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Philosophy in sport made science in earnest; being an attempt to illustrate the first principles of natural philosophy by the aid of popular toys and sports.

Philosophy in sport made science in earnest; being an attempt to illustrate the first principles of natural philosophy by the aid of popular toys and sports.

Paris, John Ayrton; George Cruikshank, illus. First edition of an engaging triple-decker science book for children in a copy given by scientist Michael Faraday to his wife's nephews, illustrated with => over 20 wood engravings by George Cruikshank. A prominent physician and medical researcher who served as president of the Royal College of Physicians, the author (1785?1856) here focuses on his beloved natural philosophy: The text uses an elaborate fictional frame story about the Seymour family (Tom, Louisa, Rosa, Fanny, John, and their parents), plus various acquaintances providing comic relief or melodramatic interest, to teach about conducting experiments and examining scientific principles via "the common toys which have been invented for the amusement of youth" (p. 25). Paris, an ardent proponent of scientific societies and in fact the founder of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall, provides a Virgil-obsessed vicar character to make unconvincing arguments against such "preposterous," potentially church-overthrowing groups ? but also, in his favor, to explicate an anti-slavery allegory. The action is set in a thinly veiled version of => Penzance, Cornwall, where Dr. Paris lived for four years; among the topics covered by the protagonists are chess, ancient music, magic tricks, and the thaumatrope. Cruikshank's illustrations capture the children at their "educational" play, with kites, shuttlecocks, etc., and the adults in various scenes from the frame narrative. Additional in-text figures depict principles of physics, etc. => The triple-decker format is very, very unusual in works for children. Provenance: Vol. I with calling card of "M. Faraday" to front pastedown and his inked inscription above his name reading, "To the Boy Buchanans from their Uncle" (the printed name on the card later underlined in pencil). Front fly-leaf with inked gift inscription to John Francis Campbell from "Adelaide & John," dated 1832; front pastedown and fly-leaf with Campbell's early inked ownership inscriptions. More recent rubber-stamp (now faded) California bookseller Bertrand Smith ("Acres of Books"); other volumes similar. Later in the children's book collection of Albert A. Howard, small booklabels ("AHA") at rear. 12mo (18.3 cm, 7.2"). 3 vols. I: xviii, 316 pp.; illus. II: viii, 314 pp.; illus. III: vi, 207, [1] pp.; illus. (half-titles lacking). NSTC 2P3301; Cohn, George Cruikshank, 599 & 626. Not in Osborne Collection; not in Gumuchian. 19th-century half brown calf and marbled paper?covered sides, spines with gilt-stamped leather title-labels; bindings worn overall, spines rubbed, front joint of vol. I cracked, spine label of vol. II absent. Front pastedown of vol. I with binder's ticket of Carss, Glasgow. All three half-titles lacking. A very few spots of foxing scattered throughout, two pages in vol. II with light smudges, several pages with stripes of offsetting from attached silk bookmarks, overall clean. => An enormously appealing production with an enormously appealing provenance.
The first American Bible: a leaf from a copy of the Bible translated into the Indian language by John Eliot and printed at Cambridge in New England in the year 1663

The first American Bible: a leaf from a copy of the Bible translated into the Indian language by John Eliot and printed at Cambridge in New England in the year 1663, with an account of the translator and his labors, and of the two printers who produced the book.

Winship, George Parker. The "Eliot Indian Bible" is legendary among Bible and Americana collectors and libraries for its place in American history, book history, and the spread of the Scriptures beyond Europe and the Middle East. Winship (1871?1952), a major figure in American rare books in the first half of the 20th century, was successively the librarian of the John Carter Brown Library, the curator of the Harry Elkins Widener Collection at Harvard, and the keeper of the Treasure Room, then the rare books and manuscripts collection of the Harvard College Library. As such it was natural for Goodspeed's Book Shop to turn to him for the historical essay that forms the text of this leaf book. And a great historical essay it is, detailing the people and institutions involved: printers Samuel Green, Marmaduke Johnson, and the Indian assistant known as James the Printer; translator John Eliot; and the financial backer The New England Company. => The "Eliot Indian Bible" was "the earliest example in history of the translation and printing of the entire Bible in a new Language as a means of evangelization" (Darlow & Moule 6737), was the first printing of the Bible in the New World, and was the first printing of the Bible in a New World language. And of course the fact that a native American had an actual hand in printing it is remarkable. This leaf book, printed by D.B. Updike at the Merrymount Press, was limited to 157 (unnumbered) copies, each bearing a leaf from the "1663" edition of the Bible in Massachuset; but actually, since the leaf in this copy is from the New Testament, it was printed in 1661, the N.T. having been printed two years before the O.T. The leaf present here is Aa4 of the N.T., being John 6:2?71 and 7:1 ?3, and so it contains => the parable of the loaves and fishes. Small 8vo (20 cm, 7.75"). [2], 20 pp., tipped-in leaf. de Hamel & Silver, Disbound and Dispersed, 45; Updike, Merrymount Press, 685; Darlow & Moule 6736 & 3737; Pilling, Proof-sheets, 1174?1177. Publisher's dark brown cloth, the covers reproducing the gilt design "used by John Ratcliff, the earliest American bookbinder, on the copy of the Eliot Bible now in the Library of Harvard University" (de Hamel & Silver, p. 73). Lightly rubbed at extremities; discoloration to rear fly-leaf and free endpaper from a tassled leather bookmark. Else very good, and with a particularly appealing "Eliot" leaf.
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Tommy Thumb’s pretty song-book. The first collection of English nursery rhymes: a facsimile edition with a history and annotations.

Immel, Andrea, & Brian Alderson. Delightful, award-winning set offering both scholarship and aesthetic appeal: Facsimiles of the earliest known printed collection of nursery rhymes (Tommy Thumb's Song Book, 1744, followed by Tommy Thumb's Pretty Song Book Vol. II and The Pretty-Book), accompanied by an illustrated quarto volume featuring Immel and Alderson's bibliographical essay "Nurse Lovechild's Legacy" and their annotations to the rhymes. The commentary and the three miniature nursery rhyme volumes ? the latter in scrupulous photo-facsimile, including the never-before reproduced Cotsen Children's Library copy of the Pretty Song Book ? are presented in a well-designed cloth-covered clamshell case. This set was => limited to 500 copies, designed and typeset by Patrick Reagh and Patty Holden, and printed and bound by Ken Coburn. Folio box (32.7 cm, 12.87"). 4to: xv, [1], 121, [1] pp.; illus. I: [4], 59, [5] pp.; illus. II: [2], 64, [4] pp.; illus. III: [2], 63, [3] pp.; illus. Quarto in publisher's purple cloth with gilt-stamped title on front cover, miniatures in red, crimson, and violet ribbon-stamped cloth with gilt-stamped title on front covers, the whole in a purple cloth?covered clamshell case with compartments for each book; case with very slight sunning and ISBN label to back cover. => All volumes clean, crisp, and unworn.
Food for the young

Food for the young, adapted to the mental capacities of children of tender years.

A Mother). Interesting educational tales of natural history and voyages, worked into a frame story about the Johnsons and their children Frederic, Lucy, and William. Part of the excitement comes from a visitor who tells the children stories about being => shipwrecked in Africa and encountering Negroes (friendly) and Moors (unfriendly). Other topics include harvesting and preparing tea, American beavers, the "economy of bees," flora and fauna in Ceylon, glassmaking, the Black Hole of Calcutta (unmistakable, but not named with that epithet), and the life of "an American savage" (p. 169). While the preface notes that the work was written for children eight or nine years old (whereas the first edition specified six or seven!), that target age seems nebulous: many of the teaching moments are conceptually basic ? the protagonist children have never heard of and have to ask about concepts such as deserts and volcanos ? but the text takes for granted that readers will be comfortable with language on the level of "traversing," "voracious," "expatiating," "approbation," etc. The benevolent mamma does, however, mention several times that her children should always be sure to ask adults the meaning of any unfamiliar word or concept they encounter. The volume is illustrated with => four copper-engraved plates: a frontispiece showing two well-dressed children and their mamma discovering a lark's nest, a group of Africans attacked by a lion, the fashionable mamma plus all three children and their dog in a flowery arbor, and a final engraved advertisement for Darton's "maps, charts, & plans [and] extensive collections of books for the use of children and young people." The first three plates are dated 1823. Darton first published the present work in 1818 and again in 1820; this third edition is, like the previous two, now uncommon. Provenance: Tipped-in engraved presentation leaf filled out to John Lewis Provoost by his friend Miss S. Lock of New York; front free endpaper with early pencilled inscription of Charlotte E. Marshall. Later in the children's book collection of Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear. 12mo (14.4 cm, 5.67"). [4], 176 pp.; 4 plts. For first ed., see Gumuchian 2589 & Osborne Collection, p. 708. Contemporary marbled paper?covered boards with roan shelfback, spine with gilt-stamped title; sides a little scuffed, spine leather worn and cracked with head chipped. Hinges (inside) tender, sewing just starting to loosen; pages age-toned with offsetting from plates and a handful of spots of foxing, front pastedown with => early pencilled profile doodle.
The cutter

The cutter, in five lectures upon the art and practice of cutting friends, acquaintances, and relations.

Evans, Arthur Benoni. First edition of this biting satire on high society courtesy ? or rather the deliberate absence thereof. The author (1781?1854) was an educator and clergyman who published an array of miscellaneous works including Leicestershire Words, Phrases, and Proverbs; Synopses for the Use of Students in the Royal Military Academy; Fungusiana, or, the Opinions, and the Table Talk, of the Late Barnaby Fungus, Esq.; and Personal Piety, or Aids to Prayer; as well as a number of sermons and poems. The Rev. Evans' obituary in the Gentleman's Magazine noted "his remarkable felicity in penning jeux d'esprit," into which category the present item surely falls. This copy is => complete with all six hand-colored copperplates: the frontispiece (with a caption in Greek) and five oversized, folding plates, all drawn and etched by John Augustus Atkinson. Atkinson's depictions of various snubs and avoidances (mostly committed by gentlemen) are skillfully accomplished and ? if mentally divorced from the context ? serve as charming renderings of early 19th?century social encounters. Provenance: Front fly-leaf with inked inscription of T.G. Willes, 1813, and with undated pencilled inscription of L.[?]F. Willes. Following a bookstore fire in the 1970s, briefly held by the University of Chicago and then owned and worked on by eminent bookbinder-librarian Sidney F. Huttner (see note below). Later in the library of American collector Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear. 8vo (18.2 cm, 7.16"). [8], 104 pp.; 6 col. plts. (5 fold.) NSTC E1383. 20th-century quarter dark red cloth and marbled paper?covered sides, spine with paper shelving label; spine slightly sunned with label lifting, back pastedown with annotation noting "washed, mended & bound" by Huttner in 1974. Page edges untrimmed. First quarter (roughly) of volume with leaves showing signs of having been possibly pinned together at outer margins. Moderate to notable staining and smudging of various sorts throughout, very notably to sectional title for Lecture I); plate leaves not excepted although images all still "pop" ? one plate with outermost section reattached and paper darkened along the repair, one plate with short tear starting from foot of one fold (not touching image). => Hard copies of this London first edition are not commonly encountered, particularly with all six plates.
Phaedri

Phaedri, Augusti Caesaris liberti, Fabularum Aesopiarum libri quinque; notis perpetuis illustrati, & cum integris aliorum observationibus in lucem editi.

Aesop). Phaedrus; Laurentius, Johannes, ed. Sole edition of this annotated, indexed, and illustrated version of Phaedrus's classical fables. Phaedrus (ca. 15 bc ? 50 ad), originator of the expression generally translated as "adding insult to injury" (book V, fable III in the present collection), was the first to put Aesop's fables into Latin verse, adding a number of his own Aesopian-inspired pieces. The editio princeps was published in Troyes, 1596 and regularly reprinted thereafter. Here, in => the first illustrated edition printed in the Netherlands, Johannes Laurentius provides copious annotations in both Latin and Greek for each fable, as well as variant readings and indices of topics and morals. The volume opens with a copperplate frontispiece signed by Chr. Hagens, and almost every fable is graced by an in-text copper engraving. There are => two instances here of the correct illustration being mounted over the one actually printed on the page (pp. 133 and 205) ? while => the risqu? engraving for fable XIII, on p. 276, sometimes found obscured or removed, appears in this copy in crisp and uncensored form. Schweiger called this vignette, a brothel scene, "sehr anst?ssige," but Dibdin opined that fewer owners removed the offensive image than claimed to have done so. The type of this edition is quite small; the engravings, on the other hand, are quite large, at half-a-page each! Binding: 19th-century quarter green calf with later cream paper?covered sides, spine with older gilt-stamped leather title-label and gilt-stamped compartment motifs; later endpapers with earlier pastedowns partially visible. All edges speckled blue and brown. 8vo (19 cm, 7.5"). Frontis., [60], 462, [204] pp.; illus. Schweiger, II, 732; Landwehr, Emblem & Fable Books (Low Countries), p. 313; Dibdin, II, 280; Brunet, IV, 588. Bound as above; spine sunned, title-label worn, corners and edges with minor dust-soiling, text block starting to pull away from spine at head of front hinge. Last line of frontispiece caption shaved; otherwise one leaf with short tear from lower margin, not touching text; one leaf with small ink spot, not obscuring text; one index page with old repair to outer margin. One page with pencilled annotation in Latin. Pages slightly age-toned with light waterstaining to some lower and outer margins of first and last few leaves, otherwise clean and fresh. => A very attractive copy.
Sancti Laurentii presbiteri Novarum

Sancti Laurentii presbiteri Novarum, scriptoris perantiqui, Homiliae duae.

Laurentius Mellifluus?; St. Lawrence, bishop of Novara? The first edition of two homilies widely ascribed to one of the most venerated saints in Europe. St. Lawrence of Novara (225?58 A.D.) was a disciple of Pope Sixtus II, who appointed him archdeacon of Rome. Strongly committed to the poor, he was punished for distributing among them wealth belonging to the Church; his martyrdom, ordered by Emperor Valerian, was => slow death by roasting on a gridiron. His works and life, which had been in print since the late 15th century, were inspirational for the pastoral care and charity they advocated, with this edition presenting his homilies on penitence and alms and celebrating the pure principles, explained in clear, refined Latin, of the early Christian Church much admired by 16th-century Catholic and Protestant humanists alike. A cataloguer at the University of Illinois dissents from the opinion of Bibliotheque National and other national libraries as to authorship and writes, "The two homilies De poenitentia and De eleemosuma, here ascribed to Laurentius, Bishop of Novara, are medieval compositions by an unknown author usually designated as Laurentius Mellifluus, who cannot be identified with the Bishop of Novara nor with Laurentius, Bishop of Milan." => An elegant edition in Roman type, with historiated woodcut initials, including one of a bear chasing a boy and another of a very "busty" seraph. Provenance: Most recently in the library of American collector Albert A. Howard, small booklabel (?AHA?) at rear. Evidence of readership: occasional early underlinings. WorldCat locates only one U.S. library (University of Illinois) reporting ownership. 4to (18.5 cm, 7.25??). [31 of 32] ff., lacks final blank leaf (only). Pettegree & Walsby, French Books, 77263; Moreau, IV, 461. 20th-century grey paper boards; edges sprinkled red. Text clean, save for a few scattered spots on title-page and verso of last leaf; wanting final blank. Lower outer corner of one leaf torn away, just touching one letter, small paper flaw to outer blank margin of one leaf. => A handsome Vascosan production.
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Comoedia sacra cui titulus Joseph.

Crocus, Cornelius. This successful Christian play on the life of Joseph the Patriarch followed in the wake of Gnaphaeus?s ground-breaking comoedia sacra, Acolastus. Relying on scant traces of early Christian drama, these novel plays brought biblical stories onto the secular stage through the dramatic and linguistic tradition of Terentian comedy, inventing => a Christian theater of a humanist nature blending moralism and linguistic refinement ? one that proved a powerful didactic instrument for Christians and also for Latin-learning schoolchildren in post-Reformation Europe. (Cornelius Crocus (ca.1500?50), a Jesuit theologian and the dramatist here, was also a teacher at the Latin school in Amsterdam.) First published in 1536 and here in its sixth edition, Joseph is printed in compact Italic with Wechel's woodcut printer?s device on both the title-page and the verso of the last leaf, and with two historiated woodcut initials in the text. Provenance: On the title-page, 16th-century ownership inscription of Fran?ois Couetoux and 17th-century pen trials (dated 1617) with Latin motto; indistinct 17th-century inscription on verso of last leaf. WorldCat locates => one U.S. library (Harvard) reporting ownership of this edition. 8vo (14.8 cm, 5.82??). 62 pp. Pettegree & Walsby, French Books, 63672. Not in Index Aurel.; not in DeBacker-Sommervogel. Disbound, outer edge close trimmed occasionally just touching shouldernotes, short closed tear or cut to lower edge to title-page not approaching print; text with limited light (often faint) waterstains to edges and light general soiling. => A good, representative survivor of an important hybrid tradition.
Ein new Mandat Jesu Christi an alle seine getruen Christen in welchem er auffgebeut allen so jm in der Tauff gehuldet vnd geschworn haben

Ein new Mandat Jesu Christi an alle seine getruen Christen in welchem er auffgebeut allen so jm in der Tauff gehuldet vnd geschworn haben, Das sie das verlorne Schloss (Den Glauben an sein wort) dem teuffel widerumb abgewinnen sollen, Gezogen auss heyliger schrifft.

Herman, Nikolaus. This very successful pamphlet prints a letter to Christians from Christ ? "signed" by him (in type, of course) at the end. Nikolaus Herman (1500?61) was a Lutheran teacher and cantor at the Latin School of Joachimsthal, and his Mandat joined the numerous Protestant lay works published in the wake of the Reformation, advertising the new doctrines in an accessible format. In this letter, written in the first person, Christ explains how he had defeated the devil, and thus lost his life; albeit his teachings have become distorted due to centuries of misinterpretations, leading to the devil?s comeback, Christ is now ready to rescue his people again through the true faith and spirituality he had left as legacy. First printed in 1524 and not again until 1546, this is one of three editions printed in the latter year. As will surprise no one, the text is in gothic type, with shouldernotes, and there are two woodcuts: one on the title-page is of Christ preaching indoors to a large assembly of kneeling men, and on that page's verso is one of a minister in the pulpit preaching to a congregation of men and women, some seated, others standing. Provenance: Most recently in the library of American collector Albert A. Howard, small booklabel (?AHA?) at rear. Searches of NUC and WorldCat find => no U.S. library reporting ownership of this edition. 4to (20 cm, 7.75??). [8] ff. VD16 H2406. 20th-century grey paper boards, complete with the final blank; old ink notation of position in sometime nonce volume ("N. 16") to title-page, and old navigation/index tab to fore-edge of same. Text with a faint waterstain to lower margins, moderate on last leaf and final blank, only; otherwise, gentle age-toning generally. => A attractive copy of an attractive production.
Opusculum de cognitione peccatoru[m] venialium et mortalium.

Opusculum de cognitione peccatoru[m] venialium et mortalium.

Gerson, Johannes. This successful devotional manual, first published in 1502 and here in its fourth edition, was the work of Jean Charlier de Gerson (1363?1429), one of the most influential French theologians, Chancellor at the University of Paris, and a keen supporter of the conciliary movement, which he defended at Constance. A short, popular handbook, Opusculum abandons Scholastic rationalism in favor of a plainer, clearer theological language explaining to the devout reader how to understand when a sin committed ? e.g., vain glory, envy, wrath, avarice, lust, or false oath ? should be considered venial or mortal. It also advises on when to get confession and concludes with practical considerations such as => the "special conditions" in which merchants find themselves, often led as they are by their work towards mendacity or ill faith. The title-page, printed in a compact Gothic typeface, is graced by one of Froschauer?s handsome woodcut borders, with leaves, flowers, tendrils, a butterfly and a superb finch; the text is likewise in black letter with spaces and indications supplied for initials left unaccomplished. Provenance: Stamp "Bibliotheca Regia Monacensis" (crossed out) on verso of title-page. Most recently in the library of American collector Albert A. Howard, small booklabel (?AHA?) at rear. WorldCat locates only one U.S. library (Folger) reporting ownership. 4to (20 cm, 7.875??). [20] ff. VD16 J566; Panzer, VI, 133. 20th-century light green boards with cream shelfback, author and date hand-lettered to spine. Title-page and last blank soiled and repaired at gutter, edges dusty, occasional slight marginal foxing. => A nice example of a popular Froschauer imprint.
Bulla monitorii apostolici co[n]tra tres reuerendissimos cardinales

Bulla monitorii apostolici co[n]tra tres reuerendissimos cardinales, vt redea[n]t ad obedie[n]tia[m] S.d.n. Papa Ne Scisma in Ecclesia sancta dei oriet[ur].

Catholic Church. Pope (1503?1513: Julius II). Attributed to the press of Marcello Silber, this papal bull issued by Julius II against Bernardino Lo?pez de Carvajal, Guillaume Bric?onnet, and Francisco Borgia appears here in its second edition. These were=> the three notorious cardinals who, supported by Louis XII of France, led an unauthorised synod called "Conciliabulum" of Pisa in 1511?12. The bull was issued over three months before the first meeting of the assembly as a "warning" to the Catholic community concerning the three cardinals? schismatic intentions, and expressing the Pope?s desire they should desist as their seeking to disrupt the sacred and pure unity of the Church was "diabolic" and "sacrilegious." The title-page bears Julius II?s large woodcut arms. Provenance: Bookseller's label of Jean Clavreuil; most recently in the library of American collector Albert A. Howard, small booklabel (?AHA?) at rear. Evidence of readership: Indistinct early inscription to tit-page, 16th-century numbers and German inscription to verso of last leaf ("abst Consilium / Wie sten heillicken aus (?)"). WorldCat locates => one U.S. library (Pitts Theological, Emory U.) reporting ownership of this edition in the U.S. 4to (19.4cm, 7.63??). [6] ff. EDIT16 CNCE 51283; Tinto, Annali, 104 (assigns it to Silber). 20th-century slate blue paper boards. Title-page and verso of last leaf soiled, text a bit dusty, and the odd marginal spot; first and last leaves strengthened at gutter.
Abroad.

Abroad.

Keary, Eliza?]; Ellen E. Houghton & Thomas Crane, illus. "Last year, dear friends, we met 'At Home,' / And now 'Abroad' we mean to roam," in the even lovelier companion volume to At Home. For this outing, the poems and illustrations share a coherent theme: the experiences of an English family travelling in France. Osborne notes that "Thomas Crane, Walter's elder brother, designed the ornamental pages while his cousin, Mrs. Houghton did the figure designs." The chromolithographed scenes include our well-dressed friends departing from Charing Cross Station (and later, sleeping on the train home), boarding the steamer to cross to Calais, walking the Rue de l'Epicerie and visiting the Creche of Sister Rosalie (a nursery for children of working women) in Rouen, observing lacemakers in Caen, and enjoying all sorts of amusements in Paris. The publisher tells us only that "the verses are by various writers," but Opie suggests that Eliza Keary, who wrote the poems for At Home, may have been involved. Provenance: Front pastedown with bookplate of Margaret Heydon Folger. 4to (22 cm, 8.66"). 56 pp.; col. illus. Osborne Collection, p. 49; Opie PP 330. Publisher's color-printed paper?covered sides with teal cloth shelfback; extremities rubbed with a little loss to paper of covers at corners and front cover with an instance of abrasion affecting the "O" of "Abroad"; general light soiling and limited areas of old blue (ink?) staining. Bookplate as above; half-title with inked Christmas gift inscription dated 1882. Pages gently age-toned with a very few small spots, overall clean; sewing loosening but not broken; a children's book "read," for sure. => One ready for more reading, and looking!
Il bardo della Selva Nera Poema epico-lirico. Parte prima.

Il bardo della Selva Nera Poema epico-lirico. Parte prima.

Monti, Vincenzo. Deluxe Bodoni super-royal folio edition ? the first in this format ? of this epic lyric poem, dedicated to Napoleon and extolling his military accomplishments. Drawing not only on Neoclassical tropes but also on Ossian for literary inspiration, Monti describes triumphs including the Battle of Ulm, the Egyptian campaign, the coup d'?tat of 1799, and the Battle of Austerlitz. In 1806, Bodoni printed the six existing cantos (the proposed second and third parts of the poem were never completed) in three forms: folio, quarto, and octavo, with => the present oversized folio being predictably the most lavish of the productions. The dedication and each canto open with a headpiece engraved by Patrini from designs by Evangelista Ferrari (taken from Bodoni's Epithalamia), featuring geometrical patterns draped in wreaths, as well as with a historiated capital (one of which was done by Patrini and Ferrari and two of which are signed by Bossi, with the others unattributed). None of the three formats are common, and => this impressive volume, intended for private distribution amongst the nobility, is the least frequently encountered. Binding: Contemporary vellum, spine with gilt-stamped black leather title-label and with gilt-tooled arabesque and foliate motifs in compartments defined by gilt rules; top edge gilt, other edges deckle. Provenance: Front pastedown with small bookplate of Brian Douglas Stilwell. Folio extra (45.5 cm, 17.9"). [4], x, 134, [2] pp. Brooks 997; De Lama, II, 171; Giani 176 (p. 71); Graesse, IV, 592. Bound as above, sprung with vellum splitting along top and bottom edges of rear cover, otherwise showing mild wear and dust-soiling overall. Front pastedown with small 19th-century shelving label, over traces of larger now-removed bookplate, and Stilwell bookplate present as above; front free endpaper with neatly pencilled bibliographic annotations. Pages with a very few instances of faint spotting, otherwise clean. => Attractive, impressive, and uncommon.
Philosophy in sport made science in earnest; being an attempt to illustrate the first principles of natural philosophy by the aid of popular toys and sports.

Philosophy in sport made science in earnest; being an attempt to illustrate the first principles of natural philosophy by the aid of popular toys and sports.

Paris, John Ayrton. "This is a faithful reproduction of a set produced in France over 100 years ago": Modern facsimile of the chapter on thaumatropes from the first edition of Dr. Paris's Philosophy in Sport, => accompanied by 14 working examples and instructions for their use. The 1827 text uses an elaborate fictional frame story about the Seymour family and friends to teach about conducting experiments and examining scientific principles via "the common toys which have been invented for the amusement of youth" (p. 25), including the thaumatrope, or wonder turner ? a spinning-disk optical illusion serving as an early form of animation, and often considered a part of cinematic history. The French "jeu du thaumatrope" set reproduced here was originally published circa 1891; 12 of the present thaumatropes have preprinted illustrations, while two have been left blank for a user to decorate. Provenance: Inside box lid with bookplate of Vance Gerry of the Weather Bird Press; later in the children's book collection of Albert A. Howard, with small booklabel ("AHA"). 12mo (15.3 cm, 6.02"). 28 pp. (incl. pr. wrappers). Publisher's printed paper wrappers, housed in the original printed paper?covered box with color-printed "Jeu du Thaumatrope" illustration; box edges and corners with minor rubbing. => Booklet and toys clean, absolutely fresh, and ready for fresh experimentation!
In quarta Lateranen[sis]. Concilii sessione habita oratio. iiii. Idus Deceembris M.D.XII.

In quarta Lateranen[sis]. Concilii sessione habita oratio. iiii. Idus Deceembris M.D.XII.

Marcellus, Christopher. Sole edition of this important oration delivered on the fourth day of the Fifth Lateran Council (1512 ?17). Cristoforo Marcello (1480?1527) was an Italian bishop and theologian. In his speech De officio principis, he celebrates Julius II and his role as emissary of Christ famously defining the Pope as "physician," "governor," and "another God on earth." This doctrinal stance sought to defy once and for all the conciliary threats to papal supremacy, after the recently-disbanded, ill-fated "Conciliabulum" of Pisa. He also mentions how the "very ferocious Scythians" (the Ottomans) seized the seat of the Patriarchate of Constantinople after the Fall of 1453. The handsome woodcut border, found in several sermons or orations printed in the 1510s, was probably owned by Mazzocchi and circulated among other printers, including Silber. Provenance: Most recently in the library of American collector Albert A. Howard, small booklabel (?AHA?) at rear. WorldCat locates only three U.S. libraries (Harvard, Folger, UPenn) reporting ownership. Curiously, while the colophon reads as above, both Harvard and Cambridge, noting the colophon data, go on to record the publication as "excudebat Joannes Beplin impensis Jacobi Mazochii." 4to (20.4 cm, 8.125"). [10] ff. EDIT16 CNCE 30311; Sander 4211; G?llner 54; Adams M526; Ascarelli, Giacomo Mazzocchi, 59. 20th-century modern quarter crushed morocco over marbled boards, signed in upper outer corner of the front pastedown "Lobstein-Laurenomet"; gilt-lettered spine. Text is on strong, thick paper, with minimal, mainly marginal foxing to a handful of leaves, upper edge trimmed touching woodcut border on title-page. => Notably clean.
A Kentucky cardinal and Aftermath.

A Kentucky cardinal and Aftermath.

Allen, James Lane; & Hugh Thomson, illus. Two connected novels from an acclaimed Kentucky author, here in a newly combined and revised edition with => a new preface by the author and 100 drawings by Hugh Thomson. Set in a Kentucky village, the two pieces recount from beginning to end ? in a fashion reminiscent of a natural history ? the relationship between a serious-minded naturalist and the young lady who moves next door. The stories' focus on native plants and and birds was informed by the author's own experiences growing up near Lexington as one of the last of several generations of gentleman farmers. Cardinal, which opens in 1850, was first published in 1894 and Aftermath in 1895, with both stories making references to the coming war and to the question of Kentucky's honor; the publisher's advertisements at the back of this edition quote contemporary praise for their simplicity, gentleness of spirit, and "old-time courtesy." This edition was the first to feature Thomson's charming illustrations, depicting both indoor and outdoor scenes while notably prioritizing well-dressed human figures over Allen's lovingly described gardens and woods. Binding: Publisher's olive cloth, front cover and spine with gilt-stamped branch and bird designs (unsigned). 12mo (20.9 cm, 8.22"). [2], xxxii, [2], 276, [4 (adv.)] pp.; illus. BAL 468; Wright, III, 76 & 80 (for first eds.). Binding as above, spine and board edges sunned. Page edges untrimmed; one signature carelessly opened. => Aesthetically pleasing, culturally intriguing, and sure to be of interest to both birders and gardeners.