Jeremy Norman's historyofscience

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De uteri partiumque eius confectione

De uteri partiumque eius confectione

Bonaccivoli, Luigi Bonaccioli, Ludovico (1475-1536). De uteri partiumque eius confectione. Eiudsem. Quonam usu in absentibus etiamnum Venus citetur. Quid, quale, undeque prolificium semen, unde menstrua etc. 8vo. [72]ff. (signatures A - I8). Strasburg: H. Sybold, n.d. [1530]. 156 x 98 mm. Vellum ca. 1530, spine repaired, traces of worming on front and rear endpapers. Minor foxing and dampstaining, but very good. First Separate Edition of the first three chapters of Bonaccioli's Enneas muliebris, first published in 1502. The 1502 edition, which was the first significant book on gynecology, is extremely rare. Bonaccioli, who taught philosophy and medicine at the University of Ferrara, was one of the first to write about the clitoris and the hymen, which he appears to have been the first to describe accurately. He followed Galen and Mondino's error regarding the anatomy of the uterus, describing it as seven-celled. Bonaccioli was Lucrezia Borgia's personal physician, and he dedicated the Enneas muliebris-his only published work-to her. "An entirely new composition, [Bonaccioli's work] was unusual not so much in being dedicated to a woman . . . but in eschewing a therapeutic focus for a more discursive, compendious survey of scientific opinion on generation" (Green, Making Women's Medicine Masculine, p. 266). This edition of De uteri partiumque also contains another tract on reproduction, Aristoteles de signis quae puerorum seminis emissionem, puellarumque viripotentiam preveniunt. Leonardo, History of Gynecology, pp. 189, 278.
Science in our courts of law. Proof with manuscript corrections

Science in our courts of law. Proof with manuscript corrections

Smith, Robert Angus Smith, Robert Angus (1817-84). Science in our courts of law. Proof with several manuscript corrections in pencil, presumably by Smith. 6 columns printed on large bifolium. N.p., n.d. [1860]. 512 x 339 mm. Unbound. Some small losses along folds affecting a few words, light soiling, edges a bit frayed but very good. From the library of Alfred Swaine Taylor (1806-80), docketed in his hand. Pre-Publication Proof with Manuscript Corrections of Smith's important paper on the role of expert scientific testimony in legal affairs. The proof is from the library of Alfred Swaine Taylor, founder of forensic toxicology and the leading medico-legal expert of his day, who worked with Smith to reform the British legal system's handling of scientific evidence. Angus Smith was an analytical chemist who investigated numerous environmental issues in 19th-century industrial Britain; he is best known for discovering what we now know as "acid rain," a term he coined. In 1857 Smith was an expert witness in a nuisance case against an alum factory owner in Manchester, who had been accused of allowing noxious gases to pollute the surrounding area. During the trial the lawyers for each side bent and shaped the scientific evidence to support their opposing arguments, a process that Smith found both repugnant and antithetical to the impartial nature of scientific inquiry. He joined with several other scientists, including Taylor, to call for changes in the way that the legal system dealt with scientific evidence, delivering the present paper before the Royal Society of Arts on 18 January 1860 and publishing it in vol. 7 (1860) of the Society's Journal. Smith had three primary objections to the current use of expert evidence. The first concerned the supposed conflict in the expert evidence by the opposing parties: there was often no conflict, but where it existed it was manipulated by counsels who had little or no understanding of the evidence and were prepared to distort it for their own selfish advantage. The second issue was at the heart of the evidence itself and the role of science in public affairs: if the evidence could be challenged at every stage, then, Angus Smith argued, "science would effectively be prevented from providing useful guidance in public affairs." The third issue was the overriding concern of the antipathy between science and the advocacy of the law, comparing a scientist and a barrister [trial lawyer]. While a barrister in practice may be required to take a biased role, for the scientist it was different" (P. Reed, Acid Rain and the Rise of the Environmental Chemist in Nineteenth-Century Britain, pp. 89-90).
book (2)

Antiprotons. Offprint. With 4 other papers

Chamberlain, Owen 1. (with Clyde Wiegand) Proton-proton scattering at 340 Mev. Offprint from The Physical Review 79 (1950). 81-85pp. 268 x 201 mm. Without wrappers as issued. Tear in lower margins of all leaves, light toning. First edition, offprint issue. 2. (With Clyde Wiegand). Experiments on proton-proton scattering from 120 to 345 Mev. Offprint from The Physical Review 83 (1951). 923-932pp. 268 x 201 mm. Without wrappers as issued.First edition, offprint issue. 3. (with Emilio Segre, Clyde Wiegand and Thomas Ypsilantis). Antiprotons. Offprint from Nature 177 (1956). [4]pp. 213 x 141 mm. Without wrappers as issued. First edition, offprint issue. 4. (With 20 other authors). The antiproton-nucleon annihilation process (antiproton collaboration experiment). Reproduced typescript. 91ff. Berkeley: Printed for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, 1956. 281 x 218 mm. Chamberlain's name inscribed in a secretarial hand on first leaf. First edition. 5. The early antiproton work. Les Prix Nobel en 1959. 107-124pp. Stockholm, 1960. 248 x 166 mm. Original printed wrappers. First edition. Chamberlain shared the 1959 Nobel Prize for physics with Emilio Segre for their discovery of the antiproton, the antiparticle (same mass, different charge) of the proton. The antiproton had been predicted by Dirac in the 1930s, but it was not until 1955 that Chamberlain and Segre, both physicists at UC Berkeley, were able to confirm the particle's existence experimentally using the University of California's new Bevatron particle accelerator. The third, fourth and fifth papers offered here describe some of Chamberlain's antiproton work; no. 5 is his Nobel Lecture. The first and second papers offered here describe Chamberlain's early research on proton-proton scattering, undertaken with experimental physicist Clyde Wiegand.
Autograph letter signed to Thomas Twining

Autograph letter signed to Thomas Twining

Watson, Hewett Watson, Hewett Cottrell (1804-81). Autograph letter signed to [Thomas?] Twining. 7pp. on two bifolia. Thames Ditton, 28 January [no year; ca. 1850]. 185 x 115 mm. Fine. From Hewett Watson, British botanist, phrenologist and evolutionary theorist. Watson, the editor of the London Catalogue of British Plants from 1844 to 1874, was an expert on the geographical distribution of plants in the British Isles and a strong advocate for the use of statistical methods in scientific research. Charles Darwin corresponded with Watson and made use of Watson's botanical knowledge in his own evolutionary researches, acknowledging Watson as a vital source of scientific information in On the Origin of Species. Watson's correspondent here was most likely Thomas Twining, Jr. of Twickenham, who in 1846 had sponsored Watson's candidacy for a teaching post in Ireland, and who, like Watson, was interested in educational reform. Watson's letter discusses the subject of education, particularly that of the working classes. He and Twining both supported the progressive educational ideas of fellow phrenologist George Combe, whom he mentioned in his letter-"I forward your letter to Mr. Combe, of Edinburgh, & ask him to send you a list of addresses. I know of no one more likely to select persons qualified to give information of value than is Mr. C. Education is with him quite as much a hobby as phrenology is or has been . . ." Watson mentioned the Williams Secular School in Edinburgh-"established under the auspices of Mr. Combe"- which, like William Ellis's Birkbeck Schools, was founded expressly for the purpose of teaching science, art and economics to working-class children and adults. Watson included Ellis's name in a list of contacts who might prove useful to Twining.
Hand-colored engraved portrait of Linnaeus in Lapland dress

Hand-colored engraved portrait of Linnaeus in Lapland dress, by Dunkarton after Hoffman

Linnaeus, Carl Linnaeus, Carl (1707-78). Linnaeus in his Lapland dress. Mezzotint portrait, hand-colored, by Robert Dunkarton after the painting by Martin Hoffman. London: Published by Dr. Thornton, 1 June 1805. 505 x 351 mm. (platemark); 565 x 459 mm. (sheet). A few small chips and marginal tears not affecting image, traces of former mounting in upper corners, but very good. Striking hand-colored mezzotint portrait of Linnaeus at age 30 from the 1737 painting by Martin Hoffman, engraved by Robert Dunkarton for inclusion in R. J. Thornton's Temple of Flora (1805). In the words of Linnaeus's early biographer, Dietrich Heinrich Stoever, the portrait showed Linnaeus "with boots of reindeer-skin, about his body a girdle, from which was suspended a Laplander's drum, a needle to make nets, a straw snuffbox, a cartridgebox and a knife; his neck was bare; his head was covered with a grey round hat [colored red in the present engraving]; his hair was of a stiff brown colour; over his hand he wore Laplander's gloves; and in his right hand he held a plant, red from within and white from without" (Stoever, The Life of Sir Charles Linnaeus [1794], quoted in Blunt, Linnaeus: The Compleat Naturalist, p. 117). The plant was twinflower, which Linnaeus observed while exploring Lapland and subsequently adopted as a sort of emblem. "[Linnaeus's] teacher Jan Frederik Gronovius took notice of his student's fondness for the plant and, perhaps because of Linnaeus's entreatment, renamed twinflower Linnaea borealis in honor of his student. Linnaeus reveals the story in his book Species plantarum: 'Linnaea was named by the celebrated Gronovius and is a plant of Lapland, lowly, insignificant and disregarded, flowering but a brief space-from Linnaeus who resembles it'" (Stetter, p. 21). T. Stetter, "Meeting twinflower [Linneae borealis]," in P. Cenki, ed., Nature and Culture in the Northern Forest, pp. 17-27.
The honey ants of the Garden of the Gods and the occident ants of the American plains

The honey ants of the Garden of the Gods and the occident ants of the American plains

McCook, Henry C. McCook, Henry C. (1837-1911). The honey ants of the Garden of the Gods, and the occident ants of the American plains: A monograph of the architecture and habits of the honey-bearing ant, Myrmecocystus melliger . . . 188, [2]pp., including 13 full-page illustrations. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1882. 223 x 144 mm. Original cloth, gilt spine (a bit faded), light wear to extremities, small split in front inner hinge, evidence of bookplate removal. Very good. Inscribed to President Chester A. Arthur (1829-86) on the front flyleaf by McCook's brother, Congressman Anson G. McCook (1835-1917): "His Excellency, Chester A. Arthur Compliments of A. G. McCook." First Edition. McCook, a Presbyterian minister and naturalist, was the first to document honey ants, publishing his observations in the present work. Honey ants, which are found in several ant genera including Myrmecocystus and Camponotus, have specialized workers called "repletes" that store large amounts of nectar in their swollen abdomens; other ants in the colony then extract this nectar by stroking the replete's antennae. McCook noted the presence of these ants in the American plains and in Colorado's "Garden of the Gods," a natural landmark near Colorado Springs. McCook belonged to an Ohio family known as the "Fighting McCooks," which sent a total of fifteen men to serve as officers in the Union Army during the Civil War. One of his brothers, Anson G. McCook, became a politician after the war, serving three terms as a congressman and developing close relationships with several leading Republicans. Anson's ties to the Republican Party no doubt prompted him to inscribe this copy of his brother's book to President Chester A. Arthur.