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Jonathan A. Hill

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Traité de la Comete qui a paru en Decembre 1743, & en Janvier, Fevrier & Mars 1744. Contenant outre les Observations de l’Auteur, celles qui ont été faites à Paris par Mr. Cassini & à Geneve par Mr. Calandrini. On y a joint diverses Observations & Dissertations astronomiques.

CHESEAUX, Jean Philippe Loys de Six folding engraved plates. Title in red & black. 1 p.l., 308 pp. 8vo, cont. mottled sheep, flat spine nicely gilt, contrasting leather lettering piece on spine. Lausanne & Geneva: M.M. Bousquet, 1744. First edition of this important book in which Cheseaux (1718-51), grandson of Crouzas and a fellow the Royal Society of London, first stated what was to become known as "the paradox of Cheseaux": "With an infinite and uniform distribution of stars throughout space, the night sky should shine with a brightness corresponding to their average surface brightness." A number of notable astronomers have struggled with this problem, including Halley, Olbers, Struve, and Herschel. "The magnificent comet of 1744 was both bright and unusual in that it was reliably reported that it had multiple tails spread out like a fan. The Swiss astronomer Jean Philippe Loys de Cheseaux, after whom the comet is often named, began his observations on December 13, 1743, and computed a parabolic orbit based on his own observations through March 1, 1744.Before morning twilight on March 7 and 8, 1744, Cheseaux reported seeing a multiple-tail system, with 6 distinct rays extending above the horizon."-Yeoman, Comets, pp. 161-62. This work also contains the observations of Cassini and Jean Louis Calandrini. Nice copy. ? Lalande, p. 425.
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Shijo Family’s Collection of Secret Information]

SHIJOKE HIDEN SHO Numerous woodcuts, many full-page, in the text. 2 p.l., 27, 11, 26; 20, 21, 24 folding leaves. Six parts in two vols. Oblong 8vo, orig. blue wrappers, manuscript title labels on upper covers (the label on Vol. I is largely worn away), new stitching. [Kyoto?]: most of the parts end with the date 1642. First edition of this rare collection of early gastronomic texts from the Shijo school of hocho shiki. It was the oldest school of the special imperial knife ceremony and describes rituals in which the chef carves fish and poultry using a special kitchen knife and metal chopsticks, without once touching the flesh with his hands. "Unlike the modern steak house chef who is a vaudeville version of a short-order cook, medieval chefs who performed knife ceremonies were not ordinary chefs: they were at the top of their occupation, employed only by the military and aristocratic elite.The Shijo [school] traced their genealogy back to a branch house - appropriately called the 'fish name branch' - of the northern branch of the Fujiwara family, which dominated government during much of the Heian period."-Rath, Food and Fantasy in Early Modern Japan, pp. 40-41 This book collects and prints six earlier texts, all of which remained in manuscript until being printed here for the first time: Vol. I: 1. "Sanjuroku no Koi" ("36 Ways to Cut Up Carp"). 2. "Choshi richu" ("How to Serve Sake with Carp"). 3. "Ryori shitsuke sho" ("Recipes & Etiquette"). Vol. II: 4. "Hocho kan dai ichi" ("First Section on the Knife"). 5. "Hocho kan dai ni" ("Second Section on the Knife"). 6. "Shijo kei hiden sho" ("Shijo Family's Collection of Secret Information"). The fine and numerous illustrations depict methods of cutting up various fish and game (including cranes), the setting of trays, how to wrap fish, chopping boards, knife handles, sake dispensers, mochi, etc. This is an extremely early Japanese printed gastronomic work. WorldCat lists only two parts: numbers 2 and 3. Fine copy, preserved in a chitsu. Occasional minor spotting. One woodcut partly defective due to a natural paper flaw.
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Japanese title: Ruikei [&] Zuyoku [&] Fuyoku; in Chinese with Japanese reading marks: Lei jing [&] Tu yi [&] Fu yi; [Illustrated Appendix to the Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon Arranged by Topic]

ZHANG, Jiebin; [Japanese name: CHO, Kaihin] Many full-page woodcuts. 32 parts in 30 vols.; 11 parts in 8 vols.; 4 parts in 2 vols. Total: 40 vols. (complete). Large 8vo, orig. blue wrappers (some wear & rubbing, occasional worming to covers), orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers (some defective or worn away), new stitching. [Japan]: Prefaces dated 1624. First edition, complete with the additional 11 parts of the illustrations and four parts of Addenda. Zhang (1563-1640), a native of Shaoxing, was a physician during the Ming dynasty and the "author of a famous set of commentaries [the present work] on the Yellow Emperor's Inner Classic."-Yi-Li Wu, "The Gendered Medical Iconography of the Golden Mirror." in Lo & Barrett, eds., Imagining Chinese Medicine, p. 113. His writings on acupuncture in the present work are systematic and important. "The Lei jing constitutes a revised edition of the contents of the Su Wen and the Ling shu, rearranged according to the topical categories.this book has divided the contents of the Su Wen and of the Ling shu into the following sequence of topical categories: 1. Nourishment of life. 2. Yin yang. 3. Condition of the depots and their outer signs. 4. Pulse and complexion. 5. Conduits and network vessels. 6. Tips and roots. 7. Qi and flavor. 8. Therapies. 9. Illnesses. 10. Needling. 11. [Five] Periods and [Six] Qi. 12. Summary of different views. Altogether the books consists of 390 paragraphs, with an appendix including the Tu yi in 11 juan and the Fu yi in 4 juan. Even though it was unavoidable that the original text was severely cut, the [new] order makes sense, and lends itself to easy consultation. The comments are quite illuminating too."-Paul U. Unschuld, quoting the Si ku quan shu zong mu ti yao in Huang di nei jing su wen (2003), p. 68. "The content of juan [parts] 3 to 11 mainly relates to acu-moxa. The whole text contains over 50 illustrations (not including tables) with most concentrated in juan 3 and 4. They comprise the following woodblock print charts: -whole body channel and network vessels; -segments of the body with their acu-moxa point locations; -the viscera and bowels; -charts of the Neijing; -facial diagnosis; -the nine needles. The illustrations are innovative in one respect. Whereas the limbs were normally drawn in outline and the acu-moxa point terms placed on top or linked with a line to the text, in Leijing tuyi the skeletal structure is also revealed. Four charts are notable for this feature: those of the three Hand Yin channels, the three Hand Yang channels, the three Foot Yin channels, and the three Foot Yang channels. While the focus is not on the anatomical structure of the body for its own sake, it is an effect that gives extra clarity to the location of the acupoints."-Wang Shumin & Gabriel Fuentes, "Chinese Medical Illustration: Chronologies and Categories," in Lo & Barrett, eds., Imagining Chinese Medicine, p. 45. Nice set, preserved in four chitsu. A few volumes have some minor staining and wormholes. ? Needham & Lu, Celestial Lancets, pp. 19, 30, 31, 33, 49, 94, 144, & 277. Unschuld, Medicine in China. A History of Ideas (2010), pp. 220-22.
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From the inside cover, lettered in gilt: H. Gruson Eisengiesserei & Maschinenfabrik Buckau-Magdeburg. Hartguss-Panzerthürme

H. GRUSON EISENGIESSEREI & MASCHINENFABRIK 26 (of 30?) albumen photographs (all ca. 215 x 160 mm.), mounted on boards within frames printed in red, all images with printed titles on the boards (410 x 320 mm.). Numbered 501 to 530 but lacking (?) nos. 506, 507, 511, & 525, signed: "Photographie des H. Gruson'schen Ateliers." Oblong folio, orig. green leather portfolio, panelled in gilt with leather wreath, with metal crest in center of upper cover. Buckau, near Magdeburg: n.d. [but 1872-76]. From the collection of Otto von Bismarck, the German statesman and unifier of Germany. This deluxe portfolio of original photographs was presented by the Grusonwerk, a leading member of Germany's defense industry, to Bismarck and comes from his personal collection. The splendid photographs depict the construction, transportation, and installation of enormous armored turrets at Fort Langlütjen II on the Weser Estuary in 1872-76, built to protect Bremen and Bremerhaven. These armored turrets were one of the specialties of the company. Hermann Gruson (1821-95), started his firm in Buckau near Magdeburg in 1855 as a shipbuilder and iron foundry. The company's technological improvements led to the manufacture of iron and steel suitable for machine parts and the construction of railways, as well as for armor and guns. Soon Grusonwerk became, along with the Krupp company, the greatest manufacturer of large weapons in the world. In 1893, Krupp bought the Gruson company. Industrial photographs were a new kind of specialty, produced to show potential clients around the world products for sale. In 1872, the industrialist Gruson, by then Krupp's biggest competitor, engaged Gustav Härtwig as the company's official photographer. Härtwig set up a photographic studio and produced a series of photographs at the testing grounds, docks, foundries, and fortresses. Härtwig took part in the photographic exhibition at the Royal and Imperial Austrian Museum for Arts and Industry in 1875, submitting large-format views of the Gruson iron foundry and engineering factory. He was a co-founder and long-serving president of the association of independent photographers in Magdeburg. In fine and fresh condition. Binding a little worn.
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From upper cover: Belagerung von Strassburg 1870. 20 Blätter photographischer Aufnahmen der Breschen, Uebergänge, Thore und anderer militairisch bedeutender Ansichten.Aufgenommen in den Tagen vom 1 bis 3ten October 1870 unter Leitung des Ingenieur Majors Albrecht

STRASBOURG, Siege of, 1870 Complete set of 20 original albumen photographs (image sizes: 170 x 250 mm. & 230 x 190 mm.) by Charles David Winter mounted on card boards (440 x 350 mm.). Folio, orig. portfolio with large printed title pasted on upper cover (cloth spine a little worn, some rubbing to boards), orig. cloth ties. Strasbourg: Winter Fassoli, 1870. A fine set of this extremely rare portfolio of 20 albumen photographs by the Strasbourg photographer Charles David Winter (1821-1904). These photographs reveal the devastation that took place during the siege of Strasbourg in August and September 1870 by Germany in the Franco-Prussian War. This siege was the first example of "total war," a new kind of warfare with indiscriminate violence. Winter began his career as a lithographer but later turned to photography and opened his own daguerreotype studio in 1848. By 1852 he was making salted paper prints and using the collodion process. Winter made portraits, landscapes, and studies of sculptures. The photographs in this album were made in October 1870 under the supervision of the German engineer Major Albrecht. "Winter's greatest accomplishments, however, are his photographs documenting the urban transformation of Strasbourg in the second half of the nineteenth century including the building and demolition in the city center (1855-1880), the construction of a railroad bridge over the Rhine (1858-61), and the restoration of the Cathedral in 1857-59. Striking for both their large size and their fine detail, his photographs revealed the formal beauty in new forms of architecture and engineering. Winter also recorded, in wrenching detail, the devastating destruction of Strasbourg following the Franco-Prussian war of 1870."-Sarah Kennel in John Hannavy, ed., Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Photography, p. 1501. "In contrast to Germany's triumphal framing of Strasbourg's damaged cityscape, Charles Winter, one of France's most eminent nineteenth-century photographers, provided an alternative Alsatian perspective on the disfigured city in his album of the Siege of Strasbourg [the present work]. The album's photographs, silent witnesses to Strasbourg's devastation, offered a dark premonition of the total wars to envelop Europe in the twentieth century."-Dunlop, Cartophilia, p. 172. Apart from some dustiness to the covers and boards, a fine and complete set of photographs with strong tonality. The boards are a little foxed.
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Nangkyo [or] Nankei hongi taisho [Original Meaning of Nanjin, Explained]. In Chinese with Japanese reading marks

MORIMOTO, Genkan (or Sho or Keisai) Many woodcuts & diagrams in the text. 27 vols., including one vol. of Preface, bibliography, & index; three vols. of the Nanjin & Shou Wa's commentary; three vols. of illus. & remarks on the illus.; & 20 vols. of Morimoto's commentary. Large 8vo, orig. semi-stiff wrappers (some rubbing & wear, occasional worming), orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers (some missing or worn), new stitching. [Japan]: Preface dated 1678; [according to the Union Catalogue of Early Japanese Books, publication date is 1695, but on what basis, we do not know]. First edition of this rare (not in WorldCat) and extensive commentary on the Nanjin (Classic of Difficult Issues, or, more fully, Manual of Explanations of 81 Difficult Passages in the Inner Canon of the Yellow Emperor), written in the first or second century A.D. The Nanjin (or Nan Ching) played a seminal role in the later development of Chinese medicine; it addresses questions concerning the location, size, and normal functions of the basic units that constitute the organism, discusses the origins and the nature of illnesses, outlines a system of therapeutic needling, and develops in great detail an innovative approach to diagnosis. "The Nan-ching is the Chinese medical classic that provoked the largest number of commentaries in subsequent centuries. It is safe to say that in terms of intellectual importance and influence, the Huang-ti nei-ching texts [The Inner Canon of the Yellow Emperor], with their unsystematic, heterogeneous, and partly pre-systematic correspondence contents, were pushed almost into oblivion during the first millennium A.D. by the Nan-ching.the diagnostic innovations introduced by the Nan-ching gained wide acceptance in subsequent centuries and have remained, in theory at least, the dominant diagnostic tool of the practitioner of the medicine of systematic correspondence to this day,"-Unschuld, Medicine in China. A History of Ideas (2010), p. 85. The 81 chapters of the Nanjin are as follows: chapters 1-22 discuss the pulse; chapters 23-29 deal with channels and collaterals; chapters 30-47 explain visceral organs; chapters 48-61 study diseases and ailments; chapters 62-68 focus on acupoints; and the final 13 chapters explore acupuncture. In the 14th century, the famous Chinese physician Shou Wa (active 1360-70), whom Needham describes as "one of the greatest medical writers of the Yuan times" (Celestial Lancets, p. 101 & see pp. 156-57), provided extensive commentaries on the Nanjin. To the 12 standard meridians, Shou Wa was the first to add two extra meridians, the "governor vessel" (du mai) and "conception vessel" (ren mai); the 14 meridians then became the standard major meridians in most schools of clinical application. Several editions of Shou Wa's commentary were published in Japan in two volumes under his Japanese name, "Ju Katsu." The present work is a further extensive commentary on the Nanjin and Shou Wa's own commentary. Little is known about Morimoto except that he was a doctor in Nagasaki. This set is complete and in fresh condition. There is some worming to many of the covers and some worming in 13 of the volumes, touching text and illustration. However, we do not find these defects offensive or important, considering the rarity of this book. Occasional minor staining and dampstaining. In two chitsu.
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Azumako akindokagami [Mirror of Merchants of the Azuma Association]

OSHIROYA, Ryosuke Many fine woodcut views & street maps. 78 folding leaves (incl. leaf 16bis). Oblong 8vo, orig. patterned wrappers, orig. block-printed title label on upper cover. Edo: Komoto Oshiroya Ryosuke, Preface dated 1855, under the author's pen-name ("Ryozan Ko"). First edition of this invaluable travel guide, covering inns, restaurants, shops, and notable sights from Kyoto and Osaka to Hokkaido; we have rarely seen a book so packed with information, all of which can be exploited for many kinds of research. During the 19th century, there was a considerable increase in travel within Japan, both for commercial purposes and religious pilgrimages. This created a need for guides, several of which were issued by associations of hoteliers. The present work was, for a decade or so, the most popular such guide and offers an invaluable picture of Japan of the period. The Azuma Association was founded in the early part of the century by Ryosuke Oshiroya. In this work, the Association provides a list of inns and restaurants guaranteed to be safe and clean. Each member inn posted with pride a sign stating that it was a member of the Azumako. And it a was reciprocal process: before leaving home, the travellers were given wooden membership plaques stating that they, too, were reliable and trustworthy. The first woodcut, which is charming, shows a traveller presenting his wooden membership "card" to the hotelier, who has his list of approved travellers by his side, issued by the Azumako. Another traveller is washing his feet at the hotel's entrance, while a hotel employee is soliciting potential customers on the street. This is followed by a wonderfully useful index. The rest of the book is devoted to the cities or villages of Japan - and hundreds are included - each with a detailed map with street names, ads for every kind of merchant (including doctors, dentists, sake and tea dealers, oil merchants, dried fish dealers, hardware stores, etc., with their trademarks), lists of approved inns (no harlots allowed) and eateries, the notable sights, the location of the pleasure quarter, etc., etc. The detail is just incredible. Guides like this are typically used to death and thrown away. Our copy is in very fine and fresh condition and a most remarkable survival.
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Somoku sodategusa [On the Cultivation & Care of Plants]

IWASAKI, Kan-en (or Tsunemasa) Two double-page & eight full-page color-printed woodcuts in various delicate pale shades of gray ink (usuzumi). 49; 50 folding leaves. Two vols. 8vo, orig. blue speckled wrappers, orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers, new stitching. Edo, Kyoto, & Osaka: Yamashiroya Sahei et al., 1818. [with]: ABE, Rekisai (or Yoshito). .Kohen [.Sequel]. One double-page & 13 full-page black & white woodcuts. 36; 47 folding leaves. Two vols. 8vo, orig. blue speckled wrappers, orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers, new stitching. Edo, Kyoto, & Osaka: Yamashiroya Sahei, Preface dated 1837. First editions; complete with the sequel by Abe (1805-70). Iwasaki (1786-1842), a samurai in the service of the Tokugawa shogunate, was a leading botanist, zoologist, and entomologist. Iwasaki botanized in the mountains and fields near Tokyo for many years, developing his abilities as both a botanist and artist. He served as superintendent of a botanical garden belonging to the shogun in Tokyo. His greatest publication was the Honzo Zufu, which was published in 1830-44 in nearly a hundred volumes. It was the largest and most definitive botanical work issued during the Edo period. The Somoku sodategusa and its 1837 sequel were practical works, issued with an extremely useful index to make consultation easy for anyone interested in botany or agriculture. The authors describe improved methods of cultivation, grafting, new species introduced into Japan (cactus and pineapple), pest control, etc. The handsome woodcuts depict grafting methods, improved hothouses, pests, ornamental plants, how to protect plants and bushes during harsh winters, agricultural tools, etc. Fine set, preserved in a chitsu.
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Scroll of paper entitled from old label on outside & at beginning of scroll: “Takagari shozoku” [“Ceremonial Costumes for Falconers”]

FALCONRY COSTUME SCROLL 38 fine color paintings of costumes and their elements. Scroll (280 x 4170 mm.), consisting of five joined sheets, gold-flecked endpapers. [Japan]: ca. 1800. A very finely painted scroll with 38 images of ornate costumes and their elements for falconry hunts. The artist has used extremely delicate and fine brushstrokes to depict all the complex elements of each of the fabrics, which are, for the most part, elaborate brocades. Intended for aristocrats and their entourage, mounted and on foot, the costumes are richly ornate, with ample use of fur on scabbards, chaps, and footwear. The artist has skillfully revealed not only the richness of the fabrics but also their functionality (pockets, containers, etc.). The first image depicts a mounted nobleman with a falcon on his arm. Both the rider and his horse are luxuriously attired. The next image is of a colorfully dressed master of the kennels. Following this are three images of exquisitely dressed noblemen on foot, each in different costumes. Next is a series of paintings of hats, hoods, over and under jackets, gaiters, chaps, socks, slippers, swords and scabbards, a bag for "treats" for the falcon, vests, trousers, other images of finely dressed falconers, etc. This beautiful scroll belonged to Toshikata Mizuno (1866-1908), a well-recognized Meiji-period ukiyo-e artist, who worked as an illustrator, painter, and printmaker. He was a considerable collector of art and clearly liked this handsome scroll, as he has placed his seal 17 times on blank portions. Based on a note at the end, we believe this is a copy of a scroll created by Sadatake Ise (1717-84), a member of the ancient family of Sadatsugu, who were for generations masters of ceremonies to the Muromachi shogunate. A scholar of yusokukojitsu (the study of the ancient records, statutes, codes, and customs of the palace), he wrote important books on these subjects as well as on origata, the foundation of what we today know as origami; military practices; and costumes. In fine and fresh condition. Preserved in a wooden box.
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Manuscript scroll on paper entitled from the accompanying label “Uma shobyo miyo [or] kenyo no koto. Yakushin issai no ryoji” [“Diagnoses of all the Horse Diseases. Grand Encyclopedia of Medicine and Needle Treatments”]

EQUINE MEDICINE SCROLL 30 black & white brush & ink drawings of diseased horses. Scroll (130 x 27,630 mm.), 94 joined sheets, with several extension flaps, which fold down with additional text, recently & expertly backed. Omi Province (today's Shiga Province): the most modern date we find in the scroll is 1809. A remarkably long scroll (90 feet); this is the most comprehensive old Japanese encyclopedia of horse diseases and their treatments we have encountered. The text includes recipes for medicines and acupuncture techniques as well as numerous case histories. There are references in this scroll to texts being copied in 1611. Each of the 94 sheets is numbered. It is obvious this was once a codex in at least two volumes that has been converted into an enormously long scroll. The accompanying title label was clearly the upper wrapper of the codex. At the beginning of this scroll are 30 brush & ink drawings of diseased horses, representations of case histories adapted from the Inner Classic of the Yellow Emperor, written about 2700 B.C. The case histories discuss rare diseases, digestive problems, drinking too much cold water, kidney diseases, heart problems, lung problems, wounds to the head, diseases of the spleen, parasitical worms, breathing problems including asthma, constipation, cramping, intestinal blocking, food poisoning, lack of appetite, nervous horses, brain diseases, "black sweat," chills, etc. Each case history concludes with pharmaceutical recipes. Sheets 51 to 94 contain sections on specific topics and include eye diseases, tongue diagnosis, diagnosis based on the condition of the tail, setting of broken bones, medicines to treat blood clots, the six meridians, the 18 meridians, acupuncture treatments for tumors, with a long list of pressure points and explanations of their relationships to tumors and other diseases, etc. At the very end of this scroll we find the date "1809" with the name "Akatsu." In fine condition, preserved in a box.
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Sencha shojutsu [or] Sencha tsu [Connoisseurship of Tea]

YAMAMOTO, Toryuken (or Tokujun) Three color-printed double-page woodcut illus. 4, 21 folding leaves. Small 8vo, orig. wrappers (label gone, unimportant worming), new stitching. Edo & Osaka: Suharaya Mohe et al., "October 1834" on penultimate leaf; "January 1835" on colophon. Second edition (1st ed.: 1834), finely illustrated by Kaho Tachi (1808-53), a well-known artist and son of the famous artist Ryuwan Tachi. The author, Yamamoto, owned a famous tea company, founded in the 17th century, which continues today as a dealer in tea and seaweed, with headquarters in Nihonbashi, Tokyo. Sencha is a leaf tea and is occasionally used in tea ceremonies (normally, powdered green tea is used). The first illustration is delicately printed in color and depicts a Chinese man lounging on a Chinese chair, holding a delicate porcelain teacup for drinking leaf tea. He is reclining in front of a vessel used to transport tea leaves, tools to boil water, a heating device, and a teapot. The second double-page illustration shows a portion of a tea bush with blossoming flowers, printed in rich colors. The final double-page illustration depicts a landscape with tea bushes covered by bamboo roofing and peasants harvesting the leaves. This has been very finely color-printed with gray. The text provides a history of tea and its consumption, its health benefits, regions that produce fine tea, types of tea, how to store tea leaves, the selection of refined brewing tools, the etiquette and rituals of serving tea, the theory of water, how to choose charcoal, how to brew tea, measurements and proportions of tea and water, temperature of water, and types of foods that could be served. Fine copy and rare. We learn from the penultimate leaf and colophon that the ownership of the woodblocks was leased by Yamamoto to several publishers in Edo and Osaka for the 1835 edition.
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Historie van den Amsterdamschen Schouwburg

FOKKE, Jan] Engraved frontis., engraved vignette on title, & four double-page folding engraved plates. 4 p.l., 80 pp., [12] pp. 4to, cont. half-sheep & speckled boards (corners a bit worn), uncut, spine gilt, red morocco lettering piece. Amsterdam: "by G. Warnars, en P. den Hengst," 1772. [bound with]: [-]. Historie van den Nieuwen Amsterdamschen Schouwburg. Engraved vignette on title & five double-page folding engraved plates. 3 p.l., 56 pp. 4to. Amsterdam: "by G. Warnars, en P. den Hengst," 1775. First editions and fine, fresh, and uncut copies of these beautifully illustrated works; all the plates are after Simon Fokke (1712-84), and Noach van der Meer the younger (1741-1822). The first work is the earliest illustrated account of the old Schouwburg theater in Amsterdam, published in the same year of its destruction by fire. The Schouwburg was erected in 1638 on the site of the old Amsterdam Academy and was the first permanent theater in the city. Initially, the theater saw 90 productions per year; during the 18th century it became more of an opera house. In May 1772, during a performance of Monsigny's Déserteur, a fire swept through the building, destroying it completely and killing 18 people. Fokke's dramatic illustrations in the first work depict the outbreak of fire on the stage behind the scenes; the whole building burning, illuminating the night sky, with onlookers thronging the streets and bridges; and an internal view of the gutted theater. The plates in the second work illustrate the exterior and interior of the new theater. The illustrator Simon Fokke, brother of the author, Jan Fokke, was an actor as well as a stage designer. He designed the set for the opera Demostenes at the Schouwburg.
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Haikai shokugyo zukushi [Catalogue of Artisan Haiku Poetry]

SESSUIKEN CHASEI, pen-name for Seishichi INOUE Many full-page woodcuts in the text, all color-printed with gray ink. 70; 74 folding leaves. Two vols. 8vo, orig. green wrappers, orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers, new stitching. [Japan]: 1842. First edition of this wonderfully illustrated collection of artisan-themed haiku poetry competitions. There are nine matches for each of the four seasons, with two teams participating in each match. The teams, whose participants are named, contribute many haiku for the individual matches. For the matches, the teams are given different topics to compose haiku. The themes for the haiku are all quite varied but are related in some way to the relevant season. We learn from the Preface that the professions illustrated were deliberately selected to be some of the most unusual found in Japan. The fine color-printed full-page woodcuts, all using various delicate pale shades of gray ink (usuzumi), by Shozan Tachibana, are akin to the best of black & white movies: rich, alive, and incredibly nuanced. The illustrations are quite remarkable for their vividness and humor; for instance, the fox hunter, by putting meat into hollowed gourds, traps the heads of the foxes in the gourds. The first volume shows artisan professions related to the spring and summer. For spring, they include a straw-mat weaver, a man sowing eggplant sprouts, a cow herder, a sparrow catcher, a shell picker at low tide, deer antler gatherers (five pages long), a collector of China root, a net weaver (three pages), a sea snail catcher, a catfish catcher (with a fox hiding in the bushes, waiting to steal a fish), a carp fisherman (a rather extraordinary image), irrigation dike builders, a sea turtle catcher, a pond loach fisherman, a heat-cured bamboo-stick preparer, an ice seller, a Chinese salamander hunter, and a snake hunter. Vol. II covers the autumn and winter professions; they include a flathead gray mullet fisherman (four pages), a sandpiper catcher, a tobacco harvester, a thrush catcher, a bird catcher using large and elaborate nets, a stone mill manufacturer, wild horse catchers, a salmon fisherman, an edible-lichen harvester who is hanging by a rope on the face of a cliff, an incense stick manufacturer, a fox catcher, a scraper of resin from the urushi tree for lacquer, a rabbit hunter, a plover catcher, crushers of sugarcane, bear hunters, a signal sender using a torch, and men crushing seeds to render oil. Following each illustration, many of which are double-page or more, there is a detailed description of each profession with information on the region where it was found, the "tricks of the trade," etc. Fine copy of an utterly charming book.
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Manuscript on paper entitled on label on upper cover “Seikotsu yoketsu” [“Keys to Orthopedic Manipulation”]; title on first leaf “Kyoinsai seikotsu yoketsu” [“Kyoinsai’s Keys to Orthopedic Manipulation”]

YOSHIWARA, Gento (or Ryusen) 31 finely hand-colored mounted drawings with eight fine black & white brush drawings on slips also pasted on. 36 folding leaves of which 20 are text. 8vo (253 x 180 mm.), orig. patterned wrappers, manuscript title label on upper cover, new stitching. [Japan: late Edo]. Gento Yoshiwara (d. 1800), was one of the three most important orthopedic specialists in Japan during the final years of the 18th century, along with Bunken Kagami and Genka Ninomiya. Yoshiwara studied both Dutch medicine in Nagasaki and Chinese medicine, being greatly influenced by the Chinese Dao yin treatment of massage and exercise. Unlike the works of Kagami and Ninomiya, Yoshiwara's most important work - "Seikotsu yoketsu" - remained in manuscript, as it was restricted to students of Yoshiwara's school (Ninomiya was a student). Yoshiwara's trade name or mark was "Kyoinsai." Following the 20 leaves of manuscript text, which describe 13 types of treatment in detail, is a series of 31 finely drawn and hand-colored illustrations of treatments and manipulations, including fixing dislocated shoulders, fingers, and jaws; spinal stretching, dealing with hip problems, etc. Many of these treatments have rather fanciful names: "Windmill," "Bear Hug," "Bird's Wing," "Control the Wind," "Crane Feather," "Playing with a Fish," "Worm," "Play with a Jewel," "Tail of the Bird," "The Snail Method," "Riding on the Dragon," "Swallow's Tail," etc. An additional eight smaller, pasted-on black & white drawings show further treatments. A number of pharmaceutical ointments and plasters are described. In fine and fresh condition (although the outer upper corner of all the leaves has been a little nibbled by a mouse). The scribe of this manuscript has used one incorrect character when spelling Yoshiwara's name on the first leaf, giving his name as "Yoshio." ? Mestler, A Galaxy of Old Japanese Medical Books, III, p. 152.
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A most unusual manuscript, written throughout in one hand, concerning waka kanjo, with a seemingly unrelated second part covering women’s cosmetics & hairstyles of the Kamakura period

WAKA KANJO & COSMETICS 24 illus., including 13 figures of women with various applications of cosmetics, and a number of hairpieces & extensions, etc. 44; 15 folding leaves. Two parts in one vol. 8vo (273 x 193 mm.), later patterned wrappers, new stitching. [Japan: mid-Edo]. A fascinating manuscript, written throughout in one hand, concerning two seemingly unrelated subjects. The first part, of 44 leaves, is dedicated to waka kanjo, the initiation rituals performed to transmit knowledge regarding literary texts such as waka poetry, the early native poetry of Japan. Derived from esoteric Buddhist ceremonies created to transmit doctrines, waka kanjo began to occur in the late Kamakura period. "At these waka kanjo, a waka mandala was displayed along with portraits of Sumiyoshi Daimyojin (the patron deity of waka poetry) and the poets Kakinomoto no Hitomaro and Ariwara no Narihira (considered the founders of the Way of Poetry). Incense was burnt; elaborate gifts of money and clothing were presented; and after appropriate poetic mantras were recited, commentaries containing esoteric poetic secrets were transmitted to the initiate along with genealogical lineage documents (kechimyaku) purportedly authenticating an unbroken line of transmission."-Susan Blakeley Klein, "Allegories of Desire. Poetry and Eroticism in Ise Monogatari Zuino" in Monumenta Nipponica, Vol. 52, No. 4 (Winter 1997), p. 441. To make things more complicated and obscure, the rituals varied by poetic school. The beginning of this manuscript provides a history of the origins of waka kanjo and the rules for how to write waka poetry. This is followed by 20 leaves with a history of the changes in rituals as waka kanjo developed. There is an account of the 31 gods of poetry (deities and emperors) and in which region each was worshipped. Lists of famous waka kanjo ceremonies follow. A most interesting family tree of the greatest waka poetry practitioners starts with Sumiyoshi Daimyojin and includes Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, Yamabe no Akahito, and Sugawara no Michizane. The family tree of poets continues to a final name, "Kimura," who received a copy of this manuscript in 1683. Our manuscript is a mid-Edo copy of the manuscript received by Kimura. The second part of the manuscript is devoted to court ladies' cosmetics and hairstyles of the Kamakura period of the 12th century. Most of its first section addresses the sculpting of eyebrows. The illustrations of the women catalogue the varieties of eyebrow shapes and positions depending on age, rank, and occasion. The accompanying text gives detailed explanations. These illustrations are finely and richly colored with ample use of gold and other metallic pigments. The next section is devoted to hairstyles, hairpieces, and hair ornaments. There are a number illustrations of these hairstyles, along with images of ornate makeup brushes. We find a remarkable image of a court lady's full attire. On the final page of the manuscript is a passage stating that all the information in this manuscript is secret and should be treated accordingly and the reader should not tell anyone else of its contents.
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Dobokuko yoroku [A Handbook for Civil Engineers]

TAKATSU, Giichi Woodcut illus. in the three vols. of text. Two vols. of atlas containing 50 double-page illus., many with overlays. Five vols. Large 8vo, orig. patterned wrappers, orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers, orig. stitching. Tokyo: Naimusho Dobokukyoku [Civil Engineering Section of the Department of the Interior], 1881. First edition of the one of the major civil engineering textbooks published in the early Meiji period; it is a comprehensive treatise of traditional Japanese methods devoted to river management, flood control, soil erosion, etc. Takatsu, a civil engineer employed by the national government, also incorporated Dutch techniques in the present work. The two atlas volumes, in accordion format and printed on thick paper, are very remarkable: many of the fine double-page woodcuts have flaps (and sometimes several flaps) mounted in very imaginative ways. Also, a number of the woodcuts have several overlay sheets over the full image, showing the layers of construction and giving a most vivid, near 3-D effect. A great deal of the text and many of the illustrations are devoted to the theory and practice of methods of using the jakago ("serpent baskets"), skillfully woven bamboo baskets filled with boulders and used to stabilize riverbanks, deflect currents, secure bases of bridges from scouring, etc. Jakago were originally devised by the Dutch and were commonly used in Italy. Many kinds of jakago are illustrated, and the images all contain labels describing the various parts. Jakago were also used to construct artificial ponds, as depicted. Dam, bridge, and chute construction are also illustrated. Fine set. The three text volumes have a pale brown marginal stain at the upper outer corner of each leaf. Preserved in a chitsu.
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Kaisen shogyo shochushikan [Comprehensive Guide to Ocean & River Fish]

SEITAIEN, author & TAKASHIMA, Shunsho, artist Many full-page woodcut illus. in the text. 80 folding leaves. Oblong 8vo, orig. wrappers (a little rubbed), orig. block-printed title label on upper cover (largely worn away), new stitching. Osaka: Seitaien, 1837. First edition and very rare, with no copy in WorldCat (a second edition, appearing in 1849 with a different title, Gyokai nodoku hinbutsuzu ko, is also rare). Osaka, known as the "country's kitchen," has always been the gourmand capital of Japan. In 1679, nearly all the fresh fish dealers of Osaka relocated to Sagishima on the Kizu River, the principal water artery of the city. It soon became known as the Zakobacho market, and there, customers had their choice of catches from provinces along the Inland Sea and as far away as Kyushu and Shikoku. This is a guide to the fish found for sale at Zakobacho. What makes this book so interesting is that it amounts to an exposé of the activities within the fish market. In the preliminary leaves, we learn the real "nitty-gritty" of the fish trade: the two different codes for prices used by fresh fish and preserved fish dealers, the special argot used within the market, financial arrangements (commissions, loans, interest rates, etc.), the politics within the fish wholesalers' several guilds, the mechanics of bidding on fish (with an explanation of the special notations used on bid sheets), the rules and regulations of the market, a list of the wholesalers, etc. The main body of the text is devoted to a discussion of about 200 kinds of fish, with 46 full-page fine woodcuts of the fish, shellfish, whales, turtles (and one mermaid!). The text describes how to determine the freshness of each kind of fish, which region produces the best fish, the nutritional qualities of each fish, which are appropriate as gifts to samurai, regional names of fish, poisonous fish, etc. There is a wonderful double-page woodcut of the Zakobacho market that expresses beautifully the hyper-activity taking place there. Fine copy with some minor worming, mostly mended. Preserved in a chitsu.
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An album of about 100 natural history drawings in brush & watercolors

NATURAL HISTORY ALBUM 44 sheets of mica paper. Oblong folio (267 x 385), orig. wrappers (wrappers soiled), stitched with cord. [Japan: late Edo or early Meiji]. A lovely album - entitled on the upper cover in manuscript "Shasei jo[cho]" ["Sketchbook"] - of ca. 100 superb drawings of natural history subjects, all drawn on mica paper. Most of the images are botanical and express all that is wonderful in Japanese aesthetics. The highly accomplished artist also drew insects and, in addition, included a pheasant, several turtles, a decorative sword, a magnificent feather duster, a teapot adorned with a pomegranate motif, a waraji sandal, a landscape, grasshoppers, and praying mantises. Some of the images are preliminary black & white drawings, but for the most part the artist has rendered finished and exquisite drawings of botanical subjects including a wasabi plant with a snail, Chinese silvergrass, young bamboo, pine branches, plum branches, narcissus, spinach, camellia, azalea, a daisy, peonies, daikon radish, onion, mizuna, rape flower, wild chrysanthemums, ornamental cabbage, and a number of plants that we are unable to identify. Many of the drawings are double-page. A Japanese inscription on the inside front cover states that the images were copied from a master and collected. We cannot identify the characters of the name. The outer back wrapper states that this was copied in September of the third year [Meiji period?]. A little fraying, but very nice condition. A few of the sheets have minor wrinkles.
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Koeki kokusanko [Essay on Furthering the Nation’s Industries]

OKURA, Nagatsune Many full-page & double woodcut illus. Eight vols. 8vo, orig. blue patterned wrappers (somewhat discolored), orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers, new stitching. Osaka, Kyoto, Edo: Kawachiya Mohei et al., 1859. First edition of a very scarce book, completed in 1844 but published 15 years later. This work is a summary of the author's agricultural and technological writings over a 55-year period. Okura (1768-1856?), was one of the three most eminent agriculturalists of the Edo period. A reformer, he wrote more than 20 books on all aspects of agricultural improvement and technology; they were among the best of their period for range and clarity of explaining the new methods. "Okura's writings emphasized ways to make farming more efficient and productive: timely cultivation, better seeds, better equipment, supplementary crops, and the care of and culture of silkworms."-Jansen, The Making of Modern Japan, p. 209. In this work, Okura discusses improved methods of papermaking, seed storage, sugar production, making beeswax and honey, growing cotton and producing textiles, making starch from fiddle ferns, dyeing, oil production from seeds, management of orchards, growing tea leaves, sericulture, rice production, harvesting seaweed, manufacturing soy sauce, producing igusa to make tatami mats, jute production, etc., etc. There is a significant section on treating forests as a crop (especially concentrating on growing Japanese cypress and pine trees). Okura strongly encouraged the fiefdom lords to educate and encourage their local farmers to choose the right crops, appropriate for the region, thereby increasing the fiefdoms' wealth. The author also discusses the market for certain crops and products and how to maximize profits. This work is also richly illustrated with numerous woodcuts of improved agricultural and forestry techniques, methods of transportation, agricultural tools, footwear appropriate for working in wet fields, marketplaces in Osaka, papermaking (with a list of the varieties and qualities of papers), the manufacturing of bitter fermented persimmon juice, which served as an insect repellant (oftentimes used on book covers) and a waterproofing agent, rendering of rape-seed oil, making of soy sauce, kuzu starch, cotton growing, a cotton warehouse, complex weaving machines, etc., etc. In fine condition. Vols. I and VI have unimportant marginal worming. Vol. III has minor worming in the gutter. The fourth volume has worming touching the text of six leaves. Vol. VII has minor marginal dampstaining.
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Toru or Tohoru [libretto for the Noh play Toru or Tohoru]

KOETSU UTAI BON from the Saga Press 16 leaves of differing color gampi paper treated with gofun, bound in two "quires" & sewn together. Small 4to (238 x 179 mm.), orig. semi-stiff pale gray wrappers with mica woodblock-printed designs in a diamond-shaped pattern, orig. printed label on upper cover. [Saga, near Kyoto: about 1607]. One of the series of 100 Noh plays produced at the famous private press in Saga, just north of Kyoto. These sumptuous luxury editions were printed for the wealthy and enlightened merchant Suminokura Soan (1571-1632), in collaboration with his calligraphy teacher Koetsu, a leading cultural figure of his day, famous as an artist, potter, lacquerer, and connoisseur. They are amongst the most remarkable books created in Japan or anywhere else; their design is far in advance of anything produced in the West. Issued in limited numbers, they were intended for private distribution to an elite audience, friends and acquaintances of the creators who formed the patrons of the Saga artistic community. Printed with movable type on luxurious thick paper, they books have, according to Hillier, a modernity in design matched only by William Blake and the French artists' books of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They reveal the beauty of native Japanese calligraphy. The movable type is based on the calligraphy of Koetsu. This series of mostly chants from Noh plays comprises "small, pamphlet-size books, each of about twelve or thirteen sheets, whose outstanding feature is the decoration, invariably of mica-printed patterns on stained or dyed paper, which is of a distinction that immediately links them with the collaborative scroll works by Koetsu and Sotatsu and which has led to their being called Koetsu-bon.These designs, resulting from a sophisticated adaptation or distortion of natural forms, are notable examples of one of the unique contributions of Japan to world art. "But, decoration apart, these No booklets are remarkable in other ways. An unusually thick and opaque kind of paper was used, no doubt made specially for these editions, and, contrary to normal practice, it was printed on both sides of the sheet. This ruled out the normal construction of a book whereby the sheets, printed on one side only, were folded in two and bound at the loose edges. The majority of the Koetsu-bon were made up by an entirely different method. A number of sheets, usually six [in this copy, four in each "quire," the outer leaves are used as paste-downs], were placed flat, one above the other, and the batch was then folded in two; two such sections would form a complete book. The binding again was unusual. The outer covers, though printed first as a single sheet, invariably with a mica-printed design, were cut in two and each given a folded turnover along one edge, in which one batch of the folded sheets was lodged. The two halves were then sewn together through the turn-overs of the two halves of the cover, brought together at the inner edge. This is a binding method unique to Japan and is known as Yamato-toji [or retchoso]. "The Saga Press published many different No texts and the same background designs, printed from the same blocks, recur in several different books. "These Koetsu-bon represent an astonishing leap forwards to something entirely unprecedented in the history of the illustrated or decorated book. This was the first time a book had been conceived as a single unified work of printed decorative art.not until we come to William Blake's Prophetic Books, do we encounter anything remotely comparable, and the creation in the West on any appreciable scale of books composed as homogeneously decorated printed works of art did not occur until the appearance of the French livres d'artiste in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries."-Hillier, The Art of the Japanese Book, pp. 51-54. These Koetsu utai bon were produced in three levels of luxury. The finest had mica patterns printed on the text leaves and cover sheets before the text was printed. The next level (our example) also has mica-printed covers but employed papers of different colors (in our copy: cream, pale blue, pale pink, and pale yellow) for the text leaves. The least luxurious version used only cream-colored text paper and had mica patterns printed on the covers. The movable type characters are based on the calligraphy of Hon'Ami Koetsu (1558-1637); this type is called hiragana majiri, a combination of kanji and kana accompanied by dashes next to each syllable. These dashes are the notations for the pitches to be sung. The notes are not written as specifically as they are in Western sheet music. If the dash goes up, the pitch is raised; if it is straight, the same pitch is continued; and if it goes down, the pitch is lowered. A very fine and fresh copy, preserved in a chitsu. These Koetsu utai bon are very rare on the market, especially when in excellent condition like our example. The example at the Smithsonian has a variant label on upper cover. ? Fischer et al., The Art of Hon'Ami Koetsu, Japanese Renaissance Master, pp. 174-75-"The deluxe editions of utai-bon that were printed at the Saga presses, where Koetsu and Suminokura Soan collaborated to produce classics of earlier Japanese literature, were intended for amateur connoisseurs like themselves. The thick paper, mica-printed motifs, and carved wood type were all part of an artistic whole, meant to complement the aesthetic pleasure of the utai vocal performance." Murase, Tales of Japan. Scrolls and Prints from the New York Public Library, pp. 157-59.