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Histoire de la decouverte et de la conquete du Perou.Amsterdam, J. Louis de Lorme, 1700. 2 volumes. 12vo. With an engraved frontispiece, a folding engraved map of Peru, 11 engraved plates, and 2 folding engraved plates. Further with two different woodcut vignettes on the red and black title-pages of both volumes, woodcut decorated initials, woodcut headpieces and headpieces built up from typographical ornaments, and a large ornamental woodcut tailpieces. 18th-century gold-tooled red morocco.

ZARATE, Augustin de. [1], [1 blank], [36], 307, (1 blank); [1], [1 blank], [4], 408 pp.First translation into French of one of the most valuable works on the history of the discovery and conquest of Peru. Augustin de Zarate (1504-1560) was sent out to examine the finacial affairs of Peru. He remained there several years, making notes and collecting material for the present work. He had access to the best official sources of information, and his work is the foundation for later works on the subject. The original Spanish edition was published in Antwerp, 1555. The history starts with the Spanish discovery of Peru, and ends with the death of Gonzalo Pizarro and the restoration of royal authority by governor Pedro de la Gasca. Zarate has an elegant and clear style, strongly drawing the characters of the different heroes. A seperate chapter describes the two main players, Pizarro and Almagro. The accounts of the execution of Almagro, and of the assassination of Pizarro, are written with much spirit and picturesqueness; and the story of the misfortunes and final death of Atabaliba, a young Peruvian Inca, is very touching. Zarate has tried very seriously to be an impartial historian. He was aware of the dangers of publishing his history during his lifetime, since it related to recent and controversial matters. But after Prince Philip - later King Philip II of Spain - had read a manuscript copy, publication was ordered. The work was well received, and also popular outside of Spain, since it was also published in Italian (Venice, 1563) and in English (London, 1581).With a book binders label on the verso of the second free end leaf "Relié par Derome le Jeune . en 1785". The boards are very slightly scuffed, internally some occasional minor foxing. Otherwise in very good condition.l Chadenat 6466; Palau 379639; Sabin 106259; STCN 108630161 (2 copies); USTC 1560725 (5 copies); cf. Cox II, pp. 251-52; Rene-Moreno 784 (1808 French edition).
  • $7,280
  • $7,280
book (2)

Souvenirs d un voyage dans l Inde exécuté de 1834 à 1839.Paris, Bétrune et Plon for Fortin, Masson et Cie & Langlois et Leclerq, 1843. 2 parts in 1 volume. 4to. With 8 lithographed plates of landscapes and cities in India by V. Dollet, 27 engraved plates of mammals, birds, and insects, in the second part after the designs by J.G. Prêtre, Delahaye, and Vaillant, including 24 beautifully coloured by hand by the famous “coloriste” Gérard, and 1 large folding map of Europe, Africa, and Asia, indicating in red the route of Delessert’s journey. Contemporary gold-tooled half red morocco.

DELESSERT, Adolphe. [6], III, 134; [4], 107, [1 blank] pp.First and only edition of the memories of Adolphe François Delessert (1809-1869) of his voyage to India. The first part is devoted to the voyage, and the second part, which is the most important, to the natural history of India, containing 27 marvellous plates of birds and insects. Delessert was the nephew of the rich industrial Jules Paul Benjamin Delessert (1773-1847) to whom he dedicated this book. The Delessert family consisted of many travellers and writers on natural history. This voyage was made on an educational basis, and was, thanks to the wealth of Benjamin Delessert, not deprived of some luxury. Delessert embarked on the 24th of April 1834 at Nantes, and after stopovers at Madeira and the Canaries, he arrived at Ile de France, where he learned many things about the Indian flora, fauna and customs. He sailed on to the Dutch East Indies, Calcutta, Bengali, Bombay, Goa, and studied during a long time the flora and the extremely variable climate of the Mount Nilgiri. On the 30th of April 1839 he returned to France, bringing with him large collections of mammals, birds, reptiles, fishes, insects, shells, plants, and minerals.With the bookplate of P. Million mounted on the front paste-down. Plates 4 and 5 in part 2 are loose. Otherwise in very good condition.l Chadenat, 556, 2602, 3723; Nissen, ZBI, 1067; Numa Broc, Asie, pp. 131-2; Quatre siècles de Colonisation Francaise, 238.
  • $10,976
  • $10,976
book (2)

Aviso de Cazadores y Caça.Madrid, Pedro Madrigal, 1593. With: (2) [bound before ad 1] NUÑEZ DE AVENDAÑO, Pedro. De exequendis mandatis regnum Hispaniae, quae rectoribus civitatum dantur, & hodie continentur in titulo.Madris, Pedro Madrigal, 1593.2 works in 1 volume. Folio (27 x 18.5 cm). With the woodcut printer’s device on the title-page of ad 1, and two decorated woodcut initials. Further with the woodcut coat-of-arms of Habsburg Spain on the title-page of ad 2, numerous decorated woodcut initials, a woodcut headpiece at the start of the work, and headpieces made up of typographical ornaments in the first few chapters. Later limp vellum, sewn on 2 vellum tapes laces through the joints, with the manuscript title on the spine, remnants of ties.

NUÑEZ DE AVENDAÑO, Pedro. [8], "555" [= 553], [1], [2 blank], [40]; 34 pp.Exceedingly scarce work on the chase and falconry, one of the earliest and most important of those written in Spanish; the work focuses on the laws of hawking and hunting in 16th-century Spain. It was the first Castilian printed book on hunting and the first to deal with its legal and moral aspects. It has here been bound with a work about Spanish law. The 1593 edition of the Aviso is very rare, as we have only been able to trace it in two sales records of the past 100 years.The treatise was first published in 1543 in Alcala and is now scarce. According to Carter: "Avendano wrote the Aviso to show the Castilian aristocracy its responsibilities regarding hunting. He argued that hunting was made legal by natural law and ius gentium and could be controlled by the monarch only when hunting threatened the public interest". The present work is the second edition, published 50 years later, of which Uhagon writes (translated): copies of this second edition are perhaps even rarer than those of the first. Indeed, Iberian books lists far more copies of the first than the second edition (31 and 8 respectively). An interesting fact about the second edition is that it was printed by the same workshop that printed the first edition of Don Quichote (1605) and has the same printer's device on the title-page.Pedro de Nuñez de Avendaño (ca. 1490-1560) was born in the province of Castilla-La Mancha. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in Law from the University of Salamanca and likely obtained his doctorate at the University of Valencia. He worked as a lawyer for the Dukes of Infantado and was a member of the ducal council. He later became a lawyer at the Real y Supremo consejo de Castile, or the Royal council. His son Diego inherited that position from him and continued to publish his works after his death.With two ownership annotations on the recto of the first flyleaf, an annotation at the foot of the title-page, and a crossed out annotation in the middle. The vellum is slightly creased and stained, with a few light scratches on the back, the sewing supports in the back have broken, affecting the structural integrity of the binding. Ad 1 is slightly browned, with minor spotting, and a waterstain in the lower outer corner of some of the leaves, slightly affecting the text, lacking the final blank leaf. Ad 2 is somewhat browned and spotted throughout, with some leaves affected more than others, brown stains in the text on pp. 217 and 219, with annotations in the margins on some of the leaves, the top outer corner of the front flyleaf until p. 92 has been torn, without affecting the text, the top outer corner of the title-page has been restored, as well as a small portion of the lower margin of p. 260 and the lower inner and outer corner of p. 361, without loss of text. Otherwise in good condition.l CCPB, CCPB000018859-X; Ad 1: Harting 235; Iberian books 58914/ IB 13741 (8 copies); Palau 197084 (other ed.); Porbase 226339 (0 copies); Schwerdt II, p.46; Souhart 354; Uhagon 296; WorldCat 433978856 (1 copy); cf. Carter, J.M., Medieval Sport. In Journal of Sport History, vol. 9, no. 1, Spring 1982, p.71. Ad 2: Iberian books 58927/ IB 13742; Palau 197089; Porbase 226342 (2 copies); WorldCat 807886964, 45670188, 82325465 (5 copies).
  • $13,999
  • $13,999
book (2)

Histoire de Nicolas I. Roy du Paraguai, et Empereur des Mamelus.Saint Paul [= São Paulo, but the work was likely printed somewhere in Western Europe], 1756. 8vo. With a typographical ornament on the title-page. Contemporary brown paste paper wrappers.

[PARAGUAY - KING NICOLAS I]. 88 pp.First or second edition of a rare biography of the mythical Spaniard Nicolas Rubiuni (1710-?), the "first king of Paraguay" and "emperor of the Mamelukes (Mamelucos) of São Paulo". It was the first time that the Bandeirantes (settlers) of Pirintinga served as the theme for a novel. This curious work is sometimes considered to be an anti-Jesuit publication, but Borba de Moraes argues that it should simply be seen as a work of fiction instead. The first two editions of this novel were both published in 1756 and it is therefore unclear which is the first. However, the present edition appears to be the most rare of the two, as we have only been able to find it in two sales records of the past 100 years.The myth of Nicolas Rubiuni is said to have been created by Marquis Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo (1699-1782), chief minister to the Portuguese king, to undermine the Jesuits. When the Jesuits first arrived in Paraguay in 1588, their objective was to convert to local people, the Guaraní, to Christianity, and to protect them from European colonists and slave traders. The Guaraní were threatened by the Bandeirantes from Brazil, who tried to capture and enslave them to work on the sugar plantations. However, armed by the Jesuits, the Guaraní were able to defeat them in 1642, which ended to worst of the slave trade in the region. The involvement of the Jesuits inspired mixed feelings in Europe. They were painted as either romantic saviours or as exploiters, who were using the Guaraní to create their own independent kingdom in Paraguay. The figure of Rubiuni was said to have stood up against the Jesuits and restore order in the region.According to Borba de Moraes, the work demonstrates how closely the activities in the Americas were followed in Europe, as the unknown author displays a wealth of knowledge about the missions, the subjecting of Paraguay to Jesuit rule, and the treatment of the Guaraní. The work must have been fairly popular in Europe, as Italian, German and Dutch translations were published shortly after the first French editions. With the bookplate of Carolus Franciscus S. R. J. Comes à Nefelrod mounted on the inside of the front wrapper. The edges and corners of the wrappers are somewhat scuffed, with creasing and some loss of material on the spine, including of the two paper labels mounted there, making them difficult to read. With a wormhole on the front wrapper and first 3 leaves, barely affecting the printed text. Otherwise in good condition.
  • $5,600
  • $5,600
book (2)

Histoire de Georges Castriot, surnommé Scanderbeg, Roy d’Albanie.Paris, G. Chaudiere, 1597. 8vo. With 2 full-page engraved portraits (of Scanderbeg and Mahomet II), numerous decorated woodcut initials and woodcut headpieces, a woodcut printer’s device on the title-page. Early 19th-century gold- and blind-tooled brown calf.

LAVARDIN, Jacques de. [20], 447, [13] ll.Rare French edition of a famous biography of the national hero of Albania, Georg Kastriota or Castriota, known as Skanderbeg (1405-1468). He became a national hero in Albania as he had been the leader in the struggle with, and the wars against, the Ottoman Empire, fighting for Albanian independence. Skanderbeg became popular in the rest of Europe as a model of Christian resistance against the Muslims. This edition of his biography is quite rare, as we have not been able to find it in any sales records of the past 100 years.Skanderbeg was born into an Albanian noble family. In 1415, when he was still a boy, he was sent as a hostage to Sultan Murad I. After his return, he again was taken hostage in 1423, by Sultan Murad II in Constantinople. During this stay, he received military training at Enderun school, converted to Islam and took the name Iskender (Skanderbeg is derived from that name). In the 1440's Murad II sent Skanderbeg with the Ottoman army to his native Albania. Once there, he left the Turkish army in November 1443 and abandoned the Sultan to become the leader - and hero - of the struggle for Albanian independence, rebelling against the Ottomans and leading a successful military campaign that expelled them from Albania. He managed to maintain Albania's independence for 25 years, but after his death the country fell back under Ottoman control. The biography highlights Skanderbeg's influence on the political landscape of Albania, the Balkan peninsula, and Europe. The present work is a translation of Historia de vita et rebus Scanderbegi (ca. 1520) by Marin Barleti, the first Albanian historian. This near-contemporary biography of Skanderbeg became very popular throughout Europe and was translated into many European languages in the 16th century. The French translation was made by Jacques de Lavardin (fl. 1575-1585) and was first published in 1576. Nine more editions followed until 1621. The present work is the fourth edition overall and the second by Guillaume Chaudière (dates unknown), who also published the first French edition.With a small white bookplate from the library of the Duke of Genoa mounted on the front pastedown ("Biblioteca di S. A. R. il duca di Genova"), and a black oval stamp from this same library on leaf 169 and 278. Further with an ownership annotation on the head of the title-page ("D. P. L."). The edges and corners of the boards are somewhat scuffed, and the hinge is slightly weakened, but without affecting the structural integrity of the binding. The edges of the end leaves have darkened from the leather, with small ink- or water stains on some of the leaves. Otherwise in good condition.l Göllner, Turcica, 2296; Pettegree and Walsby, French vernacular books, 33242; USTC 5966 (20 copies); WorldCat 797374690; 1055968425 (3 copies).
  • $10,640
  • $10,640
book (2)

De ontleedkundige plaaten van B. Eustachius.Amsterdam, Lodewijk van Es, [1798]. Folio (ca. 37 x 24.5 cm). With 47 engraved plates on 41 leaves. Early 19th-century quarter vellum, brown marbled paper sides, with the author in manuscript at the head of the spine.

EUSTACHIUS, Bartolomaeus and Andreas BONN (editor). [2], [51] ll. and 47 engraved plates on 41 leaves.Very rare Dutch edition of a famous anatomical atlas by one of the most prominent anatomists of the 16th century, Bartolomaeus Eustachius (ca. 1510/1520-1574). The present copy contains all 47 anatomical plates and their descriptions. Although not mentioned in most of the relevant reference works, there are two Dutch 1798 editions of the atlas, one printed by Jan Barend Elwe (fl. 1777-1815) and the other by Lodewijk van Es (dates unknown). The edition printed by the latter, which includes the present copy, is exceptionally rare. According to WorldCat, it can only be found in two libraries worldwide. We have also not been able to trace any copies in sales records of the past 100 years.Eustachius was an Italian physician working in Rome. He enjoyed great prestige and had many members of the Italian nobility among his patients. He was particularly interested in anatomy and preferred to do his own research instead of accepting theories from other physicians. The present Dutch translation contains all 47 plates that Eustachius has ever made. For this edition, they were newly engraved under the supervision of the Amsterdam professor in anatomy Andreas Bonn (1738-1817). The first few plates illustrate the kidneys and the inner structure of the ear, plate 8 shows the heart, the next seven plates depict the organs in the chest and abdomen, plate 17 and 18 show the brain, spinal cord and nerves, and the final plates are devoted to muscles and bones. Although the plates were long since obsolete from an anatomical viewpoint, their publication in the 18th century led to many changes in the history of anatomic discovery by helping to trace many important discoveries back to their original source. Eustachius was credited with some of his discoveries by having them named after him, including the Eustachian valve in the heart, and the Eustachian tube in the ear.The work shows traces of use, the edges of the boards are scuffed, resulting in tears in the marbled paper, revealing the cardboard underneath. With a water stain in the head margin of the first 8 typographical leaves after the title-page, but not in the plates, slightly affecting the text. Otherwise in good condition.l Blake, p. 139; STCN 298448114 (1 copy); WorldCat 1090147277 (2 copies); cf. Bibliotheca medica Neerlandica, p. 85 (different ed.); Choulant p. 36 and pp. 200-204; Waller 2839 (different ed.); Wellcome II, p. 536 (different ed.).
  • $1,680
  • $1,680
book (2)

Histoire des deux conquestes d’Espagne par les Mores, la premiere faite par Tarif & Mussa, sur les Crestiens; la seconde, par Abdalasis, sur les Mores revoltez, et des revolutions arrive es dans l’empire des califes pendant pre s de cinquante ans. .Paris, widow of François Muguet, 1708. 12mo. Contemporary mottled calf, red edges.

LUNA, Miguel de. [24], 485, [4], [3 blank] pp.First edition of the second French translation of a history of the conquest of Spain by the Moors, detailing events from 712 to 761 CE, a description of Spain during the same period, and a biography of Almanzor (ca. 938-1002), the Islamic ruler of the Iberian Peninsula at that time. "This was a false chronicle, halfway between a history and a novel of chivalry, supposedly translated from an Arabic manuscript by a (fictitious) historian called Tarif Abentarique that Luna had found in El Escorial" (García-Arenal & Mediano). In the account, first published in 1592, the Iberian Peninsula is saved by the Arab newcomers from a state of evil and corruption under the Visigoth rulers. Luna's account is a defence of Arab culture in Spain, independently of the religion of Islam and particularly defending the Arabic language. "His writings attempt to reimagine the origins and history of Christianity in the Peninsula such that its inhabitants of Arab origin may be seen as "natural" or "native" .; therefore they cannot be expelled as alien invaders ., but rather, and above all, may aspire to honors and privileges" (García-Arenal & Mediano).Miguel de Luna (ca. 1550-1615) was a Spanish physician of Arabic descent, who also published a treatise on bathing. Known for his knowledge of Arabic, he worked as a translator for King Philip II of Spain and the Spanish Inquisition.With owner's inscriptions on the back of the first fly-leaf and the title-page. Binding lightly worn at the extremities; with a few spots; a good copy.l Brunet I, cols. 16-17; García-Arenal & Mediano, The orient in Spain, pp. 155-164; not in Blackmer.
  • $1,680
  • $1,680
Correspondence . relating to the slave trade. [In some volumes: "relative to the slave trade"

Correspondence . relating to the slave trade. [In some volumes: “relative to the slave trade”, “on the slave trade” or “respecting the slave trade”].London, William Clowes (1837-1845); T. R. Harrison (1848-1872); 1837-1872. With:(1) Class B (further series). Correspondence with foreign powers regarding the slave trade. 1837.(2) Class C. Correspondence with foreign powers, parties to the conventions between Great Britain and France upon de slave trade. May 1838 – February 1839.(3) Idem. June – December 1839.(4) Idem. May – December 1840.(5) Class D. Correspondence with foreign powers, not parties to conventions, giving right of search of vessels suspected of the slave trade. May 1838 – February 1839.(6) Idem. February – May 1839.(7) Idem. January – May 1840.(8) Idem. May – December 1840.(9) Class C. Correspondence on the slave trade, with foreign powers parties to conventions under which vessels are to be tried by the tribunals of the nation to which they belong. January – December 1941

[CORRESPONDENCE - SLAVERY AND SLAVE TRADE]. Rare collection of 14 volumes containing transcriptions of British diplomatic correspondence with other countries relating to the slave trade in the 19th century, printed for the British government. Although slavery in the British Empire was abolished in 1807, enslaved people in the colonies were not freed until 1838. In the present volumes, which mostly date from 1837-1846, directly after slavery was abolished in most British colonies, the British government urges other countries to help put a halt to the now illegal slave trade. The present collection contains the correspondence between Britain and numerous countries in Europe, the Americas and North Africa, especially France, Spain, the United States and Austria. The letters describe the ships carrying enslaved people in detail, also mentioning their ports of call, so they could be more easily found and stopped. Of particular interest are the transcriptions of slave trade acts from various countries as well as the treaties between France and chiefs in African colonies, which are difficult to find in print anywhere else.The letters reveal the profound change in attitude towards slavery in the middle of the 19th century. The tone of the correspondence with countries that were quick in abolishing slavery, like Denmark, is very different than that of the countries that were much slower, like the Netherlands and various countries in Latin America. However, the letters especially make clear how difficult it must have been to find and stop the ships that were illegally carrying enslaved people. The owners of the vessels often hid their illegal practices behind obscure transactions and renamings, which made finding them arduous and sometimes dangerous. It was the task of British commissioners and naval officers to try to uncover the network behind the Atlantic slave traders and bring them to justice. By collaborating with other countries, the courts succeeded in the condemnation of over 600 vessels engaged in the slave trade and the liberation of nearly 80,000 enslaved people.Ad 11 with blue library stamp on the title-page ("Bibliothèque du palais de la paix"). All volumes in good to very good condition, some very slight browning and foxing, some marginal notes in most volumes.
  • $9,520
  • $9,520
book (2)

Histoire des deux conquestes d’Espagne par les Mores, la premiere faite par Tarif & Mussa, sur les Crestiens; la seconde, par Abdalasis, sur les Mores revoltez, et des revolutions arrive es dans l’empire des califes pendant pre s de cinquante ans. .Paris, widow of François Muguet, 1708. 12mo. Contemporary mottled calf, red edges.

[24], 485, [4], [3 blank] pp.First edition of the second French translation of a history of the conquest of Spain by the Moors, detailing events from 712 to 761 CE, a description of Spain during the same period, and a biography of Almanzor (ca. 938-1002), the Islamic ruler of the Iberian Peninsula at that time. "This was a false chronicle, halfway between a history and a novel of chivalry, supposedly translated from an Arabic manuscript by a (fictitious) historian called Tarif Abentarique that Luna had found in El Escorial" (García-Arenal & Mediano). In the account, first published in 1592, the Iberian Peninsula is saved by the Arab newcomers from a state of evil and corruption under the Visigoth rulers. Luna's account is a defence of Arab culture in Spain, independently of the religion of Islam and particularly defending the Arabic language. "His writings attempt to reimagine the origins and history of Christianity in the Peninsula such that its inhabitants of Arab origin may be seen as "natural" or "native" .; therefore they cannot be expelled as alien invaders ., but rather, and above all, may aspire to honors and privileges" (García-Arenal & Mediano).Miguel de Luna (ca. 1550-1615) was a Spanish physician of Arabic descent, who also published a treatise on bathing. Known for his knowledge of Arabic, he worked as a translator for King Philip II of Spain and the Spanish Inquisition.With owner's inscriptions on the back of the first fly-leaf and the title-page. Binding lightly worn at the extremities; with a few spots; a good copy.l Brunet I, cols. 16-17; García-Arenal & Mediano, The orient in Spain, pp. 155-164; not in Blackmer.