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Daniel Crouch Rare Books LLP

A Plan of the Attack by Lord Nelson of the Combined Fleet

A Plan of the Attack by Lord Nelson of the Combined Fleet, October 21st, 1805.

DODD, R[obert] Rare Broadsheet of the Battle of Trafalgar Coloured aquatint with letterpress text below, minor loss to lower right not affecting text. This rare broadside was published the month following Nelson's most famous victory. The great deciding naval battle of the Napoleonic Wars took place on 21st October 1805, off Cape Trafalgar, between 27 British ships under the command of Admiral Lord Nelson and 33 French and Spanish vessels under Admiral Villeneuve. The broadside clearly illustrates Nelson's radical battle formation of two straight lines. Although the formation would open up his vessels to enemy broadsides, it would spilt the enemies formidable line, reduce the odds, and then allow their superior gunnery and sailing skills to destroy the enemy at close range. The plan worked brilliantly, and with the French vanguard cut out of the battle by the British slicing through the fleet, Nelson's men proceeded to take the enemy fleet apart. In fact the British did not lose a ship, while 18 enemy vessels were destroyed and some 14,000 French and Spanish sailors killed or captured. Below the acquatint Dodd gives a defence of his rather schematic depiction of the French and Spanish line: 'In order that the enemy's line should be clearly distinguished, by shewing the colours of each nation distinctly, the artist has judged it best (to avoid confusion that the smallness of scale would occasion), to dispense with exhibiting their sails and rigging, which if introduced, would in this view, have prevented their different flags from being seen; but at the same time begs leave to inform, that they lay too with their maintopsails to the mast, waiting the approach of the British columns, which are bearing down to them under a press of sail, and broke through their line with royals and studding sails set; and, to use the Admiral's words, "like true British seamen engaged them at the muzzles of their guns", whose admirable letter will be read by every lover of his country with heartfelt satisfaction, and is subjoined, as the best description of this little sketch'. Below the note are printed Collingwood's letters to the Admiralty describing the battle, his general orders congratulating those who took part in it and a list of ships in each fleet. Robert Dodd (1748-1815) British Marine painter and graphic artist who lived and worked in Wapping, London. Nothing is known about his training but he was a prolific aquatint engraver who published much of his own work. He exhibited at the Society of Artists in London in 1780 and the Royal Academy between 1782 and 1809. He produced fine and detailed portrayals of famous ships such as "Nelson's 'Victory' Sailing from Spithead" and also painted naval actions of both the American Revolutionary War and the French Wars of 1793-1815. He conveyed well the drama of a battle and storm though spectacular light effects, such as the sun's rays piercing dark clouds, and by contrasting fire and black smoke against a serene blue sky. He also painted and engraved a series of views of the Royal Dockyards and of Greenwich Hospital. The print from his painting 'The Mutiny of the 'Bounty', showing the mutineers casting Captain Bligh adrift is the best known contemporary image of the event. He also illustrated an edition of William Falconer's poem 'The Shipwreck' (W. Baynes, London, 1811) with 18 aquatint ships in various weather conditions. In 1795 he painted a huge canvas of the end of Lord Howe's victory at the Battle of the Glorious First of June 1794, for the dining room of his local inn n Commerical Road, in London: this too is now in Greenwich. His works have been confused with those of his lesser known marine-painter brother, Ralf. NMM PAF4741. (image) 265 by 365mm (10.5 by 14.25 inches); (sheet) 660 by 440mm (
Complete Map of the Inner Capital City Beijing Jingshi chengnei shoushan quantu .

Complete Map of the Inner Capital City Beijing Jingshi chengnei shoushan quantu .

Anonymous] Inner Beijing in the late nineteenth century Engraved map. A comprehensive map of Shoushan (inner capital city) Beijing in 1870, accurately depicting the architecture and streets within the symmetrical layout of the city. A 7.8 kilometre central axis runs as the backbone of the capital city from Yongding Men (Yongding Gate) in the north, to the Zhong Gu Lou (Bell and Drum Tower) in the south. The Inner City wall, which surrounded the Imperial City, was around twenty-four kilometress long, fifteen metres high, twenty meters thick at the base and twelve meters thick at the top. It was constructed with Nine gates and Four corner towers. Two gates to the north named Desheng , Anding ; three to the south named Chongwen , Zhengyang , Xuanwu ; two to the west named Fucheng , Xizhi ; two to the east named Dongzhi , Chaoyang . The layout of the city is meticulously depicted and rich in content, and revives the original appearance of the inner city of Beijing in the Qing Dynasty, including, Hutong (alleys), city gates, Pailou (archways), temples, and the Gongyuan (Imperial Examination Hall). The system is unique to Beijing, and most of the Hutong names shown on the map remain in use today. It is significant to note that the Eight Manchu Banners, a military establishment that has been synonymous with Manchu identity, are also shown on the map. Beijing's central axis now extends northwards to a total length of 26 kilometres, connecting the past to the present. The architectural style within the walls of the inner capital city has also evolved, although the past is preserved with the retention of many of the Hutong depicted on the map. We are only aware of one other example of the map, that in the Yokohama City University Collection.
A book auction].

A book auction].

DUNTHORNE, James junior] A book auction by the 'Colchester Hogarth' Pencil, pen and black ink and watercolour. A charming scene of a book auction, possibly held at Sotheby's, or Leigh & Sotheby at the time. The room is dominated by a great bookcase which is being hand-picked by a young porter up a ladder. The crowd is fashionably dressed and caught in a variety of poses, such as greeting each other and conversing, eying the bidder in the back of the room, checking the catalogue, and perusing one of the recent purchases, as the seated lady in the middle is doing. The smiling auctioneer is about to knock down his gavel, and the scribe below intent in recording the sale. The drawing was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1787 and was marked as 'for sale'. It is the work of James Dunthorne junior (c1758-1794), an artist from Colchester, his father also a painter mostly of portraiture and miniature works, who worked as a mapmaker and surveyor on the side. Dunthorne junior ran a print shop on Colchester High Street, and exhibited 14 works at the Royal Academy between 1783 and 1792, with the exception of four years (1785, 1786, 1788, 1789). His favoured themes were mostly genre and domestic subjects, and a number of his drawings were engraved by the artist and caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson, thus showing that Dunthorne junior had some reputation as an artist (Benham). Some of his works include 'Private Card Party', showing a fashionable party of Colchester elite, 'Morning Concert', 'Skating', 'A bath shop', and 'The Pieman'. The lack of works recorded after 1792 and the darker nature of part of his oeuvre, such as 'Ague & Fever' and 'The Hypochondriac', suggest that Dunthorne junior's health was poor in the early 1790s. A benefit concert was held in his honour on 30 July 1793 and his drawings, prints, music etc. were sold on 16 August 1794. He eventually passed away 'after a long affliction' on 12 October of the same year. Dubbed the 'Colchester Hogarth', his legacy has allowed historians to catch a glimpse of society in a secondary Georgian town. A number of engravings based on drawings by James Dunthorne junior are held in institutions world-wide. We are unaware of any other of his drawings offered for sale. Exhibited London, Royal Academy, 1787, no. 532. W. G. Benham, 'The Dunthornes of Colchester', Essex Review, 10, 1901, pp. 27-35; Shani D'Cruze, 'A Pleasing Prospect: Society and Culture in Eighteenth-century Colchester', 2008.
Plan of Shanghai 1928 Published under authority of the Municipal Council 1928.

Plan of Shanghai 1928 Published under authority of the Municipal Council 1928.

Anonymous] Plan of Shanghai, 1928 A large coloured lithographed map showing the plan of Shanghai, made in 1928. Signed by Commissioner of public works, 44 (4 by 11) sheets mounted on linen. The map depicts Shanghai city in 1928, with the French Settlements and Shanghai International Settlements hand-coloured in outline in brown and pink. Two lines noted below the title: 1. The Pootung shore is taken from surveys by the Whangpoo Conservancy Board. 2. The French settlement is taken from surveys by the French Municipal Council. The famous Whangpoo (Huangpu) river in Shanghai is prominently shown from the midpoint of the bottom edge sinuating upwards to the top right corner, which divides the settlements to the left and Pootung (Pudong) to the right. Between the bank of the river and the French settlement, are the 'Chinese city' and a district labeled 'Nan Tao' (Nan Dao). The "Chinese city", is now called the "Old City", the traditional urban core of Shanghai. Its boundary was formerly defined by a defensive wall. The Old City was the county seat for the old county of Shanghai, with the advent of foreign concessions in Shanghai, it became just one part of Shanghai's urban core but continued for decades to be the seat of the Chinese authority in Shanghai. It was essentially coterminous with the old Nanshi District - Nan Dao, which is now part of Huangpu District. In 1927, in a bid to establish a tangible Chinese authority in Shanghai, the Republic of China government established the Special Municipality of Shanghai. The municipal government was moved out of the Old City to near Xujiahui. In 1928, Shanghai City (the Old City) was reduced to district status under the Special Municipality. In 1930, Shanghai County became a separate parallel administrative unit to the Special Municipality, and the county government was moved out to Minhang. This was the end of the Old City's role as the seat of government of Shanghai. From 1928, the Old City was Hunan District; 'Hunan' literally meant 'southern Shanghai'. An exact copy of the map dated to the same day 21st April 1928, was published in Shanghai, North-China Daily News and Herald, Limited. by permission of the Municipal. It is signed by the same commissioner of public works. We are only aware of a single surviving example, that in the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division Washington, D.C. Publisher Edward Stanford (1827-1904) rose to prominence during the height of the Victorian age a period defined by technological innovation, social upheaval, literary excellence and world exploration. In 1853, Stanford became sole proprietor and expanded his shop to 7 and 8 Charing Cross whilst acquiring premises on Trinity Place for a printing works. This solidified Stanford's as the largest and only map maker and seller in London at a time when British colonialism, the rise of the railways, and the continuing popularity of the Grand Tour. Edward Stanford II took over in 1882, when Stanford's had become the sole agents for Ordnance Survey Maps in England and Wales, and in 1887 published Stanford's London Atlas Of Universal Geography dedicated to Queen Victoria on the occasion of her Royal Jubilee, and he received his royal warrant as Cartographer to the Queen, in 1893. Edward Stanford II died in 1917 and his son Edward Fraser Stanford assumed control of the business in 1917. This map was made in the succeeding period between the wars, which saw the company continue to innovate and encourage exploration.
A New Geological Map of England and Wales

A New Geological Map of England and Wales, with the inland navigations; exhibiting the districts of Coal and other Sites of Mineral Tonnage by W. Smith, Engineer: 1820.

SMITH, William Rare reduction of William Smith's seminal geological map Engraved map, fine original hand colour, dissected and mounted on linen, two small stains near the Thames Estuary, folding into original green marbled paper slipcase, publisher's label pasted to upper board, rubbed. Rare reduction of William Smith's seminal geological map; the first large scale, detailed scientific geological map of any country. The map, described on the slipcase label as "reduced from Smith's large map:' incorporates all of Smith's many revisions to his original geological map of 1815, including changes made subsequent to the latest issue (post-1817) of the wall-map. "Copies have been recorded dated 1824, 1827, and 1828, but no change in the geological lines has been observed, although the shades of colour may vary" (Eyles). The present single-sheet map was published during the same period as Smith's "Geological Survey Atlas of England:' a series of 24 slightly smaller county maps coloured to show geological strata, issued in parts of 3 maps each from 1819 through 1824. Smith may have planned to sell the general map of England along with the completed series, however, due to lack of funds the atlas project was never completed. The printed title label on the slipcase states that the present map was "intended as an elementary map for those commencing the study of geology". Rare we are only able to trace ten institutional examples. J. Challinor, "The Beginnings of Scientific Palaeontology in Britain" Annals of Science 6 (1948): 46-53; Joan M. Eyles, "William Smith", in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (vol.12), ed. Charles Coulston Gillispie (New York: Scribner, 1970-80) 486-492; Eyles, "William Smith: A Bibliography of his Published Writings, Maps and Geological Sections" Journal of the Society for the Bibliography of Natural History V (1969); H.D. Horblit, One hundred books famous in science: based on an exhibition held at the Grolier Club (New York: Grolier Club, 1964), 94; Ruth A. Sparrow, Milestones of Science: Epochal books in the history of science as represented in the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, (Buffalo: Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, 1972), 180; Simon Winchester, The Map that Changed the World (London: Harper Collins, 2001).
Map of the country round Soochow Surveyed by Thomas Ferguson

Map of the country round Soochow Surveyed by Thomas Ferguson, 1900-1901

FERGUSON, Thomas Ferguson's Map of Suzhou Coloured lithograph map. Scale: 1 inch = 1 mile. A comprehensive map of Soochow [Suzhou] based on the survey by Thomas Ferguson in 1900. The area depicted spans from Yangcheng xihu (Yangcheng West lake) situated on the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, down to Sanli qiao (Sanli bridge) that connects to Hangchow [Hangzhou] in the south, and from Taihu (Tai lake) to the west to the Suzhou [Soochow] creek in the east connecting to Shanghai. Soochow [Suzhou] city is depicted in a rectangle in the middle of the upper section, marked as "Soochow city", encircled by a waterway that extends outwards into several streams that join with different lakes and branch of the Grand Canal. All waterways are easily distinguished by the shade of green. The map is printed in both Chinese and English for the title and major landmarks, descriptions indicating more specific features and the legend are given in English only. The map shows various features of the city, including bridges, buildings, stations, roads, steam-launch routes and Shanghai-Nanking [Nanjing] railway. Some features are meticulously noted and distinguished, for example, three different keys are used to distinguish "Bridges passable to average Houseboat", "Bridges of doubtful height" and "Impassable Bridges". An inset is shown at the top right, giving particular attention to a tablet called , which is not depicted on the map, only a description of its location is given, which locates it to bottom, to the southeast of Taihu (Tai lake), near "NG-KONG" . It also explains the system of waterways between the Soochow [Suzhou] creek and the Whangpoo river. Thomas Ferguson was a mapmaker active around 1900, based in Shanghai. While he was surveying the waterways near Shanghai between 1900-1901, it seems that Suzhou as the neighbouring city was also included, and hence the present work. The map of Shanghai was commissioned by the Imperial Maritime Customs, a tax collection institution jointly set up and managed by the Chinese, French, British and American representatives in 1854. Located in Shanghai, which had become a foreign treaty port since China's defeat in the First Opium War in 1842, the service aimed to replace the previous imperial customs house. The new institution managed customs collection in the treaty ports between 1854 to 1948. Between 1862 and 1899, steam boats began to ply inland along the narrower waterways. "Five new Treaty Ports and five Ports of Call had been opened along the Yantze and trade had grown enormously. So, to meet the altered conditions and calls for revision, Hart [Commissioner of the Imperial Maritime Customs] consulted the river port Commissioners and, as a result, revised Yangtze Regulations containing many provisions for tightening Customs control were put into effect on 1 April 1899" (Foster Hall 20). Ferguson's map was commissioned in the same year and was likely part of the Customs Service's drive to attain more knowledge of the area. Kelly & Walsh was an 1876 merger of two Shanghai-based English language booksellers – Kelly and Co. and F. & C. Walsh – produced Kelly & Walsh, a prodigious publisher and retailer which relocated to Hong Kong in the 1950s, was ultimately sold to book seller Swindon Book Co. Ltd. It was most active from the 1880s through the 1930s, with publications from cities including Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, and Yokohama. Rare. We are only able to trace five other examples in institutions: BnF; Library UvA/HvA; Trinity College Library; Cornell University Library; and Universität Marburg, Zentralbibliothek.
Military Plan of the country around Shanghai From surveys made in 1862. 63. 64. 65.

Military Plan of the country around Shanghai From surveys made in 1862. 63. 64. 65.

GORDON, Lieutenant Colonel Charles George Case map of Shanghai, China, and vicinity by "Chinese Gordon" Lithograph map, hand-coloured, dissected and mounted on linen, of military plan of the country around Shanghai. The earliest serious British attempt to map the area around Shanghai, China. Surveyed by 'Chinese Gordon' during the Taiping Rebellion. An extremely rare map depicting Shanghai and her enivrons. The map, by British military officer Charles George Gordon (or 'Chinese Gordon'), covers from the mouth of the Yangtze River south to the Tsien Tan River (Fushun River), Hangchao (Hangzhou), and from Ching Keang (Zhenjiang) to the Tunsha Banks, including all of the country in between, the Grand Canal, Shanghai, Soo Chow (Suzhou), Tai-Hu Lake (Tai Lake), and Hoo Chow (Huzhou). The map was produced by Gordon whilst he was leading the Qing 'Ever Victorious Army' against the Taiping rebels between 1862 and 1865. The manuscript plan drafted by Lieutenant Colonel Charles George Gordon and his Chinese assistants apparently covered an area of over 80 square metres. Following the defeat of the Taiping Rebellion in 1864, the map was zincographed at the Topographical Department of the War Office in Southampton, then under the direction of Colonel Henry James. This enormous map was, in turn, reissued in the same year, the present example, on a reduced scale by Edward Stanford. Although the British had been present in this area for some time, Gordon's map, surveyed to facilitate his campaigns during the rebellion, represents the first focused British survey of the Shanghai region. Gordon would go on to be highly decorated by both the Chinese and British authorities, he would later enter the service of the Khedive of Egypt, and would become the Governor General of the Sudan, where he did much to suppress revolts and the local slave trade. He returned to Europe in 1880. A serious revolt then broke out in the Sudan, led by a Muslim religious leader and self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad. In early 1884 Gordon had been sent to Khartoum with instructions to secure the evacuation of loyal soldiers and civilians and to depart with them. In defiance of those instructions, after evacuating about 2,500 civilians he retained a smaller group of soldiers and non-military men. In the build up to battle, the two leaders corresponded, each attempting to convert the other to his faith, but neither would accede. Besieged by the Mahdi's forces, Gordon organised a citywide defence lasting almost a year that gained him the admiration of the British public, but not of the government, which had wished him not to become entrenched. Only when public pressure to act had become irresistible did the government, with reluctance, send a relief force. It arrived two days after the city had fallen and Gordon had been killed. Rare. OCLC records only two institutional examples: The Essex Peabody; and the National Library of Australia. Mossman, S., General Gordon's Private Diary of his Exploits in China; amplified by Samuel Mossman, London, p. 208-209.
A Topographical Survey of the County of Berks

A Topographical Survey of the County of Berks, in Eighteen Sheets. In which is expressed His Majesty’s Royal Palace at Windsor, its Parks and Forrest; the Seats of the Nobility and Gentry; Towns, Villages, Hamlets, Farms, Cottages, &c. with the Main and Cross Roads, Bridle Ways, Pales, Hedges, Hills, Valleys, Rivers, Brooks, Canals, Ponds, Bridges, Ferries, Wind and Water Mills, Woods, Heaths, Commons, and Greens, appertaining to each Parish, &c. To which is added, a geographical and historical index of all remarkable places in the said county; with their bearings and distance to the next market town, or well known place. The length, breadth, circumference, and content, in acres and square miles,of the county, the Windsor Forest, and of each Parish. [together with] A Map of the County of Berks reduced from an actual survey in 18 sheets, by the late John Rocque Topographer to His Majesty, 1762.

ROCQUE, John John Rocque's large-scale map of Berkshire Folio (530 by 375mm), key map, title, engraved frontispiece (which is sheet fifteen of the map), a description of the county with a reference to the numbering of each sheet of the map, a 12-page index of the towns, villages etc., and 17 engraved maps, which together with the frontispiece form the large-scale map, later half-calf over marbled paper boards. The comprehensive title page provides a full description of the detail included in this magnificent map, engraved by R. Benning and L. F. Deharme, which includes, unusually, detailed survey of parts of the surrounding counties and which reflects Rocque's stated intention to produce similar surveys of Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire though neither materialised. The letter-press preliminaries are of particular interest commencing with the description of the ancient history of the county with conjecture as to the derivation of its name. It also describes in detail the extent of the county with the rivers and major towns and indicates that nine members are sent to Parliament. It is also interesting to note "the high price which land bears here, more than in other parts equally near London". There is a "Reference to show in what Manner each plate is numbered". There is also an eleven page "Index of Towns, Villages, Seats of the Nobility and Gentry, Places of Antiquity, and Historical Remarks, with the Bearings and Distances to the next Market Town or Well-known Place, In order to make the Topographical Map of Berkshire useful and agreeable". The large running title-piece on the map is in both English and French and reflects Rocque's Huguenot extraction. He came to England early in the eighteenth century and his cartographic achievements resulted in his appointment as Topographer to George III, to whom this map is dedicated. Apart from the two large plans of London he had already produced fine surveys of Bristol in 1750, Shropshire in 1752, and Middlesex in 1754 whilst he also spent some time in Ireland surveying Dublin, Cork, Kilkenny and Armagh. On his death in 1762 his widow, Mary Ann Rocque, published a map of the county, which though squared off as a key to the large-scale survey is a fine map in its own right. It contains an interesting plan of Oxford on a scale of 300 yards to the inch. Rocque was also resonsible for other cartographical work, including a small English county atlas that went into many editions from 1753. It is, however, for his superb large-scale maps that he achieved most fame. His map of Berkshire is the largest of his county surveys.
Whale Chart by M. F. Maury A. M. Lieut. U. S. Navy. (Preliminary sketch) Series F. Constructed by Lts. Leigh Herndon & Fleming & Pd. Midn. Jackson. Published at the National Observatory by Authority of Commo. L. Warrington Chief of bureau of Ordnance & Hydrography 1851.

Whale Chart by M. F. Maury A. M. Lieut. U. S. Navy. (Preliminary sketch) Series F. Constructed by Lts. Leigh Herndon & Fleming & Pd. Midn. Jackson. Published at the National Observatory by Authority of Commo. L. Warrington Chief of bureau of Ordnance & Hydrography 1851.

MAURY, Matthew Fontaine The pathfinder of the seas Electrotyped map. Twentieth century example of Maury's chart, first printed in 1851, here with 'H.O. Miscel. No. 8514', 'Price 50 cents', lower right. The chart shows the distribution of actual whale catches on a global scale, compiled from data extending back to 1830, initially gathered using old whaling log books, but soon Maury was requesting that whalers send in reports of their voyages on forms he had specially prepared for the purpose. At an international oceanographic meeting in Brussels in 1853, Maury persuaded other maritime nations to adopt his methods. His painstaking work was only partly superseded once steamships replaced sailing vessels. Maury's Whale Chart, centred on the Pacific Ocean, was of enormous benefit to America's deep-ocean whaling industry at its peak. The map directly addresses the industry's concerns over a depleted stock of traditional whales in traditional hunting grounds. Initially, a shore-based activity, the gradual decline in the coastal population of right and sperm whales, in the first decades of the eighteenth century, around Cape Cod and Nantucket, led the whalers farther out to sea and northward into whaling grounds off Newfoundland, the St. Lawrence River and farther north, even into the Straits of Belle Isle along the coast of Labrador and the Davis Straits west of Greenland. Once larger, two-masted schooners replaced smaller sloops, the whalers were able to pursue sperm whales throughout the North and South Atlantic, as far as the coast of Guinea in Africa, and of Brazil in South America. By 1774, the Colonial American whale fleet operated about 360 vessels out of 15 New England and New York ports. The American Revolution, and the War of 1812, had devastating effects on the American whaling industry. The ships of His Majesty's Naval service blockaded American ports, and interfered with the whaling ships at sea: capturing and destroying them, pressing their sailors into service. Then, huge duties were applied to the import of whale products into England. Jefferson enacted the Embargo Act, forbidding American ships from embarking on foreign voyages. After the signing of the Treaty of Ghent in 1814, unrestricted American shipping resumed, and whaling ports, grew in strength almost exponentially. By 1841, 75 whaling ships sailed out of New Bedford, reaching its peak in 1857, when the fleet numbered 329 and employed 10,000 men. Using the key provided in Maury's map, the whalers could calculate the best place, and time of year, for sighting their preferred whale, over a much wider area than they were perhaps used to exploring. By about 1860, the American whaling industry suffered a gradual decline. The price of whale oil dwindled, with the discovery of petroleum in Pennsylvania in 1859, and the Civil War resulted in the further destruction of an already depleted whaling fleet. In 1836, Maury (1806-1873), "the pathfinder of the seas" (Charles Lee Lewis), wrotethe book that established his reputation as the pioneer of oceanography, 'A New Theoretical and Practical Treatise on Navigation'. In it he emphasized the necessity of systematically collecting data on winds and ocean currents, which could then be expressed, as here, visually in maps. As a direct result of his publication, Maury was appointed as astronomer on a U.S. Navy exploring expedition to the Pacific, the following year, in 1837; in 1842, he was appointed superintendent of both the Depot of Charts and Instruments of the Navy Department in Washington, D.C., and the Naval Observatory, during which time this Whale Chart was issued for the first time. The map was reprinted in 1935; then in 1956, with the printed note, lower right: "Price 20 cents / H.O. Miscel. No. 8514", and with the ink stamp dating this reissue to 1956; and subsequently in 1960s, with a new price of 50 cents. See New Bedford Whaling Museum online
A Mapp of the two Hemispheres of the Heavens.

A Mapp of the two Hemispheres of the Heavens.

SELLER, John John Seller's first celestial map Double-page engraved map, with fine original hand-colour. The chart depicts the northern and southern hemispheres, both of which are centred on an equatorial pole using a polar stereographic projection with geocentric orientation. Text to the upper left and right of the chart provides the reader with information on how to find the position of stars with help of the chart. Surrounding the hemispheres are diagrams of the solar system, individual planets, and the phases of the moon. To the upper and lower border are the 12 signs of the zodiac. John Seller (1630–1697) was one of the most important individuals in the early history of the atlas and map trade in England, yet his grand ambition – to rival the great atlas publishing houses of Blaeu, Janssonius, and Goos – would lead to bankruptcy and eventual failure. Before entering the atlas market, Seller traded in nautical instruments from his shop 'at the Sign of the Mariner's Compass' in Wapping – at the time the heart of the maritime trade. In 1669 he published 'Paxis Nautica: Practical Navigation', which established his credentials within the maritime community. His place was further strengthened when, in 1671, he was appointed hydrographer to Charles II. The present chart was sold both separately by Seller, and also included in one of his most important atlas, the 'Atlas Maritimus'. Published in 1675, the atlas was the first English attempt to challenge the Dutch monopoly in printed sea atlases by the likes of Goos, Doncker, and Colom. Each was made up according to the wishes of the purchaser, and so individual copies can vary considerably. However, due to Seller's considerable financial troubles, and competition from Dutch imports, the work was not a commerical success and very few examples were published. We are unaware of an example of the present chart appearing at auction since the War. (plate) 300 by 445mm. (11.75 by 17.5 inches). (sheet) 445 by 555 (17.5 by 21.75 inches).
To The Hon[oura]ble the Court Directors of the East India Company This Improved Map of India Compiled from all the Latest & most Authentic Materials Is Respectfully Dedicated by their most Obedient & most Humble Servant A. Arrowsmith.

To The Hon[oura]ble the Court Directors of the East India Company This Improved Map of India Compiled from all the Latest & most Authentic Materials Is Respectfully Dedicated by their most Obedient & most Humble Servant A. Arrowsmith.

ARROWSMITH, Aaron The largest map of India produced before the trigonometrical survey Large engraved map, on nine sheets, original outline hand-colour, some off-setting. Arrowsmith's monumental wall map of India on nine sheets. With the growing influence of the British in India at the end of the eighteenth century, the need for an up-to-date general map of the sub-continent grew. The first Governor-General, Warren Hastings, employed Major Rennell who, in 1779, published his famous Bengal Atlas, followed up in 1788 by his map of India. The map itself was based upon D'Anville's map of 1752, though enriched by much new material, supplied by the numerous "route surveys" carried out by the army. As these "route surveys" began to become more numerous and accurate the need for a new general map of India soon became apparent. In 1816 Aaron Arrowsmith published his Map of India in nine sheets, on a scale of sixteen miles to an inch, which was the last great general map based on route surveys. His subsequent Atlas of South India, published in 1822, was based upon the trigonometrical surveys of Colonel Lambton, filled in by the officers of the Madras Institute. BLMC Maps K.Top.115.17.2.2 TAB.END.; Maps of India 269, Handbook to the special loan collection of scientific apparatus 1876. Prepared at the request of the Lords of the Committee of council on education, London, Chapman & Hall.
A correct view of the gallant victory obtained by Adl. Nelson over the French under the command of Adl. Brueys. (Taken from a drawing made by an officer in the engagement.) In which the French Admiral lost his life

A correct view of the gallant victory obtained by Adl. Nelson over the French under the command of Adl. Brueys. (Taken from a drawing made by an officer in the engagement.) In which the French Admiral lost his life, and for which the English Admiral was made Lord by the title of Baron Nelson of the Nile. &c. The Battle was fought in the shoals with the mouth of the River Nile, in Egypt. August 1st 1798.

EVANS, John Rare view of Nelson's victory at the Battle of the Nile Wood engraved view on two sheets joined, trimmed to neatline, a few tears with minor areas of loss to text below. The view, taken from a vantage point on the shore, depicts the battle at its climax when Admiral Brueys' flag ship the 'L'Orient' exploded; numerous men, the main mast, and barrels are shown being flung into the air. To the upper left and right are portraits of Admiral Nelson, and Admiral Brueys commander of the French force, who is said to have been "cut in two by a chain-shot". The title below states that the view was "taken from a Drawing made by an Officer in the Engagement", although the particular officer is not named. To the right and left of the title are two tables listing the British and French fleets, their number of guns, and men. On the British side the table also lists the number of dead or wounded, whereas the French side lists whether or not the ships were captured or burnt. Below both tables totals are given: British: 1012 guns; 8,068 men; 821 killed and wounded. French: 1,190 guns; 10,710 men; and about 5,000 killed or wounded. The Battle In early 1798, Napoleon began planning the invasion of Egypt with the goal of threatening British possessions in India and assessing the feasibility of building a canal from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea. Alerted to this fact, the Royal Navy gave Rear Admiral Horatio Nelson fifteen ships of the line with orders to locate and destroy the French fleet supporting Napoleon's forces. On August 1, 1798, following weeks of futile searching, Nelson finally located the French in Aboukir Bay, just to the east of Alexandria. The French commander, Vice Admiral François-Paul Brueys D'Aigalliers, anticipating a British attack, had anchored his thirteen ships of the line, in line of battle with shallow shoal water to port and the open sea to starboard. With sunset fast approaching, Brueys did not believe the British would risk a night battle in unknown, shallow waters. As a further precaution he ordered the the ships of the fleet be chained together to prevent the British from breaking the line. During the search for Brueys' fleet, Nelson had taken the time to meet frequently with his captains and thoroughly schooled them in his approach to naval warfare, stressing the individual initiative and aggressive tactics. These lessons would be put to use as Nelson's fleet bore down on the French position. As they approached, Captain Thomas Foley of HMS 'Goliath' (74 guns) noticed that the chain between the first French ship and the shore was submerged deep enough for a ship to pass over it. Without hesitation, Hardy led five British ships over the chain and into the narrow space between the French and the shoals. His manoeuvre allowed Nelson, aboard HMS 'Vanguard' (74 guns) and the remainder of the fleet to proceed down the other side of the French line sandwiching the enemy fleet and inflicting devastating damage upon each ship in turn. surprised by the audacity of the British tactics, Brueys watched in horror as his fleet was systematically destroyed. The climax of the battle occurred when the French flag ship 'L'Orient' (110 guns) caught fire and exploded, killing Brueys and all but 100 of the ships crew. As the battle drew to a close, it became clear that Nelson had all but annihilated the French fleet. Publisher John Evans (fl 1791-1820) was a mapseller, bookseller, printseller, map and print publisher, printer and printers' supplier, but also a pharmacist and patent medicine seller. Rarity The only institutional example of the present work we could trace is in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. We are unable to trace another example of the work appearing at auction. NMM PAI6533.
Map of Brooklyn and Vicinity.

Map of Brooklyn and Vicinity.

DRIPPS, Matthew Brooklyn as the third largest city in the United States Folding lithographed pocket map with contemporary hand-colour in full, tipped-in to blue cloth gilt covers, some separations and toning at old folds. Dripps' first map dedicated to Brooklyn was published in 1864. Between then and when he published the current map nearly ten years later, the third largest city in the United States, as it was then, had grown exponentially in terms of both population and geography. In 1873 Brooklyn extends north to Newtown Creek, east and southeast to Flatbush, south to 59th Street, and is bounded by the Buttermilk Canal and the East River to the West. Wards are colour-coded and numbered, with the location of XXI, XXIII, XXIV and XXV being overstamped as subdivisions of the old 21st ward, which contained Bedford. It would be another 25 years before Brooklyn extended to include all of Kings County, and was annexed as a borough of New York. The map is extremely detailed, with all major and minor road and rail routes outlined and complemented by a myriad of ferry routes that connect Long Island to Manhattan and the mainland. The ghostly outline of the future Brooklyn Bridge, which was under construction from 1869, is a testament to the increasing number of commuters into Manhattan. Real estate ownership is meticulously recorded for all plots, large and small. Green spaces, including the relatively newly designated Prospect Park, are colour coded. A guide pasted to the inside front cover lists all the stops on the 'Horse Car Railroad Routes from Fulton Ferry'; the 'Horse Car Railroad Routes from Broadway Ferry, E.D.'; and the 'Brooklyn Central Elevated Railroad, Proposed Line', which includes a station for Brooklyn Bridge. Dripps is perhaps best known for his large and similarly detailed wall-map ' of the City ofNewYorkExtending Northward to Fiftieth Street', 1851, which was the first to show all real estate plots and is the forerunner of the lareg-scale fire insurance maps of Sanbourne, and Bromley of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Matthew Dripps emigrated to Philadelphia in 1843, from Belfast in Ireland (Philadelphia, A History of The City And Its People: A Record Of 225 Years, Volume IV Biographical, Pages 258-261. Matthew Dripps Family). He "was an unlikely man to stand at the beginning of such an important phase of New York mapping. An immigrant grocer with no training in geography, he established his map business one year after disembarking in America from Ireland" (Cohen & Augustyn, Manhattan in Maps, pps. 124-27).
World on Mercator's Projection

World on Mercator’s Projection, Shewing the Distribution of Gold.

WYLD, James Unrecorded separate issue, and a possible prototype Lithographed pocket map folding into publisher's green cloth wallet, with circular printed paper label on both covers, uncoloured One of five maps issued with Wyld's very rare 'Gold Fields of Australia', also 1851, this is possibly a proof or prototype copy, for issue as a pocket map, with the deposits uncoloured. No other examples of a separate issue for this map are recorded. The imprint makes reference to Wyld's famous 'Great Globe', or 'Monster Globe', constructed to coincide with the Great Exhibition, which had rejected its inclusion on account of its vast size, of more than 60 feet in diameter. It was a popular attraction at Leicester Square between 1851 and 1862. Since it was hollow, and contained a staircase and elevated platforms, the public were able to climb up inside, and feel the interior surface of the earth, complete with mountains and rivers to scale. The front paste-down of the wallet gives a table of distances, and advertises Wyld's atlases and more manageable 12-inch globes; all of which were available at the attraction at Leicester Square. James Wyld (1812-1887) was "the most important mapmaker producing maps of London in the year of the Great Exhibition". Wyld was a highly successful publisher, MP for Bodmin, and an active figure in public life. He promoted the development of the British Library and campaigned for the Public Libraries and Museums Bill, accusing its agricultural opponents of trying to make the poor drink instead of read in order to keep malt consumption high; although he did oppose the introduction of the Ordnance Survey on behalf of private surveyors. Like his father, he was made Geographer to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in 1836. He built his business on his ability to produce maps quickly in reaction to new discoveries and information: Punch remarked drily that if a country were discovered in the centre of the earth then Wyld would have a new map out "as soon as it is discovered, if not before". Rare: no other recorded examples found. Provenance: with the contemporary library label of "Milton, Peterborough".
Analise Géographique des departements de la France.

Analise Géographique des departements de la France.

BOURRUT-LÉMERIE] Bourrut-Lemerie's maps of the French Departments Set of 90 cards (132 by 820mm), title, advertisement, distribution, index, 86 cards for each department with map and text below, housed within original pull-off slipcase. The third edition of Bourrut-Le Merie's rare set of cards of the French Departments. First published in around 1820, work consists of four numbered cards (I-IV): title, advertisement, the information contained on each card, and index; and 86 numbered cards of each department. Each card provdes information on the size of the department, number of inhabitants, major cities and towns, prefectures, and regional produce. The maps are derived from the work of Aristide M. Perrot, who's maps where first published in 1821. For the second edition Bourrut-Le Merie printed new plates: "The numbering of the cards is slightly different, with just the figures 1-86 at top left. The revised maps are now of various shapes and sizes and are surrounded with pretty little illustrations which often include the names of famous sons. Although they have been moved around, these are instantly recognizable as derived from the decorative vignettes of Aristide M. Perrot. The map titles now consist of just the name of the department." (King) The present set are an example of the third edition, the maps are exactly the same as the second edition, but with the title card now without publisher or edition line. Bourrut-Lemerie was a author and publisher of both playing cards and educational cards, active in Paris in the early nineteenth century. Rare: Worldcat records only one institutional example in Stanford University.
A Topographical Map of Hertford-shire from an Actual Survey; in which is Expressed all the roads

A Topographical Map of Hertford-shire from an Actual Survey; in which is Expressed all the roads, lanes, churches, noblemen, and gentlemen’s – seats, and every thing remarkable in the County: together with the divisions of the parishes. By Andw. Dury, Jno. Andrews.

ANDREWS, John [and] Andrew DURY Hertfordshire - Rare large-scale map of Hertfordshire Folio (550 by 400mm), index map, large-scale engraved map, on nine sheets, fine original full-wash colour, plan of Hertford, and plan of St Albans, half-calf over blue marbled paper boards. Andrews's and Dury's large scale map of Hertfordshire. John Andrews and Andrew Dury were responsible for three large scale eighteenth century county surveys: the present map - Hertfordshire 1766 , Kent 1769, and Wiltshire in 1773. All three surveys are on a scale of two inches to one mile. The majority of the large scale maps were on a scale of one inch to one mile. This larger scale allowed for much greater detail; and the map depicts hills, woods and barrows, commons heaths and parks, rivers, ponds and wells, bridges and windmills, churches and chapels, towns, villages and parishes, gentlemen's seats, farms and houses, turnpikes, secondary roads and lanes, county and hundred boundaries. A note on the map reads "NB The Western Part of this County from Chipping Barnet along the North Road was Survey'd by John Andrews, the East Part by Andrew Dury etc". Dury was a London book-seller who probably put up most of the capital for the project. The map, which sold for £1.16s. in sheets, is functional rather than decorative, the title being contained in a simple rectangle. The only decoration is provided by the dedication - a large vignette engraving incorporating a hunting scene with the names of various nobility on a banner in the sky. Although the name of the map's engraves is not given, it could be possibly have been John Cheevers who engraved the town plans that were published by Dury around the same time.
Gezigt van de Haringpakkers toren

Gezigt van de Haringpakkers toren, nevens de Haarlemmers sluis, en Nieuwe Vismarkt tot Amsterdam. van ‘t y aan te zien. Turris in Salsamentaria quae regione est, nec non Hydrercii Harlemai Novique Fori Piscarii, qua res ad yam vergit, oculus objecta species. Veue de la tour des paquers du harang, ecluse de harlem, & nouvelle poissonerie; du côté de l’ye, golfe d’amsterdam.

SMIT, Jan] View from outside the Haringpakkerstoren towards the Koepelkirk Engraving with etching, on two sheets joined. The Haringpakkerstoren was a tower on the corner of the Singel canal and the current Prins Hendrikkade. The tower was originally part of the medieval defensive wall, and was at the time called the Tower of the Holy Cross. The tower would later become known as the Haringpakkerstoren, because the area was where the herring fishermen salted and packed their catch. In 1829, the city authorities took the decision to demolish the tower (the Jan Roodenspoortstoren was also demolished at the same time), as the city lacked the funds to maintain them. Before their demolition detailed drawings of the towers were taken, so that they could be reconstructed when funds became available. Although plans have recently been made to reconstruct the tower, there have been concerns that this would adversely affect Amsterdam's position on the UNESCO world heritage list. Jan Smit was a draftsman and engraver working in the first half of the eighteenth century in The Netherlands. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 287.
t Gesigt Van de Portugeese

t Gesigt Van de Portugeese, en Hoogduy[t]se Joden Kerken, tot Amsterdam. Veue ou perspective des eglises des juiss portuguese et allemands a amsterdam. A Prospect of the Portugese and High German Jews Churches at Amsterdam.

GUNST, Pieter van [after RADEMAKER, Abraham] View of Amsterdam's Jewish Quarter Engraving with etching, on two sheets joined. View of the Plantage Muidergracht and the Jonas Daniël Meijerplein. The view shown from the present day Mr. Visserplien, the busy intersecti.on in central Amsterdam, depicts the Portuguese Synagogue on the left and the High German or Great Synagogue. These momumental buildings now house the Jewish Historical Museum. The first Jews to settle in Amsterdam were the Sephardim, who had been expelled from Portugal and Spain in 1493. They were joined in the following decades by the Ashkenazi from Central and Eastern Europe, the first of whom had come from Germany in 1600. In those years, the only available land for them was at the outskirts of the eastern side of the Centrum — the island of Vlooienburg, surrounded by the Amstel River and the canals — so they settled along the island's main street, Breestraat, which quickly became known as Jodenbreestraat. The Great Synagogue (now the Jewish Historical Museum ), and the Portuguese-Israelite Synagogue, were opened in 1671 and 1675, respectively. The Portuguese Synagogue was the place where Spinoza was placed under the ban by the Sephardic Jewish community in 1656. Pieter Stevensz. van Gunst (1659-1732), also known as Pieter Stevens van Gunst or Petrus Stephani, was a Dutch draughtsman, copperplate engraver and printmaker active in Amsterdam, London (1704), and the Dutch town of Nederhorst (1730-1731). Abraham Rademaker (1677 – 21 January 1735) was an 18th-century painter and printmaker from the Northern Netherlands. Rademaker was born in Lisse. According to the RKD he was a versatile artist who painted Italianate landscapes, but is known mostly for his many cityscapes and drawings of buildings that were made into print. R.W.P. de Vries, auction, 1925: 295.