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Descripción de diferentes piezas de Historia Natural de las mas del ramo marítimo representadas en setenta y cinco láminas

Cuba; natural history] Parra, Antonio First scientific book printed in Havana, and the most profusely illustrated. 1787. Habana. Imprenta de la Capitania General. 4to, (198 x 150 mm). 1 ff., 4 pp., 195 pp., 3 ff., 75 plates -2 folded. Contemporary calf, probably a Cuban binding spine flat, tooled in gilt, just slightly rubbed. Excellent example with only scattered foxing spots, very fresh and clean. 30,000 $ The first scientific book and first book on natural history printed in Havana, one of the first and the most profusely illustrated at that time, first edition, here in the contemporary binding and in exceptional condition; the 75 full page plates are made by Parra’s son,Manuel Antonio Parra y Munoz, born in Cuba, and represent fishes, crustacea, geology and human deformities, specifically a black slave with a hernia, he has recently been identified as Domingo Fernandez, and is one of the first Caribbean slaves to be portrayed in a printed source. The 75 plates is a substantial portion of the engravings published in Havana in the 18th century. “One of the earliest specimens of printing in Havana, and contains the first copper-plates engraved in Cuba” (Sabin). Little is known before Parra’s voyage to Cuba, except that he enlisted in the Spanish Army and that he travelled to Cuba in 1763 under the command of Funes de Villalpando for the return of the Island to Spanish control from the English, following the Treaty of Versailles in which Florida was given to England. His naturalist labor in the country led him to build a collection of natural history -namely- marine specimens collected by him, which he exhibited in Havana in custom made furniture; his collection was later partially acquired by the King of Spain following the author’s trip to Spain (1788) to present this book, and the recommendation of the Director of the Gabinete de Historia Natural of Madrid, Jose Clavijo. The plates have no scientific names, probably a consequence of Parra’s lack of academic training as naturalist. Parra continued to collect and send seeds to Madrid and Aranjuez in the 1790’s. Palau, 213307; Sabin, 58835.
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Descripción de diferentes piezas de Historia Natural de las mas del ramo marítimo representadas en setenta y cinco láminas

Cuba; natural history] Parra, Antonio First scientific book printed in Havana, and the most profusely illustrated. 1787. Habana. Imprenta de la Capitania General. 4to, (198 x 150 mm). 1 ff., 4 pp., 195 pp., 3 ff., 75 plates -2 folded. Contemporary calf, probably a Cuban binding spine flat, tooled in gilt, just slightly rubbed. Excellent example with only scattered foxing spots, very fresh and clean. 30,000 $ The first scientific book and first book on natural history printed in Havana, one of the first and the most profusely illustrated at that time, first edition, here in the contemporary binding and in exceptional condition; the 75 full page plates are made by Parra’s son,Manuel Antonio Parra y Munoz, born in Cuba, and represent fishes, crustacea, geology and human deformities, specifically a black slave with a hernia, he has recently been identified as Domingo Fernandez, and is one of the first Caribbean slaves to be portrayed in a printed source. The 75 plates is a substantial portion of the engravings published in Havana in the 18th century. “One of the earliest specimens of printing in Havana, and contains the first copper-plates engraved in Cuba” (Sabin). Little is known before Parra’s voyage to Cuba, except that he enlisted in the Spanish Army and that he travelled to Cuba in 1763 under the command of Funes de Villalpando for the return of the Island to Spanish control from the English, following the Treaty of Versailles in which Florida was given to England. His naturalist labor in the country led him to build a collection of natural history -namely- marine specimens collected by him, which he exhibited in Havana in custom made furniture; his collection was later partially acquired by the King of Spain following the author’s trip to Spain (1788) to present this book, and the recommendation of the Director of the Gabinete de Historia Natural of Madrid, Jose Clavijo. The plates have no scientific names, probably a consequence of Parra’s lack of academic training as naturalist. Parra continued to collect and send seeds to Madrid and Aranjuez in the 1790’s. Palau, 213307; Sabin, 58835.
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Nos Don. a todas las personas. Si el Cura de los Dolores D. Miguel Hidalgo hubiera estado presente [Edicto contra el cura de los Dolores D. Miguel Hidalgo [Edict against Priest Miguel Hidalgo, author of the ‘Grito de Dolores’]

Grito de Dolores; Hidalgo, Miguel] Lizana y Beaumont, Francisco Xavier de. Mexican broadside opposing to the devolution of the land to the Indians and the author of the Grito de Dolores which sparked the revolution. 18 October 1810. Mexico City. Broadside (570 x 430 mm). Unbound. Original paper stamp in perfect condition, remains of glue on middle fold visible, rubric over signature of the Archbishop of Mexico, middle fold creasing, generally in good condition. 1800 $ Important edict by the Archbishop of Mexico harshly condemning the Grito de Dolores’ author Priest Miguel Hidalgo, one of the most important figures of the Mexican revolution, accusing him of seeking fortune, and opposing the devolution of the lands to the native population: “Si la Nueva España se volviera en el día á los Indios en el estado en que se hallaba quando lo conquistaron los Europeos, las Provincias conquistadas por Emperadores Mexicanos reclamarian su derecho, y la de Tlaxcala su constante y valerosa resistencia e independencia ¿Qué gobierno sería el que había de establecerse en semejante caso? Hijos míos, no eso dexeis engañar, el Cura Hidalgo está procesado por herege: no busca vuestra fortuna sino la suya Os impondrá tributos y servicios personales y derramará vuestra sangre y la de vuestros hijos” Father Miguel Hidalgo lead the first stage -both politically and militarily- of the independence struggle, sparked with the famous Grito de Dolores; nevertheless, after a series of military defeats, he was captured in March 1811 and taken to Chihuahua where he was executed. Francisco Javier de Lizana y Beaumont (1749-1813) was Archbishop of México and Viceroy of New Spain, during his reign, he oversaw the first years of the rebellion. Medina, México, 10479; Biblioteca Medina 3727.
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Extraordinary Mexican archive recording the purchases and life of an Hacienda from Maya Indians, including four manuscript maps of the region

Mayan society and land ownership in Yucatán] Extraordinary Mexican archive recording the purchases and life of an Hacienda from Maya Indians, including four manuscript maps of the region. 1730-1819. Campeche [Mexico]. Folio, (320 x 250 mm). Manuscript on stamped paper dated 1810–1819 throughout, ff. 165, with 4 manuscript maps (two are the same, one is a later copy, both are folding and in colour), edges untrimmed, slightly browned throughout with occasional oxidation affecting the text. Contemporary limp leather, with metal clasps, somewhat worn but a good, honest volume. Large folding map worn and separated at fold, scattered foxing else fine. 20,000 $ A collection of documents, including four large manuscript maps, tracing the history of a large Mexican hacienda founded on the outskirts of present-day Campeche among the indigenous Mayan population of the Yucatán peninsula. The volume was compiled in 1819 from original documents dated between 1730 and 1819, it records the acquisition records for the Hacienda from local indigenous Maya people and later Spaniards. No other copies have been found. The Yucatán peninsula, lacking precious metals, remained primarily agricultural throughout the colonial era and, as the climate was unsuitable for the introduction of European crops, maize, grown using the indigenous milpa system, continued to be the principal output. Spanish colonists, however, introduced cattle ranches, initially in the sixteenth century but most actively in the eighteenth century. The history of this hacienda, San Agustin de Olá and San Cayetano, therefore, in many respects perfectly epitomizes the nature of society and inter-ethnic relations in the Yucatán peninsula. The manuscript begins with the original purchase of land from the local indigenous population in 1730, continues in 1755 with its re-sale and significant expansion through a further purchase of Mayan land as well as its foundation as a cattle ranch with a licence for 200 head of cattle. As an indication of its size, the historian Wolfgang Gabbert notes that a typical hacienda or estancia in the region had an average of only 90 head of cattle (W. Gabbert, Becoming Maya: Ethnicity and social inequality in Yucatan since 1500, Tucson, 2004, p. 14). With San Agustin de Olá, Mayan authorities consented to the establishment of such a large ranch explaining in detail, and included in translation into Spanish from the original Mayan by their interpreter, D. Juan Alonso Manzanilla, that the land was only suitable for pasture, there was a great need for meat and, through it, ‘no era perjudicado ningun Pueblo, ni los naturales recibian agravio sino veneficio’. In this case, the governor of Campeche had authorized the original sale and creation of the hacienda on the condition that the Indians of the nearby town, San Diego, would approve it and not have their crops harmed by the hacienda's cattle. A local official, the Defender of Indians charged with preventing the exploitation of the indigenous, also had to approve the deal. The cacique or leader of the town, Sebastián Chuc, had approved the sale of the hacienda for 50 pesos to non-Indians. His descendants some decades later, however, argued t
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Vida de Santa Rosa de Viterbo].

Puebla engravings] Nava, Jose de. Magnum Opus of Puebla’s engraver, Jose de Nava; the complete suite on the life of Saint Rosa. S.a. [c.1800]. Puebla (México). 4to. 33 engraved plates. Contemporary Mexican calf, spine flat, gilt fillet to boards, spine tooled in gilt, slightly rubbed. Light foxing and spotting here and there, tiny worm holes away from images, overall fine. 12,000 $ First edition, this is Puebla’s master 18th century engraver, Jose de Nava’s magnum opus, and an extraordinary feat of Novo-Hispanic artistic production, it is a remarkable suite of engravings representing the life and deeds of Saint Rosa of Viterbo. The maker, José de Nava (1735-1817), was Puebla’s greatest engraver, “one of the most talented artists and skilled engravers of his time in the old world and the new” (Mathes, La Ilustracion en Mexico Colonial, 2003, p.125-127) and amongst the first to transition from the simpler wood plates to the more complicated and detailed copper plates; “one of New Spain's most important engravers of the entire century” (El grabador poblano José de Nava. Estudio de algunas de sus estampas religiosas, Juan Isaac Calvo Portela, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The suite illustrates the life of Italian 13th century Saint Rose of Viterbo in 33 plates, each with a legend below and signed in print “Jph. de la Nava la gravó. En la Puebla de los Angs”. Most of Nava’s production happened in the Seminario Palafoxiano and the shop of Pedro de la Rosa, and among his work we count the magnificent illustration to the Missa Gothica, seu Mozarabica (1770). The work was issued without a title page, intended as a suite of engravings in the European style, the dating of the work is uniformly given as c.1800, though it could be earlier or just slightly later, within the range of Nava’s years of activity. Extremely rare, we located copies University of Texas Austin, DIBAM (Chile), and JCB. Medina, Puebla, p.xliv; Palau, 187900.
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Assiento Ajustado entre las dos Megestades Catholica, y Bretanica, sobre encargarse la Compañía de Inglaterra de la introducción de Efclavos Negros en la América Efpañola, por tiempo de treinta años, que empezaran a correr en primero de Mayo de el prefente de mil fetecientos y treze, y cumplirán en otro tal día del de mil fetecientos y quarenta y tres

Slavery; Assiento] Tinagero Efcalera, Bernardo Extraordinarily rare Mexican printing of the Assiento. 1734. Mexico. Imprenta Real del Superior Govierno de Doña María de Rivera. 4to. 29 pp. Modern half calf. Manuscript inscription on title page, occasional foxing, generally fine. 10,000 $ First Mexican edition, one of two known copies, of the famous asiento contract agreed between the crowns of Spain and Britain in 1713 following the Treaty of Utrecht, following the Treat of Utrecht, which gave England a right to transport African slaves to the Americas for a period of 30 years, which England passed on to the South Sea Company. The infamous contract gave England right to traffic up to 4800 slaves into America, and monopoly over the trace. During the 30 years of life of the contract, troubles ensued in several opportunities, and the reason behind this printing was presumably one of those. The Spanish empire in the Americas, which had relied on slave labour and the large-scale importation of enslaved Africans since the early sixteenth century, depended on other nations to supply them from Africa. From as early as 1518, it had granted a monopoly, or asiento, to various Europeans for this, although none on the scale envisioned by this 1713 treaty. ‘The asiento was coveted among the nations of Europe. It guaranteed the holders a significant market and source of revenue in Spanish America, the possibility of trade in other goods, and access to the specie that flowed from the Spanish mines, as well as an opportunity for the ships of that nation to access Spanish ports, where they might engage in the significant contraband trade to the area’ (A. Finucane, The Temptations of Trade: Britain, Spain and the Struggle for Empire, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016, p. 13). The treaty also meant that England replaced France in the contract or “renting settlement” which granted that country the exclusive privilege in the black slave trading in all Spanish America. The English Company of the South Sea, which was assigned the trade monopoly for a period of thirty years” (Rafael Donoso Anes Un análisis sucinto del Asiento de esclavos con Inglaterra (1713-1750) y el papel desempeñado por la contabilidad en su Desarrollo, abstract). The slave trade, profitable as it was, was also an entryway to commerce with the American colonies, which were not allowed to engage in commercial activities with anyone except Spain, a centralized hub, which later was one of the strongest reasons to split and become independent; “De esta forma los ingleses obtenían una importante victoria sobre franceses y holandeses en sus aspiraciones comer- ciales en el Nuevo Mundo, ya que, como hemos visto, se consideraba que el Asiento de esclavos era uno de los mejores mecanismos para introducirse de forma subrepticia en el ambicionado mercado hispanoamericano” (Donoso Anes). The 1713 asiento granted the British through the South Sea Company a right to transport a predetermined number of enslaved African labourers (4,800 in total) into Spanish America for a thirty-year period and to sell a limited amount of goods at the annual Portobello trade fair. It also permitted a small group of Britons to reside in Spanish America providing the opportunity for Britain to increase its knowledge of the Spanish empire, explore the potential for its annexation and strengthen significantly its contraband networks and activities. Spanish authorities in the Americas were tasked with squashing such attempts and ensuring that the terms of the asiento were maintained but, in this, they were hindered by uncertainty and disputes over the precise terms of the agreement. As tensions escalated, particularly in the 1730s, Spanish authorities in Mexico most likely sought to clarify what was and what was not legal trade as part of the asiento by publishing this very rare edition of treaty in the region most affected by it. This, however, was unsuccessful. ‘Tensions between Britain and Spain arising from disputes over.
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Miguel la Grua Talamanca y Branciforte, de los Principes de Carini, Marques de Branciforte, grande de Espana de primera clase La Soberana piedad del Rey. determinando por Real Orden de 19 de Marzo ultimo que en este Reyno se permitiese la libre fabrica y expendio del Aguardiente de cana o Chiringuito

Alcoholic beverages; Rhum; Aguardiente de cana production and distribution in colonial Mexico]. Regulations Governing the Production and Sale of Aguardiente (Rhum) in New Spain. 1796. México. Large broadside, (596 x 787 mm). Printed in four columns. Unbound. Separated along vertical fold, now professionally restored, generally clean and crisps. 3,500 $ Important colonial broadside decree announcing the regulations concerning the production of Rhum , or aguardiente de cana, over forty-five articles relating to the production, ingredients, sale and exporting of Rhum [aguardiente] in Mexico. It sets forth locations where it is permissible to produce it, and fundamentally establishes that the Mexican aguardiente must be distinguishable from the Castilian one in two ways: first, the color (white) and the form of their containers “de figura chata” called castanas, rather than the rounded barrels used in Castilla (Spain). The document is signed and executed at the bottom by several officials. Manuscript authorization at bottom dated at Chihuahua, Dec. 26, 1796, and docketed on verso with arms of New Spain. Rare institutionally, we locate copies at Yale, JCB, University of San Diego and Texas A&M.
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Vida y hechos del ingenioso cavallero don Quixote de la Mancha. Nueva edicion, coregida y ilustrada con differentes estampas muy donosas, y apropriadas a la materia

Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de First illustrated edition of the Quijote in Spanish. 1662-1697. Brussels and Antwerp. Juan Mommarte and Cornelio Verdussen. Two volumes, 8vo. Engraved frontispiece, 13ff., 611 pp., 5 pp. (pp.55-58 and 561-576 shorter and supplied), 8 plates; engraved frontispiece, 7 ff., 649 pp., 7 pp., 16 plates. Modern full brown morocco, faux raised bands, spines lettered in gilt. Scattered foxing, occasional toning, a few leaves shorter, overall very good. 12,500 $ First Spanish illustrated edition of Don Quijote, Cervantes’ magnum opus and one of the most influential literary works of all times. First edition of the first part (1662), and second of the second part (1697), virtually identical to the first edition. According to Palau the printed text of the edition of 1697 is the same as the edition of 1662 but issued with a slightly altered title page. Although previous editions had illustrated title pages, properly speaking the first illustrated edition of the Quijote is the Dutch edition of 1657. The engravings of the first part of this 1662 edition are not signed and are generally attributed to Frederick Bouttats and are for the most part copies of the designs of Jacques Savery for the Dutch edition of 1657. The first part contains 8 plates, the second part, here in the 1697 edition, contains 16 plates, 8 of which are the same as those of the 1662 edition. It has, therefore, 8 more plates than the 1662 edition, making a total in the two volumes of 24 plates plus the two engraved frontispieces. The Quijote is arguably the most influential literary work written in Spanish, considered the first modern novel, it transcends language, and sits amongst a few others as the masterpieces of world literature; Cervantes’ magnum opus speaks of a man so consumed by the reading of old chivalry romantic texts that he confuses reality with fantasy, becoming a knight-errant with the mission of medieval chivalry ideals. Of the 1697 edition, Palau says “Esta tirade continua a plana y renglon el texto de 1662”. Of the 1662 edition, H. E. Watts (Cf. Engravings for Don Quixote, 1662-1669, p.4) says: “This edition has the further distinction of being the first which was ‘embellished’ with plates.” Palau 51993 & 52000; Peeters-Fontainas 232.
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Origen de las especies. Por medio de la seleccion natural ò conservacion de las razas en su lucha por la existencia. Traduccion directa de la sexta edicion Inglesa por Enrique Godinez. Segunda edicion castellana notablemente corregida y aumentada

Darwin, Charles First Spanish translation of the Origin of Species, extremely rare, first edition to include two letters by Darwin. N.d. [1877]. Madrid. Imprenta de Jose de Rojas, Tudescos, 34, principal. 8vo, (212 x 135 mm). xi, 1 plate, 559 pp., 1 folding plate. 2,500 $ Exceptionally rare second Spanish edition considerably enlarged and augmented, of one of the most significant and meaningful works of science ever published “the most important single work in science” (Dibner), “a turning point, not only in the history of science, but in the history of ideas in general” (DSB). First published in 1877, almost 20 years after the first saw light in London, the reason for the delay was -most likely- the strong influence the Church had still in most Spanish-speaking countries, in direct relation with the contradiction between Darwin’s theory and Church teachings (evolution from an animal as opposed to creationism). Whatever the case may be, this translation into Spanish meant Latin American countries (Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Peru, etc.) would profit from its reading, expanding in a single act the potential readership to almost 20 countries; Darwin’s letter, included in the book, speaks of that, and he expresses his content with making it available for the Spanish-speaking. Audience. “The book, stripped of references and academic paraphernalia, was aimed not at the specialists, but directly at the reading public” (DNB, for the first English edition, but the point being it was an easy-to-read book). Freeman, 770 (for the first Spanish edition)
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Aventures et espiègleries de Lazarille de Tormes, ecrites par lui-meme

Lazarillo de Tormes] [Hurtado de Mendoza, Diego] [Ransonnette, Nicolas]. The founding of the picaresque novel, a unique copy, with 40 plates avant la lettre and 21 original drawings. 1801. Paris. L'imprimerie de Didot Jeune. Two volumes, 4to, (212 x 132 mm). viii, 154 pp., 22 plates; 4 pp., 182 pp., 18 plates, and 21 original drawings. Slightly later half green morocco by Semet et Plumelle, with delicate romantic tooling and lettering to spine, just lightly rubbed, generally fine. Exceptional copy, mostly pristine, only scattered foxing here or there. 10,000 $ Unique copy of the founding work of the picaresque novel, a literary genre that has influenced much of the 19th and 20th century literature, illustrated with 40 plates avant la lettre and 21 original drawings by Ransonnette and Chasselet. This outstanding copy contains 9 original drawings by Pierre Nicolás de Ransonnette (1745- 1810) which were not used for the edition, with the exception of the portrait frontispiece, and 12 original drawings by Charles Abraham Chasselat (1782-1843), which are dated 1817 and prepared for a later edition. Ransonette (1745-1810), a student to Choffard, was draughtman and engraver to the brother of the King of France, he drew and engraved the illustrated to the Histoire de la Sainte Chapelle (1790), and some of the illustration of the L’Encyclopédie des Arts et Métiers and L’Expédition d’Egypte. Chasselet, slightly less known, was also an artist and lithographer of some renown. The Lazarillo is one of the most important pieces of Spanish literature of the Golden Age, to some, as important as the Quijote; it’s importance for the development of modern literature transcends the Spanish frontiers, credited as the founding work of the picaresque, a genre which exposes injustice whilst amusing the reader; more recent literature of the same genre includes Fielding’s Tom Jones and Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The Lazarillo is a reflection of what the public sought, the picaresque genre being prose fiction -with elements of comedy and satire- centered in the adventures of appealing heroes -or even antiheroes- who live in a corrupt society, Dicken’s Pickwick Papers, Lesage’s Gil Blas, Fielding’s Tom Jones, and of course Cervantes’ Don Quijote are too picaresque in genre; the main character tends to be of low character and social stratum, who unlike a traditional hero is cynical and amoral, the lack of plot is often a common feature in the genre, and the story is told as a series of loosely connected adventures. The authorship remains to-date unknown, despite several attempts to an attribution, in recent times the name of Diego Hurtado de Mendoza has been given often as the author, however Rosa Navarro, an academic from the University of Barcelona has published two well-received articles granting authorship to Alfonso de Valdes, a secretary to Charles V, of Jewish ascent, and dating from 1520-1530 for the material included, and previous to the Council of Trent. She, in turn, gives the second part as the produce of Hurtado de Mendoza’s pen, inferior in quality and overall different. “The anonymous author of Lazarillo de Tormes is a master of deception. He makes his protagonist supremely attractive to the reader by contrasting him with unlikable characters (the blind beggar, the priest, the squire) and by the intimacy of autobiography. The reader increasingly sympathizes with Lazarillo, reaching in the third chapter a point of genuine admiration for the boy's self-sacrifice at the time of greatest physical suffering. The author then creates an illusion of passing time to reach the book's final scene, in which the mature Lázaro profits from the sexual exploitation of his wife. Lazarillo de Tormes, comic only on a superficial level, presents a corrupt society that forces its materialistic values on even its most virtuous members; Lázaro, like all men, eventually compromises. The reader, so attracted by the young Lazarillo who dominates the work, often fails to see the odious Lázaro who.
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Rare contemporary manuscript copy of Floridablanca’s celebrated ‘Representación del Conde de Floridablanca al Rey sobre los sucesos ocurridos en los doce años de su ministerio’.

Floridablanca, José Moñino y Redondo, Conde de]. The report of powerful Floridablanca to the King of Spain, including notes of the War for Independence in the United States. 6 November 1789. San Lorenzo. 8vo, (210 x 148 mm). pp. 352, manuscript without a title page and in a neat eighteenth-century hand. Some leaves slightly browned, occasional tears and one ink stain slightly affecting the text, water staining to some 30 leaves, otherwise a good, clean copy. Later calf elaborately decorated in gilt, triple gilt rule with floral border, gilt florets in the corners, spine gilt in compartments, lettering in gilt ‘Expedicion al Rio de la Plata. Manuscrito 1777–89’ with marble endpapers. Watermark of the Virgin Mary monogram similar to the Cardó paper watermarks of 1750 to 1775 though without the ‘Cardó’ name which is possibly hidden in the margin, see Valls i Subirá, nos. 159–164, and p. 252. 14,500 $ A description of Spanish colonial, foreign and domestic events from 1777 to 1789, a period which included the American War of Independence ‘Todos estos hechos conducen à la inteligencia de quanto ocurrio en la ultima guerra con Inglaterra. El origen de esta guerra save V.M. y saben todos que fue la insurrección de las Colonias Americanas de los nuebos Estados Unidos’ and the establishment of an effective border between Spanish and Portuguese territory in South America, written by the Conde de Floridablanca (1728–1808), one of Spain’s most successful and reformist statesmen. In it, Floridablanca provides a detailed analysis of events during his time in office and explains the decisions he took as head of the Spanish government during this period. It begins with the departure of Pedro de Cevallos’ military expedition to force the Portuguese out of Colônia do Sacramento, an expedition which also resulted in the creation of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata, and includes Floridablanca’s observations on the American War of Independence from Spain’s initial informal support for the United States before then joining the conflict outright on the side of the United States in 1779 (see L. D. Ferreiro, Brothers at Arms: American independence and the men of France and Spain who saved it, New York: Alfred D. Knopf, 2016, for Floridablanca’s centrol role in Spanish involvement). The account includes copious information on Floridablanca’s many domestic Enlightenment financial and social reforms such as, for example, the establishment of Spain’s National Bank and the architectural beautification of Madrid. The treatise was originally written for Charles III dated 1 October 1788 but then expanded for Charles’ son and heir, Charles IV, who inherited the throne after his father’s death on 14 December 1788. It concludes with a Royal Decree issued by Charles IV stating that the content of the manuscript was correct where it relates to him and his father, and noting that it was being used in the libel case brought by Floridablanca against Don Vicente Salucci, Marqués de Manca, former Spanish envoy to Denmark. The accusation that Floridablanca attempted to bribe the judge in this libel case subsequently brought about his downfall in 1792 and imprisonment for three years. The importance of this account was recognised in subsequent years and published as the Representación hecha por el Conde de Floridablanca al Sr. D. Carlos III en que le refiere los hechos principales de su ministerio (Murcia: Viuda de Muñiz, 1809). Very rare: only three contemporary manuscript copies found, at the Biblioteca Nacional de España (two copies, one bound with another manuscript), and at the Biblioteca Valenciana.
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Breve Relación sobre la Persecución de Nuestra Santa Fé en la Provincia de Kiamnan, y otras Provincias del Imperio de la China, Ilustres Vidas, y Gloriosas Muertes de los VV. PP. Antonio Joseph Henríquez, y Tristán de Atimis, de la Compañía de Jesús [with] La Christiandad de Fogan [with] Apendice a la relacion, que de la persecucion de la Christiandad de Fogan

Manila printings sammelband; persecution of Christians in China] Sequeira, Luis de; Simoes, Juan Remarkably rare Manila imprint, narrating the persecution of Jesuits in China. Breve Relación sobre la Persecución de Nuestra Santa Fé en la Provincia de Kiamnan, y otras Provincias del Imperio de la China, Ilustres Vidas, y Gloriosas Muertes de los VV. PP. Antonio Joseph Henríquez, y Tristán de Atimis, de la Compañía de Jesús. 1751. Manila. Imprenta de la Compañia de Jesus, Nicolas de la Cruz Bagay. 4to, (193 x 144 mm). 3 ff., 72 ff. 19th century quarter calf over marbled boards, spine lettered in gilt. Worming in upper inner corners throughout causing varying text loss. [Bound after]: Serrano, Francisco. La Christiandad de Fogan. 1748. Manila. Gerónimo Correa de Castro. 68 ff., lacks title and plate. Scattered clean tears, cellophane tape repairs on first leaf, some worming. [and] Pallas, Francisco de. Apendice a la relacion, que de la persecucion de la Christiandad de Fogan, y Martyrio del Illmo y Rmo Senor Don Fr. Pedro Martyr Sanz de la Provincia de Fokien. S.a. [c.1750]. S.l. [Manila]. 29 ff. Scattered clean tears, blank lower inner corner off last leaf. 5,000 $ First edition of the three works, all printed on Asian paper. First edition of the Breve Relación; the work deals with the persecution, arrest, imprisonment and execution of a group of Jesuit missionaries under the Qianlong Emperor. “During the violent outbreak of persecution in Fukien, in 1746, Hukwang and Kiangnan enjoyed a relative peace that lasted until the end of 1747 when two Jesuits working in Kiangnan, Antonio Jose Henriques and Tristano Francesco de Attimis, were arrested, condemned to death and executed” (China Missions in crisis, Joseph Krahl). After De Attimis and Henriquez’ capture, they were subdued to torture “De Attimis who was new in the mission and did not speak the language well, was not treated badly, but Henriques was cruelly tortured on several occasions”, apparently Henriquez got the worst part. “Relatan las persecuciones sufridas por los cristianos en 1746 y años siguientes. La Relacion del P. simoens es relativa a la Provincia de Pekin.” (Medina). The book is divided into chapters, entitled: “Principio de la persecucion, y castigos con que Dios en este tiempo afligio a los Chinas” [Origin of the persecution and punishments with which God in this time inflicted the Chinese]; “Persecucion del Kiamnan, y su autor. Prision de los Missioneros, y su examen” [Persecution of Kiamnan and its author ], in this particular chapter, there is a reference to Father Tristan de Attimis, by Father Juan de Sexas, that when the former was captured a map was found amongst his papers, a map arguably to be used for a premeditated rebellion; “La sentencia, y muerte a los venerables Padres” [The sentence and death, of the venerable Fathers]; “Breve noticia de la vida de los VV. PP. hasta su Martyrio ”. The Jesuit presence in China underwent different periods with the local authorities, some of great favour and some less so. This chapter of the Sino-Jesuit relations is amongst the most agitated. The relations under the Manchu were overall excellent, especially under Kangxi, who had little hesitation to appoint the Jesuits as advisers on mapping and engineering. The persecution, martyrdom and imprisonment of these priests, was one of the few periods of unrest for the missionaries. Medina does not appear to have seen it or collates an incomplete copy. Palau mentions refers to a 1606 edition quoted by Nicolas Antonio, which is impossible as it was written after the events of 1748 and gives a collation which is different than the other 3 known copies, thus a mistake. The copy at the BNE collates as ours; the Yale copy says only 72. The second and third books Christiandad de Fogan and the Apendice deal with the persecution of Christians in China’s Fujian Province, a second edition of the Christiandad was published shortly after the Manila edition, though without the Apendice, which was presumably published later in Manila. The Apendice follows the.
Medici atque Historici Philippi II. Hisp. et Indiar Opera

Medici atque Historici Philippi II. Hisp. et Indiar Opera, cum edita, tum inedita, ad authographi fidem et integritatem expressa

Hernández, Francisco; Gomez Ortega, Casimiro Previously unpublished material on the most important work on Natural History of New Spain published in the 17th century. 1790. Madrid. Heirs of Joaquin Ibarra. Three volumes, folio, (298 x 220 mm). [2], xviii, [6], 452, [1]; [2], 562, [1]; 571, [1] pages. Contemporary speckled calf, gilt fillet to boards, raised bands and red morocco lettering pieces to spine, compartments tooled in gilt in neo-classical style; slightly rubbed and worn. Minimal wear to contents, faint dampstaining in Volume III, edges tinted red, generally a fine, fresh and tall copy. 10,000 $ The most complete text of the botanical portion of Hernandez’ seminal magnum opus on the botanical natural history of New Spain (Mexico and Southern United States), here edited by the most eminent botanist of Spain in the 18th century, Casimiro Ortega. “Belle édition, publiée par J. B. Muñoz Casimire Ortega. Elle est augmentée de pièces jusqu’alors inédites et sauvées de l’incendie.” (Brunet). This is the first unabridged edition, following the Historia Plantarum Novae Hispaniae, it shows the late 18th Bourbon interest in scientific advances and research. Hernandez was a Spanish physician and botanist, chosen by Philip II to lead a scientific expedition to America, specifically the territory of the Viceroyalty of New Spain; the expeditionary group consisted of a geographer, draughtmen, botanists, etc. The observations were only partially published between 1635 and 1651, it was almost a full century later that Casimiro Gomez Ortega made a second compilation of the material gathered by the expeditioners, to produce a revised, complete, edition, added with previously unpublished material from the Imperial College of Jesuits, which is here offered. Gomez Ortega (1740-1818) was a Spanish botanist and physician, appointed as the first professor of the Real Jardin Botanico of Madrid, and oversaw the formation of the new botanical garden moved to the modern premises by Charles III, with the aim of studying the new species of plants being identified by European explorers, mainly in South America; he published several works on plant species, and was the translator to the Spanish edition of Byron account of circumnavigation -which he added. In 1777 he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society. “This is the work of Hernandez unabridged, but without engravings. It is entirely taken up with the Historia Plantarum Novae Hispaniae, containing the Mexican names of the plants, with the latin equivalents [Eames]. This edition is not to be compared with the work of Dr. Ricci. This is more of Hernandes without his editors, more correct, with many additions, but without any illustrations. Hernandes, the celebrated naturalist, was sent to New Spain by Philip the Second about 1595, where he spent seven years in active research into the natural history of the country, and returned to Europe with an herbarium, the very richness and magnitude of which overwhelmed the men of science. A part of the original collection was burnt with the library of the Escurial in 1671 [Stevens’s Bib. Hist., 1870, pp. 76, 226]. The natural history of Dr. Hernandez gives evidence [of the copiousness of the Aztec language], in which are described twelve hundred different species of Mexican plants, two hundred or more species of birds, and a large number of quadrupeds, reptiles, insects, and metals, each of which is given its proper name in the Mexican language.---Bancroft’s Native Races, vol. 3, p. 728.” (Pilling, 1748). “The author was a Spanish physician and naturalist sent to the North American Spanish possessions by order of Philip the Second, for the purpose of describing their productions, concerning whom A costa remarks: ‘Doctor Francis Hernandes hath made a goodly worke uppon this subject, of Indian plants, liquors, and other phisicall things, by the King’s expresse commission and commandement, causing all the plants at the Indies to be lively painted, which they say are above a thousand two.
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Dogma socialista de la Asociación Mayo, precedido de una ojeada retrospectiva sobre el movimiento intelectual en el Plata desde el año 37

Socialism in South America] Echeverria, Estevan Fundamental philosophical and political work produced and printed in South America in the first decades of the Republics. 1846. Montevideo. Imprenta del Nacional. 8vo. Title page, 2 ff., CIII pp., 84 pp. 2 ff. Near contemporary half green cloth over marbled boards. Scattered foxing but overall fine. 5,000 $ First edition, one of the earliest works published and produced in South America about socialism, undoubtedly one of the most important political and philosophical productions of its time, written by an influential thinker of the first half of the 19th century. Esteban Echeverría was born in Buenos Aires in 1805, in his youth he moved to France for a period of 5 years, there he clearly got impregnated with European modern ideals, returning to Argentina when Juan Manuel de Rosas was already ruling with an iron fist the Provincias Unidas del Rio de la Plata, which allowed little to none foreign influence, and was adverse to intellectual progress, especially if politically opposed to the regime. In Buenos Aires he participated actively in the reunions of the Salon Literario, created by the bookseller and writer Marcos Sastre, he edited the first literary manifestations of the Romanticism in the Spanish language to be published in Argentina. The group was integrated by him, Juan Maria Gutierrez and Juan Bautista Alberdi, it was soon closed and a new, secret association was created, strongly opposed to the Rosas administration: called the Asociacion de Mayo, it produced a Credo (or a pronunciation of beliefs), which is here greatly expanded, and published in Uruguay, during Echeverria’s exile. The Dogma Socialista contains an eclectic synthesis of the European liberal thought of the time, it was an intellectual lighthouse to the Argentina that was to be formed after Rosas gave up power. Unfortunately, Echeverria didn’t live to see it, as he died in exile, consumed by poverty. "Pero el desarrollo de la guerra declarada por Rosas contra la Confederación Peruano Boliviana y la inminencia de un conflicto con Francia, hechos a los que nos referiremos en seguida, acrecentaron las agresiones veladas o directas y aconsejaron el paso a la clandestinidad de los miembros del Salón Literario. Ello ocurrió en julio de 1838 tras la venta a precio vil de los libros de Sastre, quien abandonó Buenos Aires. El grupo, al que se tildaba de afrancesado, se dio el nombre de Asociación de la Joven Genera¬ción Argenti¬na, tomando como modelo, en su organización y objetivos, a la Giovine Italia, del admirado Giuseppe Mazzini. Tras haberse aprobado ocultamente las Palabras simbólicas del Código o declaración de los principios que consti¬tuyen la creen¬cia social de la República Argentina, luego conocido como Dogma Socialista, en cuya elaboración participaron Echeverría y Alberdi, éste, temeroso de las conse¬cuen¬cias, pidió pasaporte y en agosto de 1838 cruzó a Montevideo. Mientras tanto, Echeverría puso prudente distancia refugiándose en la estancia Los Talas. Antes o después, emigraron otros adversarios de Rosas, que al llegar a la ciudad oriental no tardaron en alternar con poetas y escritores uruguayos y en divulgar sus ideas a través de la prensa o en salones donde se bailaba y discutía sin comer una rosquilla por la generalizada pobreza reinante.” (Juan Manuel de Rosas y los bloqueos al Río de la Plata). Extremely rare, no copy recorded at auction records; we can locate 5 copies at Harvard (Houghton), DIBAM (Chile), Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, BNF (apparently incomplete), BL. Sabin, 21772.
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Patronage of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico] Nos el Dr. D. Alonso Nunez de Haro y Peralta por la gracia de Dios y de la Santa Sede Apostolica, Arzobispo de México Por quanto esta Nobilisima y leal Ciudad, en manifestacion y desahogo de sus pios y fervorosos deseos de que se propague el debido culto y mayor devocion a su Prodigiosa Imagen de Nra. Sra. De Guadalupe

Virgin of Guadalupe; Mexico]. Rare Mexican broadside about the Patronage of Our Lady of Guadalupe, recently declared. 12 august, 1776. México. Broadside in folio. Signed at foot, official wax seal, verso with manuscript annotation; a couple small wormholes touching a few letters. 5,000 $ The Virgin of Guadalupe or Our Lady of Guadalupe is today immediately associated with Mexico and Mexican Culture, the apparition of the Virgin to an Aztec convert to Christianity St. Juan Diego in the early stages of the Conquest of Mexico (1531) led to centuries of devotion and a singular iconography, undoubtedly today one of the most recognizable symbols of Mexico; in May 1754 the Papal Bull Non Est Equidem by Pope Benedict XIV declared Our Lady of Guadalupe Patroness of the territory of the Viceroyalty of New Spain (Mexico, Central America and today’s Texas, California, Arizona, Florida, etc.), promoted by Novo Hispanic authorities and the Society of Jesus. In this decree, the Archbishop of Mexico puts forward dates for festivities, masses and celebrations in honor of the Virgin (11 and 12 of December). This broadside, published in Mexico, is one of the pieces instrumental to the role the Virgin of Guadalupe had in forming a Mexican Identity. On the verso, a manuscript inscription reads: ‘Edicto del Illmo. Sor Do. Antonio Nunez de Haro para la festibidad de Nra, Sra, de Guadalupe Ano de 1776’. Institutionally we located copies at Brown, University of Iowa [perhaps microfilm?], and BNE.
Copias de Cartas Escritas por el Governador de la Habana

Copias de Cartas Escritas por el Governador de la Habana, durante el Sitio de aquella Plaza, à los Gefes de las Colonias Francesas, y à los Virreyes, y Governadores de los Dominios del Rey nuestro Señor, en solicitud de socorros

Cuba] [Siege of Havana, 1762] Prado Mayera Portocarrero y Luna, Juan. The Siege of Havana of 1762, only one other copy known. [1762–1763]. N.p. [Spain]. Folio, (282 x 198 mm). pp. 28. Modern marble paper boards with a printed paper label on front cover with the text: ‘Defensa, Capitulacion, Pérdida, y Rendicion de la Plaza de la Habana. La Habana, 1763’. Excellent condition. 5,000 $ Important publication of the letters from the Governor of Havana regarding the siege by the British. ‘On the morning of June, 6, 1762, the governor of Havana and captain general of Cuba, Juan de Prado, was awakened and summoned to the Morro fortress to take a look at something troubling that his lieutenant had sighted on the horizon. A small boat rowed Prado from the walled city to the entrance to Havana’s harbor, where he climbed the rocky promotory to the fort’s lookout point. Through a spyglass, he could see a large British fleet offshore, what one eyewitness described as “a forest of ships.” It was without doubt a powerful armada coming to lay siege’ (E. E. Schneider, The Occupation of Havana: War, trade, and slavery in the Atlantic World, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018, p. 63). At first, Juan de Prado (1716–c.1770) did not believe that this imposing British force intended to attack Havana and, although he had arrived in Cuba in February 1761 as Governor and Captain General with express instructions from Charles III of Spain to prepare the island for such an attack, Havana was far from ready. The first of Prado’s letters in this collection, dated 7 June 1762 (the day after, therefore, the beginning of the siege) was written to Gabriel de Bory de Saint-Vincent (1720–1801), who had recently succeeded Philippe-François Bart (1706–1784) as Governor of Saint-Domingue (now Haiti), informing him of events thus far, the intelligence gathered and seeking assistance from the French since Spain was allied to France during the Seven Years’ War (1756–1763). It is followed by similar letters (30 in total) sent during the course of the siege giving detailed updates on developments and requesting reinforcements from a variety of quarters, not just from various colonial, military and naval commanders at Saint-Domingue but from the French naval squadron at Martinique, from the Spanish viceroys of New Spain and Santa Fé and the governors of Santo Domingo, Florida, Yucatán and Campeche, and Cartagena de Indias, as well as from Luis de Córdoba (1706–1796), then commander of the Spanish naval squadron at Cartagena de Indias. Also included are instructions for authorities within Cuba, including giving notice of the delegation of Prado’s powers to the naval officer, Juan Ignacio de Madariaga (d. 1771), for the administration of the rest of the island while Prado was besieged within the city of Havana and unable to govern outside it. The letters cover the most significant stages of the siege up to 1 August 1762 when Prado provided Joaquín de Montserrat, Marqués de Cruillas (1700–1771), Viceroy of New Spain, with a detailed account of the British assault on the fortress of El Morro. His account includes news of the deaths of the naval officers, Luis de Velasco and Marqués González, whose heroism later came to symbolise this dramatic episode in the defence of Havana. After the fall of El Morro which directly overlooked the city of Havana and which Prado acknowledged as ‘un fatal golpe’, there was little hope and the city was surrendered on 13 August 1762. The city was occupied by the British for the next eleven months before being returned as part of the peace negotiations. In the meantime, Juan de Prado as well as the other colonial, military and naval leaders who had surrendered themselves to the British along with the city were returned to Spain where dissatisfaction with their perfomance resulted in the king ordering for several of them, including Prado, to be tried by a Council of War. This Council was composed of several leading figures such as the statesman and diplomat, the Count of Aranda.
Arbol chronologico genealogico de los descendientes de Adan y Eva hasta Jesu Christo

Arbol chronologico genealogico de los descendientes de Adan y Eva hasta Jesu Christo

Nava, José de (engraver). Mexican broadside with the genealogy of Christ from Adam and Eve, presumably meant for education purposes. 1791. Puebla de los Angeles. Broadside in large folio, (749 x 546 mm). Unbound. Tear to lower right margin just entering text, some mostly marginal staining, overall perfect. 3,500 $ Very rare large Mexican engraving by Puebla’s major printer and engraver Jose de Nava portraying the history of the Old Testament through the genealogy of Christ from Adam and Eve; in it, important Biblical events are narrated and set into a chronology which divides the history of the world in Ages. It shows the descendants of Adam and Eve through Jesus Christ. The maker, José de Nava (1735-1817), was Puebla’s greatest engraver, “one of the most talented artists and skilled engravers of his time in the old world and the new” (Mathes, La Ilustracion en Mexico Colonial) and amongst the first to transition from the simpler wood plates to the more complicated and detailed copper plates; “one of New Spain's most important engravers of the entire century” (El grabador poblano José de Nava. Estudio de algunas de sus estampas religiosas, Juan Isaac Calvo Portela, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The Arbol is made after a design by Juan Manrique de Lara and dedicated to the bishop, Salvador Biempica y Sotomayor. As expressed above, the broadside is extraordinarily rare, we can locate 3 institutional copies at: University of Notre Dame, JCB and Southern Methodist University. Not in Medina or Palau.
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Guia Politica, Eclesiastica y Militar del Virreynato del Peru para el ano 1795

Colonial travel guide to Peru and surrounding regions] Unanue, Jose Hipolito. Rare colonial guide to the Viceroyalty of Peru. [1795]. [Lima]. Imprenta Real de los Niños Huefanos. 8vo. 2 [blank], 3 ff., 1 [blank], folding map, 280, folding tables, 5 ff., 2 [blank]. Contemporary Peruvian mottled calf, spine flat tooled in gilt, foot of spine with small loss. Internally pristine, fresh and clean copy. 3,000 $ First edition of this extremely rare guide to the Viceroyalty of Peru, printed in Lima by the Orphan children, and housed in its contemporary binding; his first guide was issued in 1793, and this would be Unanue’s last. The illustration is composed of a folding map, “Plano del Virreynato del Peru” by Andres Baleato, which depicts the coastline and partial interior, including portions of the Altiplano, and 7 folding plans (which provide a comprehensive panorama of the production, distances and present state of the Intendencias, mines, posts, population and such of the Viceroyalty). This guide offers detailed information on the provinces of Peru numbers of people (divided into sub-categories i.e. clergy, Indios, Spanish, Mestizos, slaves, etc.), the existing buildings (types and uses, often with amount of rents paid), the names of public officials (administrators, clergy, etc.), then a list of the main staples produced by the town, village or region. The folding plans are financial, showing import and export values, the number and type of mines, their values, and the number of laborers at each. Unanue (1758 – 1833) was a Peruvian scientist, teacher and author; from 1793-97, he conducted a census of Peru, befriended Simon Bolivar and took part of the Independence struggles of Peru. Medina, Lima, 1790 (for the 1794 edition); Sabin, 97718 (for all editions).
Real plan del exercito de S. M. Co. Carlos Tercero en l'año de M.DCC.LXVIII [Manuscript schema of the armed forces of Charles III].

Real plan del exercito de S. M. Co. Carlos Tercero en l’año de M.DCC.LXVIII [Manuscript schema of the armed forces of Charles III].

Spanish military forces drawing] [Charles III (1716-1788), King of Spain]. Remarkable depiction of the Spanish Armed Forces under Charles III. 1768. Madrid. Broadside in plano (655 x 980 mm); ink and watercolour on paper, laid onto canvas, minor splits and cracks and overall a little darkened; integral wooden roller and case (c.1130 x 55mm closed). 35,000 $ A unique and attractive watercolour broadside depiction of the military and maritime armed forces of Spain in full pomp and splendor, representing the sweeping changes introduced under the wise leadership of Charles III of Spain, a reforming ruler, produce of the Spanish Enlightment, and partially due to the defeat in Havana in 1762. The broadside lists each of the regiments of the Spanish army, both infantry and cavalry, and includes illustrations for each of their respective uniforms. A smaller section, framed on both sides by an illustration of a ship of the line, lists the ships of the line, packet boats, frigates, gunboats, galleases, bomb ketches and xebecs in Charles III’s navy as well as provides a summary of Charles’ military forces. The regiments represented by 64 figures of infantrymen and 26 mounted cavalrymen in full attire, their coats, breeches, etc., appropriately coloured, in each case recording the name of the regiment and the number of battalions and of men, the navy represented by two men of war in full sail, a table at the foot recording the navy divided into 'navios', 'paquebotes', 'fragatas', 'bombardas', 'galeotas', 'brulotes' and 'xavecques', framing a 'resumen general' of the armed forces, in a border of lances, spears, canon, mortars, shot, etc. By 1768, as shown here, any damage wrought by Spain's participation in the Seven Years' War had been repaired; the present manuscript schema represents a well-ordered army and navy. As part of Charles’ reformist military zeal, the Royal College of Artillery was founded in Segovia in 1764 and, in 1768, the Royal Ordinances for the Regime, Discipline, Subordination, and Service in His Armies (in effect until 1978) were published introducing substantial innovations in the army and making it into a more effective force. It is possible that this ornate broadside was produced to commemorate the introduction of these important reforms as well as to highlight the military and naval rearmament which Charles had ordered following the Seven Years’ War and in the lead up to the American War of Independence (1775–83), which Spain entered in 1779 making a significant contribution to the success of the American side. During the Seven Years’ War (1756–63), ‘the defeat of Havana in 1762 led Charles to elevate military imperatives to the top of his reformist agenda for America It was a time of sweeping imperial innovations, which persisted even after Spain’s triumph in the War of the American Revolution, as Charles’s military ambitions grew. This reformist momentum would survive his death and continue under Charles IV (1788–1808). In possession of a well-armed, highly productive empire and the second largest navy in the world, Spain appeared a power of the first order as it entered the 1790s’ (A. J. Kuethe and K. J. Andrien, The Spanish Atlantic World in the Eighteenth Century: War and the Bourbon Reforms, 1713–1796, Cambridge: University Press, 2014, p. 6).
Spanish manuscript description of the Earth] Elementos de la Esfera Celeste.

Spanish manuscript description of the Earth] Elementos de la Esfera Celeste.

Geography and world description]. Apparently unknown manuscript treatise in Spanish regarding celestial spheres and terrestrial geography. N.d. [ca.1760]. [Convent of San Antonio and San Onofre, Spain]. 4to, (208 x 148 mm). 186 pp. Contemporary brown morocco with gilt embossed decoration to front and back covers, corner florets, lightly marked and a little worn at edges and corners, spine in compartments with ornate gilt ornament. Original marbled endpapers, front endpaper loose and with 20th century annotations to verso, all edges gilt. Scattered foxing though overall perfect. Manuscript in ink on wove paper, with colored headings and capitals and illuminated floral head- and tailpieces; copied from an unidentified text in a neat and consistent hand, with frequent marginal notes and page references. 4,000 $ Pedagogical charmingly decorated manuscript in Spanish in a neat 18th or early 19th century hand with ornamental watercolour headings, initial letters and chapter breaks, comprising a treatise on celestial spheres and terrestrial geography, followed by explanations of key geographical terms, and then a series of short descriptive geographies covering Europe. While the manuscript is probably a copy, no other version, printed or manuscript, has been found. This didactic treatise would provide a student of this period with a basic education in geography. It is divided into two sections: the first covering subjects such as the terrestrial sphere, the climate, the seasons, longitude and latitude; the second, describing specific regions from the various European states to Russia, Asia, North, Central and South America, and the Arctic and the Antarctic. It has an inscription, dated 26 November 1827, presumably from a student ‘siendo Prior Mariano Raix’, by a Dominican friar, Salvador Menaez, of the Real Convento de San Antonio y San Onofre in Sagunto in the Spanish province of Valencia. This gives an indication of its most likely origins and purpose since this convent, which was founded in 1805 when the Dominican Friars of San Onofre took over the premises in Sagunto which had been left empty by the Hospital Fathers of Saint Anthony in 1787, was very involved in the resuscitation of education in Spain following the Peninsular War (1807–1814). A Royal Decree issued in 1816 asked religious orders to dedicate themselves to the recovery of the education system destroyed by the war and, after Father Ramón Guerrero, Vicar General of the Dominican Order in Spain, further promoted the idea, various Dominican convents dedicated themselves to the improvement of education, the Convent of San Antonio y San Onofre in Sagunto among them. The calligraphy and beauty of the manuscript indicates it probably belonged to a youth member of the ruling class.
Historica relatione del Regno di Cile

Historica relatione del Regno di Cile, e delle Missioni e ministerio che esecita in quelle la Compagnia di Giesu

Ovalle, Alonso de One of the most important early histories of Chile. 1646. Rome. Francesco Cavalli. Folio, (253 mm x 182 mm). 4 ff., 378 pp., 1 ff., 18 woodcuts in text on 9 leaves, 12 full-page plates, 6 [maps], folding map. Elegant 19th century burgundy morocco by Petit, two triple gilt fillets to boards forming compartments with corner pieces, raised bands to spine, compartments heavily gilt, lettered, foot of spine starting, but overall fine. Fine copy in 19th century condition, washed and pressed. 22,000 $ First Italian edition printed the same year as the first in Spanish; the simultaneity of both relations makes it impossible to assess to their priority in time. Ovalle provides a description of the geography and natural history of the province of Chile, including Tierra del Fuego, and describes the native populations who inhabited the region. In particular, this work is a highly important source for the study of the Araucanian Indians, as it deals at length with their social structure, political organization, diet, and domestic life. Ovalle also discusses the early contact period between the Spanish and Indians, the ensuing conflicts, the Spanish settlement, the advent of Catholic missionaries, proselytization and conversion, the role of the Society of Jesus, miracles and apparitions of the Virgin, and numerous other topics. Overall, it is one of the most primary and richest sources of information on the physical and cultural reality of the country, and provides a remarkable amount of information of the Indian ethnology. Ovalle (1601 – 1651) was a Chilean born historian, educator and Jesuit; he lived in Rome from 1642 to 1650 where he had his work published. Complementing Ovalle's history is a wealth of visual images, with renderings of natives, architecture and city life. In the text are fourteen engravings showing Indian customs, Catholic religious imagery, and a map of the city of Santiago. The woodcuts illustrate Jesuit establishments throughout Chile, a map of the Chiloe archipelago, and unusual bird's-eye woodcut views of harbours along the coast. The engraved map, "Tabula Geographica Regni Chile," shows the entire region discussed in the book and is considered one of the most relevant cartographic productions on Chile of the 17th century; it is, additionally, quite a beautiful map. The importance of the text, combined with the illustrations, make this volume one of great appeal and historical interest. European Americana, 646/113. JCB (3), II, 346. Sabin, 57971. De Backer –Sommervogel, VI:60. Palau, 207399.
Laude de lo contemplativo & extatico B.F. Jacopone. Item alcune laude de. S. Thomaso de aquino & certe altre laude de doctori dignissimi che i[n] le prime no[n] erano

Laude de lo contemplativo & extatico B.F. Jacopone. Item alcune laude de. S. Thomaso de aquino & certe altre laude de doctori dignissimi che i[n] le prime no[n] erano

Jacopone da Todi, Jacopo de' Benedetti]. The Fairfax-Murray copy of a chef-d'œuvre of Italian Medieval Poetry. 1514. Venice. Bernardino Benali. 4to (196 x 135 mm). 1b. on vellum, 8 ff., 128 ff. Sumptuous 19th century olive morocco by Mackenzie, boards with interlacing fillets, spine flat tooled and lettered in gilt, inner boards with similar patterns incorporating tooling of birds, insignificant rubbing. A beautiful copy, minor foxing here and there, edges gilded. 12,000 $ Rare and beautiful edition of this Italian poetry chef-d'œuvre, sumptuously bound for Fairfax Murray by Mackenzie. Franciscan religious Jacopo de Benedetti (Todi, c.1230 – 1306) is, alongside Dante, possibly the most illustrious and influential figure and poet of the Italian medieval literature. The book contains one of the earliest printed versions of the Stabat Mater, later made into music by Vivaldi, Haydn, Rossini, Schubert, Verdi, des Pres, Scarlatti, and others. This edition, published in 1514 by Benali (1483 – 1543) follows partially the Florence and Brescia editions, but adds to it with new pieces, both authentic and some attributed, along with pieces by other authors, such as St. Thomas Aquinas. It is illustrated with 3 woodcuts in text, one shows St. Francis receiving the stigmata, and another shows Jesus in prayer. Provenance: Ch. Fairfax Murray, bookplate on flyleaf. Rare, we can locate copies at Biblioteca Casanatense, BNCR, Cambridge University, BNF, Morgan Library, Harvard Houghton Library, Newberry Library, Yale, Institute of Information Science, BNE, according to OCLC. Gamba, 577; Sander, 3550; Essling, 1825; Adams, J-54.