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Athena Rare Books

Aus fremder Seele (From an Alien Soul).

Aus fremder Seele (From an Alien Soul).

ANDREAS-SALOMÉ, Lou. Half title with publisher's advertisements on the verso + TP + [5]-154. Octavo. First Edition.Lou's Autobiographical Novel of Lost Faith and a Disastrous Love.Paralleling and incorporating the themes from her two previous novels (Struggling with God and Ruth), From an Alien Soul, explores the complexities and nuances of love. Widely admired by scholars in Salome's literary circle, this work is a powerful blend of philosophy, Shakespearean drama, and social commentary that even inspired Rilke to write a poem about the story. In this novel, Salome perfectly captures the complex atmosphere between the two main characters, a father and son, and, in doing so, demonstrates her belief that all love-romantic, familial, or platonic-is rooted in the innate comfort found in a master and apprentice relationship.The protagonist is the foster son, Kurt, who adores his father, a pastor. In a series of emotional interactions between the two, it becomes clear that Kurt has manifested his idolization of his father so intensely and for such a long time that it has become an essential part of his identity. However, this idolization is completely shattered when his father begins to demonstrate his faults. Kurt loses his belief in God and assumes that this means he has destroyed the bonds between himself and his father. This, however, leads to an even more terrible revelation; the pastor shares that he too had lost his faith in God while young and has spent his subsequent life preaching empty sermons without belief. Shocked by this abject hypocrisy, Kurt becomes hopelessly lost. His identity, which was so deeply defined by his adoration of his father, had been decimated by his father's betrayal, resulting in a total loss of self. Without his real god, the deified father, Kurt experiences a mental breakdown, and unsuccessfully attempts suicide. The pastor tries to win his son's trust and love back by confessing the damaging truth to his congregation. But this is completely unsuccessful and Kurt dies unforgiving while his father goes mad.Although an exaggerated story, Salome weaves several philosophical ideas about faith and identity into the plot of the novel. With Kurt's suicide and his father's resultant insanity, Salome elucidates the dangerous results of lonely individuality - a theme that she later detailed in a more analytical style in Die Erotik. Additionally, this novel, like her two previous ones, is highly autobiographical; Salome herself experienced a dramatic crisis of faith in her early adolescence while under the supervision of a charismatic teacher; an event permanently altered the course of her system of thought and liberated her into the life of freedom that she so eloquently led from that point forward. Original publisher's green cloth with dark brown and gilt lettering and decorations on the front cover and the spine. The spine is just a bit worn on the lower edges and very lightly worn on the top. There is a contemporary-looking former owner's ked-signature to the top of the half-title page. Otherwise, this is a lovely, clean and tight copy of this novel by the revolutionary Lou Andreas-Salomé. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
The Principles of Psychology.

The Principles of Psychology.

JAMES, William. Volume 1: 1 blank leaf + 1 leaf with book ads on recto + TP + Dedication page + v-vii = Preface + ix-xii = Contents + [1]-689 + 1 blank leaf; Volume 2: 1 blank leaf + 1 leaf with book ads on verso + TP + iii-vi = Contents + [1]-704 + [1]-8 = ads for The American Science Series + 1 blank leaf, Octavo. First Edition, Second Printing. McDermott 1890-4. The First Edition, Second Printing of William James Psychological Masterwork.EDITION: Harvard speculates that the first printing of Psychology had a print run of 1,000 copies but the great rarity of the first printing (characterized most easily by the hyphenated "Psy-chology" opposite the title page) versus this second printing is legendary and somewhat mystifying if, in fact, that many copies of the first printing were actually made. Clearly errors were caught early in the press run and quickly corrected. (see James, Psychology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1981, p. 1577.)As called for in Harvard's definitive edition, this second printing has the unhyphenated "Psychology" in the book ads opposite the title page. In addition, it also has two corrections to the errors found in the first printing: "not the sole seat of intellect" rather than "the seat of intellectual power" (Vol. 1, p. 10, l. 9-10) and "object of some absent sensation" rather than "object of some absent object of sensation" (Vol. 2, p. 101, l. 20). THE BOOK: William James was an original thinker in and between the disciplines of physiology, psychology and philosophy. While more widely known as the proponent of "pragmatism" and "radical empiricism", James's psychology is regarded by many as a far more original and substantive achievement. His nuanced rejection of the subject/object split in favor of a more fluid intersection between self and world, completely reoriented subsequent inquiry into the nature of consciousness and perception. This, his twelve-hundred page masterwork, is a rich blend of different academic and scientific disciplines blended with his own personal reflections, giving us such ideas as "the stream of consciousness" and the baby's impression of the world "as one great blooming, buzzing confusion". These two volumes contain the seeds of both pragmatism and phenomenology, and influenced generations of thinkers in Europe and America, including Edmund Husserl, Bertrand Russell, John Dewey, and Ludwig Wittgenstein along with such schools of thought as European phenomenology, Gestalt psychology, humanist psychology and the cognitive sciences.A seminal work in the history of modern thought and a work that is (still) frequently quoted by psychological theorist. Original publisher's dark green bindings with gilt lettering on the spine. The is just the lightest of wear to the edges and the spine tips. The front cover of volume 1 has a darkened ring - looking to be from a glass placed upon the book at one time. There is a contemporary former owner's #7 Winthop). Other than these very minor defects, this is a beautiful, clean, tight and bright copy of this important work by William James. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Reflexions Curieuses d'un Esprit des-Interressé sur les matieres les plus Importantes au salut

Reflexions Curieuses d’un Esprit des-Interressé sur les matieres les plus Importantes au salut, tant Public que Particulier (Curious Reflections of a Spirit Interested in the Most Important Things Needed for Salvation, both Public and Private) + Traitte des ceremonies Superstitieuses des Juifs tant Anciens que Modernes (Treatise on the Superstitious Ceremonies of the Jews both Ancient and Modern) + La Clef du Santuaire [sic] par Un sçavant homme de nôtre Siecle (The Key to the Sanctuary by a Learned Man of Our Century).

SPINOZA, Benedict. Reflexions Curieuses d'un Esprit des-Interressé sur les matieres les plus Importantes au salut, tant Public que Particulier (Curious Reflections of a Spirit Interested in the Most Important Things Needed for Salvation, both Public and Private), Claude Emanuel, Cologne, 1678. + (Second Title Page) Traitte des ceremonies Superstitieuses des Juifs tant Anciens que Modernes (Treatise on the Superstitious Ceremonies of the Jews both Ancient and Modern), Jacob Smith, Amsterdam, 1678 + (Third Title Page) La Clef du Santuaire [sic] par Un sçavant homme de nôtre Siecle (The Key to the Sanctuary by a Learned Man of Our Century), Pierre Warnaer, Leyde, 1678. TP + [1]-[24] = Preface + [25]-[28] = Table des Chapitres + 1-531+ [532]-[560] = Table des Materieres principales + 1-30 = Remarques Curieuses + 1 blank leaf, 12mo, First Edition. The Clandestine First French Translation of Spinoza's Tractatus Containing the First Edition of Spinoza's Critical Notes on the Book with ALL Three of the False Clandestine Title PagesThere was a huge scandal when Spinoza first published his Tractatus Theologico-Politicus in 1670 and the book was banned by the state four years later in July of 1674. That book had been printed and published in Amsterdam by Jan Reiuwertsz but with a title page falsely claiming that it had been printed by Henricum Künraht [sic] of Hamburg. When Gabriel de Saint-Glen - a French Calvinist who had fled to Holland - translated the work into French, Reiuwertsz became even more surreptitious and published it using three different title pages to deflect any attention from his own shop in Amsterdam. Rather than the quarto format of the original Latin edition, this book was published in 12mo - making it easily concealable and more portable. Most important from a scholarly point of view, the book contained a separate 30-page section at the end Remarques Curieuses, et necessaires pour l'intelligence des ce Livre (Curious and Necessary Notes for the Understanding of this Book) which present - for the first time - a transcription of Spinoza's own notes for corrections and clarifications to the original text. These notes were taken from his autograph annotations that he made in the margins of his personal copy of the book in the weeks just before he died. This French presentation was not supplemented with a copy of the Latin original text until 1802. A beautifully preserved contemporary full-leather binding with five raised bands on the spine and ornate gilt decorations each compartment. The second compartment with the title lettered in gilt on a red field. With all three of the clandestine title pages. This is a clean, tight, bright and altogether gorgeous copy of this important Spinoza publication. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
De l'esprit (On the Mind).

De l’esprit (On the Mind).

HELVÉTIUS, Claude-Adrien. 1 blank leaf + half-title + TP + i-xxii + [1]-643 + [644] = Approbation and Privilege du Roi + 1 blank leaf. Quarto. First Edition, Second Issue, The "B" Tirage of De l'esprit (see below). Smith E.1b. A Beautiful Copy of the "B Tirage" of Helvetius' De l'esprit. One of the Great Causes Célébres of the 18th Century. An Important Document for Understanding 18th Century French Censorship and Printing Practices and the Philosophical-Political Climate in 1758"The publication in 1758 of his principal work, De l'esprit was noisily condemned by the authorities, both ecclesiastical and ministerial, for its dangerously heretical and subversive opinions. Suppression of the book signaled a grave - but fortunately temporary - setback for the party of philosophes and Encyclopedists. Despite the recantations that Helvétius was forced to make regarding De l'esprit, he reaffirmed his ideas even more strongly in De L'Homme, de ses facultes intellectuelles, et se son education, published posthumously in 1772." (EP, Vol. 3, p. 472) Helvétius continued the work of Condillac by reducing all human understanding to sensation or sense-perception. He then took this reductionist psychology and erected a utilitarian theory of morality based upon it - making him "one of the chief pioneers and promoters of utilitarian moral theory" (Copelston, VI, 1, p. 51). Helvétius was a strong defender of the benefits of education and also extremely political - attacking all forms of despotism and, in particular, French despotism.This book comes with a tremendously complicated printing history - the details of which have only been clearly defined in the past few years. In a story worthy of a screenplay, Helvétius convinced Tercier, a friendly (or naïve) government censor, to approve his book although Tercier had only given the text a cursory inspection. This ruse was discovered at the end of June, 1758, by Malesherbes, the directeur de la Librairie, just as the first printing was being finished by Nicolas François Moreau. Malesherbes immediately ordered the publisher, Durand, to suspend publication of the work and to destroy the typeset and the sheets from the book that were deemed to be offensive. [This printing is now called E.1A, the first edition, first issue.]Responding to the criticisms made by a second, newly appointed, government censor, Helvétius then wrote new innocuous text passages of the appropriate length to replace the suppressed passages. These new leaves were then printed and inserted into the already printed book - replacing those that had been removed and destroyed. With these changes, De l'esprit was finally published on July 27, 1758. Once again there was a furor over the book, but this time it was much more public and involved complaints from both the Queen and the Dauphin. Malesherbes ordered the book to be withdrawn from sale and revoked the work's privilege on August 10, 1758 - just two weeks after its original publication date. [This printing is now called E.1B, the first edition, second issue.] By this time, the book had become a succès de scandale and pirated editions began to appear from several quarters. Because these copies frequently masqueraded as being published by the original publisher, Durand, it is not surprising that Durand took advantage of this confusion and had the printer, Moreau, reset the book in type based on the E.1B text and published it in late September of 1758. NOTE: Given this short turn-around time, it is likely that Durand (or Moreau) had preserved the parts of the original typeset that had not been confiscated from the very first printing of the book and then just reset the type for the missing sheets based upon the newly censored [E.1B] text. [This printing is now called E2A, the second edition.][ABE SPACE LIMITATIONS PREVENT US FROM UPLOADING THIS BOOK'S COMPLICATED BIBLIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY, BUT WE WOULD BE HAPPY TO SEND YOU A FULL DESCRIPTION UPON REQUEST.] an absolutely gorgeous contemporary full calf armorial binding. With a gilt armorial devise in the center of the front and back cover and a decorative gilt border around each. There is an elegant and small (1" x 1½") paper library stamp in the upper left corner of the front board. The spine has five raised bands and beautiful ornate gilt decorations in each compartment - except for the title compartment which is in gilt on a red field. The pages are all clean and bright with wide margins. Overall, as lovely a copy of this important book as one might ever expect to find. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Im Zwischenland (The Land in Between).

Im Zwischenland (The Land in Between).

ANDREAS-SALOMÉ, Lou. 2 leaves with publisher's advertisements on both sides + TP + [7] = Dedication page + [9] = half title + [11]-412 + [413] = Inhalt + [415]-[416] = Publisher's advertisements. Octavo. First Edition.Salomé Explores the Many Facets of Surviving Female AdolescenceThe Land in Between is a collection of five stories, all of which return to the time of adolescence, a topic Salome dealt with regularly in her writings. The book's title comes from a term Rilke coined to describe his near-mad condition of nightmare and loss of self, a state that Salome saw similar to the turbulent transitional period of adolescence. In these five stories set in Russia, Lou repeats themes already seen in Ma, From an Alien Soul, and other fictional works, but here she focuses one the painful transition from reverie to reality that young girls experience during adolescence, using realistic examples and details to strengthen her argument.In her first story, she recounts the youthful worship of a famous, authoritative, or fatherly man that is destroyed when the child begins to enter maturity and realizes that the idealized image is not at all realistic. In another, she details the family dynamic between siblings, describing a setting where the intimate closeness between two siblings turns into an awkward and detached relationship as they progress from adolescence into adulthood. While her longer novels - written during her time with Rilke - detail the transition from adolescence into adulthood, here she centers on the marital and maternal emotions and concerns of teenage girls, portraying the unsettling and the settling of the turbulent feelings that so dominate adolescence. Lacking the erotic urgency and sentiments of her earlier works, Salome's writing here is full of a more placid, refined gratitude for maturity and tranquility. And, in contrast to the strongly feminist themes of her other works, she prominently advocates for the human ability to harness one's individuality, emphasizing the necessity to separate oneself from the common herd and becoming autonomous. Original publisher's rose colored cloth with black and gold embossed lettering and designs on the front cover and gilt lettering on the spine. The spine is just a bit sunned and there is some very light staining and scruffing to the front and back boards, but otherwise, this is a truly lovely, unmarked copy of this book. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Dictionaire Historique et Critique (Historical and Critical Encyclopedia).

Dictionaire Historique et Critique (Historical and Critical Encyclopedia).

BAYLE, Pierre. Volume 1 (A-B): TP + [i]-[ii] = Priviegie + 1-12 = Preface + 1-586 + 557-560 + 591-712; Volume 2 (C-G): TP + 713-1359 + [1360] = Errata du I. Volume; Volume 3 (H-O): TP + 1-525 + 510 + 527-710; Volume 4 (P-Z): TP + 711-1331 + [1332] = Errata du II. Volume + [1333]-[1388] = Table des Matieres; Folio (10.5" x 15.75"), First Edition.The true first edition with the Preface dated 23rd October 1696. Bound in four volumes rather than the more commonly seen two. One of just 2,000 copies printed. Beautiful wide margins:1¼" top and 2½" on the bottom and the right side. Bayle, "the most important and influential skeptic of the late seventeenth century" (EP, Vol. I. p. 257) "wrote his 'Historical and Critical Encyclopedia' in his voluntary exile in Rotterdam as an anti-clerical counterblast to Moréri's work [Le Grand Dictionnaire, 1674] in order, as he put it, 'to rectify Moréri's mistakes and fill the gaps'. Bayle championed reason against belief, philosophy against religion, tolerance against superstition. In a seemingly detached way he posed argument and counter-arguments side by side, reserving his most daring insinuations to the renvois (references), which supplemented the actual entries. For over half a century, until the publication of the [philosophes] Encyclopédie, Bayle's Dictionaire dominated enlightened thinking in every part of Europe." (PMM)Printing and the Mind of Man 155. 8" x 34"), unobtrusive black seal on the title page -- just to the right of the central illustration -- 17th or 18th century, which looks to be the mark of a bishop's library. Occasional foxing throughout. Beautiful wide margins:1¼" top and 2½" on the bottom and the right side. Overall, an excellent copy. COMPLETE DETAILS ON THE CONTITION OF ALL FOUR VOLUMES UPON REQUEST. ADDITIONALPHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Zum Ewigen Frieden

Zum Ewigen Frieden, Ein philosophischer Entwurf (On Perpetual Peace, A philosophical Sketch).

KANT, Immanuel. TP + [3]-104, Small Octavo. First Edition, First Issue (Warda 154). NOTE: in the first issue, the catchword "Welt" appears at the bottom of page [3] with a capital letter. The second issue corrected this mistake to the proper "welt" - using lower case. Kant's essay On Perpetual Peace, raises the concept of peace from a political to an ethical level. His thoughts are the clear outcome of the growing emphasis on the need to manage relations between states that are increasingly operating on an international scale. Kant, who knew Rousseau's Extrait du projet de paix perpetuelle [1761] (which is, in turn, based upon Saint-Pierre's fundamental work, Projet pour render la paix perpetuelle en Europe, published posthumously in 1713), here details the basis of practical pacifism. In his far reaching analysis of the necessary preconditions for the establishment of peace, Kant clearly anticipates later twentieth century developments such as the League of Nation and the United Nations. The social order that Kant recommended, based as it was on his analysis of man's nature, would permit a maximum of individual freedom and competition, yet would have enough power to restrain this freedom whenever it threatened to produce oppression or anarchy. He proposed a similar system for international affairs, each separate state would be free to run its own affairs, but a supra-national federation of sovereign states would have enough power to regulate international relations and prevent war. Kant believed not only in political progress-the history of the human race could be viewed as a development toward a perfect political constitution -but also in moral progress. The stages in man's moral development are anomy, heteronomy, and autonomy. In the natural, primitive, anomic state, impulses were naive, innocent, and uncontrolled. Civilization began when man broke with the natural state and accepted externally imposed moral law; this is the stage of heteronomy. Ultimately, there will be moral autonomy, a state of absolute freedom, in which the individual will obey only a self-imposed law, the "moral imperative.(International Encyclopedia of Social Sciences)The "Preliminary Articles" described in On Perpetual Peace outline the following steps that should be taken immediately or with all deliberate speed:1. No secret treaty of peace shall be held valid in which there is tacitly reserved matter for a future war2. No independent states, large or small, shall come under the dominion of another state by inheritance, exchange, purchase, or donation3. Standing armies shall in time be totally abolished4. National debts shall not be contracted with a view to the external friction of states5. No state shall by force interfere with the constitution or government of another state6. No state shall, during war, permit such acts of hostility which would make mutual confidence in the subsequent peace impossible: such are the employment of assassins (percussores), poisoners (venefici), breach of capitulation, and incitement to treason (perduellio) in the opposing stateAlso described are Three Definitive Articles that would provide not merely a cessation of hostilities, but a foundation on which to build a peace.1. The civil constitution of every state should be republican2. The law of nations shall be founded on a federation of free states3. The law of world citizenship shall be limited to conditions of universal hospitality Contemporary mottled tan boards. The spine had been professionally repaired. Otherwise, this is a really pretty copy of this revolutionary and important work by Kant. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Menschliches

Menschliches, Allzumenschliches. Ein Buch für freie Geister (Human all too Human. A Book for Free Spirits) + Menschliches, Allzumenschliches, Anhang: Vermischte Meinungen und Sprüche (Human, All Too Human A Supplement: Mixed Opinions and Maxims).

NIETZSCHE, Friedrich. Half title + TP + [i] = Vorrede + [iii] = Inhalt + half title + [3] - 377 + [378] = Printer's information + [379]-[380] = Publisher's advertisements, Octavo. TP + [3]-163 [bound with] Der Wanderer und Sein Schatten (The Wanderer and His Shadow). Schmeitzner, Chemnitz, 1880. TP + [3]-185 + [186] = Berichtigungen + [I]-XVIII = Publisher's advertisements, Octavo. Three First Edition, All First Issues, (Schaberg 29, 31 & 32a) These books sold poorly and they were subsequently sold to another publisher and reissued with new title pages. Although each was printed in an original edition of 1,000 copies, only 511 first issue copies of MAI survive along with 350 first issue copies of MAII and 192 first issue copies of W. Menschliches I: INCLUDING all of the important issue points, one or more of which are usually lacking: the initial half title before the full title page, the advertisements at the end and the "eere" correction, cut and pasted by Schmeitzner over "menon" (a non-word) to create "meere" (sea) on p. 290 (aphorism 431). Menschliches II: WITH the publisher's penciled hand correction to page 35 - correcting "Opfersinns" to "Opfe rthier's" - as requested by Nietzsche in his March 5, 1879 letter to Schmeitzner (KSB 5, p. 392, #812). The Human, All Too Human series constituted such a radical departure in style and content for Nietzsche that he at first proposed it be released anonymously or with a pseudonym. His publisher, however, would not allow it. Reluctant to construct a philosophical "system," and sensitive to the importance of style in philosophic writing, Nietzsche composed these works as a series of several hundred aphorisms, a departure from his style up to this point. Much of the work is devoted to what one might now call "psychoanalytical" insights into the nature of common human experience and the origins of our human valuations. At the time, serious inquiry into such things as the nature of dreams, the meaning of pity or the phenomenon of laughter had no place in the field of philosophy. Human All Too Human also contains Nietzsche's reflections upon cultural and psychological phenomena in reference to individuals' organic and physiological constitutions. The idea of power sporadically appears as an explanatory principle, but Nietzsche tends at this time to invoke hedonistic considerations of pleasure and pain in his explanations of cultural and psychological phenomena. It is here, too, that Nietzsche's famous epistemological "perspectivism" is first broached: the view that "truths" are nothing more than interpretations of reality, formed from different perspectives and more or less successful in their struggle against competing "truths." Contemporary black half-leather bindings and green marbled boards. There are four raised bands on each spine along with gilt lettering and decorations. A truly charming set of these three revolutionary books by Nietzsche. Contemporary black half-leather bindings and green marbled boards. There are four raised bands on each spine along with gilt lettering and decorations. A truly charming set of these three revolutionary books by Nietzsche. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Nietzsche: Einführung in Das Verständnis Seines Philosophieren (Nietzsche: An Introduction to Understanding His Philosophical Activity).

Nietzsche: Einführung in Das Verständnis Seines Philosophieren (Nietzsche: An Introduction to Understanding His Philosophical Activity).

JASPERS, Karl. TP + Dedication page + [V] = Vorwort + [VII]-[VIII] = Inhalt + [1]- 437 + [438] = Publisher's advertisements + 1 blank leaf, Octavo. First Edition.In 1935, Karl Jaspers, an anti-Nazi German existentialist, ambitiously set out to expose and dismantle the Nazi's appropriation of Nietzsche's philosophy. At this time, the Third Reich and its multitudinous disciples hailed Nietzsche as a prophet of Nazism, using a very misunderstood concept of his works to justify their despicable actions. Karl Jaspers abhorred this warped possession of Nietzsche's philosophy and so wrote Nietzsche in a desperate effort to reveal and defend Nietzsche's true ideas. One year after this book was published, Jaspers was fired from his job at Heidelburg University under Nazi leadership. Karl Jaspers does not fall into the same trap as ideologues do, citing bits and pieces from Nietzsche's work to reinforce already held opinions. Instead, he openly shows the wide range of Nietzsche's views, including his endorsement of wars and warriors, his prophecies of world struggle and "new masters," and the cruel arrogance of the supermen. Jaspers finds Nietzsche's philosophy to be extraordinary not only because he foresaw all the monstrosities of the twentieth century, but also because he saw through them.The appearance which Nietzsche's work presents can be expressed figuratively: it is as though a mountain wall had been dynamited; the rock, already more or less shaped, conveys the idea of a whole. But the building for the sake of which the dynamiting seems to have been done has not been erected. However, the fact that the work lies about like a heap of ruins does not appear to conceal its spirit from the one who happens to have found the key to the possibilities of construction; for him, many fragments fit together. But not unambiguously; many functionally suitable pieces are present in numerous, only slightly varied repetitions, others reveal themselves as precious and unique forms, as though each were meant to furnish a cornerstone somewhere or a keystone for an arch. Original blue publisher's cloth with gilt lettering on both the front cover and the spine. Former owner's bookplate ("Heinz-Dietrich Wendland, Dr. Theol.") on verso of front cover. A nicely preserved copy of this significant book. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Systême de la Nature. ou Des Loix du Monde Physique & du Monde Moral (The System of Nature. or The Laws of the Physical and Moral World).

Systême de la Nature. ou Des Loix du Monde Physique & du Monde Moral (The System of Nature. or The Laws of the Physical and Moral World).

HOLBACH, Baron Paul von. In two volumes: Volume 1: 1 blank leaf + half-title + TP + [i]-[ii] = Avis de l'Editeur + [iii]-[vi] = Preface de l'Autuer + [vii]-[viii] = Table des Chapitres + [1]-366 + 1 blank leaf; Volume 2: Half title + TP + [i]-[ii] = Table des Chapitres + [1]-408 + 1 blank leaf; small Octavo. First Edition, Second Printing. Vercruysse 1770, A-7.This is the second printing of the first edition - with the corrections made to the text. The first issue is paginated 370/412 (rather than the 370/408 seen here) and has a comma (rather than a period as here) after "Londres." Holbach contributed some four hundred articles to the Encyclopédie of his lifelong friend and colleague, Denis Diderot. Diderot, d'Alembert, Helvetius, Voltaire and others of the philosophes met frequently for dinner and philosophical discussion at the Baron's house, which became known as "the café of Europe" (among whose foreign visitors were Wilkes, Hume and Sterne).In the Systême, Holbach rejected the Cartesian mind-body dualism and attempted to explain all phenomena, physical and mental, in terms of matter in motion. Holbach rejected religion because he saw it as a wholly harmful influence, and he tried to supply a desirable alternative. In fact, he outlined a whole ethical and political philosophy - which is expanded in his later works. Holbach was "the foremost exponent of atheistic materialism, and the most intransigent polemicist against religion in the Enlightenment." (EP, Vol. 4, p. 49) "He could not publish safely under his own name, but had the ingenious idea of using the names of recently dead French authors. Thus, in 1770, his most famous book, 'The System of Nature', appeared under the name of Jean-Baptiste Mirabaud" (PMM, p. 130) "The third and properly philosophical stage of Holbach's output began in 1770 with [this work]. This first - and only - example in the Enlightenment of a comprehensive, unmitigated defense of atheistic materialism was the culmination of a whole trend of ideas already expressed in varying degrees by La Mettrie, Helvetius, Diderot, and others. It caused much consternation in France, not only among spokesmen for the official faith but among the deistic philosophes as well. It was suppressed by judicial decree, and among the flood of refutations it provoked were those of Voltaire. and Frederick the Great." (EP, Vol. 4, p. 50) Contemporary calf rebacked with the original spines. There are no library markings Wendell T. Bush May 29 1934." [NOTE: Wendell T. Bush was an esteemed professor of philosophy at Columbia University. He died in February of 1941 at the age of 74.] Overall, a lovely copy of this first edition, second issue of Holbach's most important work. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Friedrich Nietzsche. Ein Lebensbild (Friedrich Nietzsche. A Picture of His Life).

Friedrich Nietzsche. Ein Lebensbild (Friedrich Nietzsche. A Picture of His Life).

GALLWITZ, Hans. Series half title + TP + frontis portrait of Nietzsche + [i] = Inhalt + [1]-274. Octavo. First Edition. A very early biograph of Nietzsche, published as Number 4 in the series Manner der Zeit (Men of the Time) with the chapter headings: The Pupil; The Student; The Professor; The Artist; The Untimely; The Moralist or Immoralist; Zarathustra; The Antichrist; Conclusion.Nietzsche would not be dead for another two years, but people were already severely distorting his philosophy and adapting it to their own purposes. As early as 1896, the theologian Hans Gallwitz, provided Protestantism with a clear Nietzschean thrust. For him, Nietzsche's manly, warrior values were not only worthy of emulation but also constituted the heart of original, authentic Christianity. The masculine, heroic virtues of Nietzscheanism and "real" Christianity were virtually indistinguishable If one penetrated the "paradox" of Nietzsche's thinking and arrived at the core of his ethics, Galliwitz proclaimed, one would discover that Christ and the antichrist had advocated the same values and truths. Armed with quotes form the New Testament and the Nietzschean one, Gallwitz, demonstrated the affinity [in his biography of he philosopher.]. (Aschhelm, The Nietzsche Legacy in Germany 1890-1990, University of California Press, 1992, p. 204) Contemporary ¾ leather with green marbled boards and gilt lettering and decorations on the spine. The bottom of the spine has one small nick and the boards are a bit worn. With a former owner's signature (Bernard Seliccinger (?) Nr. 66) to the title page. The text is lightly browned but otherwise unmarked. A nice copy of this interesting approach the Antichrist. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Letters Addressed to the Daughter of a Nobleman

Letters Addressed to the Daughter of a Nobleman, on the Formation of Religious and Moral Principle.

HAMILTON, Elizabeth. Volume 1: 2 blank leaves + TP + [v]-xxiii] = Preface + [xxv]-xxxi = Contents + [1]-257 + 2 blank leaves; Volume 2: 2 blank leaves + TP + [v]-xiv = Contents + [1]-271 + 2 blank leaves, Octavo. First Edition.Following the publication of her two-volume Letters in 1801 & 1802, Hamilton continued her discourses in letters, and, in 1806, after spending six months supervising the education of a nobleman's daughter in Essex, she published Letters Addressed to the Daughter of a Nobleman, on the Formation of Religious and Moral Principle. The books addressed such topics as Sunday observance, humility, the workings of Providence, and self-control. Returning home to Edinburgh from that assignment, Elizabeth wrote to her former pupil, the Lady Elizabeth, and to her sisters in an effort to supplement the instructions she had begun during that "too short" visit of just six months. Although not challenging the domestic role of women (and opposing the radical stance taken by some of her female contemporaries), Hamilton strongly supports a thorough education for women so that they can better pursue their maternal role of raising children properly - both in the ways of knowledge and the ways of morality. Thus, the first volume is devoted almost entirely to the proper virtues of a young noblewoman and how these are to be practiced in the real world. The second volume is, however, much more religiously philosophical in its intention and execution. The origins of "natural religion" is extensively investigated - including Greece and Rome - along with a history of the Jewish faith and an examination of the Old Testament. How this relates to Christianity is then examined in detail and the Christian virtues are revisited and reaffirmed. Despite all these efforts, Hamilton's peers derided her discourse on Christian theology as "unladylike." Contemporary marbled calf with a double line gilt border to the front and rear boards of each volume. Gilt lettering (on a black field) and ornate decorations on the spine. Spine labels to volume 1 have been repaired and renewed. Both volumes have the same contemporary gift [erased first name] Anne Louis with the warmest wishes of her affectionate Aunt Anne Woollcombe" - both of which are dated 1812. Below this ink inscription is the penciled name "J. H. Woollcombe." Overall, a well-preserved, clean, tight and bright set of these books. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Spuren (Traces).

Spuren (Traces).

BLOCH, Ernst. 1 blank leaf + half title + dedication page + TP + [9]-278 + 1 blank leaf, Octavo. First Edition.Written between 1910 and 1929, Spuren (Traces) is considered Ernst Bloch's most important work after The Principle of Hope and The Spirit of Utopia. A collection of aphorisms, essays, stories, and anecdotes, this book emphasizes Bloch's interest in demonstrating how paying attention to "traces" can be utilized as a method of philosophizing. Bloch's chief philosophical invention is to begin with what gives an observer pause - with what seems strange and astonishing. He then follows such traces into an awareness of the individual's relations to himself and to history, conceived as an exercise in thinking into the unknown, the "not yet," thus being utopian in essence. As if mocking phenomenology with its self-possession and scientific circumspection, speculative thought seeks out aconceptual phenomena and experiments with interpretation, feeling its way. Indefatigable, the philosophical moth flies at the pane of glass in front of the light. The enigmas of what Bloch once called the form of the unconstuable question are to chrystallize into the answers they happen to suggest at the moment. [Introduction to the revised edition of 1959]Spuren, a masterwork of twentieth-century philosophy, is a beautiful example of Bloch's utopian hermeneutics, taking as its source and its result the simplest, most familiar, and yet most striking stories and anecdotes of his youth. Original publisher's boards with red lettering on front cover and double red borders both front and back. Red lettering on spine. Near fine dust jacket with just a bit of wear top and bottom of sunned spine and one small hole spine. Pages lightly foxed throughout. Overall, a lovely copy of this important work by Bloch. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Antwort: Martin Heidegger im Gesprach (Martin Heidegger and National Socialism: Questions and Answers).

Antwort: Martin Heidegger im Gesprach (Martin Heidegger and National Socialism: Questions and Answers).

HEIDEGGER, Martin. TP + 5-8 = Inhalt + 9-289 + [291] = Publisher's advertisements, Octavo. First Edition. Martin Heidegger, acclaimed by some as the spiritual father of French existentialism and postmodernism, was a Nazi. Swept up in the mass enthusiasm for Hitler in 1933, he later voiced opposition to the Fuhrer but stayed in the party until 1945, and even thereafter remained silent on the controversy of the Nazi party. In 1987, Victor Farias published Heidegger and Nazism, damaging the German philosopher's reputation by advertising him as a rampant Nazi with little philosophical grasp. This book was published as a sort of damage-control; a collection of essays, interviews and comments in defense of Heidegger, edited by Neske, the philosopher's long-time German publisher, and Kettering, who taught philosophy in Mainz. Included are Heidegger's 1966 interview with Der Speigel (published posthumously in 1976); his tight-lipped TV interview of 1969; his retrospective apology when seeking reinstatement to a university post in 1945; and defenses of Heidegger by Hannah Arendt, Jacques Derrida, Emmanuel Levinas, Karl Jaspers, and colleagues and pupils. None of these apologetics nor the introduction casts much light on the connections, if any, between Heidegger's politics and his philosophy. A fine copy of the publisher's original dust jacket and orange cloth binding with an embossed devise on the front cover and black lettering on the spine. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Freiheit und Ordnung

Freiheit und Ordnung, Abriss der Sozial-Utopien (Freedom and Order, An Abstract on Social Utopianism).

BLOCH, Ernst. TP + [5]-[6] = Inhalt + [7] = Dedication page + half title + 11-[190], Octavo. First Edition.First published in New York, this was Bloch's final published work before his return to East Germany in 1948. This original 1946 edition was followed by a German edition published in Berlin in 1947. In this work, Bloch analyzes the difficult relationship between freedom and organization in the real world. He explores the strife encountered when an individual tries to mediate between those two and imagines various utopian scenes from the perspective of that eternal conflict. According to Bloch, the realization of a classless society implies the necessity of both freedom and order. Freedom for Bloch is the will of the collectivity towards a classless society. When freedom realizes this goal, it becomes the kingdom of freedom, but this social freedom maintains a dialectical relationship with order which necessarily arises out of the classless society itself. Freedom ends in order, and order is "democratic centralism, it is the common organization of the process of production, the common and uniform planning of human information and cultivation." original publisher's printed covers with original dust, lightly worn and chipped. The inside front hinge is cracked, but firm. Overall, this is a good and solid copy of this delicate book. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Psychologia Or An Account of the Nature of the Rational Soul: In Two Parts. The First

Psychologia Or An Account of the Nature of the Rational Soul: In Two Parts. The First, Being an Essay towards Establishing the Received Doctrine.The Second, A vindication of that receiv’d and establish’d doctrine.

BROUGHTON, John. TP + [i]-[xi] = Dedication + [xiii]-[xxxv] = Preface + [xxxvi] = Errata + [xxxvii] = detailed half title for Part I with advertisements on verso + 1-418 + [419]-[432] = Contents, Octavo. First Edition.In 1702, William Coward published Second Thoughts concerning Human Soul in which he maintained, partly based on theories found in Locke's Essay, that there is no such thing as a separate soul, but that immortal life would be conferred upon the whole man at the resurrection. The first part of Psychologia demonstates "by rational argument the established doctrine of an immaterial and hence immortal substance united with the human body" while the second part argues for this position, attacking Coward's position, point by point and accusing him of being a follower of Democritus, Lucretius, Spinoza and Hobbes - atheists all. But, most particularly, Boughton traced Coward's position back to the Essay Concerning Humane Understanding (1690) in which Locke claimed that God could give matter the capacity to think. Boughton attacked this belief claiming that the concepts of thought and extension were incompatible and that this incompatibility proved the existence of an immaterial substance in humans, i.e. an immortal soul. Anthony Collins described Boughton's book to his friend Locke as "a discourse on nothing, or on something about which no one knows anything." In his reply, Locke admitted that merely reading the fifth section of the book had convinced him that it was not worth bothering with the rest since it was written by an author "who argued so unconvincingly against his opponents but so convincingly against himself." Contemporary Cambridge-style calf with renewed corners. The original spine - with five raised bands and gilt lettering on a red field - has been professionally laid down. A clean, tight and bright copy of this extremely scarce book attacking John Locke and William Coward. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.