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Michael Laird Rare Books

1920s Manuscript]. Westernized and Traditional Japanese Fashion for Women

1920s Manuscript]. Westernized and Traditional Japanese Fashion for Women, Men, and Children, including Hairstyles, and assorted Illustrations

Japanese Moga / Modan Garu, or "Modern Girls"]. [Original Ink Drawings] Oblong folio (225 x 195 mm). 30 leaves, stitched (modern threading). Preserved in mylar L-sleeve backed with lig-free board. Highly curious Japanese manuscript produced during the Roaring Twenties, being an amalgamation of Westernized and traditional Japanese fashion. Our manuscript was no doubt created by one of the Modan Garu (shortened to Moga), or "modern girls," who followed Westernized fashions and lifestyles. These Moga were Japan's equivalent of America's Flappers, Germany's Neue Frauen, France's Garconnes, and China's Modeng Xiaojie. The advent of the "modern girl" in Japanese society cannot be overestimated: Moga were financially and emotionally independent, consumeristic, and sexually liberated. Our manuscript contains depictions of Moga in many attitudes, including swimming in Western bathing suits, golfing in the manner of Jordon Baker, playing tennis, drinking from wine glasses and tea mugs, eating with forks, wearing jaunty Flapper hats, off-the-shoulder dresses, lipstick, and much more. Children are also in abundance: some of the girls wear short dresses and pumps, with bows in their hair, others wear traditional Japanese costume. Some of the men wear high-collared shirts and "Dick Tracy" hats, others have mustaches. Interspersed throughout are depictions of traditional Japanese kimono and geta, as well as illustrations of a variety of subjects. Clearly an amaturish production, this is a manuscript with great charm, and particularly interesting in that the tensions between "old" and "new" Japan are graphically illustrated herein by a non-commercial artist.
Mormons and Mormonism]. The Millennial Harbinger

Mormons and Mormonism]. The Millennial Harbinger

Campbell, Alexander (editor) 2 volumes, 8vo (202 x 120 mm - 8" x 4.75"), contemporary Kentucky sheep, morocco spine labels. COMPLETE unbroken monthly run of the first two volumes, from Volume I, Number 1 (January 4, 1830) to Volume II, No. 12 (Dec. 5, 1831). Volume I with "Millenial Harbinger Extras" nos. 1 & 2 bound at end followed by the index; Volume II with index at end included in the pagination, followed by "Millenial Harbinger Extra" no. 3. [2], 576, 88, 4; [2], 574 (misnumbered 174), 48 pp. Textblock browned and stained, bindings worn be perfectly sound and completely unsophisticated. Rarely found complete. Our copy is distinguished by the fact that it is preserved in its first binding, which is actually SIGNED by the provincial Kentucky binder (see below), and is PRICED by an early owner who may well have been identical with one of the original Mormon pioneers (see below). In the second number of Volume II of the Millennial Harbinger, Campbell published his notable challenge to the tenets of Mormonism, called "Delusions" (pp. 85-97), which was issued separately in pamphlet form one year later (1832). "Delusions" is the important first printed article on Mormonism in book form. The "Millenial Harbinger" was the organ of Alexander Campbell's Restoration Movement, which sought "the unification of all Christians in a single body patterned after the church of the New Testament." The movement blossomed concurrently with, and competed with, Mormonism. Many Campbellites left the fold to join the Mormons, including Sidney Rigdon and Parley P. Pratt. The two bound volumes of the first two years of the Millennial Harbinger here offered are in their original leather bindings, rare thus. BINDING: Our binding is actually signed in pencil by the original binder in block letters inside vol. 1: "S. FOSTER BOOK BINDER / HOPKINSVILE (sic) KY." At that time Hopkinsville was little more than a village. It is unclear to us how -- or why -- a set of the Millennial Harbinger was transported to Hopkinsville, which is located in the middle of the Kentucky woodlands more than 70 miles away from the closest city (Nashville). We note with interest the misspelling of Hopkinsville by this rural bookbinder. The Kentucky provenance may well correspond with the individual named below: PROVENANCE: "Lewis Ricks's Book Price $3.30" -- early American book prices are rarely found in contemporary inscriptions. The price "$3.30" for a 2-volume set of books bound in sheepskin is perfectly in line with prices given by Earl L. Bradsher, "Early American Book Prices," Publishers Weekly, 83 ( March 8, 1913), pp. 862-866. It is possible that the individual who inscribed his name and purchase price in our volumes was Lewis Ricks (1830-1894), prominent Mormon Pioneer, first to Nauvoo, then Winter Quarters, and finally the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on 24 Sept. 1848, just fourteen months after Brigham Young, who would eventually task him to settle the Bear Lake Valley. When Lewis Ricks was a young boy, the Mormon Elders visited the family home in Madison County, Illinois. He became greatly interested and was baptized at eleven years old. In 1845 the family moved to Nauvoo and the next year to Winter Quarters, later called Florence, Neb. In 1848 they joined Heber C. Kimball's company and started the long and weary trek across the plains on the Mormon Trail, arriving in Salt Lake Valley on the 24th of Sept. 1848, settling in Centerville. In 1859 they moved to Cache Valley and built houses in Logan and Benson, where they farmed and tended the herd of sheep owned by Grandfather Joel Ricks. As a young man Lewis, with others went East to assist the immigrants coming to Utah. He made four such trips, and because of exposure and other hardships endured, he became ill and was unable to do hard work for two or three years. During this period he spent much of his time reading and studying." (SOURCE: Howard Ricks, ed. "History and genealogy of the Ricks family of America; containing biographical sketches and genealogies of both males and females" (Salt Lake, 1957) p. 277 et seq.) Lewis Ricks' marriage on Christmas 1859 (to Amorette Allen) was the first marriage recorded by the City of Logan. In 1863 Lewis and his wife were called by other young couples by Brigham Young to go and help settle the Bear Lake Valley. Conditions there were brutal but they endured and raised a family. Ricks' older brother Thomas Edwin (1828-1901) was actually born in Kentucky (Trigg County); it is not without interest that the present volumes were bound in Kentucky. Thomas was also a prominent Mormon, becoming first Bishop in the Snake River country, and then president of the Fremont Stake of Zion. Ricks was instrumental in establishing Bannock Stake academy (1888), the future Ricks College which was named after him. LATER PROVENANCE: Edward Lukasek Collection (2018). Lukasek, formerly of Houston, is a private collector whose Gay Studies Collection is now preserved at the University of Houston. MARKET COMPARABLES: the only other copy currently on the market lacks vol. 1 entirely, and is being offered for $5000.
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom [ORIGINAL LINCOLN MEMORIAL PROGRAM FLYER]

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom [ORIGINAL LINCOLN MEMORIAL PROGRAM FLYER]

Civil Rights]. Pamphlet Original printed Lincoln Memorial Program scheduled for August 28. 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Single-fold, 4 pages, vertical fold mark across the middle. Some stain marks, toning on lower half of the fold on the front page, (unrelated?) penciled number on back page. Size: 5 1/2' x 8 1/2" (folded). Very significant artifact of 20th century Americana which reflecting a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Our example is well worn, perhaps indicating use by one of the protesters at the March on Washington. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was conceived by A. Philip Randolph, founder of the Leadership Confer spearheaded by Bayard Rustin and A. Philip Randolph who forged together an alliance of civil rights, labor, amid religious organizations and leaders to bring attention to the issues of civil rights and inequalities in economic conditions for African-Americans. It is estimated that approximately 250,000 came to Washington, D.C. to help raise public awareness of the issues. After the march and program, leaders met with President John F. Kennedy at the White House. Although criticized by many, including black activists, the March on Washington is credited with creating the momentum for the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 and the Voting Rights Act one year later. In 2013 President Barack Obama conferred a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom on Bayard Rustin and fifteen others for their role in organizing the March on Washington and their advocacy for the civil and economic rights of African Americans and all citizens. Our program give the exact order of events and speakers at the Lincoln Memorial Program on the front page, including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech. The back page gives a map of the march route. The two inside pages include "Statement by the heads of the ten organizations calling for discipline in connection with the Washington March of August 28, 1963," signed in print by the leaders of the organizations, and a 10-item "What We Demand" list. Demands included withholding Federal funds from programs that were discriminatory, enforcement of the 14th Amendment, comprehensive and effective Civil Rights legislation to address the civil and economic inequalities, a broadened Fair Labor Standards Act, a federal Fair Employment Practices act barring discrimination, a national minimum wage act ($2.00 an hour or more), and a federal program to train and replace unemployed workers, both Negro and white, on meaningful and dignified jobs at decent wages, among other. When the actual program took place, several changes were made. Marian Anderson, who was to lead off the program with the singing of the National Anthem, did not arrive on time so Camilia Williams performed in her place. When she did finally arrive, Anderson sang later in the program. Mrs. Medgar Evers, who was to give a Tribute to Negro Women Fighters for Freedom missed her flight, so she was replaced by Daisy Bates, who, along with Diane Nash Bevel, Mrs. Evers, Mrs. Herbert Lee, Gloria Richardson, and Rosa Parks, was one of the women so honored. At the end of the program, just before the benediction by the president of Morehouse College, A. Phillip Randolph challenged the crowd with the pledge to go "back home to place the Cause above all else" and to "place the national human rights problem squarely on the doorstep of the national Congress and of the Federal Government." OCLC reports three institutional holdings of this program (Yale, University of Kentucky, and Williams College). This also seems to be the only copy currently on the market. The text in our copy of the flyer is different from that which sold in 2018 by University Archives, the only other 4-page March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom flyer of its kind recorded by Rare Book Hub.
Printed Diary for 1867

Printed Diary for 1867, annotated throughout by a Scottish immigrant and his son, a California gold prospector

Rutherford, Thomas and James Rutherford Small narrow 12mo. 212 ff., of which 201 have brief contemporary MS annotations. Black roan over flexible boards, leather on lower cover missing, remains of leather strap on upper cover, significant portions of spine missing. Preserved in a cloth case. A very intriguing diary containing entries from a Scottish immigrant / schoolteacher in New York, together with his and his son, a farmer-turned-prospector in California, all only a few years after the conclusion of the American Civil War. The father, Thomas W. Rutherford (1793-1878), was born in Southdean, Roxburgh, Scotland. He was trained for the Presbyterian ministry in Scotland but due to an illness after which he could no longer project his voice, in 1818 he decided to immigrate to New York with his three three brothers. These men are considered to be among the earliest settlers of St. Lawrence County, NY (Scottish or otherwise). They settled in that portion of Madrid later known as Waddington, which at that time had but a single house. They purchased one square mile of land lying a little to the southwest of the village, a section which has since been known as "Rutherford Ridge." In the following years numerous friends and relatives of these four brothers joined them in St. Lawrence County. From the early days the Rutherfords were prominent in the affairs of their community, and the land they took up originally is still largely in the hands of their descendants today. When Madrid was first organized, Thomas Rutherford was one of the original officers; he was also one of the first trustees of the Scotch Presbyterian Church, organized in 1819. Thomas became a farmer and then later a successful general merchant. He seems to have been a schoolteacher in some capacity, as many entries in the diary for both 1867 and 1868 describe his comings and goings to a school. The 1870 U.S. Census describes Rutherford as a "farmer" whose real estate was valued at "$3500" and whose personal estate was valued at "$8000." After retiring from business, he spent his remaining years on his farm, and then resided with his daughter until his death. His son, James F. Rutherford (1826-1869), who also annotated our Diary, quit the family farming business around 1853 and moved out West with his cousin William W. Rutherford. Together they "went to Illinois and Missouri and purchased cattle with which to stock the ranges of the far west. Starting overland in April 1854 they took turns in driving the stock on alternating days, arriving in California with their first herd. These they turned loose in Stanislaus County. Thereafter they engaged in raising stock both in Stanislaus and Tuolumne counties." (SOURCE: Oakdale CA Museum Archives, Glenn Burghardt, Director). Soon after, James Rutherford took "gold fever" and began engaging in prospecting. He went to California via Panama and going up the Pacific Coast. He remained in California for two years and was successful in his quest for gold. Jane Fife writes, "He struck gold, brought home a quantity of it and we all had a share of it." After a visit at home, he decided to return to California. This time he went overland taking a yoke of oxen with him. Later his relatives in New York State received word that hehe had fallen backwards off a wagon and injured his skull. James's brother, William, and brother-in-law, Walter Rutherford immediately dispatched to California and found him, seriously ill in a small room. He died on 11 August 1869 and was buried by his relatives at Knights Ferry, near Sacramento. (SOURCE: Diary of Jane Fenton Rutherford Fife, 1925, published on the Washington County Historical website - present location unknown). Many diary entries in early 1869, describe James's various gold prospecting. For example, April 10 he left Toronto, and from there went to Detroit and then Jackson, WY. On April 15: "Went into the most fearful place that I ever trod." May 4: "Started on a prospecting tour w/ Dr. Hammond Smith & Munster." May 27: another prospecting tour "with Hughes." May 28: "Woke up with blankets all covered in snow." May 29: "Was in the mountains prospecting, got back to camp, was alone, was very lonesome." June 16: left Jackson, WY and went to Chicago, Milwaukee, La Cross, Prescott, Mississippi River, and finally to River Falls, WI. The last entry in the Diary is July 28th, 1869 where James "commenced work for Guelts," only a few weeks before his death on August 11th. He is buried at Knights Ferry, near Sacramento. The printed text of the first several pages of the Diary read like an almanac, with information on rates of postage, stamp duties, eclipses and the phases of the moon. The last several pages of the diary contain miscellaneous hand-written notes, including a two-page verse poem (written to Thomas Rutherford?); a list of flowers and their symbolic meanings; distances sailed in latitude and longitude for James Rutherford's first prospecting trip through the Isthmus and up to Washington Territory, as it was then known; expense and cash income reports; and a handful of recipes, mostly for hair regrowth (sic!).
Manuscript]. [Early Philadelphia binding]. [Commonplace Album of Poetry]

Manuscript]. [Early Philadelphia binding]. [Commonplace Album of Poetry]

Hayhurst, Sarah Kinsey (compiler) Quarto (245 x 195 mm). 174 pp., all filled with neat cursive writing. Contemporary, no doubt Philadelphia, binding of diced russia calf, richly gilt: wide gilt border around sides, central frame on both covers, on the front the name of the first owner gilt: SARAH K. HAYHURST; smooth spine with 6 compartments, the second lettered ALBUM; board edges gilt, pale blue/gray pastedowns and endpapers, turn-ins gilt, a.e.g. Extremities somewhat worn but an attractive manuscript in an excellent state of preservation. Fine handwritten Commonplace album of poetry penned by Sarah K[insey] Hayhurst (1796-1884), a Philadelphia Quaker. The album is signed by her and dated 1840; although there is no indication that the album contains original poetry by her, some of her favorite poems, quotations, and patriotic speeches are included. Noteworthy is the exuberantly gilt Philadelphia binding which was created by a craftsmen of considerable technical skill. The very distinctive tools on our binding are not published in Papantonio, French, Andrews, or Maser, and thus merit further research. Commonplace books belong to a fascinating literary form that has been the subject of a great deal of recent scholarship, particularly in the field of Women's Studies. "Commonplace" is not the best word for a book whose contents are usually far from commonplace, according to William Cole, who writes: "The quickest definition of the genre is 'an annotated personal anthology'" (see his article in the NY Times, "Speaking of Commonplace Books," 3 May 1970). Sarah Hayhurst was born in Upper Makefield, Pennsylvania, to Benajah Hayhurst (1773-1849) and Martha Kinsey Hayhurst (1774-1853) both of Pennsylvania. Sarah was one of 10 children. Little is known of her life, save that she was a member of Green Street Monthly Meeting (Friends' Intelligencer 1885, Vol. 41, p. 426) and that she died unmarried in Philadelphia. In 1840, at the time when the present Commonplace album was written, she would have been a 44 year-old spinster. That she included so many patriotic poems and writings is of interest. Her first entry in the present album is "A tribute for the dead: And, sweetly blending, hence shall flow the tears of gratitude and woe!" This is followed by Invocation to Hope; To the Evening Star; Caroline, To A beautiful Quaker by Lord Byron; Moonlight; The Exiles Farewell; Carolan's Grave; Lines from a Friend; Friendship; O'Connor's Child, or the Flower of Love lies Bleeding; Our Aborigines; The Hour of Death; O love is like the summer rose; The Star of Eve; Napoleon at Rest; A Thought of Home at Sea; On the Inauguration of Washington; A Farewell Song; A Home in the Heart; There's a Star in the West (from the London Weekly); The Homeward Bound; The Reaper and the Flowers; To My Sister; I May not Wholly Die; The Joyless Mariner; The World is Bright Before Thee; Lines from Thomas Campbell against the Star Spangled Banner; Washington's Coffin; Democracy; Good Bye; The Tomb of Burrows; Lines Written on Visiting Argyleshire; Charity; Early Death; Adversity; Man; To the Autumn Forest; Kindred Hearts; Past Year Farewell (by Park Benjamin); Dreaming Hours (by Willis Gaylord Clark); The Strength of Tyranny (by Charles E Cole); The Eagle (by Henry Hirst); Tribute to Valor (by John Burrows Aitken); Learning (by Philip Snyder); Monody (by Morton McMichael); The First Man (by Rev Thomas Stockton "of this City"); Declaration of Independence; Character of Washington; Letter from the Senate to the President of the United States 23 Dec 1799; The President's Answer 23 Dec 1799(by John Adams); General Washington's Address to Congress on resigning his Commission December 1783; The President's Answer.
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Manuscript Inventory of a late-19th century Library containing approximately 800 volumes, mainly dating from the 1850s to the 1870s

Vernacular Library Catalogue] Small 4to (245 x 190 mm). 26 pp. of manuscript entries on lined paper, bound with brads along the top edge (worn). Evidence of what may have been a cover sheet at front and back. Overall toning and soiling. Preserved in a lig-free phase box. Highly curious vernacular library catalogue of a private collection in the American South, likely Alabama. Vernacular library catalogues such as this one provide incredible insight into what people were actually reading. Our manuscript provides a glimpse into an as-yet unidentified private library in the American South, in which were contained a wide variety of genres and subjects beyond those influenced by contemporary events (e.g. works on Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee). The library contained three bookcases, numbered 1-3; the catalogue records the literary genres contained within each case. Bookcase no. 1 contains works of fiction (Dickens, Thackery, Twain, Jules Verne, etc.), memoirs and biographies, classics, works and writings, history and travels, poems, and miscellaneous titles. Bookcase no. 2 contains much of the same, though adding more novels, memoirs, and some humerous works, as well as some books on religion. Bookcase no. 3 adds more travel, history, and memoirs while also adding scientific works, farmers' books, and books in politics, medicine, and housewifery. Most of the works were published between the 1850s and mid-1870s. Provenance: Acquired from the estate of Belzora Baker Kemp of Selma, Alabama, then to Bartleby's from whom we obtained it (we quote: "Belzora Baker Kemp (1901-1988) was the granddaughter of George O. Baker, a mechanical and mining engineer who moved to Alabama in 1856, settling in Selma where he engaged in the grain business. One of his daughters, Grace Baker Evans (d.c1935) mentions her home 'Nirvana' at Elm Bluff outside Selma. It was known to have a large library when it was constructed by John Jay Crocheron in about 1845, so perhaps this is an inventory of that collection, with additions").
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Balai Penelitan Batik made by the Departmen (sic) Perindustrian Rakjat P.N.P.R. Nupiksa Yasa

Batik Cloth]. Balai Penelitian Batik. [Batik Research Center] Oblong quarto. Two preliminary text leaves + 9 leaves with actual batik samples along with description and small mounted photos of persons making the fabric. Original samples measure 5 1/2" x 7 1/2". Printed map of Java on rear inside cover. Bound in cord-tied black cloth over boards with titles in gilt and mounted batik fabric sample on front cover. Toning to paper. Text in Indonesian and English. RARE Javanese portfolio of original photographs and text detailing the printed batik preparation process, complete with actual corresponding cloth specimens, some embossed. The word 'batik' is derived from the Javanese word 'tik' meaning a fine point. For written batik vegetable dyestuffs (tingi, Ceriops Candoleana), (soga Djawa, Caesalpinia Sappan), (tegeran, Cundrania Javanensis) are used, but since the beginning of 1918 the chemical dyestuffs have been imported from Germany, England, U.S.A. Swiss and Japan for printed batik. From The Batik Guild: "There is nowhere in the world where the art of batik has been developed to the highest standards as in the island of Java in Indonesia. All the raw materials for the process are readily available - cotton and beeswax and many plants from which the dyes are made. It is not known when the batik was first made but the traditional skills were particularly well developed over hundreds of years in Central Java around Yogyakarta and Solo under the patronage of the Sultan and his court. Designs were copies and in some cases the cloths could only be used by certain people or on certain occasions. The royal families had their own proscribed designs. On the coast designs were developed differently, influenced by settlers from China, the Dutch colonists and traders from India and Arabia. "Two methods of applying wax are used: 1) The cloth is hung over the frame and the design is drawn on with a canting, a small copper cupped spout which is attached to a bamboo or wooden handle. The canting is dipped into a pot of hot wax and then allowed to flow through the spout on to the fabric. On thicker fabrics the waxing is carried out on both sides. This process is carried out by the women. 2) The cloth is stretched on to long tables and a cap or copper stamping tool is used. This is dipped into a pan of hot wax and pressed on to the fabric. This enables the design to be repeated many times and is usually done on both sides of the fabric by men. This is a much faster method of wax application. "The traditional dyes used are deep indigo blues and soga browns and these are still the characteristic colours for work in central Java. Towards the end of the 19th century chemical dyes were introduced in the coastal regions and as a result of this the colours are usually brilliant and more varied." (The Art of Batik, 1999). Inland batik or batik kraton (Javanese court batik) is the oldest form of batik tradition known in Java. Inland batik generally has an earthy colour such as black, indigo, brown, and sogan (brown-yellow colour made from the tree Peltophorum pterocarpum), sometimes against a white background, with symbolic patterns that are mostly free from outside influence. Certain patterns are reserved for royalty, while others are worn on specific occasions. Noted inland batiks are produced in Solo and Jogjakarta, cities traditionally regarded as the centre of Javanese culture. This book seems to favor the inland batik style and was notably published in Jogjakarta.
Original Dr Pepper Advertising Art

Original Dr Pepper Advertising Art

Dr Pepper]. Grant Advertising Inc Important archive of original artwork for Dr Pepper soft drink advertising, most likely generated by artists and marketing staff of Grant Advertising Inc. Collection consists of 59 total items, 15 large and 44 small pieces, including 40 original drawings. Material includes a Dr. Pepper trademark specification sheet, original, illustrated commercial storyboard drawings, and proof sheets in both a positive and negative format of Frosty Dog and Pup. Each item is protected by a Mylar sleeve, the entire archive preserved in a large fitted cloth case. An extraordinary survival. This is a fascinating, entirely visual archive of a marketing campaign from the Mad Men era, containing many original drawings and story board artwork, all relating to Dr Pepper's oldest mascot Frosty Dog, and his sidekick Pup, whose slogan, "Frosty man, frosty!" were ubiquitous throughout America in a wide variety of advertisement media such as magazines and billboards. The illustrations have a striking similarity to some of Jeff Koons' explorations of American comic art. Dr Pepper, America's oldest manufacturer of soft drink concentrates and syrups, began in Waco, Texas in 1885. Over their long history, the company went through a series of different advertising campaigns, including the "10, 2 and 4" campaign, which was designed to encourage folks to get a little sugar in their systems to up their energy level at those times in the day. The "Frosty man, frosty" campaign began in 1956 and lasted into the early 1960s. The campaign featured the cartoon figures of Frosty Dog, a St. Bernard, and his companion Pup to "sell" the soft drink as the "face" of Dr Pepper. The storyboards in this collection bear the name of Grant Advertising Inc., founded in 1935 by Will C. Grant in Chicago. His company quickly grew into a world-wide network of agencies. Grant was convinced of the importance of radio and television marketing to advertisers. During the company's heyday, major clients included China Airlines, Chrysler Corp., General Foods, Mars, Inc. candy company, Mobil Oil, Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co., J.A. Folger, Old Dutch Cleanser, Ryder, and, around 1961, Dr Pepper. The storyboards all appear to be designed for TV advertising. Grant Advertising closed their operations in 1976. See: McDonough's The Advertising Age / Encyclopedia of Advertising; see also the Dr. Pepper Museum website which has an extensive article on Frosty Dog. Very Good to Near Fine Condition
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The History of Coffee, Including a Chapter on Chicory

Law, William (coffee merchant) Small octavo. 46 pp. Original printed paper wrapper cover, front cover is slightly chipped around the edges. Leaves 11-14 have come loose from the stitching. Pages are age-toned. Contains two illustrations of various coffee-making processes and equipment on ff. 11r and 14v. Bookplate inside front cover: "El Rincon de Las Flores." A wonderful pamphlet on the history of coffee, purported by the author to have originally been written as "letters from Paris to friends in Edinburgh" in 1829. The pamphlet begins with the history of coffee in Asia and Europe, and continues with various ways to cook and prepare coffee. A final letter provides interesting insight into the then-new coffee commodity chicory and its apparent upset in the coffee market. This final letter provides key arguments from both sides of the chicory debate, including the perspectives of farmers, magistrates, and other countries in Europe in which the use of chicory is prevalent (though it is plain that Law supports its use in coffee). Included is a review (i.e. Advertisement) for the Law brothers' coffee by a reputed chemist analyist and early business theorist, Andrew Ure (1778-1857). On the verso of the last leaf is a map showing the London location of the Law brothers' coffee shop near the British Museum. An additional engraving gives a front-facing view of the coffee store. William Law (1799-1878) was a coffee merchant to the Queen and, along with his brother George Law who joined him in 1840, ran a tea and coffee shop on St. Andrew's Square (opened in 1835). He later expanded the operation to include a second store front at 544 New Oxford Street in London. William Law also served as Lord Provost of Edinburgh from 1869-1872, during which time he installed the first city tramway system and erected the Ross Fountain in Princes Street Gardens. Our research shows that only two copies of this pamphlet reside in America, at Harvard and University of Massachusetts-Amherst. UC Berkeley has an electronic copy only.
Child Rearing and Quack Medicine]. Shoni Yoiku Kogane no Ishizue

Child Rearing and Quack Medicine]. Shoni Yoiku Kogane no Ishizue

Ishida, Teikan Small 4to. (223 x 156 mm). 30 ff., complete. Original wrappers sewn in the oriental style (Fukurotojii), lightly worn and with a few small marks. A statement of the efficacy of a medicine is tipped-in to the upper pastedown. NB: Dated 1862, even though the preface reads Ganji Gannen [1864]. Preserved in a mylar sleeve. A promotional book of pharmaceuticals produced by Ishida Teikan, a Kyoto-based medicine dealer and pharmacist, on child-rearing and illness prevention. Because the text was written by a purveyor of drugs and medicines -- and not an actual medical doctor -- cures for fictional parasites such as "belly insects" are illustrated in the book. From the first edition of Bunka 10 [1813] until the final edition of Meiji 34 [1901], this promotional work was distributed free of charge to Teikan's customers, obviously a rarity in mid-19th century Japan. The present volume is well illustrated: included are woodcuts of surprisingly "cute" bacteria; a color-printed woodcut portrait of Teikan himself; and five full- or double-page woodcut illustrations, as follows: The first illustrates the care of a newborn baby. The second provides examples of children's diseases (the first is a bacteria that makes the child's stomach swell); this page is titled: "Instruction for taking care of a child." Despite their "old" appearance, the people depicted in this picture are children (the one that looks like he has a beard actually has a mouth disease) -- note the traditional Japanese hairstyles for children. The third woodblock depicts an argument or discussion about if children's medicine is also effective for adults, and refers readers to leaf 22 for a more detailed explanation. The fourth woodblock gives depictions of "cataracts and glaucoma" (on the right side) and "Diseases that make people blind and are hard to cure" (on the left). And finally, the fifth woodblock: a pharmacist taking care of a woman with palpitations (on the right side) and administering medicine to men who have eaten and drank excessively, and who are clearly suffering the consequences (on the left). Highly interesting amalgamation of Japanese medicine, commerce, and book illustration.
Taxil Freemasonry Hoax]. Le Diable au XIXe siecle

Taxil Freemasonry Hoax]. Le Diable au XIXe siecle, ou les mysteres du spiritisme. La Franc-Maconnerie luciferienne / le palladisme, la theurgie, la goetie et tout le satanisme moderne. Magnetisme occulte / La Rose-Croix

Taxil, Leo]. Docteur Bataille (pseud.) 2 vol., 4to. 964 + 960 pp., respectively. Illustrated with a number of (wood?) engravings. Bound in black quarter-sheep with marbled paper boards, smooth spine bearing gilt rolls; marbled pastedowns and endleaves. Advertisement for other works of occultism and freemasonry, including works by Abel Clarin de La Rive, with their prices on verso of second leaf, volume 1. Page 953/4, vol. 1 is torn with some sections of text missing. Paper repair, p. 959/60 of vol. 1. Page 407/8, vol. 2 is slightly torn at the bottom, affecting the text. Small label of "Imprimerie Librairie A. Roussel, Nevers" inside front cover of both volumes. Textblock somewhat weak and lightly browned. Demonic encounters of Diana Vaughan, supposed descendant of the alchemist / Rosicrucian Thomas Vaughan. Vehemently anti-Masonic, this is the most important book of mystification written by Leo Taxil (pseudonym of Marie Joseph Gabriel Antoine Jogand-Pages) in collaboration with Dr. Charles Hacks. The "Diable au XIXe siecle" is a pseudo-history relating the so-called adventures of a doctor visiting secretive Luciferian societies around the world. Taxil equates Freemasonry with a Satanic sect, mixing elements drawn from Masonic rituals with abominations of his own invention. The character of Diana Vaughan was purported by Taxil to be a Great Master of the Palladin Rite, and -- until her conversion to Catholicism -- was involved in Satanic freemasonry. Abel Clarin de La Rive (1855-1914), a French historian and anti-Masonic writer, ended up confronting Taxil about his writings, though Clarin de La Rive had used them (and Taxil's correspondence) as a source for his own writings. Taxil then called a press conference on April 19, 1897 where he was to introduce Miss Diana Vaughan. Instead, he revealed that everything he had written about Freemasonry were fraudulent; he then thanked the clergy for their assistance in perpetuating and supporting his false claims. This scandal became known as the Taxil hoax, which exposed prevalent anti-Masonic prejudices amongst many Catholics. Ours is apparently the only complete copy on the market. Dorbon 235. Caillet 4017.
IRELAND TROUBLES]. Archive of manuscript sermon material

IRELAND TROUBLES]. Archive of manuscript sermon material, ca. 1930s-1970s, containing over 150 sketches, outlines, and complete manuscripts

McFarland, James A. Archive of manuscript sermon material from 1930s-1970s of an influential Northern Ireland Presbyterian pastor, Rev. James A. McFarland (1904-1987), including over 150 sketches, outlines, and complete manuscripts. Meticulously organized chronologically in folders, and preserved in a large Hollinger box. MANUSCRIPT SERMONS WRITTEN DURING THE IRISH TROUBLES. James A. McFarland (1904-1987) pastored at Toberkeigh and Croaghmore from 1931-1945, Sinclair Seamen's in Belfast from 1945-1960, and at Castlerock from 1960-1976. Many of the sermons contain multiple drafts, note sheets, and annotations as McFarland recycled sermons for different congregations throughout his career. Written during a tumultuous time in Northern Ireland's history, many of the sermons touch on contemporary social and political issues, including Catholic-Protestant tensions and the Troubles, often particularly reflected in sermon revisions and additional annotations. McFarland also engaged in conflict resolution work with the Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Northern Ireland, and his sermons from Counties Derry, Antrim, and others occasionally touch on those themes as well. Scattered throughout are church program slips and event advertisements, newspaper and magazine articles, church administration documents, and letters written to McFarland, all of which generally constitute the backs of his sermon notes. Materials are arranged chronologically in folders and reverse chronologically within folders. Materials are dated by the earliest date found in which the sermon was given. Many sermons have multiple dates throughout McFarland's career. Folder 1: Undated Sermons Luke 23:43; Matt. 27:46 - 2 drafts; John 13:17; 1 Sam. 2:3; 3 John 4; John 19:28 (I thirst) - 2 drafts; Joel 2:21, 25; Eph. 4:12; 1 John 5:1; "Little Maw"; I Sam. 20:18; Rev. 4:12; 1 Cor. 1:23 Folder 2: Undated Sermons Rom. 14:21; Luke 8:18 (Take heed how you hear); Luke 22:8; Luke 23:46; Ps. 31:5; Rom. 1:16; Matt. 27:36 - 2 drafts; Acts 20:28; John 19:30 (It is finished) - 2 drafts; 1 Cor. 16:13 (Stand fast in the faith); Luke 19:31 (The Lord hath need of Him) Folder 3: Undated Sermons 1 Sam 7:12 (Hitherto hath the Lord helped us) - 2 drafts; 1 John 2:12; Luke 23:34; 2 Kings 5:27; Acts 1:14 (Mary the Mother of Jesus); Luke 6:37/Matt. 6:15; John 19:26; Ps. 106:1; Joshua 24:15; Mark 4:31; Matt. 25:29; Matt. 25:15 (Talents) Folder 4: Miscellaneous Notes Folder 5: Newspaper/Magazine Articles Folder 6: St. Andrews University Christian Union Programs Folder 7: Postcard, 1961 Folder 8: Sermons - 1930s The Scallop (2 Cor. 12:7); John 12:32; John 4:38 - 4 drafts; Mark 14:8 (She hath done what she could); Acts 20:9; John 3:30 Folder 9: Sermons - 1940s Rom 1:16; John 15:12 (That ye love one another); Matt. 4:19 (Follow Me); Matt. 7:7; Rev. 3:20; Exodus 15:6; Phil. 4:13; John 15:13; Acts 11:24 - 2 drafts; Luke 16:10; Isaiah 45:22; Mark 6:3; Mark 5:19; Isaiah 28:20; Folder 10: Sermons - 1950s Gen. 43:11; 2 Cor. 5:20; "This is the first Sunday."; Matt. 10:8 - 2 drafts; Matt. 25:23; 1 Cor. 15:57; Luke 6:46/Eph. 4:20; Eph. 3:1 (Paul the prisoner of Jesus Christ); Isaiah 53:5 (He was wounded for our transgressions); James 3:5 (The tongue is a very little member); 3 John 12 [sic] - 4 drafts; Exodus 12:26; Matt. 6:28; 2 Cor. 9:15 - 2 drafts Folder 11: Sermons - 1950s Col. 3:23; Col. 3:15 (Be ye thankful); Untitled; Haggai 1:6 (A bag with holes in it); Mark 13:37; 1 Cor. 3:9; Ps. 40:3; John 6:12 - 2 drafts; "According to the law of our church." Folder 12: Sermons - 1960s 1 Sam. 20:18 - typescript; Rom. 5:8 (God commendeth His Love); 1 Sam 20:18; Mark 13:31; 2 Cor. 6:1 - 2 drafts; Rev. 21:5 (Behold I make all things new); Mark 8:36; Matt. 28:9; 2 Cor. 5:17; Alphabetic sermon series - '66-'67; Untitled; Prov. 3:6; Matt. 5:9 (Blessed are the peace-makers); John 10:10; Matt. 18:10; 1 Cor. 10:12; Acts 13:1 (Simeon called Niger); Ps. 119; 2 Cor. 5:4 Folder 13: Sermons - 1960s Matt. 2:13; Gen. 4:2 (Sheep); Luke 4:16; Luke 16:10; Matt. 21:28; Matt. 4:14; 1 Sam 3:19; Matt. 4:2; Matt. 5:16; Matt. 13:44;Matt 18:10; Matt. 23:14; Mark 9:42; Prov. 17:24; Isaiah 22:18 (He shall toss you like balls); John 10:9; Rom. 12:9; Mark 5:41; 2 Cor. 5:10; 1 Cor. 9:24; 1 Thess. 3:22; John 12:12; Ps. 69:9; Prov. 4:4; Gen. 44:12; Isaiah 30:21; James 2:20; Phil. 4:11; James 3:5; John 10:11; Zech. 4:10; Ps. 33:18; Gal. 5:13; John 4:19; Gal. 2:20; Ecc. 4:9; Ps. 144:16; Heb 12:2; Jonah 2:5; Matt. 5:16; Luke 9:51; Rom. 8:28 (All things); Luke 19:10; Luke 8:40; Luke 19:20; John 1:41; John 1:39; Luke 22:27; 1 Cor. 9:24; 1 Cor. 15:53; John 3:30; Heb. 12:2; Matt. 6:3; Job 38:11; Luke 11:1; Isaiah 6:5; John 15:13 Folder 14: Sermons - 1970s Mark 14:8; Acts 22:10 (What shall I do Lord); Joshua 24:14; Matt. 4:19 (Follow Me); Joshua 24:15 (Choose ye this day whom you will serve); John 21:22; Luke 2:40 (And the Child grew); Ps. 119:31; Exodus 2:10; Matt. 25:23; 2 Tim 3:15; Matt. 6:24; Ps. 67:6 (Our own God); Matt. 25:40; Luke 19:17; Acts 20:31 (Watch & Remember); James 3:4; Mark 5:19 Folder 15: Sermons - 1970s Mark 15:20; Acts 27:31; 2 Kings 7:3 (Why sit we here till we die) - 3 drafts; Luke 1:1; Eph. 1:7; Luke 8:50 - 2 drafts; Acts 14:23/Titus 1:5; Isaiah 9:6 (Prince of Peace); Acts 17:18 - 2 drafts; Phil. 4:8 (Whatsoever).
The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

John F Kennedy Assassination) Penn Jones, Jr. (editor) Original photocopy, original texts mainly typescript, profusely illustrated with reproductions of photographs, diagrams, maps, charts, and published articles from newspapers or magazines. Pioneering Texas newsletter whose original mission was to debunk the Warren Commission report; the focus of "The Continuing Inquiry" soon broadened to encompass all aspects of the ongoing powers of Deep State America during the critical years of 1976-1984. Seemingly NO lead was too trivial for the editor, Penn Jones (1914-1998), who was among the earliest to publicly challenge the "official" narrative of the JFK assassination. As the newsletter continued into the Reagan years, Jones was quick to point out the increasing power of the Deep State and expand his newsletter to include reportage on aspects and incidents that led back to the players in the JFK assassination. For a lengthy biography of Penn Jones, see the Texas Monthly article "Still On the Case" (Nov. 1983) which describes him as a "feisty, combative country editor of the Midlothian Mirror. Author of the four-volume (so far) privately printed series called Forgive My Grief, the continuing account of his JFK-assassination investigation, which focuses on the deaths and disappearances of the 188 witnesses (so far) who Penn contends knew too much about the assassination conspiracy to be permitted to live." Jones, the son of sharecroppers, joined the Army and served in all the major campaigns in WWII. Upon returning to Texas in 1946 Jones purchased the local newspaper, Midlothian Mirror (circulation - 810) for $4,000. Jones campaigned for increased spending on black schools. His liberal opinions caused controversy and his attacks on the John Birch Society resulted in his office being firebombed. He was later the recipient of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. In 1963 Jones became involved in investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. A fellow researcher, Gary Mack, later explained: "Penn was one of the first generation of researchers who felt the government was behind the assassination - probably a conspiracy involving military intelligence. He always thought LBJ was behind it somehow." Selected Articles: Where have all the bullets gone?; Flood of TV specials to mark JFK shooting; JFK assassination, Dachau to Dallas (Mae Brussell Tape 593); Two Vatican mysteries: Did John Paul I, Pius XI die natural deaths?; Robert F. Kennedy 1925-1968.
The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

John F Kennedy Assassination) Penn Jones, Jr. (editor) Original photocopy, original texts mainly typescript, profusely illustrated with reproductions of photographs, diagrams, maps, charts, and published articles from newspapers or magazines. Pioneering Texas newsletter whose original mission was to debunk the Warren Commission report; the focus of "The Continuing Inquiry" soon broadened to encompass all aspects of the ongoing powers of Deep State America during the critical years of 1976-1984. Seemingly NO lead was too trivial for the editor, Penn Jones (1914-1998), who was among the earliest to publicly challenge the "official" narrative of the JFK assassination. As the newsletter continued into the Reagan years, Jones was quick to point out the increasing power of the Deep State and expand his newsletter to include reportage on aspects and incidents that led back to the players in the JFK assassination. For a lengthy biography of Penn Jones, see the Texas Monthly article "Still On the Case" (Nov. 1983) which describes him as a "feisty, combative country editor of the Midlothian Mirror. Author of the four-volume (so far) privately printed series called Forgive My Grief, the continuing account of his JFK-assassination investigation, which focuses on the deaths and disappearances of the 188 witnesses (so far) who Penn contends knew too much about the assassination conspiracy to be permitted to live." Jones, the son of sharecroppers, joined the Army and served in all the major campaigns in WWII. Upon returning to Texas in 1946 Jones purchased the local newspaper, Midlothian Mirror (circulation - 810) for $4,000. Jones campaigned for increased spending on black schools. His liberal opinions caused controversy and his attacks on the John Birch Society resulted in his office being firebombed. He was later the recipient of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. In 1963 Jones became involved in investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. A fellow researcher, Gary Mack, later explained: "Penn was one of the first generation of researchers who felt the government was behind the assassination - probably a conspiracy involving military intelligence. He always thought LBJ was behind it somehow." Selected Articles: To the defence of the Kennedys; Kennedy aides deny yacht lost radio contact; Mae Brussell puts the pieces together; The why and how of the famous 1947 Dachau trial: Springfield attourney gains acquittal of Nazi leader accused of war crimes (Part 1); To acquit a Nazi: Strategy and the head waiter (Part II); To acquit a Nazi: Courtroom theatrics and poison bullets (Part III); To acquit a Nazi: British spies and meted justice (Part IV); Signal processing analysis of the Kennedy assassination tapes; NAS panel says sounds on JFK tapes are not shots; The shot that wasn't there; World Watchers Internationa; Tape 583.
The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

John F Kennedy Assassination) Penn Jones, Jr. (editor) Original photocopy, original texts mainly typescript, profusely illustrated with reproductions of photographs, diagrams, maps, charts, and published articles from newspapers or magazines. Pioneering Texas newsletter whose original mission was to debunk the Warren Commission report; the focus of "The Continuing Inquiry" soon broadened to encompass all aspects of the ongoing powers of Deep State America during the critical years of 1976-1984. Seemingly NO lead was too trivial for the editor, Penn Jones (1914-1998), who was among the earliest to publicly challenge the "official" narrative of the JFK assassination. As the newsletter continued into the Reagan years, Jones was quick to point out the increasing power of the Deep State and expand his newsletter to include reportage on aspects and incidents that led back to the players in the JFK assassination. For a lengthy biography of Penn Jones, see the Texas Monthly article "Still On the Case" (Nov. 1983) which describes him as a "feisty, combative country editor of the Midlothian Mirror. Author of the four-volume (so far) privately printed series called Forgive My Grief, the continuing account of his JFK-assassination investigation, which focuses on the deaths and disappearances of the 188 witnesses (so far) who Penn contends knew too much about the assassination conspiracy to be permitted to live." Jones, the son of sharecroppers, joined the Army and served in all the major campaigns in WWII. Upon returning to Texas in 1946 Jones purchased the local newspaper, Midlothian Mirror (circulation - 810) for $4,000. Jones campaigned for increased spending on black schools. His liberal opinions caused controversy and his attacks on the John Birch Society resulted in his office being firebombed. He was later the recipient of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. In 1963 Jones became involved in investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. A fellow researcher, Gary Mack, later explained: "Penn was one of the first generation of researchers who felt the government was behind the assassination - probably a conspiracy involving military intelligence. He always thought LBJ was behind it somehow." Selected Articles: What did the officials really cover up?; Princess Grace: the fairy tale that did not have a happy ending; The secret service had been advised of the assassination!; Subversion of the political; R. B. Cutler remarks on Frank O. Bennett's article; The photographing evidence; Elvis and JFK; News brief; Mae Brussell Tape 563; Tony Zoppi remembers a different Dallas After Dark;.
The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

John F Kennedy Assassination) Penn Jones, Jr. (editor) Original photocopy, original texts mainly typescript, profusely illustrated with reproductions of photographs, diagrams, maps, charts, and published articles from newspapers or magazines. Pioneering Texas newsletter whose original mission was to debunk the Warren Commission report; the focus of "The Continuing Inquiry" soon broadened to encompass all aspects of the ongoing powers of Deep State America during the critical years of 1976-1984. Seemingly NO lead was too trivial for the editor, Penn Jones (1914-1998), who was among the earliest to publicly challenge the "official" narrative of the JFK assassination. As the newsletter continued into the Reagan years, Jones was quick to point out the increasing power of the Deep State and expand his newsletter to include reportage on aspects and incidents that led back to the players in the JFK assassination. For a lengthy biography of Penn Jones, see the Texas Monthly article "Still On the Case" (Nov. 1983) which describes him as a "feisty, combative country editor of the Midlothian Mirror. Author of the four-volume (so far) privately printed series called Forgive My Grief, the continuing account of his JFK-assassination investigation, which focuses on the deaths and disappearances of the 188 witnesses (so far) who Penn contends knew too much about the assassination conspiracy to be permitted to live." Jones, the son of sharecroppers, joined the Army and served in all the major campaigns in WWII. Upon returning to Texas in 1946 Jones purchased the local newspaper, Midlothian Mirror (circulation - 810) for $4,000. Jones campaigned for increased spending on black schools. His liberal opinions caused controversy and his attacks on the John Birch Society resulted in his office being firebombed. He was later the recipient of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. In 1963 Jones became involved in investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. A fellow researcher, Gary Mack, later explained: "Penn was one of the first generation of researchers who felt the government was behind the assassination - probably a conspiracy involving military intelligence. He always thought LBJ was behind it somehow." Selected Articles: Who really killed JFK?; Auschwitz America; Whatever happened to.; A wistful look at 20 years ago by a Kennedy critic; Lyndon B. Johnson: A memoir; Introduction to "Diary of an Ex-Dallas Deputy - Roger Craig"; Review of: "Let the Trumpet Sound, The Life of Martin Luther King, Jr.; "The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The Path to Power" (a negative review of the book); No foul play uncovered in 1962 death of Marilyn Monroe.
The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

John F Kennedy Assassination) Penn Jones, Jr. (editor) Original photocopy, original texts mainly typescript, profusely illustrated with reproductions of photographs, diagrams, maps, charts, and published articles from newspapers or magazines. Pioneering Texas newsletter whose original mission was to debunk the Warren Commission report; the focus of "The Continuing Inquiry" soon broadened to encompass all aspects of the ongoing powers of Deep State America during the critical years of 1976-1984. Seemingly NO lead was too trivial for the editor, Penn Jones (1914-1998), who was among the earliest to publicly challenge the "official" narrative of the JFK assassination. As the newsletter continued into the Reagan years, Jones was quick to point out the increasing power of the Deep State and expand his newsletter to include reportage on aspects and incidents that led back to the players in the JFK assassination. For a lengthy biography of Penn Jones, see the Texas Monthly article "Still On the Case" (Nov. 1983) which describes him as a "feisty, combative country editor of the Midlothian Mirror. Author of the four-volume (so far) privately printed series called Forgive My Grief, the continuing account of his JFK-assassination investigation, which focuses on the deaths and disappearances of the 188 witnesses (so far) who Penn contends knew too much about the assassination conspiracy to be permitted to live." Jones, the son of sharecroppers, joined the Army and served in all the major campaigns in WWII. Upon returning to Texas in 1946 Jones purchased the local newspaper, Midlothian Mirror (circulation - 810) for $4,000. Jones campaigned for increased spending on black schools. His liberal opinions caused controversy and his attacks on the John Birch Society resulted in his office being firebombed. He was later the recipient of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. In 1963 Jones became involved in investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. A fellow researcher, Gary Mack, later explained: "Penn was one of the first generation of researchers who felt the government was behind the assassination - probably a conspiracy involving military intelligence. He always thought LBJ was behind it somehow." Selected Articles: Unlocking HSCA evidence; Why hide anything if there's nothing to hide?; Briefs; The assignment of Dr. G. Robert Blakey; Follow-up on last month's late bulletin; J. D. Tippit's final minutes; Mrs. Oswald's son seeks will authority; Oswald's mother left eight debts, no will; Now, a "two-casket" argument.
The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

John F Kennedy Assassination) Penn Jones, Jr. (editor) Original photocopy, original texts mainly typescript, profusely illustrated with reproductions of photographs, diagrams, maps, charts, and published articles from newspapers or magazines. Pioneering Texas newsletter whose original mission was to debunk the Warren Commission report; the focus of "The Continuing Inquiry" soon broadened to encompass all aspects of the ongoing powers of Deep State America during the critical years of 1976-1984. Seemingly NO lead was too trivial for the editor, Penn Jones (1914-1998), who was among the earliest to publicly challenge the "official" narrative of the JFK assassination. As the newsletter continued into the Reagan years, Jones was quick to point out the increasing power of the Deep State and expand his newsletter to include reportage on aspects and incidents that led back to the players in the JFK assassination. For a lengthy biography of Penn Jones, see the Texas Monthly article "Still On the Case" (Nov. 1983) which describes him as a "feisty, combative country editor of the Midlothian Mirror. Author of the four-volume (so far) privately printed series called Forgive My Grief, the continuing account of his JFK-assassination investigation, which focuses on the deaths and disappearances of the 188 witnesses (so far) who Penn contends knew too much about the assassination conspiracy to be permitted to live." Jones, the son of sharecroppers, joined the Army and served in all the major campaigns in WWII. Upon returning to Texas in 1946 Jones purchased the local newspaper, Midlothian Mirror (circulation - 810) for $4,000. Jones campaigned for increased spending on black schools. His liberal opinions caused controversy and his attacks on the John Birch Society resulted in his office being firebombed. He was later the recipient of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. In 1963 Jones became involved in investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. A fellow researcher, Gary Mack, later explained: "Penn was one of the first generation of researchers who felt the government was behind the assassination - probably a conspiracy involving military intelligence. He always thought LBJ was behind it somehow." Selected Articles: SS 'Imposters' Spotted by JFK Witnesses; Ex-officer Suspects He Chased '2nd Gun'; Jack Ruby's Gunrunning to Castro Claimed; Man's JFK 'Bombs' Reportedly Instill Fear; Officer Allegedly With Ruby at Buy; JFK Panel Never Called 2 Witnesses; Police Tape Site Disputed; Question About JFK Tape Arises: 'Who Was the Motorcycle Officer?'; 1963 Tape Reveals Threat to JFK; Oswald's Mother Claims CIA Move; Kennedy Witness 'Owed' FBI; Couple Talks About Bad Days in CIA; The Tangled Web: An Inquiry Into the Assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy; The Umbrella Man - Up Date; Justice Reformed, or Liberty Threatened?
The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

John F Kennedy Assassination) Penn Jones, Jr. (editor) Original photocopy, original texts mainly typescript, profusely illustrated with reproductions of photographs, diagrams, maps, charts, and published articles from newspapers or magazines. Pioneering Texas newsletter whose original mission was to debunk the Warren Commission report; the focus of "The Continuing Inquiry" soon broadened to encompass all aspects of the ongoing powers of Deep State America during the critical years of 1976-1984. Seemingly NO lead was too trivial for the editor, Penn Jones (1914-1998), who was among the earliest to publicly challenge the "official" narrative of the JFK assassination. As the newsletter continued into the Reagan years, Jones was quick to point out the increasing power of the Deep State and expand his newsletter to include reportage on aspects and incidents that led back to the players in the JFK assassination. For a lengthy biography of Penn Jones, see the Texas Monthly article "Still On the Case" (Nov. 1983) which describes him as a "feisty, combative country editor of the Midlothian Mirror. Author of the four-volume (so far) privately printed series called Forgive My Grief, the continuing account of his JFK-assassination investigation, which focuses on the deaths and disappearances of the 188 witnesses (so far) who Penn contends knew too much about the assassination conspiracy to be permitted to live." Jones, the son of sharecroppers, joined the Army and served in all the major campaigns in WWII. Upon returning to Texas in 1946 Jones purchased the local newspaper, Midlothian Mirror (circulation - 810) for $4,000. Jones campaigned for increased spending on black schools. His liberal opinions caused controversy and his attacks on the John Birch Society resulted in his office being firebombed. He was later the recipient of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. In 1963 Jones became involved in investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. A fellow researcher, Gary Mack, later explained: "Penn was one of the first generation of researchers who felt the government was behind the assassination - probably a conspiracy involving military intelligence. He always thought LBJ was behind it somehow." Selected Articles: Is the FBI Shielding a JFK Assassin?; More on Tom Bethell: A Dissenting View From Sylvia Meagher; Strange Death No. 136; Secret Service Report 491; Parallels Between "Operation Anthropoid" and the JFK Assassination; Henry Wade and Dallas Justice; Assassination Committee Can Help!!
The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

The Continuing Inquiry (newsletter re: JFK assassination)

John F Kennedy Assassination) Penn Jones, Jr. (editor) Original photocopy, original texts mainly typescript, profusely illustrated with reproductions of photographs, diagrams, maps, charts, and published articles from newspapers or magazines. Pioneering Texas newsletter whose original mission was to debunk the Warren Commission report; the focus of "The Continuing Inquiry" soon broadened to encompass all aspects of the ongoing powers of Deep State America during the critical years of 1976-1984. Seemingly NO lead was too trivial for the editor, Penn Jones (1914-1998), who was among the earliest to publicly challenge the "official" narrative of the JFK assassination. As the newsletter continued into the Reagan years, Jones was quick to point out the increasing power of the Deep State and expand his newsletter to include reportage on aspects and incidents that led back to the players in the JFK assassination. For a lengthy biography of Penn Jones, see the Texas Monthly article "Still On the Case" (Nov. 1983) which describes him as a "feisty, combative country editor of the Midlothian Mirror. Author of the four-volume (so far) privately printed series called Forgive My Grief, the continuing account of his JFK-assassination investigation, which focuses on the deaths and disappearances of the 188 witnesses (so far) who Penn contends knew too much about the assassination conspiracy to be permitted to live." Jones, the son of sharecroppers, joined the Army and served in all the major campaigns in WWII. Upon returning to Texas in 1946 Jones purchased the local newspaper, Midlothian Mirror (circulation - 810) for $4,000. Jones campaigned for increased spending on black schools. His liberal opinions caused controversy and his attacks on the John Birch Society resulted in his office being firebombed. He was later the recipient of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award for courageous journalism. In 1963 Jones became involved in investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. A fellow researcher, Gary Mack, later explained: "Penn was one of the first generation of researchers who felt the government was behind the assassination - probably a conspiracy involving military intelligence. He always thought LBJ was behind it somehow." Selected Articles: The Dallas Police tapes.the truth is.; QJC teacher convinced 3 gunmen in JFK assassination; The recruiting of Lee Harvey Oswald; The unannounced thumbprint;The enormity of the plot; For sale; One flew over Dealey Plaza, Dallas; Well, I feel that way sometimes!; Mae Brussell Tape 576; Hitler's 50th anniversary teaches a lesson; Editor's note.