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Alex Alec-Smith

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MANUSCRIPT LETTER.

MANUSCRIPT LETTER.

BYRON, Captain John. Single sheet addressed to A Monsr. Perregaux, Rue du Sentier, Paris with remains of black seal. The letter is written in the third person from St Germain-en Laye and dated September 19th 1786. The text reads 'Captain Byron will be obliged to Mr. Perragaux if he will pay unto Monsr Le Clere forty two Pounds for the house Rent which Mr Le Clere advanced for him. When he comes into Paris, he will give Mr Perregaux a Bill for the whole -' Mad Jack Byron was frequently in debt and had to leave England to escape his creditors. His father's death in April 1786 saw him inherit £500. M. Perrigaux was 'a Parisian banker known to the Byron family and who had funded Jack in the past on the strength of his expectations'. Perrigaux wrote to James Sykes, the Byron family lawyer, on 24 July 1786 'Some time after the Admiral's decease Mr Byron has proposed making an assignment of his legacy of £500 to you partly for the purpose of discharging another debt of about the same amount as mine, and that you has expressed much pleasure at the proposal hoping that it would enable you to secure mine; but he soon after changed his mind and assigned it to a Mr Milne, a Taylor, to whom I conclude he owed the whole and to whom probably it has since been paid. Thus I fear I am cut off from every prospect of recovering my debt.' (Bakewll, Michael and Melissa. Augusta Leigh Byron's half-sisiter. A Biography). The sale of Gight, Catherine Byron's ancestral home, in 1787 allowed Captain Byron to pay a 'partial payment' to Perrigaux before coaxing him 'into advancing him a further £200.'