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Notebooks 1914-1916.

WITTGENSTEIN, Ludwig. 1 blank leaf + half-title + TP + [1e] = Preface to the Second Edition + 2-140 + 1 blank leaf. Octavo. Second Edition, Second Issue (Fr/McG: N.M., p. [41] + N.B., p. 42).The Important Corrected Second Edition of the Notebookswith a Different Version of the 1913 Notes on Logic Published simultaneously from British sheets indicating this is a second issue copy.In her "Preface", Anscombe notes that they have corrected a few errors in the text - most of which were "very small."Most important in this new edition is the change to the Notes on Logic of 1913 which "appear here in a different arrangement from that of the first edition" which had reproduced H. T. Costello's text from his Journal of Philosophy article (Vol. LIV, No. 9, April, 25, 1957, pp. 230-244). It had since been discovered that this version was much revised and rearranged by Bertrand Russell using headers of his own creation. This second edition of Notebooks prints the earlier, pre-Russell-rearrangement which is much closer to Wittgenstein's original dictation and is therefore significantly different from what had appeared in the first edition printing.The new Appendix IV presents facsimiles of "passages of symbolism" which were omitted from the first edition because "nothing could be made of them." Seen here as they appeared in Wittgenstein's Notebooks, the reader is free to devise their own suggestions, suppositions and interpretations of their meaning. Finally, the inclusion of a detailed Index to the book provides students of Wittgenstein with the ability to more easily identify and locate particular ideas or passages they might be looking for. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original illustrated and unclipped dust jacket (showing the colored "patches" unmentioned the first edition - see the "Preface") over the original black cloth binding with gilt lettering to the spine. Fine in a fine dust . ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $115
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Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.

WITTGENSTEIN, Ludwig. Half title with a comprehensive list of other books in this series on the verso + TP + [5] = Note page + 7-23 = Bertrand Russell's "Introduction" + [25] = half title + 26-189-189 + 1 blank leaf + 1-[16] = Publisher's advertisements dated 1927. Octavo. First Edition, First Issue (Fr/McG: Tract., p. 42). "Philosophy is not a body of doctrine but an activity"Published in an edition of 1,500 copies, the book was not expected to sell quickly so copies were bound as the current supply of on-hand copies waned. The Tractatus lived up to this reputation with copies being bound at various times between 1922 and 1933 when the second, definitive edition (of 1,000 copies) was printed. With each of these later bindings, a dated catalog of other books already published in the International Library of Psychology was bound in the rear. The catalog in this copy is dated 1927. Organized with an ever-fragmenting numbering system that runs from 1 to 7, the 525 short remarks are presented without arguments. Each proposition is put forward, as Bertrand Russell once said, "as if it were a Czar's ukase." Wittgenstein claims in his "Preface" that: "This book will perhaps only be understood by those who have themselves already thought the thoughts which are expressed in it The book deals with the problems of philosophy and shows, as I believe, that the method of formulating these problems rests on the misunderstanding of the logic of the language. Its whole meaning could be summed up somewhat as follows: What can be said at all can be said clearly; and whereof one cannot speak thereof one must be silent the truth of the thoughts communicated here seems to me unassailable and definitive. I am, therefore, of the opinion that the problems [of philosophy] have in essentials been finally solved." This final solution to the "problems of philosophy" - articulating the relationship between language and reality and thus defining the limits of science - are to be found in the sum total of those short declarative, numbered statements which make up the book. They present (among other things) Wittgenstein's Picture Theory of Language (highlighting especially what language can say as opposed to what it can show), his Truth-Table showing the true nature of propositions (and thus delimiting the scope of science) and what was later termed his Theory of Logical Atomism (defining not so much the nature of objects, but rather the absolute foundational basis of logical analysis). In relation to the more mystical elements (which are mostly concentrated in the final few pages of the book), Ludwig wrote to a friend: "My work consists of two parts: the one presented here plus all that I have not written. And it is precisely this second part that is the important one. My book draws limits to the sphere of the ethical from the inside as it were, and I am convinced that this is the ONLY rigorous way of drawing those limits. In short, I believe that where many others today are just gassing, I have managed in my book to put everything firmly into place by being silent about it." This is then both a philosophical and a literary work; one which ultimately claims that "there are indeed things that cannot be put into words. They make themselves manifest. They are what is mystical" [TLP, 6.522] and it is exactly these "things that cannot be put into words" that finally must turn us away from philosophy as we embrace Wittgenstein's final conclusion that "Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent." [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original green cloth binding with gilt lettering to the spine with just the smallest of lightly discolored "chips" to the rear edge of the spine. With an original solicitation post card from the publisher laid . A lovely copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $12,500
  • $12,500
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Notebooks 1914-1916.

WITTGENSTEIN, Ludwig. 1 blank leaf + half-title + TP + [1e] = Preface to the Second Edition + 2-140 + 2 blank leaves. Octavo. Second Edition, First Issue (Fr/McG: N.M., p. [41] + N.B., p. 42).The Important Corrected Second Edition of the Notebookswith a Different Version of the 1913 Notes on Logic In her "Preface", Anscombe notes that they have corrected a few errors in the text - most of which were "very small."Most important in this new edition is the change to the Notes on Logic of 1913 which "appear here in a different arrangement from that of the first edition" which had reproduced H. T. Costello's text from his Journal of Philosophy article (Vol. LIV, No. 9, April, 25, 1957, pp. 230-244). It had since been discovered that this version was much revised and rearranged by Bertrand Russell using headers of his own creation. This second edition of Notebooks prints the earlier, pre-Russell-rearrangement which is much closer to Wittgenstein's original dictation and is therefore significantly different from what had appeared in the first edition printing.The new Appendix IV presents facsimiles of "passages of symbolism" which were omitted from the first edition because "nothing could be made of them." Seen here as they appeared in Wittgenstein's Notebooks, the reader is free to devise their own suggestions, suppositions and interpretations of their meaning. Finally, the inclusion of a detailed Index to the book provides students of Wittgenstein with the ability to more easily identify and locate particular ideas or passages they might be looking for. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original illustrated stiff wraps. The spine is a bit sunned to green rather than olive as the covers show. The upper right corner (2.5" x 2.5" x 3") of the front free endpaper has been clipped. A very good copy with no markings whatsoever. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $90
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Notebooks 1914-1916.

WITTGENSTEIN, Ludwig. Half-title + TP + v-vi = Editor's Preface + 2-131. Octavo. First Edition, Second Issue (Fr/McG: N.M., p. [41] + N.B., p. 42). Philosophical Thoughts from His Wartime Diarieswith Two Important Appendices: Notes on Logic [1913] & Moore's Notes [1914]Published simultaneously from British sheets indicating a second issue status, this copy shows the "sum" typo on page 99, but is without the inserted "Erratum" found in the Blackwell first edition, first issue. . As noted in Elizabeth Anscombe's "Editor's Preface":We publish this material as an aid to students of the Tractatus. Most of it is no easier than the Tractatus itself; it naturally shews development; thus when it appears to present views different from those of the Tractatus, there is no need to reconcile the two. It should not be used without more ado as evidence for particular interpretations of the Tractatus. It does shew clearly, however, what problems formed the context of Wittgenstein's remarks in the Tractatus; in this way it will serve to cut short some argument where wholly irrelevant contexts are supposed by an interpretation.Although the editors have deleted all of the personal entries found in these diaries, they could not resist reproducing the final entry which was made on January 10, 1917 presenting some of Wittgenstein's ongoing thoughts of suicide - thoughts that Ludwig entertained in much more detail throughout the personal sections of these diaries:If suicide is allowed then everything is allowed.If anything is not allowed then suicide is not allowed.This throws light on the nature of ethics, for suicide is, so to speak, the elementary sin.And when one investigates it it is like investigating mercury vapour in order to comprehend the nature of vapours. Or is even suicide in itself neither good nor evil? The editors obviously did consider this to be a sufficiently dramatic coda to the Notebooks - similar to the famous closing line of the Tractatus: "Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent."Appendices I & II contain the important Notes given to Russell in 1913 and to G.E. Moore in 1914 (as mentioned above). Appendix III presents extracts from 19 letters that Wittgenstein wrote to Russell between 1912 and 1920 commenting (and attempting to clarify) his thoughts during this important gestation period for the Tractatus.[See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original unclipped tan dust jacket with dark blue lettering front, back and to the spine. The dust jacket is worn on the spine with minor tears and tiny chips. This over the original black cloth binding with gilt lettering to the spine. Otherwise, a lovely copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $150
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What is Philosophy? in Ludwig Wittgenstein: Sein Leben in Bildern und Texten (Ludwig Wittgenstein: His Life in Pictures and Text).

WITTGENSTEIN, Ludwig. 2-page TP + 5 = Inhalt + 7 = Wittgenstein Quote + I-XV = Wittgensteins Persönalichkeit + 9-394 + 1 blank leaf, 8" x 11¾". First Edition (Fr/McG: #1566).Wittgenstein's First Public Presentation - November 29, 1912German language text with a wealth of photographic reproduction depicting - among many other things - the handwritten minutes of the meeting (text transcribed above and photo below) in which Ludwig Wittgenstein gave his first public presentation of his philosophical thoughts (p, 89).[See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.]The 15-page "Introduction" by Brian McGuinness offers a framework for viewing the mass of material assembled in this volume which dwells primarily on Wittgenstein's family background and his intellectual evolution.The remaining almost 400 pages of the book present a pictorial reconstruction of the important phases of Wittgenstein's life - divided into 16 chapters moving from infancy to death. The illustrations (photographs, drawings, reproductions of letters and documents, etc.) are accompanied by brief texts (almost all in German) drawn from Wittgenstein's correspondence or manuscripts designed to explain or comment more or less directly on the illustrations. Publisher's original dust jacket with a photo of Wittgenstein on the front panel over dark brown boards with lettering on the front board and the spine. A near fine dust jacket and book the original publisher's protective cardboard slip case. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $250
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On Logic, And How Not To Do It [appearing on pp. 127-128 of:] The Cambridge Mind.

WITTGENSTEIN, Ludwig. Half title + TP + 8 = Contents + [9]-[10] = Illustrations + [11] = Dedication to Bertrand Russell + 13-315. Octavo. First Edition thus (Fr/McG: Review, p. [41]). Ludwig's Scathing Review of Coffey's The Science of LogicWittgenstein could not be more disdainful of the "logic" that the author Coffey offers to both schoolmen and the public in this book:In no branch of learning can an author disregard the results of honest research with so much impunity as he can in Philosophy and Logic. The author's Logic is that of the scholastic philosophers, and he makes all their mistakes - of course with the usual references to Aristotle. (Aristotle, whose name is taken so much in vain by our logicians, would turn in his grave if he knew that so many Logicians know no more about Logic to-day than he did 2,000 years ago). The author has not taken the slightest notice of the great work of the modern mathematical logicians - work which has brought about an advance in Logic comparable only to that which made Astronomy out of Astrology, and Chemistry out of Alchemy.Mr. Coffey, like many logicians, draws great advantage from an unclear way of expressing himself; for if you cannot tell whether he means to say "Yes" or "No", it is difficult to argue against him. However, even through his foggy expression, many grave mistakes can be recognized clearly enoughWittgenstein then goes on to elaborate six of Coffey's "most striking" mistakes - generally, the traditional weaknesses of Aristotelian logic that are most regularly challenged by proponents of the new mathematical logic offered by Bertrand Russell - and concludes by saying that: "This list of mistakes could be extended a good deal. The worst of such books is that they prejudice sensible people against the study of Logic."[See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Original publisher's unclipped dust jacket (with the most minimal of wear) over light grey boards with gilt lettering. Overall, a very pretty copy of this 1970 reprinting of Wittgenstein's first public foray to the philosophical arena. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $65
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Private Notebooks 1914-1916.

WITTGENSTEIN, Ludwig. Half-title + 1 leaf = "Also by Marjorie Perloff" + TP + [vii] = Dedication page + [ix] = Contents + [xi]-xiv = "A Note on the Translation and Transcription" + half title + [1]-218 + 2 blank leaves. Octavo. First Edition. The PRIVATE Notebooks Are Translated into EnglishAside from his evolving philosophical thoughts as published in 1961 and 1979, the original Notebooks also contained a wealth of intimate details of Wittgenstein's life and thoughts during the war. While the philosophical remarks appeared on the right-hand (recto) side of the page, the left-hand (verso) side contained diary entries written in a simple code (z = a, y = b, etc.) that he and his siblings had used throughout their childhood. These were private ruminations and, being coded, were thus protected from any prying eyes that might stumble upon his notebooks during the war. Curators at the Wittgenstein Archive cracked this code, transcribed the private diaries into German and made them available to scholars. They were, for instance, extensively discussed by both Brian McGuiness (1988) and Ray Monk (1990) in their respective biographies of Wittgenstein. Still unpublished in German pending the resolution of a copyright lawsuit, the "private notebooks" were edited and translated into English in 2022 by Stanford University Professor Emerita of Humanities, Marjorie Perloff. These coded entries comment regularly on Ludwig's progress (or lack of progress) with "the work" (his philosophical struggles), his military activities, his terrible relationships with the rank and file soldiers, his readings (particularly of Tolstoy's version of the Gospels and Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov), his religious and moral sentiments, his brooding over his possible death and potential cowardice, his almost constant thoughts of suicide, and his sexual behaviors.Elizabeth Anscombe, the chief translator and executor of Wittgenstein's literary estate, was categorically opposed to the publication of the kind of revealing personal information found in his notebooks claiming that "if by pressing a button it could have been secured that people would not concern themselves with his personal life, I should have pressed the button." Nietzsche - whose Antichrist Wittgenstein was reading with sympathetic interests during the war - would counter by saying that knowledge of a philosopher's "personal life" is essential to any understanding of his philosophy: Surely the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius are the best proof of this. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] As new. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $35
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Der Teufel und seine Grossmutter (The Devil and his Grandmother).

ANDREAS-SALOME, Lou. 1 leaf with publisher's device + TP + [1] = Dedication page + [3]-59 + [60] = Inhalt + [61]-[64] = Publisher's advertisements. Octavo. First Edition. A First Edition of Lou's Only Published Play"The Devil and His Grandmother" merges sexuality with religion, encapsulating three ages of woman-from the child, to a lost soul (and the Devil's bride), to the Devil's Grandmother. Written in charmingly convoluted dialogue, this work has a cinematic, fanciful feel to it.Salomé wrote this blank verse play in 1915 - after having studied with Freud and towards the beginning of her successful career as a psychoanalyst. Finally published in 1922, this is one of three plays that she wrote around this time but the only one published. It is comprised of several unnumbered acts and an epilogue. This is one of the most interesting and philosophically complex of her fictional works, as it not only successfully integrates and addresses the thematic issues from all periods of her literary career but does so in a form and style altogether new for her.As expressed here, Salomé's psychoanalytic theories, though adhering closely to Freud's, also incorporate much of her philosophical background; and her views on religion, sex (in both senses of the word), and art in their relation to the human psyche. As revealed in this play, those ideas are anything but derivative and pointedly reflect her distinctive ability to operate between apparently contradictory positions (i.e. art and science, religion and sexuality), synthesizing them to generate new meanings.Salomé's Devil is bored in hell and resentful of humans, who have life and creative ability on Earth. He also disdains all the angels and God in heaven, who he feels are hypocritical for shunning him. When another little soul arrives in hell, he decides to amuse himself with it, first turning it into a child and then into his bride. In their marriage scene (which takes place onscreen in a scene from a silent film) the Devil rapes and dismembers his bride. After this brutal violation, however, he seems to regret his actions, and, in order to revive the Poor Little Soul, the Devil visits his grandmother, who embodies the entire universe and is the source of all being. The Devil's grandmother returns the soul to life, and the Devil is redeemed, when he sacrifices himself for the sake of humanity.In this characterization of the Devil and others, Salomé develops her ideas on the split subject and its lifelong drive to return to an (imagined) unified state. She relates this feeling of lack caused by individuation to the experience of desire, specifically to erotic desire, which she sees as an expression of the wish to return, through the other/lover, to the undivided state in the mother's womb. Salomé correlates the wish for this primal experience with the death drive, and thus, every attempt to regain the imaginary ideal, whether through artistic, religious, or erotic creation, is also an expression of this unconscious drive. Original publisher's graphic-laden front cover black and green and the publisher's device printed on the rear cover which shows some light but obvious dampstaining. The spine has been professionally restored. There is a former owner's 4-line stamp to the upper right corner of the front flyleaf. Ovewrall, a very nice copy of Lou's only published play. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $400
Friedrich Nietzsche in seinen Werken (Friedrich Nietzsche in his Works).

Friedrich Nietzsche in seinen Werken (Friedrich Nietzsche in his Works).

ANDREAS-SALOME, Lou. 1 blank leaf with a portrait of Nietzsche on the verso + TP + [i] = Dedication page + [iii] = Inhalt + [v] = Portrait of Nietzsche + [vii-viii] = Facsimile of a Nietzsche letter + half title + [3]-263, Octavo. First Edition.An "Up Close & Personal" View of Nietzsche with an Early Attempt at PsychoanalysisFriedrich Nietzsche in seinen Werken is a rare, first-hand portrait of Nietzsche, an insightful and accessible study of the poetic, psychological, religious and mystical aspects of his philosophy. Sensitive yet knowledgeable, fabricated yet informing, this book supplies an intimate psychological profile, a glimpse into the mind of one of the most influential modern philosophers. Here, Salomé - who was intimately involved with Nietzsche for seven months in 1882 - offers her personal explanations of Nietzsche's philosophy and her understanding of its relationship to his psychology. It is a bold and intriguing attempt. The main argument raised by Salomé is that Nietzsche's personality was dualistic, which resulted in a dualistic philosophy. In Nietzsche's own life, this dualism was presented in the opposition between his fabricated, pretended outer shell and a genuine, forbidden inner element. She argues that he was so wholly immersed in this dualistic personality that it was embodied in physical features; health was only attained by means of illness, his self-affirmation achieved by means of self-injury. Although some argue that he reveled in this "dividuum," Salomé leaves the reader with the conclusion that these mental conflicts were the primary cause of his later insanity and death. This provocative conclusion generated considerable controversy. Nietzsche's sister, Elisabeth Forster-Nietzsche, dismissed the book as a work of fantasy. Yet the philosopher's longtime acquaintance Erwin Rohde wrote: "Nothing better or more deeply experienced or perceived has ever been written about Nietzsche."Despite the content being solely about another person and his philosophy, it was a pivotal work in Salomé's career. It added to her credibility as a philosophical author and it was among the first books to conflate the ideas of psychology and philosophy, examining the relationship between the two. According to Freud's daughter Anna, Salomé anticipated psychoanalysis with this book. She successfully illuminated not only Nietzsche as a person, but offered personal insights into the origins of his ideas. Contemporary ¾ leather with brown marbled boards and gilt lettering on the spine. The left side of the spine label with the author's name is missing and the spine tips have been professionally repaired. Otherwise, a clean, bright and tight copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
  • $775
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Philosophische Grammatik (Philosophical Grammar).

Half title + TP + [3]-[4] = Corrigenda + 5-[491]. Octavo. First Edition (Fr/McG: P.G., p. 43). The Executors Cull The Big Typescript to Produce Philosophische GrammatikDespite infuriating everyone who worked so tirelessly to bring it to press, the ashes of Logik, Sprache, Philosophie did finally result in one of the great masterpieces of 20th century philosophy: his Philosophical Grammar. Ludwig's personal - and philosophical - idiosyncrasies carried over to his bizarre, meticulous writing style. He would begin by writing remarks into small notebooks. Later some of these would be selected for inclusion in a larger manuscript volume and from those he would select what should be dictated to a typist. This amalgamation of various fragments resulted in what Wittgenstein scholars call the "Big Typescript" [see items #30 & 31 above]- the document from which the Philosophical Grammar was extracted. Wittgenstein was engrossed not just with his new ideas but also with the problem of how to best present them and he experimented with several different styles including numbered remarks, numbered paragraphs and an annotated table of contents. His research even led him to delve lightly - for the first time in his life - into the style and thought patterns of some of the great philosophical minds such as Descartes and Hegel. Several of these thinkers were rejected outright, but some, he felt, did have something of value to suggest. However, all of them, he concluded, had exhibited a flagrant disregard for the underlying problem: they all made unforgivable grammatical mistakes. Asking philosophy's typical foundational questions - questions such as "What is time?" and "What is number?" - is to commit a basic grammatical error. Such questions are actually nonsensical and a grievous misuse of language. They manifest our unexamined belief that these "things" are substantive; leading us to look for something substantive that corresponds to them. But, in fact, number is not a substantive thing, nor is time, nor is space. Engaging and perpetuating such a fundamental error will never lead to a successful philosophical resolution. Philosophical Grammar is all about an exploration of these grammatical errors: specifically analyzing the structural rules that underlay language, rules that allow or prohibit the emergence of meaning, coherence, explanation, and understanding. The book exhibits much less focus on the interpersonal nature of language that informs so much of the Blue and Brown Books (yet to come), focusing instead exclusively on the rules embedded in speech, asking why they are so, and, consequently, what can be meaningfully said in light of those rules. Philosophical Grammar attempts to offer a framework describing the philosophical questions that can be meaningfully asked, and, more importantly, meaningfully answered. This collection of insights marks a pivotal shift from the Tractatus (with its emphasis on the world described) to the Philosophical Investigations (with its emphasis on the method of description). [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original light tan dust jacket with red and black lettering to the front and back covers and black lettering to the spine. Over the publisher's original black cloth binding with gilt lettering to the spine. The former owner's name ("D. L. Fowler") contained within a triangle stamped to the center of the front free endpaper. Otherwise, this is a truly gorgeous copy of this important work by Wittgenstein. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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G. E. Moore’s Recollections & Notes of Wittgenstein’s 1930-33 Lectures.

In three issues of MIND. Volume LXII, No. 249 (January 1954): original wrappers + [1]-144 + [145]-[148] = Publisher's advertisements; Volume LXII, No. 251 (July 1954): original wrappers + [i]-[iv] = Publisher's advertisements + 289-432; Volume LXII, No. 253 (January 1955): original wrappers + [1]-144 = [146]-[148] = Publisher's advertisements. Octavo, First Editions (Fr/McG: W.'s lectures in 1930-33, p. 46 + #205). Wittgenstein's writings and lectures during the first half of the 1930s play a crucial role in any interpretation of the relationship between the Tractatus and the Philosophical Investigations. The manuscripts from 1930 onward record his first steps away from the Tractatus concluding with an early version of the Philosophical Investigations which he had completed by the end of 1936. The first four pages of the first article offered here contain some wonderful biographical information on Wittgenstein and his relationship with Moore, and, in even more detail, his friendship with Frank Ramsey. Moore follows this with his edited version of the comprehensive notes he took during those lectures. His original archived notes comprise almost 80,000 words and cover the full range of everything that Moore heard during these early lectures. In these articles, Moore does an extraordinary job of organizing and systematizing Wittgenstein's sprawling discussions. But, he cautions that:I will try to give some account of the chief things he said under all these heads; but I cannot possibly mention nearly everything, and it is possible that some of the things I omit were really more important than those I mention. Also, though I tried to get down in my notes the actual words he used, it is possible that I may sometime have substituted words of my own which misrepresent his meaning: I certainly did not understand a good many of the things he said. Moreover, I cannot possibly do justice to the extreme richness of illustration and comparison which he used: he was really succeeding in giving what he called a 'synoptic' view of things which we all know. Nor can I do justice to the intensity of conviction with which he said everything which he did say, nor to the extreme interest which he excited in his hearers. Beyond his attempts to present Wittgenstein's views in an organized fashion, Moore often offers his own views on what Wittgenstein said. Sometimes he points out inconsistencies or peculiarities in Wittgenstein's claims, or points out where he thinks that Wittgenstein was incorrect. Sometimes he expresses doubt as to whether he understood what Wittgenstein was trying to say, and sometimes he even tries to make seemingly implausible claims of Wittgenstein's more plausible by offering possible interpretations of what Wittgenstein may have meant. The articles give a palpable sense of Moore puzzling through Wittgenstein's developing thought. It is a charming and insightful look into the thought processes of two of the most complex and original thinkers of the 20th century. NOTE: the first, January 1954, issue offered also includes a 30-page "critical notice" of Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations written by P. F. Strawson. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original light grey wrappers printed front and back, inside and out. With very minor dings to the wrappers and a few closed tears to the spine sections. Overall, this is a really lovely set of these three important continuous essays by G.E. Moore reporting on his friend and colleague Ludwig Wittgenstein. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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The Big Typescript.

1 leaf with publisher's logo + TP + [V] = Inhaltsverzeichnis / Contents + VII - XI = Einleitung / Introduction + half title + 3-546 + 1 blank leaf. Folio. First Edition. Wittgenstein's First Attempt to Write a Second Philosophy BookThis first publication of "The Big Typescript" is - other than the bilingual "Contents" and "Introduction" - completely in German.Frustrated by the failure of his project with Waismann, Wittgenstein had begun clipping texts from the notebooks where he had jotted down his thoughts since his arrival at Cambridge in 1929. He reordered these and then had them typed up in the hopes that he would be able to publish the results in a book. It was Wittgenstein's first major attempt to write a second philosophy book which would present his thoughts since his return to Cambridge and his hope of correcting what he now considered to be the "serious errors" of his earlier work in the Tractatus.Despite being an unfinished manuscript, the "Big Typescript" does exhibit a clear structure and organization, showcasing Wittgenstein's meticulous approach to philosophical inquiry. This structure guides the reader through the complex web of his intertwined ideas, providing a valuable framework for understanding his later works.But, in the end, "The Big Typescript" is only a very large fragment presenting his early 1930s thinking, without either a title, a motto or any kind of substantial conclusion. This typescript does, however, provide concrete, substantial and important evidence of Wittgenstein's evolving transition from his earlier logic-focused philosophy to his later language-based approach.Regarding "The Big Typescript", Wittgenstein noted that he felt it was important "that the thoughts in [this book] should progress from one subject to another in well-ordered consecutiveness". This noble intention was, however, seriously challenged by the rapid changes in his thought at this time. But, despite its obvious limitations, it is precisely this ultimately rejected structure of the "Big Typescript" that makes it such a valuable document in understanding the ongoing evolution of Ludwig's thinking at this time. The text reflects Wittgenstein's engagement with contemporary philosophical debates and figures, including Frege, Russell, and most especially, Schlick, Carnap and Waismann of the Vienna Circle. It provides a unique perspective on the intellectual climate of the time and the arguments and insights he was wrestling with as he tried to present his extensive reflections on the nature and limitations of philosophy itself. Overall, Wittgenstein argues that traditional philosophy has often misunderstood its role and been misled by its own methods. He proposes a more humble and therapeutic approach to philosophy, focusing on clarifying our understanding of language and the ways in which it shapes our thinking.Though never published in its entirety during Wittgenstein's lifetime, "The Big Typescript" has become an essential source for scholars and students of his philosophy, offering a significant glimpse into the working mind of this brilliant philosopher revealing the struggles and revisions that shaped his final views.[See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Original publisher's white dustjacket with black lettering to the front panel and the spine over dark blue boards with a small spine label (LW 11). Preserved in the publisher's original cardboard sleeve. A fine copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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Wittgenstein’s Lectures: Cambridge 1930-1932. From the notes of John King and Desmond Lee.

Half title + TP + [v] = Contents + [vii] = Acknowledgement + ix-xvii = Introduction + [xix] = Quote page + 1-124. Octavo. First Edition, Second Issue (Fr/McG: W.s lectures. Cambridge 1930-32, p. 46). First UK Edition of His Student's 1930-1932 NotesThis copy is identical in every way to the US edition - excepting only for the title page. For his first ever "Philosophy" course, Wittgenstein started by stating categorically the landscape of what lies ahead:Philosophy is an attempt to be rid of a particular kind of puzzlement. This "philosophic" puzzlement is one of the intellect and not of instinct. Philosophic puzzles are irrelevant to our every-day life. They are puzzles of language. Instinctively we use language rightly; but to the intellect this is a puzzle.While anticipating the mathematical emphasis that would be seen in his 1932-1935 lectures, this series is something of an "awkward phase" as Wittgenstein experimented with new ideas, but was not entirely willing to let go of his old style. That said, it offers useful and novel formulations regarding his philosophy of language, blending the future precision of the Philosophical Investigations with some familiar content from the Tractatus. Regarding the accuracy of these important and revealing notes, John King claimed - with Desmond Lee commenting - that:To the best of my ability I concentrated on taking down whatever W. said verbatim. I never made any attempt to find my own terms, comparisons or examples, nor to alter his words or their order. The effort of note-taking made such changes impossible, even if I had felt capable of making them. W. never dictated notes but treated his lectures and discussions as if he were doing so. Of course not everything could be got down, but I got down all I could. The difficulty lay in following what was often a difficult argument, with frequent digressions, harking back and repetition, and if he would often hesitate and pause before speaking it was in J.E.K.'s words from "his intense desire to pick just the right word or phrase for his purpose, or to choose the most telling illustration or example to convey his meaning. He must have the exact word or phrase; nothing else would do." [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original photo dust jacket with green lettering to the front and the spine. There is a small serrated 1½" circular gold label to the lower left corner of the front cover noting "Publisher's Special Book Sale - £1.95". The rear panel has a black and white listing of all the other Wittgenstein books published by Blackwell. Over the publisher's original green cloth boards with gilt lettering on the spine. There is a 3" x 4" loose sheet noting "With Compliments" from Blackwell serted just inside the front cover. A really lovely copy of the uncommon British issue of this book. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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Wittgenstein’s Lectures: Cambridge 1930-1932. From the notes of John King and Desmond Lee.

Half title + TP + [v] = Contents + [vii] = Acknowledgement + ix-xvii = Introduction + [xix] = Quote page + 1-124. Octavo. First Edition, First Issue (Fr/McG: W.s lectures. Cambridge 1930-32, p. 46). First Edition of His Student's 1930-1932 NotesFor his first ever "Philosophy" course, Wittgenstein started by stating categorically the landscape of what lies ahead:Philosophy is an attempt to be rid of a particular kind of puzzlement. This "philosophic" puzzlement is one of the intellect and not of instinct. Philosophic puzzles are irrelevant to our every-day life. They are puzzles of language. Instinctively we use language rightly; but to the intellect this is a puzzle.While anticipating the mathematical emphasis that would be seen in his 1932-1935 lectures, this series is something of an "awkward phase" as Wittgenstein experimented with new ideas, but was not entirely willing to let go of his old style. That said, it offers useful and novel formulations regarding his philosophy of language, blending the future precision of the Philosophical Investigations with some familiar content from the Tractatus. Regarding the accuracy of these important and revealing notes, John King claimed - with Desmond Lee commenting - that:To the best of my ability I concentrated on taking down whatever W. said verbatim. I never made any attempt to find my own terms, comparisons or examples, nor to alter his words or their order. The effort of note-taking made such changes impossible, even if I had felt capable of making them. W. never dictated notes but treated his lectures and discussions as if he were doing so. Of course not everything could be got down, but I got down all I could. The difficulty lay in following what was often a difficult argument, with frequent digressions, harking back and repetition, and if he would often hesitate and pause before speaking it was in J.E.K.'s words from "his intense desire to pick just the right word or phrase for his purpose, or to choose the most telling illustration or example to convey his meaning. He must have the exact word or phrase; nothing else would do." [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original photo dust jacket with green lettering to the front and the spine. The rear panel has a black and white listing of other Wittgenstein books "also this series". Over the publisher's original green cloth boards with gilt lettering on the spine. With former owner's (Robert F Thimmesh) bookplate to the inside front cover and his signature to the top of the title page. Otherwise, an immaculate copy of the important and popular book of Wittgenstein's earliest lectures. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.

Half title with a comprehensive list of other books in this series on the verso + TP + [5] = Note page + 7-23 = Bertrand Russell's "Introduction" + [25] = half title + 26-189 + 1 blank leaf + 1-[20] = Publisher's advertisements dated 1935. Octavo. Second Edition (Fr/McG: Tract., p. 42).The Scarce Second [Definitive] Edition of the Tractatuswith Wittgenstein's Final Corrections to the TextThis second edition is the definitive text of the Tractatus, and the one most commonly used by scholars today. Published in an edition of just 1,000 copies, this 1933 edition of the Tractatus is the most notoriously difficult to find. Note that this edition also did not sell well as evidenced by the inclusion of 20 pages of publisher's advertising dated 1935 (two years after the book was published).The corrections were made by Wittgenstein himself, changing the wording of a sentence or a phrase to make it clearer or more precise, clarifying the text and removing any ambiguities. One typical example would be:5.152: "Von einander unabhängige Sätze (z. B. irgend zwei Elementarsätze) geben einander die Wahrscheinlichkeit ½." (Independent sentences (e.g., any two elementary sentences) give each other the probability ½.) was changed to "Zwei Elementarsätze geben einander die Wahrscheinlichkeit ½." (Two elementary sentences give each other the probability ½.).[See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original dark green boards with bright gilt lettering to the spine. There is a London bookseller's (H. K. Lewis & Co.) ticket to the lower side corner of the front cover. As fine a copy as one could ever hope to find - as if the original buyer bought it and wrapped it in tissue paper, never to touch it again. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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The Big Typescript: TS 213 – German-English Scholars Edition.

Half title with the German TP on verso + TP + [v] = Dedication page _ vi-xie = Einleitung der Herausgeber / Editors' and Translators' Introduction + xii-xviiie = Inhaltsverzeichnis / Table of Contents + [1]-[1e] = half titles + 2-506e + 507-512 = Register + 513-516 = Index + 1 blank leaf. Octavo. First Edition. The English Translation of His First Attempt to Write a Second Philosophy BookThis behemoth of a book - numbering 1,040 'traditional' pages - offers the original German text along with the first publication of a facing-page English translation of "The Big Typescript" and included extensive footnotes in both languages. Wittgenstein felt it was important "that the thoughts in [this book] should progress from one subject to another in well-ordered consecutiveness" and he tried to manage this goal by organizing the material under nineteen different chapter headings: Understanding.Meaning.Proposition. Sense of a Proposition.Immediate Understanding and the Application of a Word in Time.The Nature of Language.Thought. Thinking.Grammar.Intention and Depiction.Logical Inference.Generality.Expectations. Wish. etc.Philosophy.Phenomenology.Idealism, etc.Foundations of Mathematics.On Cardinal Numbers.Mathematical Proof. Inductive Proofs. Periodicity. The Infinite in Mathematics. The Extensional Viewpoint. The wealth of insight and understanding that this book provides into the mind of Ludwig Wittgenstein during this early phase of his transition from the logic-focused philosophy of the Tractatus to his later language-based approach is immense. Because of this abundant and very clear presentation of his 1933 thinking, The Big Typescript has been acknowledged by scholars as one of the most important publications from Wittgenstein's Nachlass to date. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original dustjacket with white and light brown lettering over a photo of Wittgenstein on the front panela and similarly on the spine and the rear panel. Over the publisher's original black boards with gilt lettering to the spine. A fine copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.

Half title with a comprehensive list of other books in this series on the verso + TP + [5] = Note page + 7-23 = Bertrand Russell's "Introduction" + [25] = half title + 26-189-189 + 1 blank leaf . Octavo. First Edition, American Issue (Fr/McG: Tract., p. 42). The First American Issue of the Tractatus - Published simultaneously by Harcourt Brace in the US from British sheets."Philosophy is not a body of doctrine but an activity"Wittgenstein tried to briefly explain his book to Russell in August of 1919: "The main point is the theory of what can be expressed by propositions - i.e. by language - (and, which comes to the same, what can be thought) and what cannot be expressed by propositions, but only shown; which I believe is the cardinal problem of philosophy." In short, he was claiming to present a comprehensive account of the natures of language, logic and reality and thereby solve all of the major problems then confounding professional philosophers. Organized with an ever-fragmenting numbering system that runs from 1 to 7, the 525 short remarks are presented without arguments. Each proposition is put forward, as Bertrand Russell once said, "as if it were a Czar's ukase." Wittgenstein claims in his "Preface" that: "This book will perhaps only be understood by those who have themselves already thought the thoughts which are expressed in it The book deals with the problems of philosophy and shows, as I believe, that the method of formulating these problems rests on the misunderstanding of the logic of the language. Its whole meaning could be summed up somewhat as follows: What can be said at all can be said clearly; and whereof one cannot speak thereof one must be silent the truth of the thoughts communicated here seems to me unassailable and definitive. I am, therefore, of the opinion that the problems [of philosophy] have in essentials been finally solved." This final solution to the "problems of philosophy" - articulating the relationship between language and reality and thus defining the limits of science - are to be found in the sum total of those short declarative, numbered statements which make up the book. They present (among other things) Wittgenstein's Picture Theory of Language (highlighting especially what language can say as opposed to what it can show), his Truth-Table showing the true nature of propositions (and thus delimiting the scope of science) and what was later termed his Theory of Logical Atomism (defining not so much the nature of objects, but rather the absolute foundational basis of logical analysis). In relation to the more mystical elements (which are mostly concentrated in the final few pages of the book), Ludwig wrote to a friend: "My work consists of two parts: the one presented here plus all that I have not written. And it is precisely this second part that is the important one. My book draws limits to the sphere of the ethical from the inside as it were, and I am convinced that this is the ONLY rigorous way of drawing those limits. In short, I believe that where many others today are just gassing, I have managed in my book to put everything firmly into place by being silent about it." This is then both a philosophical and a literary work; one which ultimately claims that "there are indeed things that cannot be put into words. They make themselves manifest. They are what is mystical" [TLP, 6.522] and it is exactly these "things that cannot be put into words" that finally must turn us away from philosophy as we embrace Wittgenstein's final conclusion that "Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent." [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Original publisher's dark green boards with the publisher's device embossed on the front cover and fading gilt lettering to the spine. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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Bemerkungen über Frazers Golden Bough / Remarks on Frazer’s Golden Bough.

Half title with German TP on verso + TP in English + v-vi = Introductory Note + [1]-18e. Large octavo. First Edition (Fr/McG: R.F., p. 43). Wittgenstein Attacks Frazer's Iconic Golden Bough - His Only Foray into Anthropological Theory - "What narrowness of life we find in Frazer!"Over the years, Wittgenstein formed close relationships with several of his students. In the early 1930s, one that he particularly relied upon on for insightful conversations was Maurice Drury. Their shared animosity toward academic elitism inspired their criticism of James Frazer's pioneering work in social anthropology, The Golden Bough. This short commentary was fueled by their shared outrage at the premises and conclusions of the book. Unfortunately, they barely made it through the first half of the first volume (there were twelve volumes in all) because the book so constantly enraged Wittgenstein, who could hardly make it through a sentence without some sort of angry outburst. Frazer's work would come to be known in the mid-20th century for having espoused entrenched notions of Eurocentric superiority in what should have been objective anthropological approaches. In this short work, Wittgenstein condemns the self-serving superiority assumed by Frazer, anticipating the criticism that would become mainstream decades after Wittgenstein's first stated them here. Wittgenstein forcefully demonstrates how this kind of racist, aristocratic, and Christian-centric superiority is the necessary consequence of an anthropological or sociological thinker who insists on using their intellectual work to explain rather than describe. For Wittgenstein, anthropological work immediately and necessarily becomes nefarious when it falls into the service of some grand theory of behavior. The product of anthropology is only useful or meaningful when it is done in the service of fruitfully describing, or "translating", one network of socio-cultural values and practices to another. Since both publishers are noted on the front panel and the spine of the dust jacket, we are presuming that the book and the dust jacket were printed in England as seen here. Whether the pasted over information was required to correct printed errors or to simply provide information left off of that page when first printed is unknown. Despite the minor flaws of the dust jacket, this is a lovely copy of this important anthropological screed by Wittgenstein. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original light yellow price clipped dust jacket with just a couple of minor stains to the front panel and a small closed tear along the top edge. Over the publisher's original black cloth with gilt lettering on the spine. With a former owner's signature ("L. E. Andrade") to the upper right corner of the front free endpaper. The verso of the title page has the publisher's" information pasted down below this. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. in 1979 By Humanities Press Inc
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“Some Remarks on Logical Form” in Essays on Wittgenstein’s Tractatus.

1 blank leaf + half title with a portrait of Wittgenstein on the verso + TP + v-vii = Contents + viii-x = Introduction + half title + 1-414. Octavo. First Edition, UK Issue (Fr/McG: R.L.F., p. 42). "Some Remarks on Logical Form" including Ramsey's Important Review of the TractatusPrinted from British sheets and noting "First published in 1966" on the verso of the title page. There is no established priority over the US issue although the fact that the two editors are American collegiates might suggest the priority of the US copy. Aside from its slightly larger size and the lack of the blank sheets found in the front and back of the American issue, these two books are identical.The ever-protective Elizabeth Anscombe insisted on including a long footnote here making it crystal clear that Wittgenstein had completely disowned this essay. As his literary executor, she had "consented to the reprint of the essay because I suppose that it will certainly be reprinted some time, and if that is to happen there had better be a statement indicating how little value can be set upon it as information about Wittgenstein's ideas."There is, however, some value to the essay included in this book for any serious student to Wittgenstein's evolving thought. If nothing else, this 6-page essay is evidence of the dynamic variability of his philosophical thinking at this time as he struggled to resolve his growing dissatisfaction with several key elements in the Tractatus that Frank Ramsey had so severely criticized.In the Tractatus, there is a small section where Wittgenstein discusses color, stating that it is logically impossible for something to be blue while simultaneously being red. Ramsey, however, criticizes the proof offered for this statement, which did not stem from a logical formula but rather from physics. If red and blue are measured by the velocity of particles, one particle cannot be going two different speeds. But to use physics as evidence, Wittgenstein would have to prove space, time, matter, and particles as logically necessary. Or, he could rethink the color problem altogether. However, he found his attempts to do this in "Some Remarks on Logical Form" so completely unacceptable that he disowned it shortly after it was written and refused to even deliver this paper. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Original publisher's dust jacket which is lightly worn on the spine edges and mildly chipped top and bottom along with one very noticeably abrasion to the front cover (see photo) over publisher's green cloth binding with gilt lettering on the spine. Other than the noted problems with the dust jacket, this is a clean, tight and bright copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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Philosophical Remarks.

Half title + TP + [5] = Quote page + [7] = Foreword + a small erratum slip bound in correcting an error on page 260 + 9-357. Octavo. First Edition (Fr/McG: P.R., p. 43). The English Translation of Wittgenstein's Important "Transitional Phase" between the "Tractatus" and "Philosophical Investigations"The text of the original German found in the book above translated into English by Raymond Hargreaves and Roger White. Here Wittgenstein's amazing Foreword (dated Nov 1930) is available to his English-speaking readers:This book is written for such men as are in sympathy with its spirit. This spirit is different from the one which informs the vast stream of European and American civilization in which all of us stand. That spirit expresses itself in an onwards movement, in building ever larger and more complicated structures; the other in striving after clarity and perspicuity in no matter what structure. The first tries to grasp the world by way of its periphery - in its variety; the second at its centre--in its essence. And so the first adds one construction to another, moving on and up, as it were, from one stage to the next, while the other remains where it is and what it tries to grasp is always the same.I would like to say 'This book is written to the glory of God', but nowadays that would be chicanery, that is, it would not be rightly understood. It means the book is written in good will, and in so far as it is not so written, but out of vanity, etc., the author would wish to see it condemned. He cannot free it of these impurities further than he himself is free of them. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original red and white dust jacket with white lettering on the front cover and the spine and white lettering on the back cover. Over publisher's original burnt orange cloth binding with gilt lettering to the spine. The former owner's name ("D. L. Fowler") contained within a triangle stamped to the center of the front free endpaper. Otherwise, a truly beautiful copy of this seminal work by Wittgenstein. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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The Architecture of Ludwig Wittgenstein: A Documentation. With excerpts from the Family Recollections by Hermine Wittgenstein.

1 blank leaf + half title + TP + [7] = Acknowledgment + [8] = Frontispiece + 9-127 + 1 blank leaf. Large Octavo. First Edition (Fr/McG: #882).A Magnificent Record of Ludwig Wittgenstein the ArchitectThe book contains explanatory text along with a wonderfully wide variety of photos, floor plans and facsimile writings - including two large 'fold out' pages. Although he had no formal training as an architect, Wittgenstein did have a strong engineering background and even stronger artistic ideal. He exhibited this early in his career. When he first moved to Cambridge in 1911, he could not find anything simple enough to furnish his rooms, so he oversaw the design and construction of a complete set of furniture which met his standards. This same aesthetic rigor came strongly to the fore with this project for Margarete.The house itself was breathtakingly simple in its stark outlines and Wittgenstein complimented this on the inside with his strong aversion to any kind of superfluous ornamentation, As noted by Monk:The house was designed with little regard to the comforts of ordinary mortals. The qualities of clarity, rigour and precision which characterize it are indeed those one looks for in a system of logic rather that in a dwelling place. In designing the interior Wittgenstein made extraordinary few concessions to domestic comfort. Carpets, chandeliers and curtains were strictly rejected. The floors were of dark polished stone, the walls and ceilings painted a light ochre, the metal of the windows, the door handles and the radiators was left unpainted, and the rooms were lit with naked light-bulbs. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original stiff orange wraps with black lettering to the front cover and the spine which is lightly sunned. Overall, a lovely copy of this amazing addition to our understanding of Ludwig Wittgenstein. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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Philosophical Grammar.

Half title + TP + 5-495. Octavo. First Edition (Fr/McG: P.G., p. 43). First Edition of the English Translation of Philosophical Grammar"All that philosophy can do is to destroy idols"This English translation by Anthony Kenny was released five years after the first publication of the German text. Despite infuriating everyone who worked so tirelessly to bring it to press, the ashes of Logik, Sprache, Philosophie did finally result in one of the great masterpieces of 20th century philosophy: his Philosophical Grammar. Ludwig's personal - and philosophical - idiosyncrasies carried over to his bizarre, meticulous writing style. He would begin by writing remarks into small notebooks. Later some of these would be selected for inclusion in a larger manuscript volume and from those he would select what should be dictated to a typist. This amalgamation of various fragments resulted in what Wittgenstein scholars call the "Big Typescript" [see items #30 & 31 above]- the document from which the Philosophical Grammar was extracted. Wittgenstein was engrossed not just with his new ideas but also with the problem of how to best present them and he experimented with several different styles including numbered remarks, numbered paragraphs and an annotated table of contents. His research even led him to delve lightly - for the first time in his life - into the style and thought patterns of some of the great philosophical minds such as Descartes and Hegel. Several of these thinkers were rejected outright, but some, he felt, did have something of value to suggest. However, all of them, he concluded, had exhibited a flagrant disregard for the underlying problem: they all made unforgivable grammatical mistakes. Asking philosophy's typical foundational questions - questions such as "What is time?" and "What is number?" - is to commit a basic grammatical error. Such questions are actually nonsensical and a grievous misuse of language. They manifest our unexamined belief that these "things" are substantive; leading us to look for something substantive that corresponds to them. But, in fact, number is not a substantive thing, nor is time, nor is space. Engaging and perpetuating such a fundamental error will never lead to a successful philosophical resolution. Philosophical Grammar is all about an exploration of these grammatical errors: specifically analyzing the structural rules that underlay language, rules that allow or prohibit the emergence of meaning, coherence, explanation, and understanding. The book exhibits much less focus on the interpersonal nature of language that informs so much of the Blue and Brown Books (yet to come), focusing instead exclusively on the rules embedded in speech, asking why they are so, and, consequently, what can be meaningfully said in light of those rules. Philosophical Grammar attempts to offer a framework describing the philosophical questions that can be meaningfully asked, and, more importantly, meaningfully answered. This collection of insights marks a pivotal shift from the Tractatus (with its emphasis on the world described) to the Philosophical Investigations (with its emphasis on the method of description). [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original red dust jacket with white lettering to the front cover and the spine. Over the publisher's original black cloth binding with gilt lettering to the spine. The former owner's name ("D. L. Fowler") contained within a triangle stamped to the center of the front free endpaper. Otherwise, this is a truly gorgeous copy of this important work by Wittgenstein. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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Mention of “Infinity” and “Some Remarks on Logical From” in Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, New Series. – Vol. XXIX. Containing the Papers read before the Society during the Fiftieth Session, 1928-1929.

TP + [i] = Contents + [1]-402. Octavo. First Edition.A Brief Mention of Wittgenstein's Substitution of "Infinity" for "Some Remarks on Logical Form"This is NOT the printed text of Wittgenstein's aborted paper "Some Remarks on Logical Form" which was scheduled to be read at the July meeting of The Aristotelian Society and The Mind Association in 1929. Instead this book contains the collected papers read at The Aristotelian Society during the years 1928 to 1929. However, at the very end of this book - on pages 390-391 - are the brief minutes reporting on who was in attendance and what was presented at the joint session of The Aristotelian Society and The Mind Association at University College, Northampton between July 12th and 15th. Those minutes provide the following details on the Third Session held on July 13th, at 2 p.m.:Mr. F. P. Ramsay [sic] in the Chair. Symposium: Address by Mr. F. [sic] Wittgenstein on "Infinity" (in substitution for the published address on "Logical Form"). Discussion: Mr. Mead, Prof. L. A. Reid, Mr. Hooper, Prof. Lutoslawski.The minutes also note that Wittgenstein participated in the discussion following the Fourth Session presentation:July 13th, at 8 p.m. - Prof. Frank Granger in the Chair. Symposium: "Realism and Modern Physics." Prof. J. Laird, Mr. C. E. M. Joad, Miss L. S. Stebbing. Discussion: Prof. Reid, Mr. Hooper, Mr. Joseph, Mr. Hannay, Prof. Lutoslawski, Mr. Wittgenstein. The actual printing of Wittgenstein's disavowed paper, "Some Remarks on Logical Forms", appeared later in a separate publication Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volume, 9, 1929, pp. 162-171 (Fr/McG: R.L.F., p. 42).[See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Publisher's original blue cloth binding with gilt lettering on the spine which is sun darkened. Otherwise, a tight, bright copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
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“Some Remarks on Logical Form” in Essays on Wittgenstein’s Tractatus.

1 blank leaf + half title with a portrait of Wittgenstein on the verso + TP + v-vii = Contents + viii-x = Introduction + half title + 1-414 + 2 blank leaves. Octavo. First Edition, American Issue (Fr/McG: R.L.F., p. 42). "Some Remarks on Logical Form" including Ramsey's Important Review of the TractatusPrinted from American sheets which note "First Printing" on the verso of the title page. There is no established priority for this US printing over the UK issue, although the fact that the two editors are American collegiates might suggest this is a first edition, first issue.The ever-protective Elizabeth Anscombe insisted on including a long footnote here making it crystal clear that Wittgenstein had completely disowned this essay. As his literary executor, she had "consented to the reprint of the essay because I suppose that it will certainly be reprinted some time, and if that is to happen there had better be a statement indicating how little value can be set upon it as information about Wittgenstein's ideas."There is, however, some value to the essay included in this book for any serious student to Wittgenstein's evolving thought. If nothing else, this 6-page essay is evidence of the dynamic variability of his philosophical thinking at this time as he struggled to resolve his growing dissatisfaction with several key elements in the Tractatus that Frank Ramsey had so severely criticized.In the Tractatus, there is a small section where Wittgenstein discusses color, stating that it is logically impossible for something to be blue while simultaneously being red. Ramsey, however, criticizes the proof offered for this statement, which did not stem from a logical formula but rather from physics. If red and blue are measured by the velocity of particles, one particle cannot be going two different speeds. But to use physics as evidence, Wittgenstein would have to prove space, time, matter, and particles as logically necessary. Or, he could rethink the color problem altogether. However, he found his attempts to do this in "Some Remarks on Logical Form" so completely unacceptable that he disowned it shortly after it was written and refused to even deliver this paper. [See our Catalog 24: Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Man and His Thought for a collection of 81 books and pamphlets by and about Wittgenstein.] Original publisher's brown cloth binding with gilt lettering on the front cover and the spine. (NOTE: we believe this book was issued without a dust jacket.) With the name of its former owner ("M. Foster") to the top of the front fly leaf. An absolutely lovely clean and bright copy. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.