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The Time Tunnel: Attack of the Barbarians [Marco Polo] (Original screenplay for the 1967 television series)

The Time Tunnel: Attack of the Barbarians [Marco Polo] (Original screenplay for the 1967 television series)

Allen, Irwin (creator); Sobey Martin (director); Robert Hamner (screenwriter); James Darren, Robert Colbert (starring) Second Revised Shooting Final draft script for "Attack of the Barbarians," the 26th episode of the television show "The Time Tunnel," which aired on ABC on March 10, 1967, here under the working title "Marco Polo." Six page Shooting Schedule bound in at end of script. Laid in is a one page mimeographed episode summary, also with the working title "Marco Polo." Inspired by the 1964 science-fiction film "The Time Travelers," "The Time Tunnel" was creator-producer Irwin Allen's third science-fiction series which ran from September 1966 through April of 1967 and aired 30 episodes. Novelizations, comic books, record albums, a board game, as well as a Pinball game and a Viewmaster set were all produced as promotional material to the highly successful, but short lived television series. Doug (Robert Colbert) and Tony (James Darren) are captured and tortured by Mongols who are trying to overcome Kublai Khan. They escape and are found by Marco Polo (John Saxon), who they help to defeat the Mongels. Tony falls in love with Princess Sarit (Vitina Marcus), daughter of Kublai Khan. Gray titled wrappers with the series logo, noted as SECOND REVISED SHOOTING FINAL on the front wrapper, dated February 1, 1967. Title page present, dated February 1, 1967, noted as SECOND REVISED SHOOTING FINAL, with credits for screenwriter Robert Hamner. 81 leaves, with last page of text numbered 65. Photographically reproduced, rectos only, with green, yellow, and goldenrod revision pages throughout, dated variously between 2/1/67 and 2/7/67. Pages Near Fine, wrapper Near Fine, bound with two gold brads.
The Rounders: A Horse on Jim Ed Love (Original screenplay for the 1966 television series pilot)

The Rounders: A Horse on Jim Ed Love (Original screenplay for the 1966 television series pilot)

Kennedy, Burt (director); Max Evans (novel); Marion Hargrove (screenwriter); Ron Hayes, Chill Wills, Patrick Wayne (starring) Final draft pilot script for the MGM television series which aired on September 6, 1966 on ABC. Laid in, a MGM Work Order and Call Sheet, filled out in holograph ink, dated "WED. 12-8-65" in holograph ink. Bound in is a five page Shooting Schedule dated 11-29-65, struck through on three pages in holograph pencil. Loosely based on the 1965 film of the same name, also directed by Burt Kennedy, which was based on the Max Evans novel of the same name, the MGM television series was a western themed comedy sitcom starring Ron Hayes as Ben Jones and Patrick Wayne, son of John Wayne, as Howdy Lewis. Chill Wills reprised the role of Jim Ed Love from the 1965 film. ABC aired the 17 episode series from September 6, 1966 through January 3, 1967. Set in the ficticious J.L. Ranch in Texas. Yellow titled wrappers, noted as FINAL DRAFT PILOT SCRIPT on the front wrapper, rubber-stamped copy No. 82, dated October 11, 1965, with credits for screenwriter Marion Hargrove. Title page present, dated October 11, 1965, noted as FINAL DRAFT PILOT SCRIPT, with credits for screenwriter Marion Hargrove. 41 leaves, with last page of text numbered 38. Mimeographed, rectos only, with blue revision pages throughout, dated variously between 11-22-65 and 11-26-65. Pages Near Fine, wrapper Near Fine, bound with two gold brads. Work Order/Call Sheet Near Fine, folded. 8.5 x 14 inches (22 x 36 cm).
One Night in Rome (Original script for the 1919 play

One Night in Rome (Original script for the 1919 play, presentation copy belonging to playwright J. Harley Manners)

Manners, J. Hartley (playwright); George C. Tyler (producer); Laurette Taylor, Barry Baxter, Louise Beaudet(starring) Presentation script for the 1919 play belonging to J. Hartley Manners. The play opened on Broadway at the Criterion Theatre on December 2, 1919 and closed on February 28, 1920, for a total of 107 performances. Bound in full brown leather with gilt titles and with Manners' name to the front board, with 23 black and white photographs, hand-drawn stage layouts, and a handwritten score for the song "Come o Zuchero" bound in. The wife of a deceased, disgraced Italian traitor tries to clear her name from his accusations by appearing several years later in London and passing herself off as a fortune teller to the wealthy elite. Basis for the 1924 film of the same name, adapted by Manners for the screen. The final of three films of Manners' wife, actress Laurette Taylor, all of which were derived from her husband's plays. Taylor reprised her Broadway role for the film, and is said to have enjoyed making the "One Night in Rome" film so much that she kept a personal print of it at her home to show to guests. Set in Italy and London. Title page present, with credits for screenwriter J. Hartley Manners. 132 leaves, with last page of text numbered 21. Carbon typescript, rectos only. Pages Near Fine, presentation binding Poor, lacking spine, and with both boards loose.
Patton [Patton (Blood and Guts)] (Original screenplay for the 1970 film

Patton [Patton (Blood and Guts)] (Original screenplay for the 1970 film, signed by producer Frank McCarthy and screenwriter Edmund H. North, and with photographs bound in throughout)

Schaffner, Franklin J. (director); Ladislas Farago, Omar N. Bradley (biographies); Francis Ford Coppola, Edmund H. North (screenwriters); George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Stephen Young (starring) Second revised script for the 1970 film, here under the working title "PATTON (BLOOD AND GUTS)". Cover leaf includes a note in holograph ink from producer Frank McCarthy to an undetermined "Art", "To Art - With Appreciation of his friendship, and my best always - Frank McCarthy March, 1971" as well as the signature of one of the screenwriters, Edmund H North in holograph marker. Bound in are 14 film still photographs in mylar sleeves. Laid in is the one fold film program "PATTON: A Salute to a Rebel." An epic and irreverently stylized film biography, focusing on General George S. Patton's career as a tank commander in North Africa during World War II, and progressing through the invasion of Germany and the fall of the Third Reich. Winner of seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Screenplay, and Best Director, along with three more nominations. Beige titled wrappers, noted as SECOND REVISED SCREENPLAY on the front wrapper, copy No. 66, dated OCTOBER 24, 1968. Title page present, dated October 24, 1968, noted as Second Revised Screenplay, with credits for screenwriters Francis Ford Coppola and Edmund H. North. 175 leaves, with last page of text numbered 171. Mimeographed, rectos only, entirely green revision pages with the exception of the repetition of pages 2-3. Pages Near Fine, wrapper Near Fine with slight pink staining to lower right, bound with two gold brads. Film Program Near Fine. National Film Registry. Ebert II.
Dracula (Original screenplay for the 1974 television film)

Dracula (Original screenplay for the 1974 television film)

Matheson, Richard (screenwriter); Bram Stoker (novel); Dan Curtis (director); Jack Palance, Simon Ward, Nigel Davenport (starring) Revised draft script for the 1974 television film. "Dracula" was originally scheduled to premiere on CBS on October 12, 1973, but was pre-empted due to the resignation of Vice President Spiro Agnew. It finally premiered on February 8, 1974. Dan Curtis, creator of "Dark Shadows" (1966-1971), teams up for a second horror classic adaptation with Jack Palance (having previously worked with him on the 1968 television film adaptation of "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde") with Richard Matheson's relatively faithful adaptation of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel. This was the first film adaptation to merge the fictional character with the historical Vlad the Impaler, as well as being the first to include the romance of Dracula and the reincarnation of his dead wife, elements which Francis Ford Coppola would rely heavily upon in his "Bram Stoker's Dracula" (1992). Shot on location in England, Yugoslavia and Croatia. Pink titled wrappers. Title page present, dated March 30, 1973, noted as REVISED, with credits for screenwriter Richard Matheson and novelist Bram Stoker. 114 leaves, with last page of text numbered 106. Photographically reproduced, rectos only, with blue and pink revision pages throughout, dated variously between 3/30/73 and 4/2/73. Pages Near Fine, wrapper Near Fine, bound with two gold brads.