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Michael Laird Rare Books

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Estate of James G. Fair, deceased. S.F. no. 2871. Appellants’ petition for rehearing as to the personal property. Garret W. McEnerney, Robert Y. Hayne, Wm. M. Pierson, George E. Crothers, of counsel for appellants

McEnerney, Garret William. California Supreme Court Small 4to. 44 pp. Original printed wrappers (chipped, spine partially defective). The complex and protracted litigation over the San Francisco estate of one of the richest men in America, mining tycoon James Graham Fair, dragged on for many years after his death in 1894. Born in Ireland in 1831, Fair and his impoverished father came to the U.S. in 1843. James went to California in 1850 to labor as a lowly prospector; he soon turned his attention to Nevada. After working as a superintendent and engineer at various mining sites, he formed a partnership with three men, two of whom were born in Ireland and one was the son of Irish immigrants. Together they made millions in silver mining in the Comstock Lode, one of the largest silver deposits ever found; indeed, in just six years the Comstock Lode produced more than $100 million worth of silver bullion ($3.5 billion in today's currency). By 1875 the four "Silver Kings" had become fantastically wealthy. Fair invested shrewdly in the South Pacific Coast Railroad and in real estate. But money led to a dissolute life of affairs and alcohol. In 1883 his wife filed for divorce which was uncontested; she received the family mansion and nearly $5,000,000 in cash (at that time the divorce settlement on record), while also gaining custody of their two daughters from whom Fair had become estranged. His two sons also caused him much unhappiness. He campaigned successfully for a seat in the U.S. Senate in 1881, but following his defeat in 1886 he lived the rest of his life alone in a hotel. At his death Fair's wealth was estimated at $50,000,000 -- an almost unbelievable sum in those days. Our volume is S.F. 2871 (March 19, 1902) and concerns the famous litigation of the $18,000,000 worth of real property in Fair's trust and estate. Here the appellants in the case are the counsel of said trust, which was created by Fair's will for his children during their lives, followed upon their death by a trust to others. The trustees were empowered "to sell any property," real or personal, and to invest the proceeds, and to purchase other property, or to apply the proceeds of sales to the improvement of other property, and for any other of the purposes declared in the will, and to pay to the children mouthly "the net income." The court declared void the entire trust scheme as to the realty. An interesting aspect of the case involves the forensic accounting undertaken by one of the appellant's laywers, George E. Crothers, who had personal charge of the forgery branch of the litigation; Crothers won a notable victory in the proof of a forgery by original mathematical lines of deduction based upon consecutively numbered checks. (SOURCE: L.F. Byington, History of San Francisco, 1931, vol. 2, pp. 64-76). The full text of Fair's Last Will and Testament, dated 1894, appears at end. Scarce: two copies in OCLC FirstSearch (Berkeley and California Historical). Not in the Library of Congress. Not in Rare Book Hub.
  • $500
book (2)

[ENGLISH ROCOCO DESIGNS]. A new book of ornaments: consisting of tables, chimnies, sconces, spandles, clock cases, candle stands, chandeliers, girondoles, &c

Matthias Lock and H. Copland Folio (341 x 230 mm). Complete with 12 leaves (including title-page). Engraved throughout. Early (original?) drab blue wrappers (a little soiled), bound by Riviere in later red half morocco over comb-marbled boards, comb-marbled pastedowns and endleaves, one or possibly two labels removed from inside front cover leaving a tape residue. Each plate carefully numbered in pencil. In VERY FRESH STATE, WITH FINE IMPRESSIONS OF ALL THE PLATES. MATTHIAS LOCK WAS THE FIRST ENGLISH DESIGNER TO CAPTURE THE SPIRIT OF THE FRENCH HIGH ROCOCO; HE INSPIRED THOMAS CHIPPENDALE AND WAS LIKELY TO HAVE BEEN HIS MENTOR. These imaginative and exuberant designs are indicative of Lock's seemingly effortless style. "His scrolls, dragons, flowers, masks, birds and Chinese men are all handled with a zest and freedom rare in the English product, with a strong dash of asymmetry. [.] This evidence of an ability to teach design, combined with Lock's activity as a Rococo designer from the early 1740s, makes him a better candidate than Darly as Chippendale's mentor" (Jervis, p. 302). Our suite of twelve engravings is absolutely complete; it is one of a series of rare but important publications by Lock which presented a distinctly "British" form of Rococo scrollwork and ornament to designers and furniture makers, its influence broad and considerable. "Matthias Lock (1710-1765) [was] the carver who first introduced the French Rococo to woodworkers in London. During the 1740s he published a half-dozen modest cahiers, or suites, of ornamental designs [.] all in the Rococo taste and executed in a loose, freehand etching manner. In 1752, together with the engraver Henry Copland (1706-1753), he coauthored 'A New Book of Ornaments,' the largest and most ambitious English publication to date. With its chimneypieces, pier glasses, and candlestands, all professionally engraved, it was the forerunner of Chippendale's great folio" (Heckscher 2018, p. 10) Our 1768 edition is no reprint of the 1752 publication, as is noted by Heckscher (1979) who describes the bibliographic and artistic complexities: "There are considerable variations in the plates found in copies with the 1752 title page, suggesting the book was kept in print over a long period of time, with the title page unchanged but other plates reworked or replaced as required. [.] Sayer republished 'A New Book of Ornaments' on 1 January 1768, the first, or more accurately the earliest dated, of his Lock reprints. The plate for the title page may have been lost; at any rate Sayer used in its stead the single cartouche Lock had made in 1746 [Heckscher no. III; compare his plate 11 and 33]. [.] At first glance the remaining plates appear unchanged; but close inspection of the 1768 V&A copy shows that, in comparison with the original edition, four plates are copies and four others have been extensively reworked." Clearly further analysis is required: the catalogue of the Redwood Library, which owns a copy of both editions, suggests that leaves 4-5, 7, 9-10, 12 were "originally issued" (sic!) as part of the authors' 1752 "A New Book of Ornaments: with Twelve Leaves. Consisting of Chimneys" (etc.); and that leaves 2-3, 6, 8, 11 were "redrawn" (sic!) after plates in that same work. The Redwood catalogue fails to mention anything about the engraved title-page, which is entirely new to the 1768 edition and is -- in our opinion -- far superior to its predecessor. Copies located: 1768 edition: Redwood Library (Newport, RI), British Library, V&A; 1752 edition: Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Winterthur, Redwood Library, British Library, V&A, Metropolitan Museum of Art (acquired in 1928 from Messrs Bernard Quaritch), Statsbibliothek Berlin. Our copy formed part of the library of the legendary American furniture connoisseur Howard Reifsnyder and was sold in 1929 at American Art Galleries (24 April, lot 19). Other than our copy, which was later sold in 1981 at Sotheby's London (16 March, lot 430), no copy of either edition of the present work is found in Rare Book Hub, which currently lists more than 13 million records in the Rare Book Transaction database. Subsequently in the library of Edmond Lincoln with his bookplate engraved by Leo Wyatt. Literature: Morrison Heckscher "Lock and Copland: a Catalogue of the Engraved Ornament" in: Furniture History (no. 15, 1979), cat. no. VII. Ibid., "Chippendale's 'Director': A Manifesto of Furniture Design" (in: The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, 74:4, Spring 2018, exhibition May 2018 - January 2019). Simon Jervis, Facts on File Dictionary of Design and Designers (1984). References: Berlin Katalog 1226 and Guimard, p. 518 list only the 1752 edition. Fiske Kimball & Edna Donnell, The Creators of the Chippendale Style (published in 1929 but still of value), p.117, Lewine, p. 321. Rosenthal Catalogue 88, no. 275. Guimard (p. 518) lists only Lock's "New Drawing Book of Ornaments, Shields" (etc.). Cataloguer's note: on the Metropolitan Museum of Art website there are (inexplicably) three images of the same plate (no. 10) from the 1752 edition, plus an image of another plate (unnumbered, but no. 7) which looks to us as if it was pressed down on a scanner beneath two pieces of wood. It is this unfortunate image that is now on Wikimedia Commons.
  • $12,500
  • $12,500
book (2)

Ulysses [in Japanese: “YurishÄ«zu,” translated by Sei Itō et al., published 1931-1934]. TOGETHER WITH: Doi Kōchi, “Joyce’s Ulysses” [in Japanese: “Joisu no YurishÄ«zu” published 1929 in the academic journal Kaizō]

Joyce, James Two vols., 8vo (205 x 155 mm). 654; 603 pp., COMPLETE. Original western bindings of flexible blue cloth, original dust jackets (chipped and somewhat soiled, jacket of v.1. split), later glassine jackets. Text with some foxing, light dampstaining to leaf extremities. Faint pen mark to fore-edge of vol. 2. With the keninshi (æ¤œå°ç ™) stamps of authenticity affixed above the colophons of both volumes as a countermeasure against conterfeits. On both of the stamps there is the seal (in red) of the family name (Itō) of the main translator Itō Sei. Overall in very good condition, suitable for exhibition and study. Protective light-blue cloth case. First printing of the first complete edition of Joyce's Ulysses in Japanese, which is at the same time the first complete non-European translation of the work. It also predates the publication of Ulysses in the United States (Random House, 1934) and England (John Lane, 1936). Partial translations of Ulysses had been published in Japanese literary magazines in the years leading up to Itō's translation. Doi Kōchi (1886-1979) translated and published part of Episode 18 as part of his article "Joisu no YurishÄ«zu" in Kaizō magazine (Issue 11 Number 2, Feb. 1929) -- of which a copy is INCLUDED IN THE PRESENT OFFERING; this article is widely considered the first (partial) Japanese translation of Ulysses, and the first influential academic introduction of the work to the Japanese. Volume two contains p. 516-597 which in subsequent printings were usually excised or not printed at all due to censorship; this is, of course, the Molly Bloom soliloquy. In this first printing, "truly offensive" words and some passages were intentionally left blank, but the majority of the text is indeed present. We have learned from Rose Counsell that "The second part of Ulysses, translated by Sei Ito, Sadamu Nagamatsu, and Hisanori Tsujino, was banned on May 30 [Showa 9] 1934 after it was delivered to the Ministry of the Interior because the entire monologue by Mrs. Bloom at the end of the book was 'a depiction of a middle-aged woman's lustful imagination,' which meant that the book was 'banned' for publication for fear of causing 'public disorder.'" (Sone 2002, p. 131). Both volumes in our set belong to the first printing of the first edition, of which 2,000 copies of vol. 1 were printed, and 1,500 of vol. 2. This Japanese edition was preceded by the plodding translations into German (1927) and French (1929). This first complete Japanese translation was undertaken by the novelist Itō Sei (1905-1969) with the assistance of Sadamu Nagamatsu and Hisanori Tsujino. Itō is the first truly great Japanese Joycean. He also translated "Lady Chatterley's Lover" in both an expurgated edition (1935) and an unexpurgated edition (1950) for which he and his publishers were tried and convicted for disseminating "pornography." In 1958 Itō produced "Saiban," a novel based on the resulting Chatterley Trials against himself and his publisher. In addition to introducing Western literature to a Japanese readership through his translations, Itō developed the Shin Shinri-shugi ("School of New Psychology") style, which was greatly influenced by Joyce's stream-of-consciousness technique. REFERENCE: Slocum and Cahoon D91 (not to be confused with D93 ["Not a complete translation"], namely the 209-page volume issued by the same publisher in 1931. Rarity on the market: currently Messrs. Peter Harrington are offering a copy with a presentation signature from the translator for $16,169. Condition: binding on vol. 2 warped and bowed, both volumes lacking dust-jackets. Rarity at auction: Rare Book Hub, which currently lists more than 13,570,000 records in the Rare Book Transaction database, locates only ONE copy that has ever appeared at auction, namely the Peter Howard / Serendipity copy: *third* printing of vol. 1, textblock detached from vol. 1, lacking dust-jackets of both volumes, offered at Bonhams (twice) in 2012. SELECTED LITERATURE: ❧ Ainge, Michael W. "An Examination of Joycean Influences on Itoh Sei." Comparative Literature Studies 30, no. 4 (1993): 325-50. ❧ "About James Joyce's method - 2 - Changes in Joyce's evaluation in Japan," Studies in the Humanities / Josai University Economics Society, Humanities Research Editorial Committee 1980.01, pp. 83-97 (in Japanese:「゠ェイãƒã‚ºãƒ»ã‚ ãƒ§ã‚¤ã‚ ã®æ‰‹æ •ã«ã¤ã„ã¦-2-æˆ‘å›½ã«ãŠã‘ã‚‹ã‚ ãƒ§ã‚¤ã‚ è •ä¾¡ã®æŽ ç§»ã€, 城西人文ç"ç / 城西大å¦çµŒæ ˆå¦ä¼šäººæ–‡ç"ç ç 集å§" å"¡ä¼š ç ) ❧ Keiko Wada, "James Joyce and Kobayashi Hideo," Wada, Keiko. "James Joyce and Kobayashi Hideo." Hikaku Bungaku, 31 (1988), iii-xviii. ❧ Hirohoshi Sone, "'Chatarei Fujin no Koibito' to 'Akutoku no Sakae' - Sengo no Honyaku Shōsetsu ("'Lady Chatterley's Lover' and 'Juliette' - Translated Novels of the Post-War Period"), in: Kokubungaku: Kaishaku to Kyozai no KenkyÅ« ("Japanese Literature: Research on Interpretation and Teaching Materials") 47:9 (July 2002) pp. 131-135. ______________ OFFERED WITH: Kōchi Doi, "Joisu no yurishÄ«zu" (Joyce's Ulysses) in a complete issue of Kaizō (Tōkyō: Kaizōsha, Shōwa 4 [February 1929]), vol. 11 no. 2, pp. 24-47 in the first pagination sequence. This volume of the academic journal Kaizō contains the very important article "Joisu no YurishÄ«zu" (Joyce's Ulysses) by Doi Kōchi (1886-1979), noted scholar of English literature. It is considered "the first influential academic introduction" of Ulysses to Japan (Ito 2017). In his article Doi also offers selected translations of Ulysses (including a portion of the infamous Molly Bloom soliloquy) and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Concerning Ulysses, Kōchi praises Joyce's new writing style and his meticulous planning. This article is ostensibly the first academic consideration of Joyce printed in Japanese, and served as a major influence in the development of discourse on Joyce in Japan. "Joyce had been already partially introduced to Japan in 1918 by Noguch
  • $8,800
  • $8,800
book (2)

[EARLY AMERICAN JUDAICA 1700]. [The Fountain Opened: or, The Great Gospel Priviledge of having Christ exhibited to Sinfull Men. Wherein also is proved that there shall be a National Calling of the JEWS]. Together with: [The Fountain Opened; or, The Admirable Blessings plentifully to be Dispensed at the National Conversion of the JEWS]

Willard, Samuel Ad 1: 16mo. Lacks pp. 1-14 (including title), and pp. 199-208, [2] at end. Bound in contemporary American sheep over scale-board (VERY WORN: SEE IMAGES). Preserved in a cloth protective case with 4-flap lig-free chemise. Ad 2: 40 pp. (lacks title-page). Stitched as issued (text stained). Preserved in a mylar L-sleeve. FIRST EDITION. Very rare early American Judaica, the last copy on the market appearing ninety-three years ago in a 1929 Goodspeed's catalogue (untraced). Seventeenth-century American books on the Jewish Conversion Question are almost unobtainable in any condition. This 1700 first edition of "The Fountain Opened" is distinguished by the fact that only SEVEN American Judaica books preceded it. The work is #8 in A.S.W. Rosenbach's "Books and Pamphlets by Jews or Relating to Them, Printed in the United States, From the Establishment of the Press." Whereas our copy is defective, it will be seen below that 17th century American Judaica are not only extremely rare in commerce, but are almost invariably defective: 1. Bay Psalm Book 1640. Last copy at auction: Sotheby's New York 2020 ($14M, lacking one leaf). 2. Mather, Mystery of Israel's Salvation 1669. Last copy at auction: Sotheby's London 1951 (GBP 17). 3. Keith, New-England's Spirit of Persecution 1693. Last copy in commerce: 1979 Nebenzahl catalogue ($18,000, purchased at Sotheby's London 1977 GPB 4,000); prior to that: 1935 (the Brinley-Goelet copy, sold at Anderson Galleries). 4. Keith, Truth Advanced 1694. Last copy at auction: Sotheby's New York 2021 (Dupuy-Smith-Zinman-Snider copy, est. $70,000 to $100,000 unsold; previously offered at Bloomsbury 2007 and Sotheby's New York 1981); prior to that: Sotheby's London 1977 (Sion College copy, GBP 4000); prior to that: 1930 Henkels catalogue ($62.50 lacking four leaves). 5. Jameson, Remembrance of Former Times 1697. No copy located at auction or in commerce. 6. Sewall, Phaenomena Quaedam Apocalyptica 1697. Last copy at auction: 1897 Bangs auction ($9, stained, title-mounted and imperfect). 7. Mather, Faith of the Fathers 1699. Last copy in commerce: 1946 Midland catalogue ($50). 8. Willard, Fountain Opened 1700 (THE PRESENT EDITION). Last copy in commerce: 1929 Goodspeed's Catalogue 181 (item 144), whereabouts unknown; prior to that: 1897 Brinley Sale (lot 920), whereabouts unknown. CENSUS OF COPIES: Massachusetts Historical, AAS, Huntington, JCB, Yale, Harvard (stained and tightly bound with some loss of print), American Jewish Historical Society (Rosenbach copy), Library of Congress, Library Company, Princeton (title mounted), Peabody Essex (defective), Boston Public, Boston Athenaeum, Emory, Salem Athenaeum. THE TEXT: Willard (1640-1707), a colonial clergyman, graduated from Harvard in 1659, served as acting president of Harvard from 1701 until his death. Here he argues that the conversion of Jewish people to Christianity is inevitable and would be "a blessing" for all concerned. Willard "claims that when the Jews finally return to God and accept Jesus as the true messiah, 'there shall be a more peculiar opening of Christ as a fountain of life,' leading to 'spiritual felicity.'" (see see Sarah Levy, An Annotated Bibliography of Printed American Judaica 1676-1835 in the N-Y Historical Society, recording the 1722 edition only, which incidentally is the third oldest printed American Judaica in the Library). CATALOGUER'S NOTE: Two title-issues of this first edition exist, one printed for Benjamin Eliot, the other for Samuel Sewell Junior. References to one or both issues appear in: Rosenbach 8. Sabin 104082. Singerman, Judaica Americana 6. Evans 960. ESTC W25228 and R39834. Wing (2nd ed.) W2277 and W2277A. +++++ SECOND EDITION: Whereas our copy lacks the title-page, it contains ALL the text on the Jewish Conversion Question. The last copy of this 1722 edition to appear on the market sold in the 1879 Brinley auction, which likewise lacked the title. CATALOGUER'S NOTE: Presented here for the first time (apparently) is a comparison between the first and second edition: the text of the first pages of the second edition is an abridgement of first pages of the first edition; then, on p. 6 begins the text relating to the Jewish Conversion Question, which in the first edition appears on pp. 106-127 (see below). The second edition has an Appendix by Sewell (pp. 31-40) likewise related to the Jewish Conversion Question, which is NOT found in the first. Rosenbach 23. Sabin 104083. Singerman 19. Evans 2406. ESTC W20331. +++++ PASTEDOWNS: Our copy has a remarkable bifolium pasted down inside the front and back covers. The first page of the text of the bifolium is pasted inside the back cover and reads: "Upon Mr. Samuel Willard, his first coming into the assembly, and praying, after a long and dangerous fit of sickness; November 21. 1700. at 3. in the afternoon, being a day of publick thanksgiving. Mr. Pemberton's text, Psal. 118.2" [Boston, 1720]. Pasted inside the front cover is the second page of text, which makes reference to the pages in THIS edition of "The Fountain Opened" thusly: "N[ote]. The 106-127, & 166 pages of this book, do more especially treat the calling of the JEWS." (NB: the text on p. 166 is actually one paragraph inserted "Rather than this page should stand empty"). The text of this bifolium was written by Samuel Sewall, as we learn from his diary entry for Nov. 21, 1700. The verse is in three stanzas, the first lines being "As Joseph let his brethren see Simeon both alive, and free." This is an EARLY specimen of New England poetry. No text is lacking here, as pages [1] and [4] of the bifolium are blank. Our copy, with double-rule at head of p. [2], is a reprint of Evans 952 which was printed in 1700. Copies at AAS, Boston Public, and Beinecke have Sewall's 1720 "Upon Mr. Samuel Willard" bound in; the Library Company copy (ex-Michael Zinman) has the bifolium pasted inside the boards, as here. Of this rare bifolium only two copies have appeared on the market: the Streeter
  • $9,500
  • $9,500
book (2)

[FIRST ITALIAN REFERENCE TO SHAKESPEARE 1726]. Il Cesare tragedia. Con alcune cose concernenti l’opera medesima

[Shakespeare]. CONTI, Antonio 8vo (227-172 mm). 185, [1] pp. Collation: A-Y4 Z6. With a printer's mark on title-page and p. 76 (Apollo with lyre) plus a large woodcut of Hercules and the Nemean Lion on final page. Contemporary "carta rustica" covered with brocade paper (somewhat chipped along the joints along with a few short tears, spine somewhat discolored). Completely unsophisticated and suitable for exhibition and study. Preserved in a linen cloth protective case. First Edition of Conti's "Il Cesare," a play which Gamba pronounces as "One of the best Italian tragedies," and which is further distinguished by containing THE FIRST ITALIAN REFERENCE TO SHAKESPEARE, and is at the same time "THE FIRST OPINION ON SHAKESPEARE EVER TO BE PRINTED OUTSIDE ENGLAND" (Petrone Fresco). Included also is a fascinating discussion of the Bard's "unruly genius" and the nature of the tragic drama itself. This Italian imprint was likely in Germany at a very early date: covering the original boards is an Augsburg "Chinoiserie" brocade paper, made in 1722 by Joseph Friedrich Leopold (1669-1727); the marvelous brocade features acrobats and an elephant, which according to Haemmerle "rank among the best examples of their kind" (p. 124, illustrated on p. 82). Prefixed to Conti's play (likewise a tragedy based on the life of Julius Caesar) is the author's famous letter to Jacopo Martelli, a portion of which is here translated: "'Sasper (i.e. Shakespeare) is the Corneille of the English, only far more irregular than Corneille, though, like him, he is full of great ideas and noble sentiments. I shall only mention his Caesar here. Sasper makes him die in the third act. The rest of the tragedy is taken up with Mark Antony's speech to the People, then with the wars and the deaths of Cassius and Brutus. Could there be a greater violation of the unities of time, action and place? But the English, before Cato, treat Aristotle's rules with contempt, for the aim of tragedy is to please, and the best is the one which is most successful in this. [.] Such were, I imagine, the views of most Italians, spoilt by Spanish comedies, in the seventeenth century" (pp. 54-55). Conti "is surprised that no one thought of translating the English plays of the time, since 'they are crowded with incident, like the Spanish, while their characters are certainly more natural and more pleasing.' The Histories especially he thinks might have proved most instructive to his countrymen then." (SOURCE: Lucy Collison-Morley, "Shakespeare in Italy," Stratford-upon-Avon, 1916, translating "Il Cesare" p. 54). J.G. Robertson has underlined how Conti's judgement was soon to influence critical opinion both in Italy and the rest of Europe: "The importance of [Conti's] statement is that here, for the first time, we find a critic outside England not merely regarding Shakespeare with respect, but hinting at the possibility of the continental nation learning from him. That Conti's own 'Cesare,' excellent though it is, has nothing Shakespearian about it, does not impair his argument, and his words fell on fruitful ground in both France and Germany." (SOURCE: "The Knowledge of Shakespeare on the Continent at the Beginning of the Eighteenth Century" in: The Modern Language Review, I, 1905-1906; see also Robertson's Studies in the Genesis of Romantic Theory in the Eighteenth Century (Cambridge, 1923) in which Conti's appreciation of Shakespeare is shown to have profoundly influenced the French and German romantic credo. Antonio Conti (1677-1749) was a cultured Venetian abbot who came to London in 1715, attracted by the fame of the Royal Society and the brilliancy of English scientific inquiry. He excelled in mathematics, philosophy, and belles lettres, and was provided with excellent introductions to English scholars and some of the leading scientists of the day, including Newton (see Conti's preface pp. 49-52). London's foul air disagreed with him, and he retired to the country house of the Duke of Buckingham where he was introduced to Shakespeare's works. The Duke had written tragedies on the subject of Caesar and Brutus, and Conti's ambition was fired to write a similar work. The result was "Il Cesare" which Conti read aloud in several literary circles in Paris, and copies of it circulated in manuscript. Ultimately Cardinal Bentivoglio, also in Paris serving as Papal Nuncio, had "Il Cesare" printed -- without Conti's permission -- and in 1726 the present volume was printed in Faenza. According to Petrone Fresco, this is "the really important date in the history of Shakespeare's reception not only in Italy but in a larger European perspective as it markes the first opinion on Shakespeare ever to be printed outside England." PROVENANCE: ink ownership inscription of Leonardo Trissino (dated 1827) --> ticket of the Roman booksellers C. E. Rappaport. REFERENCES: Gamba, No. 1881. Allacci 180. Salvioli 717. Poggiali (II), n. 331 ("Il Giulio Cesare vien giudicata una delle migliori (tragedie) che si abbiano in nostra lingua"). Olschki Cat. CXXXXI, n. 114 ("Natali, p. 955, fait un parallele entre cette tragedie et le Julius Caesar de Shakespeare"). DBI XXVIII, pp. 352-359. See also Victor Hamm's "Antonio Conti and English Aesthetics" (in: Comparative Literature, Vol. 8, No. 1 [Winter, 1956], pp. 12-27); N. Orsini, "Shakespeare in Italy" (in: Comparative Literature, Vol. 3, No. 2 [Spring, 1951], pp. 178-180). Petrone Fresco, "Shakespeare's Reception in 18th Century Italy: The Case of Hamlet" (Warwick PhD Thesis, 1991, p. 52-53 and passim.
  • $6,000
  • $6,000
[Original Photograph of an Abandoned House in Detroit]

[Original Photograph of an Abandoned House in Detroit]

[Unknown photographer] Original black and white photograph (6.75" x 9.25"), minor wear. ADDED: reproductions of photographs of Richard Austin and Coleman Alexander Young. AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICAL CANDIDATES CAMPAIGN FOR CHANGE IN RUINED DETROIT. Striking, anonymous photograph of an anonymous crumbling Detroit house, likely taken in 1969 or 1970. The only remaining function of this shell of a "home" was serving as a grotesque billboard advertising hope and change. Affixed to the ruined facade are campaign posters for three African American political candidates running in Detroit's current municipal elections. We have not been able to identify the photographer or if the photograph has been published elsewhere. To suggest that these candidates candidates faced "challenging" conditions would be a gross understatement. Indeed, voters' were justifiably enraged by Detroit's police brutality, widespread racism, extreme socioeconomic disparity, unemployment and underemployment, food deserts, and the virtual absence of educational opportunities for people of color. The wounds of the 1967 Detroit riots had not yet turned into scars. The African American candidates represented here are: RICHARD AUSTIN, CPA (for Mayor). Austin was the son of a coal miner who became the first African American in Detroit to win a mayoral primary; ultimately he lost the general election, one of the closest political contests in Detroit's history. Austin's bold campaign blazed the trail for future Black candidates. ROBERT TINDAL, Executive Secretary of the Detroit Chapter of the NAACP, ran for the Common Council and was elected. CLARA RUTHERFORD (for City Treasurer). Rutherford was not elected, but she was subsequently served for many years on the Detroit Public School Board.
  • $500
[FUNERARY LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN]. A memoir of Isabella Maria L.--

[FUNERARY LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN]. A memoir of Isabella Maria L.–, who happily departed this life in the eighth year of her age

[Anonymous] 32mo. 32pp. With an engraved frontispiece. Original publisher's red wrappers, lettered and decorated in gilt. A trifle rubbed and marked. Early ink gift inscription inside upper wrapper (bottom corner of lower wrapper stained). DREARY JUVENILE CONDUCT OF LIFE TALE. Our colleague Tom Lintern-Mole informs us that "the narrative concerns the exceptionally intelligent and nauseatingly pious eponymous heroine, who, when stricken by a mysterious illness, remains unwaveringly devout in her final hours, gladly embracing the prospect of death and salvation. The moral is less than comforting: 'My dear young readers, do you calculate upon a long life? - look at Maria, and be taught you may die soon. Do you shrink from the gloom and coldness of the grave? - look at Maria and learn how to smile upon it. Do you wish to die peacefully? - apply to that Jesus who took the sting out of her death, and he will take it out of yours.'" We have learned that the text of the present "Memoir" was printed in the Evangelical Magazine and Missionary Chronicle (vol. 10, March 1832, pp. 156-160, in the Obituaries section!) and the "Memoir" is signed "R" at the end. Did it precede the present chapbook? Here no author is credited, but it does contain three "Favorite Hymns of Isabella Maria" which do not appear in the Evangelical Magazine publication. Birmingham publisher Thomas Groom specialized in children's chapbooks; imprints with bearing his name were issued from 1830 to the 1850s. Scarce (apparently unrecorded) edition in good original state. Combined searches in COPAC, Worldcat and KVK locate only the following: Second edition (one copy worldwide: Free Library of Philadelphia); Third edition (one copy worldwide: Bodleian).
  • $750
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[JAPANESE DEPARTMENT STORE FABRICS]. Shiroki gonomi (“Shiroki’s taste”)

Oblong 4to (217 x 262 mm). [25] leaves. Complete, on double leaves, traditional East Asian binding style (fukurotoji). Non-original (?) boards, foxed, extremities worn, lacks tipped-in colophon, bookseller's sticker to lower pastedown. Soiling to first and last illustrations, considerable loss and large tear to margin of first leaf, not affecting illustration (SEE IMAGES). Occasional internal offsetting, light marks, and thumbing. Ex-ownership stamps to margins of most pages. Occasional tears to gutters and leaves. With faults, in good condition. "TOKYOSH MINER" (!) -- A PRESCIENT 1920s JAPANESE FABRIC AND KIMONO DESIGNS FOR CORPORATE IDENTITIES THROUGH FASHION, PREFIGURING AMERICAN CORPORATE BRANDING ON CLOTHES IN THE 1960s AND 70s. OF GREAT INTEREST TO HISTORIANS OF FASHION, COMMERCIAL DESIGN AND MARKETING. This is a remarkably early record of Japanese fashion design in the service of commercial branding, being a rare catalogue of 50 custom designed woodblock printed designs for Tenugui handcloths, furoshiki wrapping cloths, coats, and so on, all produced by the Shirokiya Gofukuten clothing store. Most of the designs feature the name of a corporation or company; designs for Sapporo Beer, Dunlop, a Taiwanese bank, and the Ōkura Shoten bookshop are featured alongside those for a hospital, an onsen, ryōkan hotels, and electricity, insurance, makeup, and clothing companies. Shirokiya was a major kimono shop based in Tokyo and one of the city's first department stores. During the Taishō Era, at which time our catalogue was published, corporate branding and advertising began to be seen as an important economic field and went through extensive development an art form, a career path, and a necessity for marketing. Companies began to invest in their advertising, and establish in-house advertising departments. The interrelationship between fashion and commercial branding in Japan during the 1920s has yet to be adequately explored. OCLC locates no copies located outside of Japan.
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[JAPANESE HERBARIUM]. Plantae Alpicolae Japonicae (Fasc. I: 1-100)

Yokohama Nursery Co., Ltd Together 100 specimens mounted on large folio sheets; each sheet is folded once to form 4 "pages," the first two being bland (protecting the specimens), the specimens are carefully mounted on "page 3," the verso of which is blank. The folded sheets measure 39 x 26 cm. Housed in two original loose boards, with tipped- in hand-painted title plate. Original binding string present at top of upper board, no others located. Corners lightly bumped. A few small scratches, a minor scrape, and a small stain to the upper board illustration. Specimen no. 30 lacks handwritten label but is captioned on the washi folio. Some wear, foxing, and occasional tears to folio extremities. Occasional water stains to folios also, not affecting specimens or labels. Housed in modern custom-made Paulownia wood box and purple cloth chemise (furoshiki). ASTONISHING COLLECTION OF ONE HUNDRED CUTTINGS OF JAPANESE ALPINE PLANTS GATHERED BY THE PIONEERING HORTICULTURALISTS AT THE YOKOHAMA NURSERY, GATHERED BETWEEN 1904 AND 1920 FROM SOME OF JAPAN'S HIGHEST MOUNTAINS. Each specimen in the collection is housed in a folded leaf of washi paper and is accompanied by a printed label filled out by hand. Information on each label includes the name of the specimen in Latin and Japanese, the mountain on which it grows, and the month and year of collection. The cuttings are preserved in REMARKABLY GOOD CONDITION, with almost no defects. The specimens were collected from over twenty mountains, some of which rank amongst the highest in Japan, including Mt. Fuji, Mt. Ontake, Mt. Akanagi, and Mt. Nantai. This is a unique 'hand-picked' compilation by the most prominent Japanese nursery of the Meiji period. A recent and very useful assessment of the significance of the Yokohama Nursery is given by Stephen Sinon in "Plant Talk: Yokohama Nursery Catalogs" (online at the New York Botanical Gardens website: Inside Our Collections, 5/5/21). The Yokohama Nursery continues to flourish to the present day. According to the nursery's own website, the firm was founded in February 1890 as the "Limited Liability Yokohama Ueki Shokai" with Uhei Suzuki as the representative. The nursery became the first Japanese trading company to import and export plants, and opened a branch office in San Francisco. In Oct. 1893, the firm changed name to Yokohama Nursery Co., Ltd. MUST BE SEEN TO BE FULLY APPRECIATED.
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[RUSSIAN IMPERIAL PORCELAIN FACTORY 1744-1904]. Imperatorskii farforovyi zavod: 1744-1904 / La Manufacture Imperiale de Porcelaine à St. Petersbourg

Wolf [i.e. Vol'f], Baron Nikolai Borisovich von Large and very heavy folio (370 x 275 mm). COMPLETE: viii, 422, plus 63 pages, including French summary ("La manufacture impériale de porcelaine à St. Petersbourg") on pp. 325-372. Photogravure frontispiece + 12 mounted heliograph plates numbered I-XII on facing tissue-guards + 1 chromolithograph plate showing 40 different makers' marks and monograms, 493 monochrome illustrations and 8 line-drawings within the text. Mid-twentieth (Swedish?) half calf, spine title lettered in Russian (spine a trifle scuffed, minor wear to headcap, spine leather with some speckling), decorated paper over boards, original gold-printed wrappers bound in (soiled, back wrapper with two large infills). Overall in excellent condition, certainly the nicest copy we've seen. MASSIVE AND MAGNIFICENT STATE-SPONSORED PUBLICATION, BEING THE OFFICIAL HISTORY OF THE IMPERIAL RUSSIAN PORCELAIN MANUFACTORY, PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED. Ours is a complete copy in excellent condition, completely unspoiled, with all tissue guards present which are essential as they identify the heliogravure plates opposite. This work remains indispensible for historians of Imperial Russian porcelain and is perhaps the most monumental illustrated history of its subject. Still frequently cited, it is a fact that most copies of this original edition, whether in public or private collections, are in some way defective and/or damaged, unlike ours. "The history of this enterprise [i.e. Imperial porcelain manufactory] is an important part of the general history of the Russian applied arts and is of great help for students of the national crafts of the 18th-19th centuries. [.] The book had a limited circulation. It is difficult to find a copy of it in a decent state" (Vengerov, Staraia Russkaia Kniga, 78). Treated chronologically according to the reigns of the Czars, this fundamental work documents the Imperial Porcelain Factory in St. Petersburg during 260 years; the factory was founded in 1744 by the chemist Dmitry Ivanovich Vinogradov by order by Empress Elisabeth, daughter of Peter the Great. During its first decades, the factory manufactured exclusively for the Romanov family and the Imperial Court. The editor was the manager of the Imperial porcelain factories, Baron Nikolai Borisovich von Wolf, a.k.a. Vol'f (1866-1940), who was "not only a ceramic expert, but an artist of cultured taste" (Source: The Jeweler's Circular 74:1 [1917] p. 99). Wolf also includes a chapter on makers' marks. Solon writes: "A state-supported establishment, the Imperial Factory of St. Petersburg has not, as a rule, disposed of its limited [porcelain] productions through the usual channels of the trade. Hard porcelain was made from the beginning; examples of it are rarely seen in the collections. Although chiefly consisting in imitations of the leading Oriental and European types, some of the choicest specimens offer particular interest. Many pieces decorated with portraits of the Imperial family, Russian landscapes, military groups and popular scenes, testify to the care that was taken to impart to the ware a national character." The importance and rarity of this original edition is attested by the 2008 reprint, a grossly inferior production marred by unsightly and completely unsatisfactory reproductions of the twelve beautiful heliograph plates and 493 in-text illustrations. Two copies of the 1906 edition are currently available on the market, their asking prices being $8900 + shipping from the U.K. (quarter vellum, slightly worn label on spine) and $9300 + shipping from Germany (half calf, spine rubbed with gold-tooled spine partly peeled off, corners and edges heavily rubbed and slightly peeled). We mention international shipping charges because the book alone weighs 13.5 lbs = 6.1 kg (!) REFERENCE: Louis Marc Solon, Ceramic Literature: An Analytical Index to the Works Published in All Languages (1910) p. 468. PROVENANCE: Paul Forestovsky, his gift in 1945 to --> The family Andersson, Stockholm --> Thomas Heneage Rare Books UK, sold in 1985 (for $1,380) to --> James Vaughn (1939-2022), great bibliophile whose library included the finest mathematics collection ever formed by a private individual: 125 rare and foundational books in the history of mathematics were donated to the Harry Ransom Center in 2021; our volume was kept in Vaughn's home in River Oaks, Houston, and sold to us by his estate through the agency W.P. Watson. Vaughn funded the Mathematical Association of America and helped support the solution of the 300-year-old math puzzle, Fermat's Last Theorum. With Vaughn's original invoice loosely inserted. With J.M.V. bookplate.
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[FIRST EDITION OF THE COMPLETE WORKS]. Scritti de Leonardo Pisano Matematico del Secolo Decimoterzo: II Liber Abbaci; Practica Geometriae, Opuscoli

2 vols., folio. Numerous diagrams; occasional light spotting and foxing. Modern brown morocco, uncut. In slipcases. EDITIO PRINCEPS OF THE WRITINGS OF FIBONACCI, THE GREATEST MATHEMATICIAN OF THE MIDDLE AGES, STILL THE ONLY COMPLETE EDITION PUBLISHED. IN THE HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS THIS UNABRIDGED EDITION OF THE LATIN TEXT IS ESSENTIAL, AND WAS THE VEHICLE BY WHICH FIBONACCI'S WORKS WERE DISSEMINATED THROUGHOUT MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY CULTURE. Rare in private ownership. Sold at Sotheby's forty years ago, ours is ONLY copy that has ever appeared at auction according to Rare Book Hub which currently lists more than 13 million records in the Rare Book Transactions database; furthermore, it is the only copy currently available on the market. Leonardo of Pisa (ca. 1170-1250), a.k.a. Fibonacci, is justly considered to be the most important mathematician of the Middle Ages, if only for being the first Christian mathematician to systematically explain Arabic numerals. Indeed, the mathematical renaissance in the West began with him according to George Sarton. The first volume contains the the 'Liber Abaci,' devoted to problems of computation including algebraic quadratic problems; here Fibonnaci here introduces Arabic numerals, the fraction bar, and the numerical approach to square roots and cube roots. The second volume contains the 'Practica Geometriae,' devoted to the application of algebra to geometric problems; 'Flos,' written for Frederick II in answer to a number of mathematical problems posed by Magister Johannes; "Letter to Magister Theodorus" developing a general method for the solution of indeterminate problems; and finally the great "Liber quadratorum," described by Vogel as "a first-rate scientific achievement and showing Fibonacci as "a major number theorist." Vogel continues to assert (correctly) that Fibonacci was far ahead of his time, without a successor until 1621, when Bachet made the text of Diophantus available which in turn stimulated Fermat in founding number theory. "In addition to the antique manuscripts, there also undeniably exists, however, a vehicle that, notwithstanding the inadequate and problematic access to the manuscript sources, has spread the text of the Fibonaccian treatise throughout modern and contemporary culture: the well known Italian mathematician and historian of science Baldassarre Boncompagni Ludovisi, in fact, in his brilliant far-reaching project which brought into focus the personality of Fibonacci, as well as his surviving works, realized and published in Rome in 1857 [i.e. THIS EDITION] what can with ample justification be defined the editio princeps of the entire treatise." (Germano). Despite the flaws in Boncompagni's work, "it of course was a noteworthy editorial operation, especially as it made available in print to a vast number of interested parties a work which had almost fallen into oblivion and that up to that time could be consulted only from its manuscript sources, with all the difficulties and inconvenience which this could entail." (Germano). It is fair to say that Fibonacci's contributions to mathematics languished unappreciated until the rediscovery of his texts and their presentation in the present -- surprisingly rare -- volumes. Despite its flaws, Boncompagni's edition serves as the basis for only complete translation of the Liber Abici made into a modern language thus far, namely Lawrence E. Sigler's "Fibonacci's Liber Abaci. A Translation into Modern English of Leonardo Pisano's Book of Calculation" (2002). Whereas Sigler corrected some errors he introduced many others, usually on account of inability to understand and effectively translate the Renaissance Latin text. Before Boncompagni's edition, only the "Prologus" and Chapter XV of Fibonacci's Liber Abaci had received a respectful circulation in print that was due to G. Libri's "Histoire des sciences mathématiques en Italie, dépuis la renaissance des lettres, jusqu'à la fin du dixseptième siècle" (Paris, 1838) vol. II, respectively pp. 287-290 and 307-476. REFERENCES: Giuseppe Germano, "The Modern Dissemination in Print of the 'Liber Abaci' and its Pitfalls," Part 3 of his New Editorial Perspectives on Fibonacci's Liber Abaci (in: Reti Medievali Rivista, 14:2 [Firenze University Press, 2013], pp. 161-163 and passim). George Sarton, Introduction to the History of Science II, p. 611 et seq. On Boncompagni, see V. Cappelletti's in DBI, XI, pp. 704-709. M. Mazzotti, "For Science and for the Pope-King: Writing the History of the Exact Sciences in 19th-century Rome" in: British Journal for the History of Science, 33 [2000], pp. 257-282, especially pp. 259-265. On the strengths and weaknesses of Boncompagni's edition see R.E. Grimm, "The Autobiography of Leonardo Pisano" in: The Fibonacci Quarterly, 11 [1973], pp. 99-104. John D. Stanitz, Sources of Science and Technology: an Exhibit of One Hundred and One Books and Documents (Kent State, 1972) no. 14 (this copy). PROVENANCE: John D. Stanitz, (his sale Sotheby's New York, 25 April 1984, lot 268, with , with Sotheby's label on the slipcase of vol. II) --> Messrs. Bernard Quaritch (June 1984 Mathematics list, $3,000) --> James M. Vaughn (1939-2022), enigmatic American philanthropist and bibliophile who assembled the finest mathematics collection ever formed by a private individual: 125 rare and foundational books in the history of mathematics were donated to the Harry Ransom Center in 2021; our volume was kept in Vaughn's home in River Oaks, Houston, and sold to us by his estate. Vaughn funded the Mathematical Association of America and helped support the solution of the 300-year-old math puzzle, Fermat's Last Theorum; it is therefore meaningful that he owned this copy of the Editio Princeps of the complete works of Fibonacci. With J.M.V. bookplate in each volume.
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[ANCIENT ALPHABETS]. Grammaire comparée des langues bibliques. Application des découvertes de Champollion à l’étude des langues dans lesquelles ont été écrites les livres saints

Together 2 vols., folio. Paper stock untrimmed. Bound in contemporary French blue quarter basane over blue marbled endpapers (headcaps of both vols. chipped, that of vol. 1 partially defective, some wear to covers and binding extremities). In vol. 1 the first two binder's blanks excised. Original front wrapper of vol. 2 bound in. Ad 1: an annotated interleaved copy of the 1852 edition of "Histoire et analyse des alphabets sémitiques et européens." 3 ff., 56 pp. with annotations + 25 plates (some folding) with descriptive text on facing tissue guard. Ad 2: an interleaved, unannotated copy of the 1858 edition of "Grammaire comparée de l'hébreu, du chaldéen, du syriaque, de l'arabe et de l'égyptien." viii, 208 pp. THE AUTHOR'S OWN INTERLEAVED COPY WITH ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS IN VOL. 1, INTENDED TO BE INCORPORATED INTO THE SECOND EDITION. Here Eugène Van Drival, a well respected and extremely prolific orientalist and philologist, argues that the art of writing, and the many forms of alphabets, may have originated from one "Ur-alphabet" which went through centuries of alterations through time and necessity. Several scholars had been already been working on such a theory (notably Lamb, Joshua Prinsep, and M. Forster) but Van Drival attributes not only Hebrew, but all Semitic tongues generally (including Greek and Latin), to what he describes as the original hieroglyphic alphabet of Egypt. To illustrated his "discovery," our author arranges, in separate pages in a perpendicular column, each body of hieroglyphic signs which represent one alphabetic letter. In side columns he presents the Egyptian Prototype, its derivative, or imitative letter, the property of many Eastern Alphabets. Van Drival suggests commonalities, a resemblance to the (assumed) Parent Model. His theory of a subsequent derivation from this one root merits cautious examination. Through a completely novel approach, our author "proves" his theory by translating the Lord's Prayer into the Phoenician (i.e. Samaritan tongue), and printing it on transparent paper. The letters are to examined from right to left (according to Eastern usage); by turning over the page and reading the letters transparently from left to right (according to Western usage) the text becomes an antiquated Latin version of the Pater Noster. Juxtaposing the Lord's Prayer is the Phoenician alphabet according to Montfaucon and others, asserting that Phoenician and Latin letters belong to the same form. Van Drival then provides a lithograph of alphabets that read from left to right (Greek, Coptic, ancient Greek) with a "secret alphabet" in Latin of various periods. The annotations in this, the author's own copy, include numerous notes, additional references; long quotations in Greek; and (inside the front cover of vol. 1), testimonies of Monseigneur Parisis, Bishop of Arras, on the value of this work from the point of view of the study of oriental languages. CONTENTS: Part I: "History and analysis of the Semitic and European alphabets" (dated 1852 but published 1853), with numerous annotations in the margins and on the interleaved pages. A revised second edition, incorporating some -- but apparently not all -- the notes herein would be published under the title "De l'origine de l'écriture" (1873), for which a third edition would appear in 1879. Part II: "Comparative grammar of Hebrew, Chaldean, Syriac, Arabic and Egyptian" (1858), interleaved but not annotated. The author, Eugène Van Drival (1815-1887), was an erudite philologist, a Catholic priest, and an antiquarian in the best sense of the word. He served as director of the great seminary of Arras, secretary general of the Arras Academy of Sciences, Letters and Arts, and was full member of the Society of Antiquaries of Morinie. Van Drival became passionate about Champollion's work following the discovery of the sarcophagus in the Musée de Boulogne. It was there that he met a young scholar to whom he taught the first rudiments of Hebrew, a certain Auguste Mariette (1821-1881) who went on to become one of foremost Egyptologist of his day. The incomplete (!) bibliography of Van Drival's writings published well before his death, already lists 80 articles on an usually broad range of antiquarian interests (SOURCE: "Liste des ouvrages publiés par M. le chanoine Van Drival," Arras, 1882).
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[ENGLISH ROCOCO DESIGNS]. A new book of ornaments: consisting of tables, chimnies, sconces, spandles, clock cases, candle stands, chandeliers, girondoles, &c

Folio (341 x 230 mm). Complete with 12 leaves (including title-page). Engraved throughout. Early (original?) drab blue wrappers (a little soiled), bound by Riviere in later red half morocco over comb-marbled boards, comb-marbled pastedowns and endleaves, one or possibly two labels removed from inside front cover leaving a tape residue. Each plate carefully numbered in pencil. In VERY FRESH STATE, WITH FINE IMPRESSIONS OF ALL THE PLATES. MATTHIAS LOCK WAS THE FIRST ENGLISH DESIGNER TO CAPTURE THE SPIRIT OF THE FRENCH HIGH ROCOCO; HE INSPIRED THOMAS CHIPPENDALE AND WAS LIKELY TO HAVE BEEN HIS MENTOR. These imaginative and exuberant designs are indicative of Lock's seemingly effortless style. "His scrolls, dragons, flowers, masks, birds and Chinese men are all handled with a zest and freedom rare in the English product, with a strong dash of asymmetry. [.] This evidence of an ability to teach design, combined with Lock's activity as a Rococo designer from the early 1740s, makes him a better candidate than Darly as Chippendale's mentor" (Jervis, p. 302). Our suite of twelve engravings is absolutely complete; it is one of a series of rare but important publications by Lock which presented a distinctly "British" form of Rococo scrollwork and ornament to designers and furniture makers, its influence broad and considerable. "Matthias Lock (1710-1765) [was] the carver who first introduced the French Rococo to woodworkers in London. During the 1740s he published a half-dozen modest cahiers, or suites, of ornamental designs [.] all in the Rococo taste and executed in a loose, freehand etching manner. In 1752, together with the engraver Henry Copland (1706-1753), he coauthored 'A New Book of Ornaments,' the largest and most ambitious English publication to date. With its chimneypieces, pier glasses, and candlestands, all professionally engraved, it was the forerunner of Chippendale's great folio" (Heckscher 2018, p. 10) Our 1768 edition is no reprint of the 1752 publication, as is noted by Heckscher (1979) who describes the bibliographic and artistic complexities: "There are considerable variations in the plates found in copies with the 1752 title page, suggesting the book was kept in print over a long period of time, with the title page unchanged but other plates reworked or replaced as required. [.] Sayer republished 'A New Book of Ornaments' on 1 January 1768, the first, or more accurately the earliest dated, of his Lock reprints. The plate for the title page may have been lost; at any rate Sayer used in its stead the single cartouche Lock had made in 1746 [Heckscher no. III; compare his plate 11 and 33]. [.] At first glance the remaining plates appear unchanged; but close inspection of the 1768 V&A copy shows that, in comparison with the original edition, four plates are copies and four others have been extensively reworked." Clearly further analysis is required: the catalogue of the Redwood Library, which owns a copy of both editions, suggests that leaves 4-5, 7, 9-10, 12 were "originally issued" (sic!) as part of the authors' 1752 "A New Book of Ornaments: with Twelve Leaves. Consisting of Chimneys" (etc.); and that leaves 2-3, 6, 8, 11 were "redrawn" (sic!) after plates in that same work. The Redwood catalogue fails to mention anything about the engraved title-page, which is entirely new to the 1768 edition and is -- in our opinion -- far superior to its predecessor. Copies located: 1768 edition: Redwood Library (Newport, RI), British Library, V&A; 1752 edition: Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Winterthur, Redwood Library, British Library, V&A, Metropolitan Museum of Art (acquired in 1928 from Messrs Bernard Quaritch), Statsbibliothek Berlin. Our copy formed part of the library of the legendary American furniture connoisseur Howard Reifsnyder and was sold in 1929 at American Art Galleries (24 April, lot 19). Other than our copy, which was later sold in 1981 at Sotheby's London (16 March, lot 430), no copy of either edition of the present work is found in Rare Book Hub, which currently lists more than 13 million records in the Rare Book Transaction database. Subsequently in the library of Edmond Lincoln with his bookplate engraved by Leo Wyatt. Literature: Morrison Heckscher "Lock and Copland: a Catalogue of the Engraved Ornament" in: Furniture History (no. 15, 1979), cat. no. VII. Ibid., "Chippendale's 'Director': A Manifesto of Furniture Design" (in: The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, 74:4, Spring 2018, exhibition May 2018 - January 2019). Simon Jervis, Facts on File Dictionary of Design and Designers (1984). References: Berlin Katalog 1226 and Guimard, p. 518 list only the 1752 edition. Fiske Kimball & Edna Donnell, The Creators of the Chippendale Style (published in 1929 but still of value), p.117, Lewine, p. 321. Rosenthal Catalogue 88, no. 275. Guimard (p. 518) lists only Lock's "New Drawing Book of Ornaments, Shields" (etc.). Cataloguer's note: on the Metropolitan Museum of Art website there are (inexplicably) three images of the same plate (no. 10) from the 1752 edition, plus an image of another plate (unnumbered, but no. 7) which looks to us as if it was pressed down on a scanner beneath two pieces of wood. It is this unfortunate image that is now on Wikimedia Commons.
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[AMERICAN CHROMOLITHOGRAPHY]. [Nurseryman’s Guide and Sample Book of Fruit Seeds / Catalogue of Trees, Ornamental Ivy and Hedges]

Album of 63 chromolithographs / half-tone prints overprinted in one or two colors depicting plants and flowers, in some instances in front of homes, also fruit specimens, all with full-page descriptive text on verso. Black cloth (light soiling, spine somewhat worn), front cover with name "Fairview Nurseries Geneva N.Y." printed in red. ART IN THE SERVICE OF COMMERCE: A NURSERYMAN'S FRUIT AND TREE CATALOGUE IN VIBRANT COLORS. SEED CATALOGUES SUCH AS THIS ONE WERE HEAVILY USED AS VEHICLES OF SALE BY TRAVELING SEED PEDDLERS THROUGHOUT SMALL TOWN AMERICA, AND THEREFORE ALMOST NEVER SURVIVE IN GOOD CONDITION, AS HERE. "Nurserymen's plates were an American innovation. They were made by various methods, the most distinctive being painted in watercolors. In design and coloring, these plates were more akin to folk painting than to the commercial art of their time" (Charles von Ravenswaay, "Drawn and Colored from Nature," in Antiques Magazine, March 1983, pp. 594-599). Vintage Nurseryman's Guides provide a "floracopia" of American chromolithography at its apogee. All the plates have descriptive text on the versos, giving name of the plant and information on color, fragrance, taste, preferred growing season, and other particulars. Our catalogue was issued by the Fairview Nurseries of Geneva, New York, which evidently offered a wide selection of apples, peaches, pears, plums, berry fruits, flowers, ornamental shrubs and trees. Most fruit seed catalogues are undated because the plates were literally assembled according to which seeds were (or would be) in stock, as here. The plates in our Sample Book are preserved in extremely fresh state and MUST BE SEEN to be fully appreciated.
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[AMERICAN CHROMOLITHOGRAPHY]. [Nurseryman’s Guide / Sample Book / Fruit Seed Catalogue]

Album of 91 chromolithographs, principally by Stecher Lithograph Co. of Rochester. Later flexible smooth calf, inner hinges exposed. Plates with some wear or light soiling. ART IN THE SERVICE OF COMMERCE: AN AMERICAN NURSERYMAN'S FRUIT SEED CATALOGUE DEPICTING FULLY MATURED FRUIT IN VIBRANT CHROMOLITHOGRAPHY. SEED CATALOGUES SUCH AS THIS ONE WERE HEAVILY USED AS VEHICLES OF SALE BY TRAVELING SEED PEDDLERS THROUGHOUT SMALL TOWN AMERICA, AND THEREFORE ALMOST NEVER SURVIVE IN GOOD CONDITION, AS HERE. "Nurserymen's plates were an American innovation. They were made by various methods, the most distinctive being painted in watercolors. In design and coloring, these plates were more akin to folk painting than to the commercial art of their time" (Charles von Ravenswaay, "Drawn and Colored from Nature," in Antiques Magazine, March 1983, pp. 594-599). Vintage Nurseryman's Guides provide a "floracopia" of American chromolithography at its apogee. Most plates have brief captions giving name of the plant and information on color, fragrance, taste, preferred growing season, and other particulars. Most fruit seed catalogues are undated because the plates were literally assembled according to which seeds were (or would be) in stock; however, several plates in our nurseryman's guide are dated, and range from 1887 to 1898. Most of the chromos in our collection are preserved in extremely fresh state and MUST BE SEEN to be fully appreciated.
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[GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE]. A Collection of Designs for Rural Retreats as Villas. Principally in the Gothic and Castle Styles of Architecture

Large 4to. [4], xii, 43, [1] pp. + [3] page list of published works by John Malton and James Malton. Complete with aquatint half-title and 34 plates of which 29 are stunningly hand-colored and 5 are full-page plates (plans) printed in sepia only. The plates are watermarked "Whatman 1801." Contemporary acid-treated calf, unusually acid-treated with decorative lozenges surrounded by a gilt Greek-key border, flat spine, black lettering piece partially chipped, binding extremities somewhat worn, black, white, red and green marbled pastedowns and endpapers, overall in BEAUTIFUL CONDITION, the paper and plates unspoiled and extremely fresh. EXQUISITELY HAND-COLORED COPY, RARE THUS. Only edition of this very little-known, beautifully illustrated volume of imaginative designs of country "tiny houses" houses and small castles in the neo-Gothic style. In his own words the author / artist asserted that the goal of the present work was "to reject the Grecian and Roman mode of fabrick, for more picturesque forms, and less expensive decoration." The influence of Uvedale Price was in evidence here, with landscapes becoming wilder (i.e. more picturesque), and with unusual architectural designs and plans; see for instance the bizarre three-sided villas and castles with their elongated domes and wings. It would appear that our architect was influenced by Claude, Salvator Rosa, and Vanbrugh. The designer, James Malton, was not only an engraver but a watercolorist; was the present copy hand-colored by him? According to Hardie, "Malton as a topographical draughtsman had few equals, and the plates have a distinction of their own in addition to their value as an architectural record." James Malton (1761-1803) was born in London and came to Ireland with his father Thomas Malton the Elder, likewise an architectural draftsman. Like his father he was a professor of perspective and geometry, and like his brother Thomas (the Younger) produced some very fine architectural drawings. For three years worked in the studio of the famous Irish architect James Gandon. A talented designer recognized at the time, he regularly participated in exhibitions at the Royal Academy in London between 1791 and 1803. Malton was famed for his "Picturesque and Descriptive View of the City of Dublin" (1799) whereas our collection of gothic architectural designs has been completely overlooked by architectural historians -- unfortunate because his proposed designs for "rural retreats" (i.e. gothic houses and small castles) exhibit imagination with fine perspectives as well as their plans. Ours is the only copy currently on the market, colored or uncolored (but compare our gorgeous copy to the foxed and browned copy of Malton's "Dublin" currently on offer for $26,150). Since 1931 eight other copies of Malton's "Collection of Designs for Rural Retreats" have appeared at auction according to RBH (to which we add the Vroom copy); NONE of them were hand-colored, and only a few of them were actually worth owning. Searching through the first 20 Weinreb catalogues and the first 54 Pagan catalogues produce zero copies (colored or uncolored); Weinreb's Catalogue 35 lists one copy, which was uncolored (item 181). Yale Center for British Art holds 20 of Malton's preparatory drawings for the "Collection of Designs" and two copies of the published work (one is ex-Abbey). NEITHER ONE is hand-colored, nor is the Beinecke copy. To digitized copy on HathiTrust (the UC Berkeley, bound in library buckram) is not only uncolored but it makes Malton's work look MISERABLE and hardly compares with our hand-colored copy, which MUST BE SEEN TO BE FULLY APPRECIATED. References: Abbey, Life in England no. 35. Berlin Katalog 2311. Cataloguer's note: There are two other Malton works in the Millard Collection (now NGA); the Millard Catalogue of British Books mentions our, but he never owned a copy it and there is no copy of it in NGA or in many other "obvious" repositories. Provenance: Fonsie Mealy 2014 (EUR 6,600).
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[VETERINARY BROADSIDE WARNING OF CATTLE PLAGUE].Il Magistrato de’ Conservatori Generali di Sanità. Sul primo aviso da Noiultimamente avuto, che il morbo Epidemico denominato infiammazione di Polmone

Huge letterpress broadside (1070 x 360 mm), printed on 2 1/2 folio sheets, edges untrimmed. A few sections underlined and annotated in a contemporary hand in the left blank margin (worn; paper extensions mainly in the right margin; prominent horizontal central fold, other folds reinforced on verso with occasional lost of one or two letters). A remarkable survival, preserved in mylar L-sleeve backed with lig-free board. GIGANTIC, APPARENTLY UNRECORDED BROADSIDE ISSUED BY THE STATE MAGISTRATE WARNING AGAINST THE 1744 "CATTLE PLAGUE" EPIDEMIC IN NORTHERN ITALY, A FLIMSY ATTEMPT AT GOVERNMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND DISEASE CONTROL. The disease described herein was almost certainly RIDERPEST, a highly contagious viral infection which can produce a 100% death rate among herds (the colloquial term "cattle plague" is a misnomer because sheep and goats can also be afflicted by it). The 1744 outbreak had been observed in The Netherlands in the months before our broadside was printed, but the Magistrate mentions only the reports from Franche Comté. While the devating consequences of cattle plague in The Netherlands are well researched, its effects in Italy at this same time are not well-known, probably due to the comparatively low survival rate of contemporary documentation. Indeed, no other copy of our broadside can be found. Here the Magistrate of the Conservatory General of Health gives warning signs of the infection, and preventativemeasures against its spread, including mandatory "lazarettos" (quarantine areas) for livestock. The "nature and the signs" of the disease is addressed, along with a dubious (and ineffectual) attempt at a remedy which involved cold water, salt, vinegar, pepper, and camphor; "Rimedi preservativi" prophylactic measures are recommended, and steps for "fumigating" (i.e. disinfecting) livestock and their owners are given. The urgency of Magistrate's is justified: less than 30 years earlier, through circuitous trade routes, cattle plague had spread like wildfire even the most remote regions of Eastern and Western Europe and Britain. Such trade networks had become larger and more sophisticated in order to supply food to growing urban centers. Throughout history, outbreaks of cattle plague led to severe economic crisis: the resulting famine, inflation, civil unrest and overall moral decay destabilized societies with crippling effect, as had been seen in The Netherlands in the first outbreak of 1713-1720. Wherever and whenever cattle plague emerged, religious figures, government officials, technocrats, and the public wrested with the meaning and consequences of these disasters. Students and scholars of socio-economics in the Early Modern era would do well do incorporate primary sources of veterinary history in their research. NB: Interested parties are advised that this huge broadside will be shipped folded.
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[OPTICAL ILLUSIONS]. Motti piacevoli dedicati al bel sesso (and 3 additional engravings)

Together 4 items: one pamphlet and three separate engravings (see below). Small collection of rare and curious double-image optical illusions made by the very eccentric Lampridio Giovanardi (1811-1878), an Italian ebonist, inventor, and erstwhile engraver. For the distraction and amusement of his family and friends he created, in very limited numbers, small pamphlets and engravings, all crudely executed and hastily printed, of curious optical illusions known as "quadri cangianti" (changing pictures). Only about 25 engravings by Giovanardi are known today, including the the sheet of anthropomorphic capital letters known as the "Alfabeto Figurator" (ca. 1860) of which there is a a copy at Princeton Graphic Arts and the Beinecke. Our pamphlet is entitled "Motti piacevoli dedicati al bel sesso" (Dedicated to the Fairer Sex) and was presented at the Universal Exhibition in Paris in 1867 includes various proverbs and sayings, along with 6 crudely executed woodcut double image illusions which one can observe from two sides. This pamphlet is not listed in KVK or Worldcat. The three loose engravings depict similar surrealistic optical illusions: there is an image of a pelican, which (with a bit of imagination) becomes a portrait of pope Pius VII in prayer; an anthropomorphic landscape that when rotated 90 degrees appears as a man's face in the tradition of Merian, Hollar and Kircher; and a man with a billowing costume which when turned upside down can be seen as the petal of a leaf. Giovanardi is better known for his astonishly rendered tables that were decorated in the "quadretti faccettati" style and which -- unusually -- were made with non-wood materials such as metal and gold (Giovandari considered himself to be the inventor of this method). His ornamental marquetry was much appreciated in Italy, France and England. His "Italia Rotonda" table is considered to be one of the most elaborately inlaid Italian tables ever created. He presented another, equally fabulous inlaid table (the so-called "Crystal Palace table) at the Great Exhibition in London 1851 where it won a Gold Medal. Both tables are in the Collection Attilio Montorsi (Vignola) and have been meticulously described by Manrico Mezzi in two gigantic monographs (see below). Nava writes: "[.] Many collections[of illustrations]bound and adorned by him thus came to delight the winter evenings of his grandchildren and great-grandchildren, together with toys he himself built for his children! And at family vigils, sometimes cheered up by his witty and caustic sayings, among his relatives and friends, he amused himself by circulating certain little books of "Pleasant Sayings Dedicated to the Beautiful Gender".in which witty proverbs, in couplets of rhymed hendecasyllables, alternate with small wooden engravings depicting heads of men, women or animals which change into a different image when the paper is turned upside down. He printed them in Paris, and collected many copies of these burlesque drawings in a separate booklet." (p. 166). CONTENTS OF THE COLLECTION: 1. Motti piacevoli dedicati al bel sesso ("Pleasant Sayings Dedicated to the Fairer Sex"). Paris: 186[7]. 12mo, 12 pp. text printed on one side only + 6 woodcuts including two on pink paper, all on paper of various sizes, original yellow printed wrappers. Small holes in paper on various parts, otherwise in a good condition. 2. Il Pellicano. Immagine di Pio VII [Pelican. Image of Pius VII]. [S.l., n.d.]. Copper engraving, sheet: 210 x 155 mm, platemark: 155 x 107 mm. Very good. 3. [Anthropomorphic Landscape]. [S.l., n.d.]. Copper engraving, sheet: 210 x 310 mm; platemark: 185 x 237 mm. Folds in margins. 4. [A Man / A Leaf]. [S.l., n.d.]. Copper engraving, sheet: 290 x 225 mm, platemark: 200 x 135 mm. Portion of engraving not inked properly (SEE IMAGE), but the print itself is in a good condition. LITERATURE: Maria L. Nava, Una Testimonianza dell'Ottocento Provinziale. Lampridio Giovanardi e le sue tavole intarsiate, Atti e memorie, R. Deputazione di storia patria per le provincie modenesi, Ser. VIII, no. 2 (1949), pp. 163-171. Manrico Murzi, Italia Rotonda: I fasti italici in un tavolo intarsiato da Lampridio Giovanardi. Vignola: A. Montorsi, 2007. Ibid., Intarsio per un'esposizione. Vignola: A. Montorsi, 2014.
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STREET ARCHITECTURE. A Series of Shop Fronts and Facades. Characteristic of and Adapted to Different Branches of Commerce

Large folio (370 x 260 mm). With 22 steel-engraved plates including engraved title-page, most with original tissue guards (some unobjectionable intermittent foxing, mostly on the blank versos of the plates or tissue guards opposite on which there is also some offsetting). Original publisher's 3/4 red cloth by Budden of Southampton (rebacked with new red cloth spine), dark gray/brown illustrated boards reproducing engraved title-page (boards scuffed and worn with some staining on front cover). Each plate and tissue guard bears the blind stamp of the Worcester (England) Public Library, large bookplate removed from inside of front cover. Although ex-library, this volume is in excellent condition. UNJUSTLY OBSCURE VOLUME OF COMMERCIAL VICTORIAN "STREET ARCHITECTURE" PRESENTED BY TWO LITTLE KNOWN ARCHITECTS. THE FABULOUS PLATES IN OUR COPY ARE APPARENTLY PRINTED ON THICK PAPER AND ARE LARGELY DEVOID OF THE PERSISTENT FOXING THAT MARS MOST COPIES. Street architecture was the most conspicuous expression of the high Victorian neo-Gothic and neo-Classical style, and in this way our volume is a veritable "time capsule." "Victor Delassaux and John Elliott's 'Street Architecture' contains 22 plates of sometimes extraordinary designs, and true to the book's subtitle they are directly related to the merchandise on sale. The practical requirements of trade are cleverly connected with the advantageous display of various merchandise in designs that accommodate a wide variety of contingencies. [.] These plates and their descriptions show Delassaux and Elliott refining symbolism of a traditional sort, using a combination of whimsy and common sense in effective merchandising ploys" (SOURCE: Julia Scalzo, "Street Architecture": Nineteenth-Century Urban Buildings and the British Architectural Profession, Univ. Toronto PhD Thesis, 2000, pp. 39-40). The designs for shop fronts or facades depicted herein are: a Butcher's shop, Poulterer or bird Fancier, Publishing Bookseller's shop, Grocer and tea dealer's shop, Hosiers and Outfitter's shop, Boot and Shoemaker's warehouse, Jeweler's shop, Chemist and druggist's shop, Upholsterer's establishment, a Nurseryman, Florists & Seedsman's shop and greenhouse, Publishing Printseller's shop, Showroom & House, Retail Bookseller's shop, Laceman's shop, Paper hanger's warehouse, Hotel and assembly rooms, Wholesale and retail drapery establishment, Wine and spirit warehouse, and finally a Private house. The exceptionally fine and technically perfect steel-engravings were executed by Philip Brannon, a brilliant choice, as may be seen in his minute details of shading and shadow. In a remarkable section on "Designs in Domestic Gothic," our architects harken back to the ecclesiastical architecture of Middle Ages, and "how readily this style admits of application to Street Architecture." They offer proposed designs for commercial facades in the fully developed Victorian neo-Gothic style, here represented in the facade of a Grocer's shop, a Hosiers and Outfitter's shop, and a Boot and Shoemaker's warehouse. Hunnisett, Steel-engraved book illustration in England, Chapter 8. RIBA p. 277. Comment: there is one other copy of this book currently on the market, and we beg the reader to observe that it is available for a significantly lower price than ours. Caveat emptor: from what we have seen, the bespoke copy is horribly foxed, the boards are detached, and the spine has fallen off. Mindful are we that international shipping costs would be added to the expense of such a purchase.