Jonathan A. Hill Archives - Rare Book Insider

Jonathan A. Hill

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19:45-21:55, September 9th 1967, Frankfurt, Germany

Many full-bleed black & white illus (some double-page). [36] pp. 4to (310 x 213 mm.), printed wrappers, leaves uncut, staple-bound. N.p.: [1967]. A groundbreaking exhibition catalogue, designed by Paul Maenz, that documents a famous two-hour Conceptual art show; edition of 500 copies. The catalogue contains reproductions of black & white photographs of the conceptual works prepared for the show. Most of the artists were unable to attend in-person, instead they sent instructions to the organizer Maenz for the "installation" of pieces such as Jan Dibbets' sawdust Perspective Correction; Richard Long's mailed bundle of branches to be placed per his specifications; John Johnson's rectangular sections of sod; and Flanagan's participatory work involving an electric heater, salt shaker, and slice of bread, and the instructions to "appreciate and eat it all." Posenenske's cardboard sculpture was re-arranged by the artist herself and assistants for the duration of the exhibition. "In September 1967, Maenz organized another show that was essential to the beginnings of Conceptual art in Europe. The performance-exhibition Dies alles Herzchen wird einmal gehören, 19:45-21:55, September 9th, 1967, Frankfurt, Germany (Someday, Sweetheart, All this Will be Yours) was organized in Niederursel, outside Frankfurt, in the former stables of the Galerie Dorothea Loehr. It presented ephemeral works by eight young European artists: Dibbets, Fischer-Lueg, Posenenske, Roehr, Flanagan, Höke, Johnson and Long. "The show included young British artists unknown in Germany. The contact with and suggestion to include these artists was made by Dibbets. In 1967, he had been awarded a British Council grant to study at St. Martin's School of Art in London. There he got to know Long and Flanagan, and also George Pasmore (later of Gilbert & George). They could not come over for the show and therefore their work was realised according to instructions they had sent. "-Sophie Richard, Unconcealed: The International Network of Conceptual Artists 1967-77, Dealers, Exhibitions and Public Collections (2010), p. 54. A very good copy, with leaves uncut making some openings laborious to see; a little sunned and small stains to the upper wrapper. Copy no. "162" stamped on the upper wrapper, edition of 500. We find only six examples of this catalogue in North American libraries and museums. ⧠L. Lippard, Six Years: The dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972 (2001 ed.), p. 30.
  • $1,595
  • $1,595
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“Artists’ Bookworks / “Kunstwerke in Buchform”

Many illus. 131, [1] p. Small 4to, pictorial softcover, title on spine. London: British Council, 1975. The uncommon catalogue for an important exhibition hosted by the British Council, with the essays printed in parallel English and German text. Somewhat overshadowed by the exhibition Artists' Books a year later, this show presented a wide-ranging selection of 120 bookworks and reference books. As explained on pp. 18-23 (and shown by several illustrations of the exhibition space), each book was displayed on a book shelf and could be handled by visitors. "Art works" were denoted with red stickers and "reference works" with black ones. Considering the unprecedented accessibility of the show, this catalogue explicitly asks that books be returned to their slots on the shelves. This was an early and significant exhibition of artists' books (or bookworks) and periodicals. It features fascinating essays by early scholars and proponents of the genre, including Clive Phillpot, Lynda Morris, David Mayor, and Attwood. The display included works by Mark Boyle, Burgin, Helen Douglas, Ehrenberg, Finlay, Hamish Fulton, Gilbert & George, Richard Hamilton, Gerard Hemsworth, David Lamelas, Long, Mayor, Tom Phillips, Paolozzi, Telfer Stokes, Willats, etc. The present catalogue is a very useful reference for understanding the early reception of artists' books. Near fine copy; small nick to the upper cover, bookseller sticker to inside of lower cover. ⧠A. Desjardin, The Book on Books on Artists Books (2nd ed.: 2013) 5.
  • $330
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March 1969 [One Month]

[34] leaves, printed on rectos only. 4to, tan printed wrappers, staple-bound in calendar format. New York: Self-published, 1969. A very rare signed copy of Seth Siegelaub's "One Month" exhibition catalogue, with contributions by Terry Atkinson, Robert Barry, James Lee Byars, Barry Flanagan, Douglas Huebler, Stephen Kaltenbach, Christine Kozlov, Richard Long, Robert Morris, Claes Oldenburg, Allen Ruppersberg, Robert Smithson, Lawrence Weiner, Ian Wilson, etc. Siegelaub, organizer of this trailblazing exhibition, has signed the first printed leaf, beneath his letter to the contributing artists. Materials with Siegelaub's signature are extremely scarce. "For this 'calendar-as-exhibition,' Siegelaub asked thirty-one artists to each make a text-based work to be displayed on a single page of the catalogue, representing a single day in the month of March. The works appear in alphabetical order by artist's name, with blank pages (occasionally bearing the name of the corresponding artist) indicating a failure to respond or refusal to participate. Contributions were sent in by mail and transferred to the calendar, which was distributed by mail. Siegelaub's letter of invitation to the artists, reproduced in facsimile and followed by a brief statement of intent, is one of the rare prefaces to his conceptual publications."-Seth Siegelaub: Beyond Conceptual Art, pp. 140-43. In excellent condition, signed by the legendary curator and bibliographer; staples rusted as with most copies. According to Coelewij and Martinetti, the calendar was printed in an edition of 1000 copies. ⧠L. Coelewij & S. Martinetti, eds., Seth Siegelaub: Beyond Conceptual Art (2016), pp. 140-45 (pictured). L. Lippard, Six Years: The dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972 (2001 ed.), pp. 78-79 (pictured).
  • $4,675
  • $4,675
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Catalogue/Katalog: 18 Paris IV. 70

[18], 61, [6] pp. 12mo (107 x 164 mm.), black paper over thick boards, title on spine. New York: International General, 1970. Scarce catalogue for the notable April 1970 exhibition staged by Michel Claura on rue Mouffetard in Paris; the catalogue was published by Seth Siegelaub. Contributions for this group show were sent in by Robert Barry, Marcel Broodthaers, stanley brouwn, Daniel Buren, Jan Dibbets, Gilbert & George, Douglas Huebler, On Kawara, David Lamelas, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Ed Ruscha, Robert Ryman, Niele Toroni, Lawrence Weiner, Ian Wilson, etc. "Siegelaub published and distributed the trilingual catalogue of this seminal exhibition, which a friend, the French art critic Michel Claura, had organized by mailing an invitation to twenty-two artists to submit one project proposal each. The proposed contributions were circulated among all the participants, who were then permitted to alter their initial ideas and submit another proposal. The catalogue, with a preface and a postface by Claura, included both the first and the second proposal by each of the eighteen artists who responded to the call. The few works that did not exist only as text in the catalogue were presented in the exhibition space, the non-traditional setting of a rented film studio in the center of Paris, which Claura had chosen because it was a not a traditional gallery space but had white walls. Claura's project was reviewed in the French press under the headline 'L'avant garde à la Mouffe' (Les Lettres françaises), and the curator was quoted as saying that the 'exhibition at hand is not conceptual,' although it operated according to a 'mechanism' that questioned the format of the group show."-Seth Siegelaub: Beyond Conceptual Art, p. 202. A near fine copy; traces of wear to the extremities and head of spine dinged. ⧠L. Coelewij & S. Martinetti, eds., Seth Siegelaub: Beyond Conceptual Art (2016), pp. 202-5 (pictured).
  • $1,485
  • $1,485
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Catalogue for the Exhibition: May 19-June 19, 1969

[10] pp. 8vo (152 x 228 mm.), pictorial wrappers, staple-bound. Burnaby, Canada: Centre for Communications and the Arts, Simon Fraser University, 1969. A landmark publication in the history of Conceptual art; a rare Seth Siegelaub (1941-2013) catalogue, produced for his famed exhibition at Simon Fraser University where he presented the work of Terry Atkinson and Michael Baldwin; Robert Barry; Jan Dibbets; Douglas Huebler; Stephen Kaltenbach; Joseph Kosuth; Sol LeWitt; N. E. Thing Co. Ltd.; and Lawrence Weiner. Each work is described in some form and some are pictured herein. A related symposium, conducted via telephone hook-up from New York, Ottawa, and Burnaby, took place on 17 June. WorldCat records only four examples in North American institutions. "According to James Warren Felter, the Visual Arts Associate at Simon Fraser University who invited Siegelaub to curate this untitled project, 'Conceptual Art is uniquely suited to Simon Fraser University because it has an art centre as yet without a gallery and an art centre one of whose aims is the exploration of the frontiers of communication.' The works by the ten participating artists consisted mainly of announcements in the university's journals and notes posted around the campus. The symposium organized as part of the exhibition used a telephone hook-up-an early version of the conference call-to connect the participants. The catalogue, assembled after the exhibition was over, documents the works in two sections, entitled 'Catalogue' and 'Presentation,' respectively, and features an aerial photograph of the campus on the cover."-Seth Siegelaub: Beyond Conceptual Art, p. 166. In fine condition. ⧠L. Coelewij & S. Martinetti, eds., Seth Siegelaub: Beyond Conceptual Art (2016), pp. 166-67 (pictured).
  • $3,685
  • $3,685
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[Mappe 1 / Portfolio 1], the artist’s first collection of photobooks

10 vols. in varying formats, all gray cardboard wrappers, hand-stamped by the artist, staple-bound & housed in the orig. publisher's cardboard portfolio. Hilden, Germany: Self-published, 1968-71. The rare first portfolio of Feldmann's self-published photobooks, complete with all ten Bild / Bilder books and the cardboard folder, hand-stamped by the artist and in excellent condition. Although most of the artist's early books were sold in groups in these mappe, in today's market the portfolios are often broken up and the books offered individually. Our portfolio contains 10 of his earliest droll photographic artist's books - all made in editions of 80 - of ostensibly random assemblages of clouds, soccer players, shoes, a coat, airplanes, mountains, etc. In WorldCat, we have found only two institutions with the present portfolio of ten volumes: Harvard and Tate Britain (from the Martin Parr Collection). The books in this portfolio are listed below, in the order established by Kühnast: 1. 12 Bilder. 12 black & white illus. [12] pp. Small & square 12mo. Hilden: 1968. KB 1. 2. 11 Bilder, Fotos: Wolfgang Breuers. 11 b&w illus. [12] pp. Small & square 12mo. Hilden: 1969. KB 2. 3. 1 Bild. 1 double-page b&w illus. [4] pp. 12mo. Hilden: 1970. KB 3. 4. 7 Bilder. 7 b&w illus. [8] pp. Oblong 12mo. Hilden: 1970. KB 5. 5. 3 Bilder. 3 b&w illus. [4] pp. 12mo. Hilden, Germany: 1970. KB 6. 6. 45 Bilder. 45 small b&w illus. [12] pp. Square 4to. Hilden: 1971. KB 7. 7. 14 Bilder. 14 b&w illus. [16] pp. Oblong 12mo. Hilden: 1971. KB 8. 8. 6 Bilder. 6 b&w illus. [8] pp. 12mo. Hilden: 1971. KB 10. 9. 1 Bild. 1 double-page b&w illus. [4] pp. 8vo. Hilden: 1971. KB 11. 10. 11 Bilder. 11 b&w illus. [12] pp. Oblong 12mo. Hilden: 1971. KB 13. All of the volumes are in pristine condition, and the folder is very well-preserved. ⧠"The small artist's books simply entitled either Bild (Picture) or Bilder (Pictures) that Hans Peter Feldmann [1941-2023] made between 1968 and 1976 constitute one of the most important bodies of artist's bookworks in the twentieth century, along with those of Ruschas and Boltanski. In Feldmann's case, it is perhaps more difficult to explain why, but their utter simplicity and studied lack of artifice is a good place to begin. The books are invariably of modest size, most often with brown covers rather like school exercise books, in which varying numbers of found photographs of a particular subject category are reproduced cheaply."-Parr & Badger, The Photobook: A History, Vol. II, p. 158 (pictured). G. Kühnast, ed., Hans-Peter Feldmann: Bücher, Publikationen, Hefte, 1960er Jahre-2021 (2023). Anne Moeglin-Delcroix, Esthétique du Livre d'Artiste: Une Introduction à l'art contemporain (2nd ed.: 2012), pp. 226-27.
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The West Bay Dadaist / Quoz? (nos. 1-12, complete)

Black & white illus. throughout. All 12mo, pictorial wrappers, staple-bound. San Francisco: Trinity Press, 1973-75. A full run of this scarce Dadazine which emerged from the countercultural haven of 1970s San Francisco; in remarkably fine condition, and complete with the Ken Friedman extracted comic book insert in issue 11. The first five numbers were published under the title The West Bay Dadaist and the final seven as Quoz? The periodical's editor, Charles Chickadel (1943-2002, born Carlo Giovanni Cicatelli, a.k.a. Arthur Cravan), printed it on an AB Dick printing press housed in his garage. Previously, Chickadel had partnered with two other Bay Area Dadaists, Bill Gaglione and Tim Mancusi (under the aegis of "Trinity Press") on the publication of New York Correspondence School Weekly Breeder, which Ken Friedman had initiated in 1971 and then handed over to the trio. Contributing artists who mailed in collages, drawings, altered newsclippings, etc. include: Opal L. Nations, Davi Det Hompson, Mancusi, Friedman, Ray Johnson, Anna Banana, Jorge Caraballo, Monte Cazazza, Klaus Groh, Peter Koch, Jaroslaw Kozlowski, Genesis P.-Orridge, Edgardo Antonio Vigo, Horacio Zabala, David Zack, Linda Vista, Marjo Schumans, A. M. Fine, John Evans, Raul Marroquin, Sally French, Indian Ralph, Friederike Pezold, Al Souza, Clemente Padin, Irene Dogmatic, Jane Kinney, John Dowd, Gaglione, etc. Uniformly in excellent condition. WorldCat has separate records for the two titles of the periodical: The West Bay Dadaist (OCLC Accession: 53275788) and Quoz? (OCLC: 3427517). We find just a single library with a complete set of 12 issues, as of May 2024. ⧠"Publishing contributions from North America, Europe, and Latin America, the five-and-a-half inch-high West Bay Dadaist/Quoz? served as an important, if diminutive, organ of the international mail art scene."-B. W. Joseph & D. Sawyer, Copy Machine Manifestos, Artists Who Make Zines (2023), p. 432 (pictured pp. 46-48). Emily Hage, "Bay Area Dadazines and Punk Zines in 1970s San Francisco: Interactive, Ephemeral, Live," American Periodicals, Vol. 27, No. 2 (October 2017).