Kuenzig Books Archives - Rare Book Insider

Kuenzig Books

  • Showing all 22 results

book (2)

[Sporting Circular] Mauser Sporting Rifles

[Schoverling, Daly & Gales] 11 x 8 1/4 inches. Folded paper with large tear (no loss of meaning) and several crease tears. Browned, lightly smell of garage and (gun?) oil. The large tear has been partly archivally reinforced with document repair tape. A circular, no doubt used for mailing, notifying the recipient that Schoverling, Daly & Gales has a "limited quantity" of Mauser Sporting Rifles available. Noting basic specifications and a trade price of thirty-two and a half dollars each (addl for leather straps and cartridges). "Charles Daly was born in New York City on October 12, 1839. Around 1875 in New York City, Charles Daly and August Schoverling began importing firearms into the United States, primarily from the city of Suhl in what was then Prussia. Manufacturers for Daly at that time included Heym, Shiller, H. A. Lindner, Sauer, J&W Tolley of England, Newman (of Belgium) and Lefever Arms. In 1887 Schoverling and Daly were joined by a third partner named Joseph Gales, and the company began doing business as Schoverling, Daly, and Gales, before settling simply on the name Charles Daly. The original Charles Daly died suddenly in 1899, but the business continued with his son, Charles Howard Daly, taking his place until 1919 when Henry Modell purchased the partnership. The new owners continued importing firearms and marketing them with the Charles Daly name until the late 1920s when the company was sold to the Walzer family, which owned Sloan's Sporting Goods in Ridgefield, Connecticut. The Walzers established a branch of Sloan's in New York City known as Charles Daly & Company. Manufacturers from all over the world produced Daly guns for the Walzers, including Beretta, Bernadelli, and Miroku." (Wikipedia) We've dated this circa 1915 as the paper appears to be of that period. The Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Cornell and other institutions have material from this firm in the teens as well as the late 19th century. Mailing circulars tend to be scarcer than catalogs as most were discarded upon receipt.
book (2)

Programming a Computor [sic – Computer ] for Playing Chess [offprint]

First Separate Edition. [1], 256-275, [1-blank] pages. 9 15/16 x 6 3/4 inches. Self-wrappers stapled and glued. The five examined offprints [as here] have been oddly but consistently constructed. The first leaf (wrapper title) is tipped onto a gathering formed by pages 257-272 (signed 'U'). Pages 273-276 (276 is blank) are formed by folding a single sheet once and tipping that unsigned gathering to the verso of the âU' gathering. This example with hard creases on pp 271-274, soft creasing to upper right corner, and light soiling to (mostly) the upper third of the front wrapper. A remarkable survival of a fragile item. Supplied with a custom folio protector with leather spine and gilt titles over light grey cloth boards. NOTE: The offprint wrapper title introduced a typographical error: "Programming a Computor (sic) for playing chess" - mis-spelling Computer. On the verso (the first page of the paper), the title is correct. Wraps. This paper was first presented at the National IRE Convention, March 9, 1949, in New York. "The Philosophical Magazine," Ser. 7, Vol 41, March 1950 (pp. 256-275) first published this paper. Here offered in the rare offprint form. Levy, in his "Computer Chess Compendium," states, "This chapter serves as a historical introduction to the remainder of the volume. The very first paper, Shannon's seminal work dating back to 1949 [ Paper 1.1 in Levy's book ], was first presented as a lecture on March 9th of that year to the National Convention of the Institute of Radio Engineers in New York. Shannon pioneered computer chess as we know it today, and his ideas have been employed in almost every chess program ever written." (introduction) "The first technical paper on computer chess." (Origins of Cyberspace) "In their paper on 'Chess-playing programs and the problem of complexity,' Newell, Shaw, and Simon had this to say about Shannon's paper: 'The relevant history [of chess-playing programs] begins with a paper by Claude Shannon in 1949. He did not present a particular chess program but discussed many of the basic problems involved. The framework he introduces has guided most of the subsequent analysis of the problem . The basic framework introduced by Shannon for thinking about chess problems consists of a series of questions: 1. Alternatives. Which alternative moves are to be considered? 2. Analysis. a. Which continuations are to be explored and to what depth? b. How are positions to be evaluated strategically - in terms of their patterns? c. How are the static evaluations to be integrated into a single value for an alternative? 3. Final choice procedure. What procedure is to be used to select the final preferred move? We would hazard that Shannon's paper is chiefly remembered for the specific answers he proposed to these questions: consider all alternatives; search all continuations to a fixed depth, n; evaluate with a numerical sum; minimax to get the effective value for an alternative; and then pick the best one (Newell and Simon, 1963 p 42-44)" (Origins of Cyberspace quoting Feigenbaum pp 39-70) PROVENANCE: The personal files of Claude E. Shannon. Seven examples were found in Shannon's files, five in nice condition, one lacking staples, and the seventh badly creased. This example is the last remaining copy in nice condition. REFERENCES: Sloane and Wyner, "Claude Elwood Shannon Collected Papers," #54 Hook and Norman, "Origins of Cyberspace," #882 Levy, David: "Computer Chess Compendium," Springer-Verlag: 1988. (Paper 1.1) Feigenbaum, E. A. and Feldman, J. "Computers and Thought" (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1963).
book (2)

Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes and NURSERY SONGS. Set to Music by J.W. Elliott

Elliott, J. W. [4], 110, [2 (last blank)] pages. 9 3/8 x 6 1/2 inches. Chromolithographed illustration on upper board with gilt mustard colored cloth spine. Front illustration is duplicated on the lower board. (Both show Mother Goose in a shawl playing piano with music on the piano stand). Previous owner inscription "Frederica A. Yermi. Monday Jan. 1st, 1900" on front flyleaf. Base of contents page ([4]) notes "* Words by M. L. Elliott". Nine of the songs are so starred indicating their author is M. L. Elliott. Overall light wear, much better condition than found on children's books of this era. Boards. We see no ovbious method of narrowing down the date of publication beyond the inscription on the front flyleaf. The American Antiquarian Society holds several variations of this title with different covers and layout. Our example includes the text "In the arrangement of the musical portion of the volume, especial care has been taken by Mr. Elliott to keep the songs strictly within the capacity of children's execution, and the compass of children's voices. . Among the old favorites a few new aspirants to popularity will be found; but it is hoped that their presence will be considered an additional attraction."--preface, p. [3]" It also has a printed '4' in the lower inner gutter on page (49) and a printed '6' in the lower gutter of page (81), both in a much larger typeface than the song words.
book (2)

[Broadside, scientific instruments] Electrical APPARATUS of Hartman & Braun . late E. Hartmann & Co Wurzburg

29 3/4 x 19 5/8 inches. Fragile broadside printed on thin tissue with multiple folds. Purple stamp of sole American distributors "James W. Queen & Co, SOLE AGENTS, IN NORTH AMERICA (DEPARTMENT No. 40)" with the same printed in text as part of the broadside at the bottom. "The company was founded by Eugen Hartmann in 1879 in Würzburg as "optische Anstalt, physikalisch astronomische Werkstätte". In 1882 Wunibald Braun, brother of physicist Ferdinand Braun became an associate, and in 1884 the company moved to Frankfurt. In 1901 the company was incorporated." becoming Harman & Braun AG. In the 20th century, the company branched into control systems and is still represented today as a legacy part of the industrial conglomerate ABB. Printed by Knauer Brothers, Francfort o. M. [Frankfurt am Main], this broadside was printed specifically for the American market, with instruments identified in English, and the sole American Agent JAMES W. QUEEN prominently displayed at the base of the broadside. Awards from 1879, 1881, 1882, and 1884 exhibitions are illustrated at the top. Further research on the instruments offered should narrow down the broadside's printing date. The companies' early scientific instruments as represented on this broadside are found in many institutional collections, including the Science Museum in London, Harvard, and others. The intent to produce breakthrough instrumentation is evident in the illustrated instruments, many marked as designed by Prof. Kohlrausch, a physicist and innovator in this field. "Kohlrausch in 1895 succeeded Hermann von Helmholtz as President of the Physikalisch-Technische Reichsanstalt (PTR- Imperial Physical Technical Institute) an office he held until 1905. There he focused on experimental and instrumental physics, constructing instruments and devising new measuring techniques.under the direction of Kohlrausch, the PTR created numerous standards and calibration standards which were also used internationally outside Germany.He improved precision measuring instruments and developed numerous measuring methods in almost all the fields of physics known during his lifetime, including a reflectivity meter, a tangent galvanometer, and various types of magnetometers and dynamometers. The Kohlrausch bridge, which he invented at the time for the purpose of measuring conductivity, is still well known today." (Wikipedia) We have been unable to trace another example of this broadside. In general, large broadsides illustrating scientific instruments are scarce. LITERATURE: Davis and Dreyfuss, "The finest instruments ever made", p 159, showing a single known catalog by Hartman & Braun from 1908.
book (2)

The Description and use of the GLOBES and the ORRERY to which is prefix’d by Way of Introduction, a brief Account of the Solar System . The Tenth Edition

Tenth edition. viii, 220, [4] pages plus seven engraved plates. 8vo. Plain leather binding with raised bands in six compartments on the spine, and simple double ruled gilt edge decorations on front and rear boards. Corners worn, joints cracked but hinges sound. Minor surface worming to rear panel. Clean internally with the usual browning and occasional spotting. A few marginal manuscript notes on page 135 and a small notation R-52 at the head of the title page. Seven engraved plates are as follows: The Great Orrery (folding, fabulous plate facing the title page) Plate 1 (Solar System Or the Orbits of the Planets) - (folding plate marked Page 2 and inserted opposite page 2) Plate 2 - (folding plate marked Page 24, but actually inserted opposite page 28) The Globes - (folding plate illustrating two fabulous globes by Cushee, marked Page 35, but actually inserted opposite page 36) Plate 3 - (folding plate, with two figures, marked Page 166 but actually inserted opposite page 194) Plate 4 - (folding plate with large diagram, marked Page 172 but actually inserted opposite page 200) Plate 5 - (folding with seven figures, marked Page 184, but actually inserted opposite page 214). Boards. The last four pages contain a catalog for the scientific instrument maker Benjamin Cole. It is titled "A CATALOGUE of Mathematical Philosophical, and Optical Instruments, Made and Sold by BENJAMIN COLE, At his Shop, the sign of the Orrery, No, 136, in Fleet-Street, London". The list is quite long, with prices for each, followed by a note that the entire inventory is too tedious to enumerate so interested parties should apply with their interests in hand. "Joseph Harris was the son of a Cornish blacksmith who also designed mathematical instruments. He moved to London and became a success as a teacher, author and mathematical instrument maker. He was appointed Assay-Master of the Mint at the Tower of London in 1748 (many have mistakenly called him Master of the Mint, which is a different position; nor was he ever elected to the Royal Society). This is an expanded version of the small book on the Globes first written by [another author] John Harris [in 1703]. Joseph Harris revised and extended that original book.[which] incorporates the original description of the globes by John Harris but is extended by the inclusion of a brief description of the solar system, anda long description of an Orrery. It does not include the Collins quadrant material from the original John Harris work." Tomash & Williams H22 (describing the 1731 edition of this work) Benjamin Cole whose catalogue is found on the final four pages and his son (also Benjamin Cole) were both were well respected scientific instrument makers who are avidly collected today. This catalog was probably issued by the son, whose known working dates start in 1768. E. Cushee was a known associate of the father (and co-publisher here as well as engraving some of the plates). For information on the Cole family of makers, see Clifton, pp 60-61. LITERATURE: Clifton, Gloria, "Directory of British Scientific Instrument Makers 1550-1851", 1995 Tomash and Williams, "The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing, an Annotated and Illustrated Catalog", 2009 ESTC T101183.
book (2)

Speech of the President of the United States [1795 – caption title]

First Edition. [1]-7, [1 (blank)] pages. Extracted from a bound volume (stab holes evident at the spine) with leaves detached from one another. Inked 1795 above caption title. penciled "JKL 81-43" in lower margin. Signed "Go.: Washington, United States, 8th December, 1795" in type on page 7. First lines: "Fellow Citizens of the Senate, and House of Representatives, I Trust I do not deceive myself, while I indulge the persuasion ." Disbound. President Washington's State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress. He touches on many areas, with the first page devoted almost entirely to the war with various Indian tribes, including the "termination of the long, expensive and distressing war, in which we have been engaged with certain Indians, northwest of the Ohio, [now handled by] a treaty which the commander of our army has concluded, provisionally, with the hostile tribes in that region. In the adjustment of the terms, the satisfaction of the Indians was deemed an object worthy no less of the policy than of the liberality of the United States, as the necessary basis of durable tranquility.--This object, it is believed, has been fully attained.--The articles agreed upon will immediately be laid before the Senate, for their consideration." He touches then on the Creek and Cherokee Indians "who alone of the southern tribes had annoyed our frontier.have lately confirmed their pre-existing treaties with us, and were giving evidence of a sincere disposition to carry them into effect, by the surrender of the prisoners and property they had taken.--But we have to lament, that the fair prospect in this quarter, has been once more clouded by wanton murders,.which have again subjected that frontier to disquietude and danger;." Scarce in commerce, with RareBookHub showing only a copy sold at Swann in 2016 (4000 on an estimate of 1500-2500) and Parke Bernett in 1956. Swann auction listing adds a note of only 4 copies in ESTC and none known at auction since 1963. Our copy is a far superior condition copy to the Swann example, and a fine addition to any Washington collection. His last Presidential speech was printed less than a year later. LITERATURE: Evans, American Bibliography, #29739 (attributing publication to [Philadelphia: Francis Childs, 8 December 1795]) English Short Title Catalog, #W3544 (NOTE: We have been unable to confirm ESTC data due to the British cyber attack, although the record number is accurate per Rutgers temporary hosting solution.).
book (2)

Hartmann’s Practika : A Manual for Making Sundials and Astrolabes with the Compass and Rule, Written from 1518 to 1528 by Georg Hartmann

Hartmann, Georg; Lamprey, John (translator and editor) First English Language Edition. 312 pages. 13 3/4 x 9 1/2 inches. Publisher's green cloth with leather spine label. Spine slanted, a little light dusting to the cloth, otherwise an excellent copy. This title was issued in three different editions - (library, standard, and deluxe). This is a copy of the standard edition (the library edition is smaller with printed titles on the front board, the deluxe edition is larger with a 1/4 goatskin binding and fancy endpapers). Cloth. "Georg Hartmann lived from 1489 to 1564. As a young man he studied both mathematics and theology, becoming a Lutheran churchman. For over forty years he designed and constructed the astrolabes, armillary spheres, sundials, globes and quadrants that are now the pride of some of the world's most prestigious museums. Hartmann must have felt the need to record exactly how he designed this instruments, for in the summers of 1518 and 1526-1528 he scribbled down in Low German a rough draft (illustrated with even rougher sketches) of his mathematical techniques. No publisher ever considered it, for to refine this raw material into a logical and understandable treatise would necessitate enormous effort and dedication. Hartmann is therefore truly fortunate that, after nearly five centuries, John Lamprey has undertaken this task (including a translation into English) as a labor of love. The work took him six years, but the result - concisely entitled Hartmann's Practika - is a credit to both author and editor/translator. Now we can discover at first hand how this master craftsman laid out his beautiful instruments. Lamprey has rearranged and edited Hartmann's draft into seven chapters ("books") according to the type of instrument described. Book 1 - Block Sundial Book 2 - Diptych Dial Book 3 - Shepard's Dial Book 4 - Lines of Declination Book 5 - Hemispherium and Chalice Dial Book 6 - Nuremberg Portable Dial Book 7 - Designing the Astrolabe Book review courtesy of Allan Mills, 2003" (from the publisher's catalog).
book (2)

1888 Official Lawn Tennis Rules, as adopted by the United States National Lawn Tennis Association. Containing also the Constitution and By-Laws, list of officers and clubs in the association, .

First Edition. [1]-28, [4-list of clubs], 31-80 pages. Publisher's printed grey wrappers. 5 7/8 x 4 inches. Chipping and tearing to the wrappers. Previous owner name "E.F. Schuler??" is penciled on title page and one other page. Pages 72-80 contain a catalog of lawn tennis items (nets, shoes, court strip marking machine balls, and some books). The catalog is offered by Wright & Ditson, which was not only a publisher but also a manufacturer. The front wrapper has a printed illustration of the court in various typefaces. Wraps. This early lawn tennis rule book was issued seven years after the United States Lawn Tennis Association was created. It contains several articles, including "Winter Practice for Lawn Tennis" by Sears, R. D. ; "Classification of Players of 1887" by Clark, Jos. S.; "The Merits of Lawn Tennis" by Taylor, H. A. ; "Tournaments of 1887" by Slocum, J. W. Jr, Fixtures for 1888 and Terms used in Tennis. One remarkable aspect of the pamphlet is the inclusion, between pp 28 and 31, of four pages listing the clubs, their locations, and secretaries that comprised the association - a mere 76 of them nationwide. At this time, the sport was not tennis as we know it today - practiced by many - but conducted exclusively in a private club atmosphere. Wright & Ditson is still in business today, founded in 1871 by Baseball Hall of Famer George Wright and Boston businessman Henry Ditson as "a purveyor of tennis, golf and baseball equipment." Rare in commerce. Yale notes this title in their serials with no dates. There is a 1885 microform copy at NYPL (probably from the Chicago History Museum physical copy), and physical copies for the years 1889 at the British Library, and 1896 at Harvard. Otherwise not found in OCLC as of this writing. "Given what happened on this Saturday in 1881, the Fifth Avenue Hotel was a logical setting. Located at the corner of 23rd Street and 24th Street in Manhattan, the Fifth Avenue Hotel was a prime meeting spot for many American movers and shakers, including such notables as President Ulysses S. Grant, robber baron Jay Gould, political operator Boss Tweed and New York Times editor John C. Reid. If you were among New York's power elite, you knew this hotel. So naturally, a newly imported leisure sport fit in quite nicely. Tennis as we currently know itâ"called "lawn tennis" in those daysâ"had been invented in Great Britain in 1874. Soon enough, it made its way to America. According to the scholar Digby Baltzell, author of the book "Sporting Gentlemen: Men's Tennis from the Age of Honor to the Cult of the Superstar," by 1880 the game was being played at approximately 30 exclusive clubs in the United States, mostly in the East, but also in San Francisco, Chicago and New Orleans. Around this time, such tennis lovers as Clarence Clark of Philadelphia, Mary Outerbridge of Staten Island, NY and James Dwight of Boston agreed that it was necessary to start a singular, national organization to create rules and regulations for court dimensions, the weight of the ball, and other aspects of the game. So it was that nearly 100 people, representing 33 clubs, met in Room F of the Fifth Avenue Hotel and brought to life the United States National Lawn Tennis Association. A constitution was drafted, with R.S. Oliver of the Albany Lawn Tennis Club elected president and Clark becoming secretary-treasurer. By that summer, at the newly opened Newport Casino in Rhode Island, the first U.S. Championships was played." (tennis com website, article "TBT, 1881: The birth of USLTA, when the game was called lawn tennis").
book (2)

The Astrolabe

Morrison, James E. 438 pages. 12 1/2 x 9 1/8 inches. Publisher's green cloth with leather spine label. Spine slanted, a little light dusting to the cloth, otherwise an excellent copy. According to the publisher's website this title was issued in two editions, the standard, and the deluxe. This is an example of the standard edition (the deluxe is larger, and with a 1/4 goatskin binding). Out of print from the publisher. Previously published by Janus Press in 2007. Cloth. "The Astrolabe is the most complete astrolabe treatise available. It includes the description, history, use, theory and design of all types of astrolabes and several related devices, updated to modern methods and terminology. Application of computers to astrolabe design and practical advice on making an inexpensive working astrolabe are included. The Astrolabe is an invaluable reference for anyone with an interest in the history of science and astronomy, the use and history of scientific instruments and, of course, astrolabes. It is an introduction to pre-telescopic instruments for the novice, a reference for teachers and professionals, a guide for designing reproductions and a source for researchers. The Astrolabe is not a book about specific instruments. It covers the principles and design details of each instrument type. A few pictures of old instruments are included, but only to show how the principles are applied. The intent of The Astrolabe is to be clear, accurate and complete. Each topic is introduced in very basic terms and expanded with technical details as needed for more sophisticated subjects and applications. A summary of the latest historical research for each instrument and type of instrument is included. Astrolabes are visual instruments and are best learned with a visual reference. There are more than 250 figures showing the details of each instrument and scale discussed. The material on applications of computers to astrolabe design is unique. Most of the figures are computer produced and serve as examples of modern astrolabe design. Also included are figures of the astrolabe components that can be copied and made into a working instrument. Chapter 1 - The Astrolabe Chapter 2 - A Concise History of the Astrolabe Chapter 3 - The Stereographic Projection Chapter 4 - The Planispheric Astrolabe Front Chapter 5 - Drawing the Astrolabe Plate Chapter 6 - The Rete Chapter 7 - The Rule Chapter 8 - The Astrolabe Back Chapter 9 - Sample Problems Chapter 10 - The Astrolabe for Southern Latitudes Chapter 11 - Calculation Summary Chapter 12 - Universal Astrolabes Chapter 13 - The Saphea Arzachelis Chapter 14 - Orthographic Astrolabes Chapter 15 - De la Hire's Astrolabe Chapter 16 - Quadrants Chapter 17 - The Astrolabe Quadrant Chapter 18 - The Prophatius Quadrant Chapter 19 - Gunter's Quadrant Chapter 20 - Sutton's Quadrant Chapter 21 - Horizontal Instruments Chapter 22 - Astrolabe Variations Chapter 23 - Astrolabe Clocks Chapter 24 - Astronomical Background Chapter 25 - Astronomical Calculations Chapter 26 - Computers and Astrolabes Chapter 27 - Design, Layout and Fabrication" (from the publisher's catalog).
book (2)

Stoeffler’s Elucidatio – the construction and use of the Astrolabe, “Elucidatio fabricae ususque astrolabii”

First English Language Edition. [22], 250 pages. 13 3/4 x 9 3/4 inches. Publisher's green cloth with leather spine label. Spine slanted, a little light dusting to the cloth, some scuffing to the head of the front panel, otherwise an excellent copy. This title was issued in three different editions - (library, standard, and deluxe). This is a copy of the standard edition (the library edition is smaller, the deluxe edition larger with a 1/4 goatskin binding). Translated and edited [in 2007] by Alessandro Gunella and John Lamprey from the Latin text published in Paris by Guillaume Cavellat - 1553. Cloth. "Nearly five hundred years ago, one of the most popular books ever written on the construction and use of the astrolabe, 'Elucidatio fabricae ususque astrolabii', was authored by Johannes Stöffler (1452-1531), a professor at the Tübinghen University in Germany. It was first published in 1512/13 by his printer, Jacob Köbel and was an immediate success with astronomers, mathematicians, astrologers (speculators of the sky), surveyors, and other students of the good arts, and has been cited by virtually every author on the subject ever since. By 1619, Elucidatio had gone through sixteen editions, mostly in Latin, but also in French and German. At last, a modern edition of Stoeffler's Elucidatio is now available, and in English. Part One - The Construction Front of the Astrolabe Back of the Astrolabe Part Two - The Uses Using the Astrolabe Astrology Measuring" (from the publishers catalog).