ideologies that encourage her down the path. But Julia also seems aware of the pains life can bring to women. The Weeper (1848), To the Mourner (n.d.), The Sacrifice (1849), and Autumn (1849) deal with the passage of time and the inevitability of grief; even further, Mother What is Heaven? (1849), Lines on Passing the Grave of my Sister (1849), and My Child (n.d.) take such loss from the abstract to the real by addressing the specifics of death. A research rich piece, Julia's poetry collection offers scholars the opportunity for studying genealogy, the psychology of loss, women's poetry and education, ideologies of gender and motherhood, the transmission of literature in popular women's magazines, and paleography.
Biographical Sketches and Interesting Anecdotes of Persons of Colour

Biographical Sketches and Interesting Anecdotes of Persons of Colour

Abolition] Mott, Abigail Contemporary tree calf with morocco label to spine. Label chipped and binding generally rubbed at extremities. Cracking to front joint and hinge near the crown of spine causing some detachment to upper corner of front endpaper; rear hinge tender but holding. Faint dampstain to lower corner of preliminaries. Closed tear to rear blanks. Textblock toned as is typical in imprints of this period. Contemporary ownership signature of Quaker activist Elizabeth [Pearsall] Boyd (1767-1842) to header of title and page 5. Collating complete: iv, 5-192. One of the earliest collective biographies centered on Black Americans, Mott's Sketches is quite scarce institutionally and in trade. It has sold only three times at auction, with the present as the only copy on the market. The earliest collective biography centered on Black Americans, compiled by activist Abigail Mott, the sister of Lucretia. Both raised as Quakers, the Mott sisters were committed to the principles of human equality; the pursuit of it defined both of their lives. While the Motts took separate paths in the promotion of women's rights (Lucretia pursuing enfranchisement as Abigail pushed for equal education), they shared a common dedication to the anti-slavery movement that included involvement with the Underground Railroad. For Abigail, the popular genre of collective biography provided an intersection at which to promote her two passions. After all, 19th century America had seen a surge of such books anthologizing members of political and social movements to educate the public about their accomplishments. A collective biography of Black Americans could ensure that these people's contributions were documented, recognized, and remembered; and it could urge readers to think further about the number of enslaved people shaping the nation without reward. Taking a democratic approach to her selections, Abigail drew attention to Black innovators such as Phillis Wheatley and Benjamin Banneker; but she also dedicated even more space to the stories of otherwise unsung men and women, positively influencing their communities despite the violence they themselves faced. Not a single biography overlooks the cruelty of slavery at the institution or personal level -- and biographies detail whether the subjects were torn from their homes and forced into slavery, born into the condition of slavery, born into freedom or emancipated. Strategic in entwining her missions, Abigail ensured the widest possible readership for her book, designing it specifically for placement in schools: "By the consent of the compiler and at the recommendation of the Trustees of the African Free Schools of New York (who have liberally patronized the work), the pieces in the following compilation have been divided into reading sections, with a view to have the volume introduced into Schools as a Class Book. It is hoped this arrangement will be equally agreeable to Subscribers and to those Teachers who may use it in their Schools." For related movements, it provided a new model for writing previously marginalized voices into the popular national history -- 22 years later, as the women's movement solidified around women's exclusion from major abolitionist conferences, it was a method that would be adopted by suffragists. Mott's method effectively laid the groundwork for a new and more equitable approach to constructing the American canon. Sabin 51111.
The Two Soldiers

The Two Soldiers

More, Sarah] From the Cheap Repository. 24 pages in self-wraps, stitched at spine. Final leaf partially detached but holding. Some toning and soiling, particularly to page edges. The only copy on the market, ESTC reports 10 copies of this scarce tract at only 6 libraries (2 of those in North America). Working alongside her sister, the influential Bluestocking Hannah More, Sarah More helped produce The Cheap Repository Tracts as means for spreading religious education and moral lessons to people of all classes. Frequently focused on the importance of faith and the need for grace, the sisters also paid close attention to the role gender played in humans' relationships to each other and to God. The Two Soldiers is no exception. Wells and Clark, a pair of young soldiers on leave stop in a town famous for its ale, a product which has "introduced beggary, and famine amongst all the Wives and Children in the neighboring cottages." The two partake too heavily, leading to a night of debauchery; and Wells later vows to avoid all alcohol and merry-making because it strips men of "Reason, which is the gift of God," and because soldiers "should be particularly careful to keep our Accounts between God and our souls" since death could come at any moment. Clark makes the opposite decision. As the soldiers make their way back to their unit, they are robbed of their money; and while Clark turns to alcohol for comfort, Wells turns to God and decides that in asking divine forgiveness, he may also find human forgiveness. At a moment of hunger and exposure, he confesses his sins to a Mrs. Jenkins, who sees him as a fellow Christian worthy of succour. She ensures his safety, making it possible to return to his unit. Ultimately, Clark's drunkenness leads to an arrest and no future; Wells' faith leads to his promotion, and the ability to reach toward future goals of supporting a family of his own.
An Alphabetical Compendium of the Various Sects; with an appendix containing a brief account of the different schemes of religion now embraced among mankind

An Alphabetical Compendium of the Various Sects; with an appendix containing a brief account of the different schemes of religion now embraced among mankind

Adams, Hannah Contemporary sheep with red morocco label to spine. Extremities a bit rubbed, with some chipping to spine label and small loss to crown. Uper front joint cracked but holding well. Binding overall secure and square. Some foxing to preliminaries; contents mildly toned. Contemporary ownership signature to front endpaper reads "Benjamin Bell's, July 1785/6." Collating [2], ii, [2], 204, lxxxiii, [23]: complete, including errata, appendices, and subscribers' list to rear. Scarce institutionally and in trade, Adams' detailed work on world religions earned her the honorary of being the first professional female author in the U.S. Hannah Adams' story is a reminder that poor physical health can be the impetus for major intellectual projects. A sickly child, she confesses in her memoir that curiosity kept her alive; she pursued rigorous subjects from her home, including Latin, Greek, geography, history, philosophy, and logic. "I remember that my first idea of the happiness of Heaven was of a place where we should find our thirst for knowledge fully gratified" (Memoir). "Adams was fascinated by the discovery that a different world existed far from the New England town and the Puritan heritage in which she was raised. She began to conduct her own research and fact gathering surveys on the world's religions. Struck by the bias that most authors imposed on their material, Adams was determined to gain a more impartial understanding of the different denominations.upon completion of her project, Adams decided to publish her work as a means of income" (ODNB). The result was An Alphabetical Compendium of the Various Sects -- a work that became a gold standard in the field and went into multiple editions -- as well as a paycheck that made her North America's first professional, paid woman writer. Praised for her efforts by the Puritan clergymen of her community, including Samuel Willard and Jedediah Morse, Adams used her platform to advocate for the expansion of women's education. "The world has been absurdly accustomed to entertain but a moderate opinion of female abilities and to ascribe their pretended productions to the craft and policy of designing to men," asserts the preface to her book. "Unbiased reason must allow, if an insidious comparison between the sexes is in any respect justifiable, it cannot be grounded upon a defect of natural ability, but upon the different and faulty mode of female education; for under similar culture, and with equal advantages, it is far from being uncertain that the female mind would not admit improvement that would at least equal if not eclipse the boasted glory of the other sex." ESTC W37176.
The Bouquet

The Bouquet, A Selection of Poems from the Most Celebrated Authors, with some Originals

Women Authors] [Barbauld, Laetitia, Hannah Cowley, Sarah Dixon, Mary Robinson, Elizabeth Sheridan, et al.] Two volumes bound in one. Contemporary tree calf with red morocco label to spine. Front joint starting but holding well. A lovely, square copy. Mild offsetting from pastedowns. Ownership stamp of A.V. Uddman to front pastedown and header of first title. Internally fresh and bright. Collating vi, [1, blank], ix-xii, 9-200; [4], 5-192: bound without the subscriber's list to the rear, else complete, including titles and half titles to both. A scarce compilation of educational poetry directed toward female readers, ESTC records only 13 copies (9 of those in the US). It is presently the only copy on the market. The anonymous male compiler of the present volume had a female readership in mind; women were, after all, an expanding market in the purchase of poetry books, etiquette, and novels. "In selecting the following poetical bouquet," he writes in the preface, "his chief care has been that whilst he considered the various tastes of the public, he endeavored, as much as possible, to blend instruction with amusement." And though he admits that he hopes the book will grace the library shelves of "the youth of both sexes," he has striven to avoid any work which could "offend the ear of Chastity." The two volumes of poetry that follow are in some ways typical of the period. Numerous entries focus on flowers, beauty, love, and friendship. Among the "most celebrated" authors, the compiler includes expected contemporaries Thomas Gray, Lord Lyttleton, and William Cowper. But he also incorporates a number of accomplished women writers -- among them Bluestocking Anna Laetitia Barbauld, the controversial Hannah Cowley (who had accused Hannah More of plagiarism), musician and poet Elizabeth Linley Sheridan, and celebrity writer and "English Sappho" Mary Robinson. These women, prolific in their own time, were not necessarily tame in their compositions or their personal lives. In this sense, the Bouquet pushes boundaries in adhering the "chaste" requirements and instead lures readers in selections from multiple influential women. Notably, their inclusion -- and some of their political leanings -- also highlight some more political inclinations in the included male-authored poetry. This is particularly the case for William Cowper's selections, which point readers toward abolitionist and anti-slavery causes (including On Slavery, The Negro's Complaint, and The African Boy). The Bouquet, then, operates under the disguise of chaste and innocent verses while presenting a largely female readership with cutting edge and politically charged work by both men and women. ESTC T124910.
Calligraphic arithmetic book by an unmarried 18th century woman

Calligraphic arithmetic book by an unmarried 18th century woman

Women in Mathematics] Miss Vavasour Vellum binding with calligraphic signature in ink to front board. Ownership signature of the same Miss Vavasour to front pastedown in a late 18th century hand. Comprised of 83 handwritten pages in calligraphy, with writing almost exclusively confined to rectos of leaves. A fair copy rather than a practice notebook, the present was designed for ease of reference over time. An aristocratic Roman Catholic family with Norman lineage, the Vavasours had the means to rigorously educate their daughters as well as their sons. Yorkshire records suggest that the compiler of the present mathematical manuscript was Jane Vavasour (1752-1824), who would have been in her late teens or early twenties at the time of its compilation. Unmarried and well-schooled, a woman of her stature might be encouraged to take arithmetical training seriously, given that she'd be expected to run a complex household one day for her husband or her father. To this end, she includes sections on pure mathematics such as division and reduction, as well as applied arithmetic on wine and time measurements. In this sense, Miss Vavasour's training both reflects Enlightenment ideals as well the practical facts in women's lives that required expanded education. Tapping into the organized structures recommended by the likes of John Locke for designing commonplace books as reference materials, Miss Vavasour organizes her mathematical book for ease of use. Each section has a beautifully rendered title page, with a definition of the function when relevant. For example, the opening section Division has beneath its title "Teacheth to reduce things from one denomination to another, as Pounds to Farthings." Carefully copied out, the sections include Division, Reduction, Troy Weight, Avoirdupois, Wine Measure, the Rule of Three, and Practice; and each contains applications to commodities such as textiles, grain, and sugar, to currency and investing concepts of interest and return. An opportunity to consider how and why young women were being trained in mathematics during the Enlightenment, and the uses to which they put such training (in running households or educating their own children at home). In conversation with American women's mathematical manuscripts, it opens the door to comparative studies on class and education. This manuscript's provenance from a distinguished family further offers research opportunities for genealogical study and an exploration into the trajectory of its creator's life. Yorkshire: Hazlewood, St. Leonards (Record Set of Non Conformist Burials, 1824).
American Wild Flowers in their Native Haunts

American Wild Flowers in their Native Haunts

Embury, Emma C. Publisher's green morocco binding discreetly rebacked with original spine laid down. Ornately stamped in gilt. All edges brightly gilt. Corners neatly repaired. Contemporary ownership signature of Mrs. H. G. Symme dated March of 1846 and later ownership stamp of E.C. Lyman to verso of front endpaper. Complete, including all 20 hand colored lithographs of wildflowers native to the Eastern seaboard. A scarce blend of botanical illustrations and literature, the present is the only copy currently on the market. A botanical collection authored by a pioneer of women's activist literature should not be taken at face value. Praised in its own time for its vivid plates, and accompanied by scientific designations and descriptions of habitats, American Wild Flowers in actuality treats plantlife as a metaphor for women's experiences. Embury writes in her preface: "Everyone hears of our towering mountains, our mighty rivers, our dense forests, our ocean-like lakes, and our boundless prairies. The grand features of nature are so imposing we forget lesser the beauties, which amid gentler scenery would claim our chief interest.Yet why should our wild flowers lack the poetic association which lends such a charm to the 'pied daisy' and the 'primrose pale'?" With delicacy, Embury seeks to broaden readers' interest both in American plantlife and American authors often overshadowed by more famous figures. The prose and poetry compiled alongside the illustrations, indeed, connect to feminist themes. And Embury explains that where no author is designated (and among the named authors, suffragist Elizabeth Oakes Smith is most prominent), all other contributions were written expressly for the volume by her, or are earlier works that had been published under her pseudonym Ianthe and here are claimed for the first time.
The Little Prince

The Little Prince

Saint-Exupery, Antoine de First printing in English. Near Fine book in VG+ jacket. Book with a touch of fraying to the spine ends and faint spotting to the front board, else bright and unmarked. In the correct salmon colored boards. Jacket priced at $2.00 and with the publisher's Fourth Avenue address. Some loss to spine extremities and small closed tears to the front panel along upper edge and near lower joint; chip to upper front panel. Small stains to verso of jacket not visible on recto. Minor toning to the jacket, but on the whole complete and much nicer than usually encountered. The French and English editions were both released by Reynal and Hitchcock in 1943, after the author completed the work during his exile in New York. Over the course of eight days, the mysterious Little Prince recounts the story of his brief life to an aviator stranded in the Sahara after a plane crash. A best-selling children's book from the time of its release, it also remains a philosophical and spiritual work that touches adult readers. As the Little Prince shares his observations about the worlds he has visited, including our own, we have the opportunity to reflect on the kind of people we become as we enter adulthood -- and how we might work to make ourselves and the world a kinder place. Indeed, while the Little Prince often laments the foibles and tragedies of the human world, it is in nature he finds positive truth. The Rose, the Fox, and the Snake carry important lessons about love, commitment, and the finite nature of life. Saint-Exupery, himself a World War II aviator, would tragically die in a plane crash shortly after the book's release. It stands as his lasting legacy, a work of genius. Near Fine in Very Good + dust jacket.
The Patriarchal Institution

The Patriarchal Institution, As Described by Members of its Own Family

Child, Lydia Maria Printed self-wrappers stitched at spine and measuring 4.5 x 7 inches. 55 pages, [1, blank]. Light foxing to the wrappers and a small chip to the lower rear wrap; in all an exceptionally nicely preserved copy of a scarce and important feminist tract. While OCLC reports numerous copies online or in microform, it reports only three physical copies at institutions (New York Historical Society, AAS, and the Huntington). It is the only first edition on the market. Reformer, novelist, and woman of letters Lydia Maria Child firmly believed that the national fates of women and enslaved people were tied. There could be no freedom for one group without liberating the other. She was the editor of Harriet Jacobs' 1861 Narrative, the founder of the New England Anti-Slavery Society, and a suffragist. The present work places responsibility for slavery onto the same patriarchal culture that binds privileged white women. Drawing together Southern arguments by slave holders and slavery proponents, Child then skillfully and logically rebuts them. In doing so, she proves the calm presence of mind possible in woman, exposes the inconsistency and cruelty of slavery, and provides readers with talking points of their own when confronted with similar racism. Purposefully or not, she became through works like these the founder of "one of the most influential branches of nineteenth century American feminism as a resistance movement committed to the idea that the key to social reform was the recognition and maintenance of human differences" (Pratt). Not in Krichmar. Feminist Companion 202. Near Fine.
Woman Suffrage Essential to the True Republic. An Address Delivered by the Hon. George F. Hoar

Woman Suffrage Essential to the True Republic. An Address Delivered by the Hon. George F. Hoar

Women's Suffrage] Woman Suffrage Tract No. 8. Original self-wraps stitched at the spine and measuring 4 x 6 inches. 23, [1, blank]. An exceptionally clean and unmarked copy of a delicate and scarce pamphlet, which is the only copy on the market. The Woman's Journal, an organ of the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) led by Lucy Stone and Julia Ward Howe, began issuing pocket-sized and cheap Woman Suffrage Tracts that featured equality speeches by prominent activists. Within their lineup are lectures by luminaries including Henry Ward Beecher, John Stuart Mill, and the present by Smithsonian Institution regent and American Antiquarian Society president George F. Hoar. Easy to exchange and share, the tracts expanded the audiences of major suffrage speeches, helping grassroots activists gain a vocabulary for day-to-day debates. Within Hoar's speech, he asserts that "this is with prejudice and not with reason we are contending" in conversations with anti-suffragists. If the U.S. is to fulfill its republican promise, "women must stand by your side in the church as equals, or the church must go back to the time of Inquisition.by your side as an equal in schools or colleges, or you must go back to the days of monastery.by your side as an equal in the State, or you must go back or do worse than going back, you must remain where you are." To Hoar, a scholar of history, denial of women's rights leads to devolution and stagnation. Women must be brought forward with equal rights, be given equal opportunity to succeed or fail, and make it possible for progress in the nation. Krichmar 1722. Fine.
England and Her Soldiers (Author's copy with ALS)

England and Her Soldiers (Author’s copy with ALS)

Martineau, Harriet Original red cloth, carefully rebacked preserving the spine, stamped in gilt and blind. Spine darkened, foot and corners gently bruised, extremities rubbed, inner hinges expertly strengthened. Armorial bookplate of Ernest Martineau, West Hill, Edgbaston to front pastedown; contemporary clipping from The Times on the health of the British army laid-in; binder's ticket, Westleys & Co. of London, to rear pastedown. Complete, with 3 folding mortality diagrams, of which 1 coloured and 26 pp. publisher's catalogue at rear. Diagrams and facing pages foxed, short closed tear to fold of third plate. Together with a 4-page autograph letter signed (leaf size: 238 x 188 mm) laid in from Sidney Herbert to Harriet Martineau, dated July 1859 at head of first page in ink in another hand, addressed by Sidney from 49 Belgrave Square. Letter creased from folding, with just a couple of tiny nicks. Both book and letter in very good condition. Author's own copy of her collaboration with Florence Nightingale, signed by her on the half-title, "H. Martineau." In the DNB Leslie Stephens described England and Her Soldiers, a literary account of the Crimean War, as "written to help Miss Nightingale," but her link to the work is far stronger than his comment suggests. "Although Martineau appeared as the book's sole author, she and Nightingale were in effect collaborators. The latter solicited her help on the issue of sanitary reform, and supplied the data, including printer's plates for statistical graphs. In a letter to Nightingale dated 20 September 1861, Martineau writes of "Our book" and its success in America. Nightingale bought and distributed copies of the book, although she seems to have been wary of too close association, even in print, with the controversial Martineau, whom she declined to meet in person. Martineau furthered Nightingale's work in other ways too, producing a lengthy piece in the Quarterly Review (seizing the occasion to promote her own earlier Life in the Sick-Room) and a shorter one in Fraser's on Nightingale's Notes on Nursing. Nightingale, for her part, brought the Contagious Diseases Acts to Martineau's attention, which led in turn to the Daily News articles that heralded the feminist repeal campaign" (Orlando). England and Her Soldiers reproduced Nightingale's pioneering mortality diagrams and ensured that her data reached a far broader audience than a government report would generate. "Martineau sent a copy of England and Her Soldiers to Sidney Herbert, recently returned as Minister for War. She suggested to Herbert that it would be a good idea to put a copy in each regimental library" (Small). The letter present here is his response. He first expresses his pleasure at hearing about Martineau and Nightingale's recent journalistic work together: "I was only lately aware of your intercourse with Miss Nightingale on the subject of military sanitary reform, nor did I know to whom the army was indebted for the excellent articles on the subject which I read in the Daily News. Please accept my thanks for them". He promises his support with regard to the newly published book - "I will do all I can to promote its circulation and perusal" - but is more cautious with regards to its suitability for the aforementioned libraries: "Whether it can be adopted in our regimental libraries depends on others besides myself. Indeed it is a book for the authorities rather than the men". Herbert's involvement in the dissemination of Nightingale's findings was crucial: responsible for her appointment to the legendary Scutari expedition, Herbert had circulated the details in his famous report of February 1858, and "the reforms set in train as a result of the commission marked a turning point in the army medical department" (ODNB). Provenance: the book with the bookplate of Harriet Martineau's great-nephew, Colonel Ernest Martineau (1861-1952), son of Sir Thomas Martineau and Lord Mayor of Birmingham 1912-14; subsequently from the library of the historian Hugh Small, author of Florence Nightingale: Avenging Angel (1998). In his Brief History of Florence Nightingale (also 1998) Small quotes a line from the present letter, citing it as from his private collection, but it does not appear to be published in full.
An All Western Conservation Cook Book.By Aunt Prudence

An All Western Conservation Cook Book.By Aunt Prudence

Cookery] Chapel, Inie Gage Original oilcloth on cardboard printed on spine and boards. Some soiling and edgewear, but binding strong and sound. Textblock toned at edges; internally with occasional foxing or staining to margins, but with less than the usual kitchen spatter of a book of this kind. Manuscript recipes written in a contemporary hand on the front endpaper; manuscript recipe and two newsclipped recipes laid in loosely at rear; several clipped recipes pasted in. OCLC reports only 8 surviving copies at institutions, with this presently being the only one on the market. A pleasing, research-ready copy of a community cookery designed to promote frugality and the local sourcing of ingredients. Vetting recipes for accuracy and originality, Portland Evening Telegram culinary writer Aunt Prudence (Inie Gage Chapel) produced a cookery of local recipes drawing on local ingredients. Her goal is a true community cook book: "We must teach one another to cook economically, to utilize all the by-products, and with our economy we must not sacrifice food values, or palatability which is essential that our families eat the food we cook and keep well." Women should pool community knowledge for the betterment of the community itself -- both at home, in their region, and as part of a nation at war. Wartime shortages affected national supply chains, and so Chapel urges women to create and share sustainable Victory Gardens that provide healthy, fresh ingredients; and she pulled together local recipes that would prevent women from requiring exotic materials not available or not economical. Though part of the book's goal is to "respond to our president's appeal.to make the world safe for democracy," it also tacitly supports the women's movement. American suffragists were regularly using community cookeries for fundraising and to establish their authority in and out of the home. So, too, does Chapel do this. "My desire is to start a new department, not of scientific cooking to teach all women the new domestic science and cooking school ideas of cooking, valuable as these are.We want to present not the new science but the old art, to gather and publish the old tried recipes and things mother used to make -- the essential, nourishing things that we older women have cooked for years in our own families." Rather than urging readers toward male chefs' attempts to formalize and professionalize a previously domestic and "feminine" task, Chapel pushes authority back to women. Cooking is generational, familial; drawn from shared experience; it links women to the women before them. And it creates a distinction between the cold, expensive, and commercial endeavors of "cooking-school ideas" and restaurants and the economical, patriotic, local, and traditional meals that solely aim to nourish. Recipes include Parker House Rolls and Popovers, fish both fresh and preserved, and salads made from greens, tomatoes, and other plants that thrive in the region. At the same time, the present work is itself a commercial endeavor -- advertisements promoting "Moral Materials and Money.promoting savings by preventing waste" come from Banks that also urge "growing a savings account" with their branch, for example. And one must note that within the "All Western" range of recipes, there is no acknowledgement of recipes of indigenous or non-European origin. A research rich and important community cookery, scarce and with signs of use.
The Story of Ferdinand

The Story of Ferdinand

Leaf, Munro (illustrated by Robert Lawson) First issue, with jacket price clipped on front flap but without the "second printing" notation and $1.00 price present on rear flap. Near Fine book with just a touch of sunning to the upper boards. Small ownership signature and drawing to the verso of the front endpaper, else unmarked and clean. VG jacket sunned on the spine; offsetting to the upper rear panel, with closed tears along the upper edge and a .75 inch loss to the lower rear edge. In all, a much nicer than usual copy of a difficult to find children's book. Ferdinand, a young, peaceful bull, just wants to sit beneath his favorite cork tree and smell the flowers. His mother worries that he's lonely because all the other young bulls like to run around, butt heads, and roughhouse together. When a committee arrives to search for the next bull for the bull fights in Madrid, a surprising turn of events sees Ferdinand on his way to Madrid. But in the bull-ring Ferdinand stays true to himself no matter how they try to provoke him. Published at the beginning of the Spanish Civil War and earning widespread popularity during the destruction and horrors of World War II, The Story of Ferdinand has been understood as an allegory of pacifism amid a world at war. An admired children's book that can be both a celebration of marching to the beat of your own drummer as well as a meditation on pacifism. Near Fine in Very Good dust jacket.
The Sister: A Comedy

The Sister: A Comedy

Lennox, Charlotte Early blue-gray wraps stitched at spine. Pages measuring 190 x 120mm. Collating complete: [4], 75, [1]. Gentle wear to wraps with light soiling at rear; title page gently toned but else a surprisingly bright copy. One of 1000 copies printed by William Bowyer and John Nichols. Scarce institutionally and in trade, it is the only copy currently on the market. The present copy aside, it has appeared only once at auction since 1964. A scarce and important dramatic work based on her third novel Henrietta, which exposed how a young woman's virtue alone could not protect her. Indeed, it depicts Henrietta's vulnerability and her reliance on the honesty and good intentions of those around her -- humans usually grappling with their own limitations, desires, vices and fears. Biting, humorous, sensational, and realistic, in novel form Henrietta blurred the lines of expectation and set the stage for the next generations of women writers. Notably, Lennox was best known as a literary critic and novelist, "having published three plays, of which only two made it to production and one of those had just a single performance." (Schurer). That play was The Sister, which "was hissed off the stage at its one and only performance on 18 February 1769 at the Covent Garden Theatre in London" (Schurer). The comedy's onstage failure was not due to unpopularity; indeed, its first print run of 1000 quickly sold out, with a second edition of 500 being printed soon after that same year. Rather, members of the English literary elite were angered by her harsh critique of the English Bard in Shakespear Illustrated (1758) and saw this as an opportunity for publicly shaming her for maligning the reputation of "so great and Excellent an Author" (Gerrick). It was not only Lennox's attack on Shakespeare's overuse of sources that brought the ire of established male authors, however; it was also her assertion that in altering his sources, Shakespeare had "stripped female characters of their original authority, taking from them the power and the moral independence which the old romances had given them" (Doody). In this sense, the attack on The Sister was an attempt to undermine Britain's first published dramatic critic for her feminist argument, which changed the face of the field. Feminist Companion 648. ESTC T10798. Near Fine.
A Separate Peace (Presentation copy)

A Separate Peace (Presentation copy)

Knowles, John Original green publisher's cloth binding, Near Fine on account of some foxing to the text block. In a VG+ first state jacket, with the 15s. net price on the front flap; jacket with some toning to spine and wear to extremities, most noticeably to the foot of spine. Inscribed by the author on the title page: "To Brad, whose rotobroiled lobster carried me through the first chapters, here it all is from his Hells Kitchen buddy, Jack." The recipient, Bradford Dillman, the son of an E.F. Hutton stockbroker, was Knowles' roommate at Yale and after. Following college, the two shared an apartment in Hell's Kitchen, New York, each pursuing his own creative career. While Knowles set to work on what would become his masterpiece, A Separate Peace, Dillman struggled to find acting jobs despite his parents' disapproval. Miraculously, both accomplished their goals: Dillman became a successful Broadway and Hollywood actor. Clearly, Knowles' prep school and Ivy League background shaped his fiction; it was something the young men had in common, as Dillman's youth led him to take on specific character types, earning him notoriety "as an actor of imposing stature as the bossy, over-ebullient, and immature mama's boy" (Weiler). An exceptional association to someone who experiences and input shaped this classic novel. Knowles drew on his own experiences at a New England boarding school in order to write this haunting story about the friendship between Gene and Finny. Effectively polar opposites and yet fiercely devoted to each other, Gene and Finny develop a rivalry that sustains each of them. Gene especially tries to emulate Finny's positive qualities to make himself better. But their friendship takes a dark turn as a result of a rash decision that Gene makes while the two are perched on a tree branch. The fallout and ensuing tragedy haunts Gene for the rest of his life. A Separate Peace is a stirring meditation on adolescence, masculinity, guilt, and friendship. Near Fine in Very Good + dust jacket.
Shakespear Illustrated (in 3 vols.)

Shakespear Illustrated (in 3 vols.)

Lennox, Charlotte Volumes 1-2 published in 1753, followed by Volume 3 in 1754. Finely bound by Bayntun in half red crushed morocco over marbled boards. Top edge brightly gilt. Marbled endpapers. An excellent copy internally, with none of the foxing typical of the era. 12mo (pages 160 x 100 mm) collating: xii, [2], 292; [4], 274, [2, adverts]; [4], 308; complete. A pleasing set of this rare work, of which there has been no complete copy at auction in over 35 years. At a time when Voltaire and his literati questioned the artistic value of Shakespeare's works, Charlotte Lennox and her three volume Shakespear Illustrated (1753-1754) carved out space for feminine voices within the debate. Taking Shakespeare to task for what she saw as his debauchery, over-use of source-books, and usurpation of authority from female characters by "taking from them the power and moral independence which older ramnces had given them" (Doody). Lennox became one of the first published female literary critics and she laid the groundwork for other women's involvement with the Bard. Outspoken and detailed, Lennox tackles twenty two of Shakespeare's plays and their sources, and she relies on her own translations of the Italian and French rather than rely on preexisting translations by men. In this sense, Lennox asserted herself as a knowledgeable authority worthy of engaging with figures such as Samuel Johnson and Henry Fielding. And she made it possible for women to influence the creation of the British canon. Feminist Companion 648. ESTC T138281, T139076. Fine.
Notes on Nursing: What it is

Notes on Nursing: What it is, and what it is not (Association copy)

Nightingale, Florence Early state. Original charcoal medium-fine bead-cloth, stamped in gilt and blind. Yellow advertisement endpapers. Spine and ends discreetly restored (often found thus, as noted by Skretkowicz) and hinges strengthened. Light wear at corners and a few negligible marks to cloth Very faint dampstain to front pastedown, some leaves from gathering B holding at bottom cord only (pages 5-12), occasional notations but overall clean internally. A pleasing copy of this landmark work on nursing, with an intimate association, from the estate of author and politician Richard Monkton Milnes, 1st Baron Houghton (1809-1885), Nightingale's favourite, persistent, but ultimately rejected suitor. Nightingale's landmark treatise on nursing, which introduced new and rigorous standards for sanitary and hygienic treatment of patients in hospitals. It is a work that altered how hospitals approached patient care, saving countless lives from infection. It also helped transform nursing from a volunteer role to a more respected and formalized career path for women. The owner of this copy, Richard Monkton Milnes, "was a family friend from Nightingale's childhood, and her most serious suitor. She turned him down finally after a long courtship, not without some regrets . Milnes and Nightingale remained friends for life and she made a friend also of his wife" (McDonald). One of Nightingale's most vocal supporters, Milnes was prominent in the fund-raising to honour her work in the Crimean War and supported the establishment of the Nightingale Fund; he served on its Council until ill health forced him to quit, when he was succeeded by his son. Nightingale and Milnes would continue a lively correspondence, predominately on social and political themes. "Nightingale was godmother to one of his daughters [Florence Ellen], who indeed was named after her. The daughters were invited to visit and Nightingale sent them books" (McDonald.). A typed letter from Christie's is tipped-in at the rear of this copy, signed by Inken Handane of the Book Department, confirming it as from the library of a direct descendant of Milnes and sold in their 28 November 1997 sale (part of lot 140). The letter is further annotated in pencil to explicate the connection between Nightingale and Milnes, and also bears the small library label of the historian Hugh Small, author of Florence Nightingale: Avenging Angel (1998). Originally published six months before the opening of the Nightingale School at St Thomas's Hospital in London in June 1860, Notes on Nursing was not intended to be a textbook per se but as a book of hints for those nursing in the hospital ward and in the domestic sick room. Nightingale provides practical descriptions of the nurse's duties in supplying her patient's needs, and "indicated a new and more responsible role for nurses, one that required proper training and medical knowledge" (Hook & Norman, p. 260). Given the considerable number of different states of each inner and outer forme in every sheet, the idea of attempting to establish with certainty any specific 'issue' of Notes on Nursing beyond the first is utterly impractical" (pp. 29-30). This copy corresponds with Skretkowicz's group 11 of the 32 that he distinguishes (in either the a or b subcategory, with the combination of Binding 3, Endpapers 3, and the translation notice). While the earliest endpapers are blank, those subsequent bear printed advertisements, with at least eight distinct settings. The pale yellow endpapers of the present copy are in an early state: in the second setting of type, in the first state. Textually, it has the three main characteristics of group 11 as listed by Skretkowicz, and all of the typographical errors mentioned by Bishop & Goldie. Grolier, One Hundred Books Famous in Medicine, 71. Hook & Norman 1600. Osler 7737. Skretkowicz 24-46. PMM 343.