Athena Rare Books

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The Four Quartets in Their Separate Pamphlet Issue.

The Four Quartets in Their Separate Pamphlet Issue.

ELIOT, T. S. Burnt Norton, Faber and Faber, London, [1941]. 1 blank leaf + half-title + TP + 9-15, Octavo. First Separate Edition, Third Impression (Gallup A37). East Coker, Faber and Faber, London, [1942]. Half-title + TP + 7-15. Octavo. First Faber Edition, Sixth Impression (Galllup A36c). The Dry Salvages, Faber and Faber, London, [1941]. Half-title + TP + 5-15, Octavo. First Edition, First Impression (Gallup A39). Little Gidding, Faber and Faber, London, [1942]. Half-title + TP + 7-16, Octavo. First Edition, First Impression (Gallup A42). A complete set of Eliot's brilliant and beautiful Four Quartets."Burnt Norton" was originally published as the final poem in Collected Poems 1909-1935 (Gallup A32), this first separate printing was issued by Faber and Faber in 1941 in an edition of 4,000 copies. Eliot visited Burnt Norton, a decaying estate, with Emily Hale (a long-time acquaintance and possible love interest) in September of 1934 where they walked in its neglected garden - which became "the scene of Eliot's divergence into a lost world of experience" (Gordon, T.S. Eliot: An Imperfect Life, p. 267). Its five separate parts are intensely lyrical, mystically challenging and a profound reflection on the nature of time."East Coker" poem first appeared in The New English Weekly Easter Number, 1940 (Gallup A36a - quantity unknown) and the second issue was a reprint of that supplement (Gallup A36b; 500 copies printed). This wraps copy, the first Faber edition and technically the third edition according to Gallup, had a press run of 9,030 copies in its first impression. The print run for subsequent impressions is unknown.East Coker was the ancestral home of the Eliot family and the middle section of part I in this poem directly quotes some Tudor English phrases written by one of his ancestors. Eliot visited East Coker in 1936/7 and his ashes are buried there. Faber published "The Dry Salvages" on September 4, 1941 with a press run of 11,223 copies. According to Gallup, "Late copies of the first impression are printed on slightly thicker paper without the watermark ADELPHI" - which does appear here. While being one of the most English-sounding of poets, Eliot was actually born in St. Louis and his family summered at Cape Ann in Massachusetts when he was young. The Dry Salvages is a small group of rocks with a beacon off the coast of Cape Ann and the poem dramatically contrasts the Mississippi River ("a strong brown god") with the sea. Faber printed 16,755 copies of "Little Gidding" and released them on December 1, 1942. Early copies were sewn (as here) while later copies were stapled. Little Gidding is a village in Cambridgeshire that Eliot visited in 1936. It was home to a religious community founded in 1626 which Charles I visited in 1633 and then again in 1646 - while he was fleeing Parliamentary troops (who subsequently destroyed the community). "Burnt Norton" - Original green paper over burgundy card covers, stapled. A remarkably well-preserved copy. "East Coker" - Original tan paper over white card covers, stapled. Back cover a bit soiled but otherwise a lovely copy of this most difficult to obtain of the "Four Quartets." "Dry Salvages" - Original pale blue paper over blue paper covers, stapled. "ADELPHI" watermark 1941") to the top right edge of the half-title. Otherwise a lovely, uncut copy."Little Gidding" - Original stiff, light mauve card covers sewn with two loops of thread. Spine sunned around the edges. With a former owner's signature ("E.R. Martin?) to the upper right corner of the half title. Otherwise a lovely copy.ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Narratives of North American Indian Captivities.

Narratives of North American Indian Captivities.

All 111 volumes of this series, some varied in size, but uniformly bound in original green cloth. A Complete Set of First Editions.Garland Publishing's Legendary Collection of North American Indian CaptivitiesA Complete Set Consisting of 111 VolumesThroughout the 1970s, Garland Publishers published 111 volumes featuring facsimile reprints of Indian captivity narratives that had originally appeared between 1682 to 1962.The 111 volumes present 311 different titles relating the stories of people captured by American Indians - some of whom were returned to society and some whom were not. From the very beginning, these writings were immensely popular and, in fact, of the four narrative works that attained best-seller status in the American colonies there between 1680 and 1720, three were about Indian captivities (the fourth was Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress).Once the popularity of this subject became known, a new literary genre emerged which continued to be popular even after the emergence of the novel near the end of the 18th century. The captivity narrative is deeply embedded in the history of the American Frontier and has captured the imagination of the American public for centuries. Today, scholars analyze these stories for contemporary facts and details of Indian life while simultaneously delving into the reasons for our intense fascination with the subjects of abduction and captivity.Included with the purchase of this set is a pdf of the original 23-page catalog detailing the stories contained in each of these volumes starting with the 1682 A true history of the captivity and restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (the first printed account of a New England captivity) in Volume 1 and ending, in Volume 111, with the autobiography of Indian John first published in 1962 ("who was stolen by the Indians when three years of age and identified by his father twenty years later"). A COPY OF THIS PDF WILL BE SENT TO PROSPECTIVE BUYERS UPON REQUEST. NOTE: SHIPPING COSTS TO BE DETERMINED AT TIME OF PURCHASE. original publisher's green cloth. Condition ranges from very good to fine. An amazing collection essential to anyone interested in the clash of cultures between America's early settlers and the Native Americans they encountered as they expanded the boundaries of their civilization. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
The Hollow Men [Parts I

The Hollow Men [Parts I, II & IV only] in The Dial.

ELIOT, T. S. March 1925 (Volume LXXVIII, Number3) I-IV = publisher's ads + 1 leaf with a black and white reproduction of a painting (Madame Elizabeth Freake with Baby Mary - Early American) on the verso + [181]-268 + V-VIII = publisher's ads, Octavo. First Edition.This issue also includes contributions by George Santayana, Conrad Aiken, Marianne Moore, and others. Illustrations by George Bellows, Charles Sheeler, and Peggy Bacon (including a drawing of J. Alfred Prufrock along with two other drawings). Early in his career, Eliot frequently published bits and pieces of his poems before collecting them together into their final, combined version. This was true of "Ash Wednesday" and also of "The Hollow Men." "The Hollow Men" made its first complete appearance on November 23, 1925 in his eighth book (Gallup A8) Poems: 1909-1925. There the poem consisted of five separate, numbered parts - four of which had appeared earlier in various publications. Part I was first published in the Winter 1924/1925 issue of Commerce in both French and English ("Poème" - Gallup C158). The English was dated "Nov. 1924". Part III made its first appearance in the November 1924 issue of Chapbook as Doris' Dream Songs which has three poems: "Eyes that last I saw in tears", "The wind sprang up at four o'clock", and "This is the dead land" (not noted in Gallup but cited in Wikipedia). This third poem became Part III of "The Hollow Men."Parts II & IV were first published in the January 1925 issue of his Criterion magazine under the title "Three Poems." These were "Eyes I dare not meet in dreams", "Eyes that I last saw in tears", and "The eyes are not here" (Gallup C160). The first poem became Part II of "The Hollow Men" and the third became Part IV.Parts I, II & IV appeared together in the March 1925 issue of The Dial (Gallup C162) where the poem was first entitled "The Hollow Men" but here broken into just three parts (I-III). When these were finally transformed into the full version of "The Hollow Men" as it appeared in Poems: 1909-1925 these three appeared as Parts I, II, and IV.Part V was composed as the coda for these four previously published parts and only appears in the final Poems: 1909-1925 issue. In the original publisher's salmon wraps printed with black text on the front and back covers (inside and out) and also on the spine. The spine is cracked a few spots but all the parts and pieces are still present. A fairly gorgeous copy of this scarce issue of these three Parts of one of Eliot's most famous poems: "The Hollow Men." ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
A Masque of Poets. Including Guy Vernon

A Masque of Poets. Including Guy Vernon, A Novelette in Verse, [Edited by George Parsons Lathrop].

DICKINSON, Emily. 1 blank leaf + TP + [5]-8 = Contents + [9]-[303], small Octavo. First Edition. "Success is counted sweetest / By those who ne'er succeed" The only publication of one of her poems in book form during her lifetime. "Success" is the final poem to appear in the book - on page 174 without attribution (as do all of the poems in this book). The first published edition of "No Name Series" rather than the slightly later "Red Line Edition." According to BAL (#118, under Alcott) two formats of this title were advertised in Publisher's Weekly, the No Name Series and the Red Line Edition. Myerson adds that the Red line Edition, according to the publisher's records, was printed several days after the No Name Series. (The Red Line is larger in format than the No Name, has a red rule box around every page of text, and includes one illustration not in the earlier No Name Series.) An anthology of almost 70 poems. The book includes poems by Bronson Alcott ("Euminides" on p. 157), Henry David Thoreau ("Pilgrims" on p. 168), James Russell Lowell ("My Heart I Cannot Still It" on p. 142 & "Red Tape," p. 153), Bayard Taylor ("A Lover's Tests" on p. 75) and Celia Thaxter ("Awakening" on p. 15) This copy has 30 of the poems identified by author in pencil on the Contents pages. Original black cloth with covers and spine ruled, lettered and pictorially stamped red. Spine stamped in gilt. Verso of front cover and front free endpaper printed with publisher's advertisements along with an additional publisher's ad (on blue paper) tipped into the front free endpaper. A six-line poem has been written in pencil on the first blank leaf along with a former owner's name in pencil (indecipherable) to the upper right corner of the title page. Very minor wear to head and foot of spine. Circular purple ink stamp of the York Library in Maine (1½" wide) to pages 5, 7 & [9]. Aside from these markings, this is a lovely copy of this important Dickenson work. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Morgenrothe (Dawn).

Morgenrothe (Dawn).

NIETZSCHE, Friedrich. TP + [III]-XI + half title + [5]-363, Octavo. First Edition, Second Issue [Definitive] (Schaberg 50).This is the Definitive Edition which includes the new 11-page introduction that appears here for the first time. These introductions from the "Neue Ausgabe" editions, written in 1886-1887, are considered by many, including Nietzsche himself, to represent Nietzsche's best writing. There were originally 500 to 750 copies available in this First Edition, Second Issue state of this workThe fourth "aphoristic volume" was subtitled "Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality" and brings to central focus Nietzsche's attack upon and critique of Christian morality - which was to be an ongoing theme in all of his later writings. The book is also more masterful than the earlier works in its artful use of "aphoristic" juxtaposition to engage the reader in his own reflections. Indeed, Nietzsche seems more intent on conveying to his readers a particular type of experience in thinking than he seems concerned to persuade his readers to adopt a particular point of view. Dawn typifies Nietzsche's ad hominem approach to morality in which he asks primarily: "What kind of person would be inclined to adopt this perspective?" and "What impact does this perspective have on the way in which its adherents develop and live?" His answers to these questions are generally dispiriting. He is forced to conclude that Christian morality is basically self-denigrating, vindictive towards others, escapist and antagonistic to life. Contemporary marbled boards which are worn on the front and back (along with a small red stain to the center of the front cover). All the edges and corners are similarly worn. Black pebbled half-leather spine with a brown title piece and gilt lettering. There is a small bookseller ticket to the upper left verso of the front free endpaper (Gustav E Stechert 810 Broadway New-York) which has lightly offset to the title page. A worn but authentic copy of this important edition which adds Nietzsche's brilliant new preface about the "underground man." ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins.

Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins.

HOPKINS, Gerald Manley. Half title + TP + 1 leaf = Dedication page + 1 leaf = Contents + [1]-124, Octavo. 2 photogravure portraits by Emery Walker and a folded facsimile page. First Edition. Margaret are you grieving / Over Goldengrove unleaving? One of just 750 copies printed. Gerard Manley Hopkins is considered to be one of the great poets of the late Victorian era. However, because his style was so radically different from that of his contemporaries, his best poems were not accepted for publication during his lifetime, and his achievement was not fully recognized until after World War I. Hopkins's family encouraged his artistic talents when he was a youth in Essex, England. However, Hopkins became estranged from his Protestant family when he converted to Roman Catholicism. After becoming a Jesuit in 1875, he burned all of the poetry he had written up until that time. Three of those poems survive in this book but the others published here were written during the last fourteen years of his life. The poet died in 1889 after contracting typhoid fever while making one of his visits to the slum s of Dublin as a priest. This collection was put together by Hopkins' friend, the Poet Laureate, Robert Bridges, who assembled these poems from letters and other sources and published this book nineteen years after Hopkins' death. Apart from a very few poems published in anthologies, most of these works remained unpublished until their appearance here. "Hopkins's poetry, with its religious faith, his experiments in versification, his 'dark night of the soul' would have reduced all his Victorian contemporaries to immediate insignificance - like Rimbaud's in France - had they but known him." (Connolly, # 33). Original light blue paper boards with cream cloth spine and paper label. Slight wear to spine label effecting two letters. Overall, a lovely copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.