Buckingham Books

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GOOD GOODS FROM GOSHEN. LIGHTNING RODS / [TITLE PAGE] THE GOSHEN LIGHTNING ROD COMPANY. CATALOG NO. 15

GOOD GOODS FROM GOSHEN. LIGHTNING RODS / [TITLE PAGE] THE GOSHEN LIGHTNING ROD COMPANY. CATALOG NO. 15

GOSHEN LIGHTNING ROD COMPANY, GOSHEN, INDIANA First edition. 9 3/4" x 7" in white printed wrappers with title in orange. 31 [1] pp. Photo and text illustrations with color-tinted and metallic ink highlights. Directory. Index. Catalog of ornamental iron lightning rods and weather vanes. General information about the factory and their electro-plating department followed by descriptions and illustrations of patented Air Terminals, Tube Splicers, Improved Cable Anchors, Milk Glass Lightning Rod Balls, and even the glass slides to be shown in motion picture theaters with the local dealer’s name supplied inside. Lightning rods provided at the time essential protection for homes, businesses, and farm structures channeling the strike into the ground, and the Glass Lightning Rod Balls offered a warning system after a lightning storm, because if they were shattered, the property owner could check to see if their equipment and connections were still properly grounded. The Goshen Lightning Rod Company was originally formed in 1909 by Amasa Hoovens and partners, later incorporated in 1923 by Hoovens and his wife Emma. By the mid-1920s, the company was one of the largest manufacturers of lightning rods in the country, and following Amasa’s death, Emma Hoovens organized the West Dodd Lightning Conductor Company and would continue as owner and president until her death. Light soiling and damp-staining to covers and to some pages. Spine has been repaired using cellophane tape. Some rippling and offsetting to text block along with inner hinges repaired with black linen cloth at gutter margin. Good. Scarce.
OUTRAGES BY KU-KLUX KLAN

OUTRAGES BY KU-KLUX KLAN

BONE, JAMES H., CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA] 40th Congress. 3d Session. Mrs. Doc. No. 23. 9 1/4" x 6." [1]2pp. Letters addressed to General John B. Callis requesting immediate action be taken for the protection of Union citizens living in Alabama against the Ku-Klux Klan. Mr. James Bone relates two stories . the first atrocity occurred when the KKK called upon Mr. Biglow by breaking down his door, knocking his wife to the floor and then ransacking the house. Afterward the Klan dragged Mr. Biglow from his house and took him to a grove where they tied a rope around his neck and swung him from the branch of a tree. When Mr. Biglow wasÂdrawing one of his last breaths, the Klan released the rope and said to him, "You voted for General Grant, did you; this is the way we intend to treat all Grant men." The Klan swung Mr. Biglow from the branch several times, stating the same thing each time his life was about over, and then they turned him loose warning him to leave the state or next time they would not spare his life. The second story involves Senator Sibley who while staying at a hotel expected that the Ku-Klux Klan intended to call on him and kill him. Fortunately, Sibley was made aware of the Klan's intention and fled. That night, about 50 men armed and in disguise did in fact break into his hotel room looking for the Senator. January 18, 1869, the document was ordered to be printed. Scarce. Light damp-staining. Very good.