John Price Antiquarian Books Archives - Rare Book Insider

John Price Antiquarian Books

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Faust: A Dramatic Poem, By Goethe. Translated into English Prose, with Remarks on Former Translations, and Notes, by A. Hayward, Esq. Second Edition, to which is appended an abstract of the continuation, with an account of the story of Faust and the various productions in literature and art founded on it.

GOETHE. SECOND EDITION. 8vo, 216 x 130 mms., pp cviii, 350, [351 errata, 352 colophon], bound c.1900 by Riviere in half red polished calf, cloth sides; raised bands on spine; the spine colour is somewhat mottled, but else a fine, clean copy; along the top margin of the title-page, there is a neat contemporary inscription, "The Rt. Honble. / Sir Robert Peel. Bart.", the owner, then, being the Prime Minister at the time, Sir Robert Peel, 2nd baronet (1788-1850), who took office for his first term in 1834, the year this edition was published. There can hardly be a more appealing association copy from the first year of Robert Peel's reign as Prime Minister, and dating to just before the beginning of the Victorian Era. Peel was, after all, compared to Faust in the contemporary press, and the author of this translation, Abraham Hayward (1801-1884), was personally well known to both Robert Peel and his wife Lady Emily, who both appear in Hayward's published correspondence. Hayward's translation into English of Goethe's great work Faust was renowned in the early nineteenth century, with Germans and Britons alike full of vocal appreciation for it. To Germans the translation of Faust by Hayward was "word true and spirit true", and in "later years Thomas Carlyle remarked that of the nineteen translations of 'Faust' then existing," it was Hayward's that "was the best" (Henry E. Carlisle, ed., A Selection from the Correspondence of Abraham Hayward, Q.C., from 1834 to 1884, with an Account of His Early Life (London, 1886), vol. 1, p. 19). Recent revivified interest in Abraham Hayward, as an influential figure of the nineteenth century, includes a study of nearly five hundred pages by Antony Chessell, titled The Life and Times of Abraham Hayward, Q.C., Victorian Essayist (2009), wherein one may find many references made to Faust and to Peel (and not always co-extensively). As a long subtitle to his book, Chessell adds the contemporary quote asserting that Hayward was "One of the Two Best Read Men in England". Abraham Hayward (1801-1884) was a translator, essayist, poet, legal writer, and, not least, a top lawyer, as Hayward was elevated to the status of Q.C., or Queen's Counsel, in 1845, an indication of surpassingly high legal expertise, although the Oxford DNB, eccentrically, does not mention this promotion. The Oxford DNB does, however, mention that Hayward was a Peelite, detailing some of his efforts to make a "notable contribution to the Peelite cause". The Oxford DNB also notes that it was Hayward's decision to translate Goethe's Faust that "launched him into a literary career. His translation was admired and brought him to public notice in Germany and at home, gaining him admittance into the salons of the German, British, and French capitals. Congratulations were sent to him from poets such as Wordsworth, Southey, and Samuel Rogers." This second edition of Hayward's Faust is the first edition for which Abraham Hayward allowed his name onto the title-page, and it was the first version for sale. The preceding edition, from 1833, was simply a version done for private circulation, and it was printed under initials only, with Hayward signing "A. H." at the end of the preface. The bibliographer John Martin asserts that the 1833 edition was "not published" and was printed for "private distribution" only; Martin cites Hayward himself as saying that the whole of the print run of the 1833 version was circulated exclusively "amongst my acquaintance" (Bibliographical Catalogue of Privately Printed Books, 2nd edition (1854), pp. 446-7). This copy, being from the library of the contemporaneous Prime Minister, has much to recommend it, but we might add as well that no doubt the popularity of Hayward's translation of Faust in his lifetime meant that presumably readers enthusiastically read and re-read their copies, because many a copy of the first and second edition are in terrible shape today. By contrast, the condition of the present copy remains very goo
  • $938
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On the Sensations of Tone as a Physiological Basis for the Theory of Music. By Hermann L. F. Helmholtz, M.D. Translated with the Author’s Sanction from the third German edition, with additional notes and an additional appendix, by Alexander J. Ellis.

HELMHOLTZ (Hermann L. F.) FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. Thick 8vo, 223 x 139 mms., pp xxiv, 824,[28, 2, advertisements dated to 1877], text wood engravings, tables, index; original red-brown cloth, decorated in blind to the upper boards; the head of the spine snagged but repaired neatly; internally clean and sound; a very good copy. Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (1821-1894) was a physician and physicist, and this work, On the Sensations of Tone as a Physiological Basis for the Theory of Music, was a pioneering treatise in musicology and in acoustical physics. I am not one to be unduly Wiki-centric, but it is indicative of the significance of the book On the Sensations of Tone that the book itself has its own extensive Wikipedia page, in addition to the lengthy article on the author. Wikipedia calls the book "a foundational work on music acoustics and the perception of sound." The online Encyclopedia Britannica calls the work "masterly." The rather complex chronology of the different editions has been traced out and explained, from (Wikipedia): "The first German edition was published in 1863. The English translation by Alexander J. Ellis was first published in 1875 (the first English edition was from the 1870 third German edition; the second English edition from the 1877 fourth German edition was published in 1885; the 1895 and 1912 third and fourth English editions were reprints of the second edition). The editions translated into English contain detailed commentary and notes (titled 'Additions by the Translator:) by Ellis.'" The edition on offer is the first edition of the work in the English language, and it is very scarce in commerce in truly appealing condition. It is also rare enough in libraries to be not yet in some of the great music libraries of the world. The Library of the Royal College of Music in London has only a nineteenth-century edition printed ten years later, 1885, plus a Dover reprint from 1954. The Library of Juilliard in New York has no nineteenth-century editions, and instead has only a reprint from 2011.
  • $1,227
  • $1,227
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Demosthenes, Contemplating the Ruins of Athens; Theme Proposed for the Annual Prize Poem in the University of Dublin, 1812.

FITZPATRICK (P. V.) FIRST AND ONLY EDITION. 8 (in 4s), 183 x 103 mms., pp. [ii], 2 [2], [3] - 29 [30 - 34 blank], engraved frontispiece, additional engrave plates on the verso of blank leaves between page 14 and 15, 16 and 17, bound in contemporary diced calf, gilt border on covers, gilt rules across spine, with title in one panel and ornaments in five other panel; some loss of gilt to borders, spine very slightly faded, but a very good copy Sir Walter Scott had a copy in his library at Abbotsford. Writing to Matthew Weld Hartstone in 1818, Scott asked him to "Pray return my besst thanks to Mr. Fitzpatrick for his polite and flattering attention in sending me his prize poem with which I was much amused, but who should come in whilst I was busy with it but Lord Elgin [Thomas Bruce, seventh AEar of Elgin and eleveth Earl of Kincardine (1766 - 1841 the acquirer of the Elgin Marbles)] about some business about the Bruces tomb which has been discovered at Dunfermline for we are very little acquainted - I could not help laught at the circumstance when he was gone, I do not all grudge the humereous [sic] chastisement he has received, for though I am glad that the marbles are brought here yet I could have cut my own hand off rather than have displaced one of them." Presumably it was Fiztpatrick's rather elusive but critical comment on Elgin's treatment of the Marbles that amused Scott. OCLC locates copies in Maynooth, National Library of Ireland, Trinity College Dublin; Queens University of Belfast; BL; Yale
  • $938
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The Opinions of Sarah Duchess-Dowager of Marlborough, Published from original Mss.

[DALRYMPLE (Sir David), Lord Hailes)], editor FIRST AND ONLY EDITION. 12mo, 158 x 91 mms., pp. [v] vi - xx], 120, including half-title, contemporary calf, red leather; some repairs to front joint, but with rubbing present. A good copy. "Sarah Churchill was a woman of extraordinary energy and vibrancy and a brilliant and forthright intellect. Her long and devoted marriage to John Churchill, and her close association with Queen Anne, set her amid many of the most tumultuous events in British history at a time when the doting queen would have refused her dearest friend almost nothing. For all the turbulence and exasperation that her conduct frequently caused him, Sarah was the first duke of Marlborough's inspiration and he looked to her for approval. It is arguable that without the goad of her spirited influence he would not have risen so far or so fast. Sarah prided herself on her sense of logic, but her extraordinarily stubborn nature was not receptive to reasoned argument by others, with the occasional exception of her husband. This robust quality was of immense value when she was right, but quite disastrous when wrong, and her brusque temper contributed enormously to the eventual breach with Anne and her failure to exert enduring political influence in the reigns of George I and George II. She was too self-righteous to maintain a position at court through flattery and dissimulation, but her ambition and ability kept her near the centre of British political life for seventy years." James Falkner, OxfordDNB. Sources
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A Journal of Occurrences at the Temple, during the Confinement of Louis XVI, King of France. By M. Cléry, the King’s Valet-de-Chambre. Translated from the original Manuscript by R. C. Dallas, Esq.

CLERY (Jean-Baptiste) FIRST EDITION. 8vo (in 4s), 200 x 122 mms., pp. [iv], 235 [236 directions for plates], with adverts on verso of half-title, engraved plate before first page of text, another engraved plate between pages 98 and 99, and ms. facsimile at end of text, contemporary tree calf, gilt spine, red leather label (both rather faded), possibly rebacked with old spine laid down; some foxing to the first few and last few leaves, but nonetheless a very good copy indeed. Jean-Baptiste Cléry (1759-1809) had close access to Louis XVI, King of France, as his valet, holding that position most crucially during the period of the king's imprisonment in the Temple: the king "was arrested on 25 September 1793," and later "avoided the fate of the guillotine," only to be "freed on 27 July 1794" (Wikipedia). Cléry's journal of this time, popular when printed, gained him a knighthood. Cléry was also an heir of the king, as in his will Louis XVI bequeathed him "my clothes, my books, my watch, my purse, and all other small effects which have been deposited with the council of the commune" (ibid.). The provenance of this copy of Cléry's Journal of Occurrences at the Temple (1798) is remarkable. The neat contemporary inscription on the title-page reads, "Bridget Atkinson / Temple Sowerby". This is Bridget Atkinson (1732-1814) of Temple Sowerby, Cumbria, in the north of England. A pioneering conchologist, Atkinson was the first woman to be elected an honorary member of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Moreover, she was the first person of any kind to be elected an honorary member of the society, and was so elected in 1813 at the inaugural meeting of the society, according to the excellent and beautifully-illustrated webpage "Bridget Atkinson, Georgian Shell Collector" on the English Heritage website. Rightly known for her collecting of shells, Bridget Atkinson is also known for her wide learning, and incessant curiosity. The English Heritage site illustrates one book known from her library, The British Housewife, which shows her neat signature atop the title-page, as with the Cléry item on offer, but the Cléry volume dovetails with her more intellectual, more political, and more international interests than her copy of The British Housewife. Her internationalism is thematized on the English Heritage site in the section headed "An Intercontinental Network", where her wide contacts for conchological research are outlined: Atkinson "never left Britain, and rarely left the county of Cumbria, but her family and friends travelled across continents and sent her shells by ship, carriage and cart " (ibid.). Atkinson's "receipt book", with hundreds of recipes for culinary and medicinal purposes, also survives, written in 1806 "for her eldest child, Dorothy Clayton, who lived at Chesters in Northumberland" (ibid.). Bridget Atkinson has been in the news during March 2024, because several hundred specimens from her shell collection, including some from an expedition of Captain Cook, were recently rediscovered, and are to be exhibited shortly. As the newspaper The Guardian noted, "Tom White, the principal curator of non-insect invertebrates at the Natural History Museum, has been helping the project. He said the collection contained numerous rare species and described Atkinson as 'one of the earliest known women to have amassed a scientifically significant shell collection from around the world' " (Mark Brown, "Shells from Captain Cook's Final Voyage Saved from Skip," The Guardian, March 12, 2024). Tracing names and dates given on the English Heritage site, it would seem likely that Bridget Atkinson's copy of Cléry's Journal was passed down from Atkinson to her youngest daughter Jane (1775-1855); and that Jane passed it on to her own niece Sarah Clayton (1795-1880); and that Clayton passed it down to her brother, the famous Hadrian's Wall archaeologist John Clayton (1792-1890), and that he passed it down to his nephew, Nathaniel George Clayton, whose bookpl
  • $1,371
  • $1,371
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Social Life in England and France, from the French Revolution in 1789, to that of July 1830.

BERRY (Mary) FIRST EDITION. Tall 8vo, 225 x 143 mms., pp. vii [viii blank], 214, original boards, uncut, paper label on spine, which is worn with joints slightly tender The great friend of Horace Walpole, Mary Berry (1763 - 1852) and her sister, Agnes (1764–1852), were well-educated and well-travelled: Walpole described them as "the best informed and the most perfect creatures I ever saw at their age." The present book is a sequel to an earlier one, A Comparative View of the Social Life of England and France from the Restoration of Charles the Second to the French Revolution, published in 1828. The Oxford DNB conludes its entry with this assessment: "Scholars have now drawn attention to her letters and journals, for the light they throw on women's history, but her own published books remain neglected. An introspective and often melancholy temperament shows through in all her writings, but it is her correspondence with figures such as Anne Damer and the scattered confessional passages of her journals which afford the greatest insight into her sensitive and somewhat wounded spirit. The picture she gives of English society from mid-Georgian to mid-Victorian, as well as French society in the same period, is richly detailed, and gains from its nuanced treatment of individuals such as Napoleon, Mme de Staël, and Princess Caroline. She liked the princess, but regretted that 'she has not a grain of common sense' (Extracts, 2.389). Mary was also an amateur artist of moderate attainment; a few of her sketches survive."
  • $216
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Memoirs of an Unfortunate Queen. Interspersed with Letters (Written by Herself) to several of Her illustrious Relations and Friends, on Various Subject and Occasions. The Second Edition.

CAROLINE-MATILDA, QUEEN OF DENMARK. 12mo, 167 x 96 mms., pp. [ii], 260, engraved portrait as frontispiece, contemporary sheepskin; joints cracked and tender, corners worn and, overall, not a wonderful copy, with the autograph and date "R. M. Vevers/ Feb. 21/1794" on the front past-down end-paper, with the name and date repeated on the title-page. Thes memoirs were presumably suppressed, as Queen Caroline was a sister of the King of England and while married to Christian VII of Denmark entered into a notorious love affair with her husband's doctor called Struensee. It eventually led to his execution and her banishment to Celle where she died of Scarlet Fever in 1775 at the age of 23. Her later biographer Wraxall was at first inclined to doubt the authenticity of the book, but on reflection he decided that the circumstantial evidence pointed to it being written by one of her circle, avoiding the displeasure of George III by remaining anonymous. The work would also appear in French and German translations with spurious imprints. There have been several more fictionalized biographies since, including film adaptations. The work was reviewed in The Monthly Review in 1776, with an abrupt opening: "In this truly Grubean, though not ill-written performance, poor Mathilda is made to turn Authoress. These Sketches are tolerably drawn, after pretty good originals; and, on the whole, it is evident, from the promising specimens before us, that if Carolina Matilda had not, unfortunately for herself, been made a Queen, she might, in time, have arrived at the honour of being even a Monthly Reviewer. N. B. The honest Grub is a warm advocate for the virtue and innocence of his heroine; in which he may be right; though it does not appear he ever travelled to Copenhagen." The work was also translated into French, with London as the location and Bew as the printer, buth the French version was published in The Netherlands. This second edition is not a re-issue of the first also printed in London. ESTC locates copies of the first edition in BL, and Cambridge; and California State Library. The present, second edition is found in BL (three copies) and the Bodleian in these islands; and Harvard, Huntington, and Library of Congress in the United States.
  • $1,367
  • $1,367
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The Life of Mr. Rich. Hooker, The Author of those Learned Books of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity.

[WALTON (Isaac)] 8vo, 161 x 101 mms., pp. 140, 19th century quarter calf, marbled boards; lacks portrait, title-page soiled, gutter and fore-margin crudely repaired, last page soiled and darkened almost beyond readability; a very poor copy. Walton's life of Hooker was first published in 1665. A. S. McGrade's entry in the Oxford DNB is definitely revisionist: "The few known remarks made by contemporaries on Hooker's personal characteristics and the many offered in Walton's Life (first published in 1665), must be assessed in the light of his writings and the course of his life. Allowances must also be made for bias in Walton's sources—family connections no doubt resented a suit brought against Sandys for Hooker's daughters, and hence entertained a low opinion of his wife and in-laws—and for Walton's readiness to model Hooker as the proleptic defender of an English church very different from the one to which he was actually devoted. When these filters are applied, parts of Walton's account must be rejected outright, such as Mrs John Churchman's entrapment of a naïve and rain-soaked Hooker as a husband for her ill-favoured daughter Joan, and the visit of Cranmer and Sandys to a henpecked Hooker at Drayton Beauchamp. Other features in Walton's portrait must be redrawn." This title is usually part of The lives of Dr. John Donne, Sir Henry Wotton, Mr. Richard Hooker, Mr. George Herbert, and this item is probably extracted from that publication. The only copy that I found was in the Spencer Library at Kansas.
  • $144
Lex Spuriorum Or the Law related to Bastardy. Collected from the Common

Lex Spuriorum Or the Law related to Bastardy. Collected from the Common, Civil, and Ecclesiastical Laws.

BRYDALL (John) FIRST EDITION. 8vo, 165 x 102 mms., pp. [xvi], 227 [228 blank], recent full calf, new end-papers; text browned ESTC S122159 (ten copies world-wide); Sweet & Maxwell I p. 498.3 According to the Oxford DNBN, John Brydall/Bridall (?1635 - 1705) "matriculated as a commoner in Queen's College, Oxford, on 15 July 1652, graduating BA on 28 June 1655. Four months earlier, on 22 February, he had enrolled as an inner barrister at Lincoln's Inn, being listed in the admission register there as the 'heir app[arent]' of his father (Lincoln's Inn, 270). He was called to the bar in 1662. Thirty years later Anthony Wood noted that Brydall, who was 'afterwards a common lawyer hath published several things of his profession' (Wood, Ath. Oxon., 2.786). Generally, the works ascribed to him reflect a very wide range of jurisprudential expertise, covering such topics as the laws and customs of London, the rights and privileges of the nobility and gentry, conveyancing, bastardy, and lunacy. They also indicate a strongly conservative and pro-monarchical frame of mind." See also Wolfgang Schmidgen, 'Illegitimacy and Social Observation: The Bastard in the Eighteenth-Century Novel," ELH, Vol. 69, No. 1 (Spring, 2002), pp. 133-166: "John Brydall's Lex Spuriorum (1703), the first legal treatise devoted exclusively to the problem of illegitimacy, collects and summarizes terms and arguments that have been instrumental in legal definitions of illegitimacy. The ambiguities in Brydall's text begin with a characterization of the bastard as imultaneously "filius populi"-the child of the people-and "nullius filius"-the child of no one. Belonging to everyone and no one, the bastard gains an additional layer of ambiguity by its description as "Terrae-Filius," the child of the earth: "a astard is Filius Terrae, Filius Populi, and quasi nullius filius." To complicate things further, Brydall points out that the bastard as filius terrae has to be imagined as "rising out of the ground like the Wind," and the bastard thus unites the opposing forces of wind and earth, the necessarily common, intangible, elusive, with the tangible and possessible. These richly contradictory terms suggest an unnatural birth, but in law, as Brydall reminds us, the bastard is considered to be a "natural" child because he is born outside the institution of marriage and thus outside the established frameworks of culture and custom. What is remarkable about these strange terms is that Brydall shows no concern whatsoever about their inconsistency. There is not a single moment in his treatise when Brydall laments or even remarks on these proliferating categories. In fact, he is happy to use the terms "Filius Terrae, Filius Populi, and quasi nullius filius" jointly to characterize the bastard. Such unconcern, it seems to me, signals more than an acceptance of the arcana of English common law. It suggests that the law actively contributes to the cultural production of the bastard as a multifarious, polyvalent creature that eludes defini- tion by oscillating between categories.'
  • $720