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David M. Lesser

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DEMOCRATIC RASP EXTRA. UTICA, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 1840. ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE LOG CABIN CELEBRATION, AUGUST 12, 1840

[Harrison, William Henry] Folio sheet, folded to [4] pp, each page 9-1/2" x 13-1/8." Light to moderate foxing, several styles and sizes of type. Good+. A synonym for "Rasp" is "coarse," or "rough." This rare paper pulls no punches and is very tough on its Democratic Party opponents. Do not be confused by the "Democratic" in the Rasp's title. It is an unrestrained call for the election of the Whig presidential candidate, William Henry Harrison. Democratic President Van Buren is "your foe, and the man who now seeks to reduce you to poverty- - to reduce your wages at least five hundred per cent. . ." Also known as "Martin Van Ruin," he has "cheated his kinsman of their patrimony and robbed his country of her prosperity- - to gratify his griping avarice and grasping ambition." Harrison is "A man whose whole life has been a standing commentary upon genuine American Democracy." The first page prints the Order of Procession and Line of March for the Log Cabin Celebration, chaired by T.S. Faxton. proprietor of a Utica stage line and later an owner of a successful telegraph company. The Rasp "will be issued weekly from this date until after the November election. Its publisher was R.W. Roberts, 58 Genesee Street, Utica. AAS owns several issues of the Rasp, but not this one. OCLC says the Utica Public Library owns some issues, but none turn up at its web site.
  • $750
book (2)

THEY HAVE SPOKEN FOR DR. DU BOIS AND ASSOCIATES

Seven mimeographed leaves, printed on rectos only on legal-size paper, 8-1/2" x 14." Stapled at upper left corner. Occasional minor wear. "1951" written in pencil at bottom of first page. Very Good. This rare document defends Du Bois and his four associates, indicted for failing to register as agents of the Soviet Union pursuant to the Foreign Agents Registration Act. "February 1951 was a busy month for W. E. B. Du Bois, who turned eighty-three and threw himself a huge birthday party to raise funds for African decolonization. He also married his second wife, the leftist writer Shirley Graham, in what the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper called the wedding of the year. And he was indicted, arrested, and arraigned in federal court as an agent of the Soviet Union because he had circulated a petition protesting nuclear weapons. The Justice Department saw Du Bois's petition as a threat to national security. They thought it was communist propaganda meant to encourage American pacifism in the face of Soviet aggression. . . Du Bois was not in fact a Soviet agent. He was an American citizen using his First Amendment rights to protest nuclear weapons on his own behalf. A federal judge acquitted him because prosecutors failed to present any evidence" [Article in Boston Review, 13 January 2017]. The 'National Committee to Defend Dr. Du Bois and Associates in the Peace Information Center' probably issued this attack on the Justice Department. The first six leaves print excerpts from newspaper editorials-- including Black-owned papers like the Chicago Defender, Louisville Defender, and Pittsburgh Courier-- and statements from "Prominent Persons," including clergy, educators, labor unions. A 7th page consists of "Biographical Notes" listing Du Bois's education, writings, honors. OCLC records no holdings. The University of Massachusetts, which holds the Du Bois papers, has an incomplete copy [lacking page 7] and attributes authorship to the National Committee to Defend Dr. Du Bois and Associates in the Peace Information Center. NYU, which has the papers of defendant Abbott Simon, may also have a copy.
book (2)

CULMINATING 19 YEARS OF STRUGGLE BY WORKERS EVERYWHERE. FREE TOM MOONEY MASS MEETING. SUN. 2 P.M. – JULY 28 – CIVIC AUDITORIUM. . . ONCE AND FOR ALL SMASH THIS FRAME-UP ONCE AND FOR ALL

Folio broadside, 8-1/2" x 14-1/4." Mustard-colored. Union label at bottom. Very Good plus. Probably printed in 1935, the broadside promises twelve speakers-- Union leaders, Assemblymen, Harry Bridges, Laurence Ross of the Communist Party, and leading concerned citizens. Mooney is at "the storm center of every struggle of the workers against hunger - wage cuts - and oppression! He has become the living symbol of the cause of Labor. He was framed. . ." "Known worldwide as the scapegoat of anti-unionists, Thomas Joseph Mooney was falsely accused for bombing the Preparedness Day Parade in San Francisco on July 16, 1916. Mooney, a Socialist union activist and organizer, had previously been involved in an ugly strike against the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. This put him under immediate suspicion for the bombing even though it was later proved that he was no where near the actual bomb site during the parade. Mooney's wife, Rena, Warren Billings, Israel Weinberg, and Edward Nolan were also tried for the bombing but only Billings and Mooney were convicted. Mooney received the death sentence in 1917 and spent the next twenty-two years in prison despite outrage from around the world and evidence that many of the witnesses who testified against him had committed perjury, especially F.C. Oxman." ["Guide to the Thomas Mooney Collection, 1917-1918," accessed at Online Archive of California.] OCLC 962798641 [2- Yale, Autry Museum] as of May 2024.
book (2)

GRAND TABLEAU ENTERTAINMENT! FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE VERMILION ZOUAVES, TO BE GIVEN AT LINCOLN HALL, THURSDAY EVE., OCTOBER 24TH. COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS: MISSES KIRKLAND, PRINCE AND BLACK, MESSRS. FELLOWS AND FRENCH. .

Folio Broadside, 6-5/8" x 16-1/4." Very Good. This is doubtless an unrecorded Danville, Illinois imprint, printed in 1861, the only wartime year in which October 24 fell on a Thursday. Danville is located in Vermilion County, home of the Vermilion Zouaves. The Vermilion County Zouaves was organized as the 37th Illinois Vol. Inf, Co. K, in September 1861. They were active in the field in Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana during the War. "The Danville Band have kindly volunteered their services for the occasion." The broadside prints the "Programme," including Music, "Cinderella in Four Scenes," and other pleasing performances. Abraham Lincoln's law practice frequently took him to Danville. "Lincoln whiled away hours in Doctor Woodbury's drug store on Main Street. He lounged on the counter and entertained everyone with his stories. He purchased books at the store, including the 'funny book' of the day titled 'Phoenixiana'. Woodbury built a large building in 1857 and named it Lincoln Hall. This was the first building ever named for Lincoln. When he learned the name of the building, Lincoln was a little 'embarrasses' and told Woodbury he hoped he had better luck with the building than a friend did with a dog named in his honor. He said, 'After the dog's name was changed to Lincoln, he got licked in every fight he was in'." [web site of Historical Marker Database, Lincoln's Danville Friends.] Not located on OCLC as of May 2024.