Kuenzig Books

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Crystal Orientation Manual

Crystal Orientation Manual

Wood, Elizabeth A. ix, 75 pages. 7 1/2 x 10 inches. Comb bound (metal) over pictorial printed thick paper wrappers. Some wear to the extremities (particularly the paper near the metal comb binding). Clean internally, noting previous owner's address label affixed to half title page. Wraps. "Elizabeth Armstrong Wood (1912-2006) was an American crystallographer and geologist who ran a research program at Bell Telephone Laboratories that led to the development of new superconductors and lasers. She was known for the clarity of her writing and her efforts to educate the general public about scientific subjects. In 1942, Wood-whose interest in crystallography had developed at Bryn Mawr-took a job in the Physical Research Department of Bell Telephone Laboratories, where she was their first woman scientist. For over two decades, she ran a crystallographic research program at Bell Labs, focusing primarily on the electromagnetic properties of crystals. She addressed such problems as growing single crystals that would have useful conductive, magnetic, or other properties; as well as investigating new crystalline materials with ferromagnetic or piezoelectric properties. She looked at phase transitions in silicon, irradiation coloring in quartz, and ways to change the state of certain materials through the application of electric fields. In the course of her research, she developed "the first systematic notation for surface crystallography". Her work fed into the development of new superconductors and lasers at Bell Labs. Wood became known for the clarity of her writing, particularly in books intended for nonscientists such as Science for the Airplane Passenger (1969). Her Crystals and Light (1964), written for people with no prior background in optics, was long considered the standard beginner's textbook in the field. A version of this book, Experiments with Crystals and Light (1964), was put out by Bell Labs for high school students as both a booklet and an experiment kit. Her Crystal Orientation Manual (1963) was a handbook for technicians on the proper preparation of crystals for research. As the title of her 1962 book Rewarding Careers for Women in Physics (1962) suggests, she championed efforts to bring more women into the sciences, speaking out on the issues involved-such as cultural disapproval of professional women-at meetings and conferences.Wood was a fellow of the American Physical Society. She was awarded honorary doctorates by Wheaton College (1963), Western College, Ohio (1965), and Worcester Polytechnic (1970). Throughout her career, Wood undertook leadership roles in a number of professional organizations. One of her more prominent efforts was to participate in the founding of the American Crystallographic Association (ACA) out of a merger between the American Society for X-Ray and Electron Diffraction (ASXRED) and the Crystallographic Society of America (CSA). In 1957, she became the ACA's first woman president." (wiki).
book (2)

Aviation Vol 1 No 1 January 1911 [ includes Official Report of Los Angeles Meet ]

Griffith, Van M. (editor) First Edition. 28 pages plus wrappers. 6 3/4 x 9 3/4 inches. Stapled printed wrappers. Image of Hubert Latham on the front cover. Advertising contract laid in, stamp on rear (blank) cover telling readers to "Advertise in AVIATION if you wish the trade of the Pacific Coast" Covers soiled, rear cover foreedge chewed (no loss of text, marginal). Corners chipped. Wraps. An exceedingly rare publication which lasted as far as we know for only 11 issues. OCLC notes the California Historical Society has 11 issues (Jan-Nov). Seattle Public Library has May 1911. The publication was the organ of the Aero Club of California. In addition to reporting on the LA Meet of 1911, there is an article on the necessity of studying air currents for the purposes of aviation, and various other reports. Includes several pages of advertising as well. Editor Van Griffith was the son of notorious industrialist "Griffith Jenkins Griffith" who shot his wife (but did not kill her) and served two years in prison for the crime. The elder Griffith was very generous to Los Angeles, donating a large swath of land for Griffith Park. He also in 1912 designated 100 acres of the park, at its northeast corner along the Los Angeles River, be used to "do something to further aviation". The Griffith Park Aerodrome was the result. Aviation pioneers such as Glenn L. Martin and Silas Christoffersen used it, and the aerodrome passed to the National Guard Air Service. (wiki).
Journal of Science and the Arts Volume I and II . Edited at the Royal Institution of Great Britain . Published Quarterly Vol I WITH Vol II

Journal of Science and the Arts Volume I and II . Edited at the Royal Institution of Great Britain . Published Quarterly Vol I WITH Vol II

Humphrey, Sir Davy ; Babbage, Charles ; Brande, William Thomas ; Newman, John ; Pepys, W. H. ; Berzelius, J. Jacob First Edition. 2 volumes in one. vi, [1], 328 pages plus 12 plates. Several plates closely trimmed with some minor loss at foreedge. Disbound, with marbled boards detached with remnants of leather spine and corners, endpapers loose. Textblock otherwise sound. Occasional foxing (more in Vol II than Vol I) - plates browned and foxed. Ex-library (properly withdrawn) with institutional label on front pastedown. Previous owner (B. Silliman) ticket on front flyleaf (possibly Benjamin Silliman who was the founder and editor of the oldest scientific journal in the United States, The American Journal of Science, founded in 1818). Disbound. The American reprint of the Journal of science and the arts of the Royal Institute of science. "Edited at the Royal Institution of Great Britain." Some of the more interesting articles: Vol 1: Davy, Sir Humphrey. "On the Wire-gauze Safe-lamps for preventing Explosions from Fire-damp, and for giving Light in explosive Atmospheres in Coal Mines", pp 1-5 ; Babbage, Charles. "Demonstrations of some of Dr. M. Stewart's General Theorems, to which is added, an account of some new properties of the Circle", pp 6-23 ; Young, Nathan L. "On a singular Malformation of the Human Heart." pp 49-54.; "Account of a new Blow-pipe, in a Letter from Mr. John Newman to the Editor", pp. 65-66 ; Davy, Sir Humphrey. "On Aqua-regia, or Nitro-muriatic Acid", pp 67-69 ; and Brande, William Thomas." Observations on the Application of Coal Gas to the Purposes of Illumination" pp 71-79. Vol 2: Newman, John "On a new Mercurio-Pneumatic Apparatus" pp 185-187 ; Pepys, W. H. "Description of a new Construction of the voltaic Apparatus" pp 193-194 ; "Review of a Work entitled 'An Attempt to establish a pure scientific System of Mineralogy, by the Application of the Electrochymical Theory and the Chymical Proportions. By J. Jacob Berzelius. Translated from the Swedish Original by John Black Allan, Thomas", pp 226-241 ; Davy, Sir H. "One the prussic Basis and Acid" pp 288-289, etc etc.
book (2)

Advertising “broadside” ] No More Monopoly by the Bell Telephone Company . Holcomb’s Patent Acoustic Speaking Telephone .

Viles, F. T. ; Holcomb, J. R. 8 x 17 1/2 inches. An advertising assemblage related to the Holcomb Speaking Telephone, washed and laid down on archival tissue, in the form of a broadside. The top and bottom portions of the assemblage are lighter in appearance, the center portion shows evidence of foxing before being washed. There is also evidence near the right edge as if the assemblage was in a frame at some point (perhaps for use in the Agent F. T. Viles' office?). J.R. Holcomb & Co. of Mallet Creek, Ohio patented an acoustic speaking telephone on July 9th, 1878. We find Holcomb advertisements in the Boston Weekly Globe (Boston, Massachusetts) during the same period when Bell Telephone and several other companies had employed agents to sell on their behalf. Holcomb issued a series of four page brochures for sales use (one such in OCLC #35360545). We've seen them dated 1879, 1880, and 1881 based on "testimonial" content. They have several distinctive and prominent woodcuts. The first is a "concept" woodcut showing a mounted phone in an Office and also a Residence with wires going into and out of a "Manufactury" (sic) and a "City". The second distinct woodcut is a "General and Sectional View" of the telephone receiver/transmitter. A variant of this woodcut shows just the outsides of the telephone sets. The earliest advertisements price the "set of Telephones" at four dollars. Wiring for the phone sets was available for 3 cents per rod, guaranteed to work over a mile's distance. The advertising piece offered here is an oddity we've not seen, and is organized in three parts. The top 1/3 includes the "concept" woodcut from the original four page brochure. The bottom third includes the "General and Sectional View" woodcut (of the later variety). The middle section contains wording that is common to the Holcomb advertisements, but has been compressed and reworded in places. This piece has no testimonials, and offers the complete set of Telephones for three dollars fifty cents. The lower price of goods, combined with the lack of technical descriptions leads us to believe this is somewhat later than the earliest advertisements for Holcomb, circa 1880. The marketing material for Holcomb telephones is scarce, and we've seen only a few examples in 20 years. Although the "History of Medina County and Ohio" (p. 786) boasts that the telephone was one of the best and sold 10,000 units, we find this highly unlikely given the paucity of remaining artifacts and literature. Holcomb however was clearly a good businessman, starting small and scaling nicely over years of effort. This was his first venture into the telephone space, having retailed novelties, school supplies, published a successful educational journal, and other ventures. F. T. Viles was probably Frank T. Viles of the Western Union Telegraph Company. He learned telegraphy in Waltham MA in 1872, then became operator and messenger for Western Union at Concord MA. He bounced around as a telegraph operator in various railroad and telegraph companies in New England until Feb 12, 1880 when he entered the service of Western Union Telegraph Company at New York. Back in New England in 1882, he worked in various places as night manager. He became inspector of the Western Union Telegraph Company's city line and leased wire service in Boston in Sept 1887. Viles was well respected, creating new office layouts and designs that were incorporated into Western Union operations. (Telegraphers of Today, pp 145-146). With regards this venture, we find no advertisements in period newspapers, nor any mention of it on Google. Likely Viles was caught up in the new wave of exciting technologies, fed up with part time work, and reached out to Holcomb as an agent to compete for business with agents already in place for Bell Telephone and others. In 1880 (shortly after this piece was created?) he headed for New York with a real job for Western Union. Coldbrook Springs could refer to two places in MA - one a railroad depot, the other a village removed in the late 1800s when the Quabin Reservoir went in. Both in the Barre, MA area. The advertising copy on this piece is of interest because it clearly is positioning against Bell Telephone - and the talking points (different than the traditional Holcomb brochures) may add to the understanding of telephony marketing in the Boston area during this time period. Certainly rare, perhaps the only survivor of Viles' connection to Holcomb's Speaking Telephone, and a fine addition to any telephone, history of communication, advertising or marketing history collection. This period was a wild west for early telephone, and everyone wanted a piece of the pie!!
The Federal Reserve System Its Origin and Growth . in Two Volumes

The Federal Reserve System Its Origin and Growth . in Two Volumes

Warburg, Paul M. First Edition. Vol 1: xix, 853 pages. Vol 2: viii, 899 pages. 7 1/4 x 10 1/4 inches. Publisher's cloth. An ex-library set, with bookplates, spine lettering and glazing, rear pockets, bindings scuffed, and occasional embossed stamps throughout. Sound and generally clean. Properly discarded. Cloth. Paul M. Warburg was a member of Kuhn, Loeb, & Co., of New York, who was a member of the Federal Reserve Board from 1914-1918. "Warburg became known as a persuasive advocate of central banking in America. Many of his contemporaries regarded him as the chief driving force behind the establishment of America's central bank. Russell Leffingwell, who served variously as the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, head of the Council on Foreign Relations, and chairman of J.P. Morgan, credited Warburg with doing "yeoman's service in preaching the doctrines and practices of modern [central] European banking" while all other "friends of sound money" were so occupied with battling against the free silver movement that they gave scant thought to the need for currency reform. Harold Kellock of The Century Magazine, characterized Warburg as "the mildest-mannered man that ever personally conducted a revolution". This shy and sensitive man, Kellock continued, "imposed his idea on a nation of a hundred million people"." (wikipedia) Larson, A Guide to Business History #1909. The Economic Library of Jacob H. Hollander #3749.
An Inquiry into the Nature and causes of the Wealth of Nations . the Eleventh edition; with notes

An Inquiry into the Nature and causes of the Wealth of Nations . the Eleventh edition; with notes, supplementary chapters, and a life of Dr. Smith, by William Playfair. In three volumes

Smith, Adam Three volumes. Vol I: xl, 515 pages. Vol II: viii, 567 pages. Vol III: viii, 590, [2-ads] pages. 8vo, full calf, earlier rebacking preserving original boards, renewed endpapers. Red spine labels gilt, basic gilt tooled compartments but without raised bands. Leather overall a little dry with small hairline cracks starting in spine leather. Hinges still sound and usable. Corner tips bumped with wear and leather loss. Generally clean internally, noting several signatures in Vol III with significant foxing. Boards. First published in 1776, Printing and the Mind of Men notes this work "is the first and greatest classic of moderrn economic thought" by bringing economic thought to the same point that the political aspects of human rights were after two centuries, but here in a single work. With the first edition bringing well into six figures, this is an opportunity to purchase a this important work with later additions at a reasonable price. Early editions are avidly collected by those interested in the field. Kress, "Library of Business and Economics", B.4976. Williams "Guide to Printed Materials for English Social and Economic History", Vol 1: p187 (ref 1st ed): "Extremely valuable not only from its place in the history of economic theory but also as a source for contemporary economic conditions." Howey, A Bibliography of General Histories of Economics 1692-1975, #10 (Ref 1st edition): "The later editions and translations of Wealth of Nations were more numerous by far than those of any other book contributing to the historiography of economics." Howey laments the lack of respect given to Smith when his bibliography was written (1982).
Java

Java, Siam, Canton Voyage Autour du Monde

Beauvoir, Le Comte de [ Ludovic, Marquis De Beauvoir ] Second Edition. 451, [1] pages. 4 1/2 x 6 7/8 inches. 1/4 leather over cloth boards (minor wear to high points). Spine red leather gilt, page edges speckled, marbled endpapers, green reading ribbon. Includes both the fold-out frontis and multi-fold colored map (minor tear near attachment point to book). Second edition noted on title page. Text in French. Boards. Assoc. Prof. Wening UDASMORO (Univ. of Gadjah Mada) in his article "Representing the Other: Marquis Ludovic de Beauvoir's Account of Nineteenth-Century Java" (ASIAN STUDIES: Journal of Critical Perspectives on Asia, Volume 53: 2 (2017)) writes: "Marquis Ludovic de Beauvoir's travel report, A Voyage Round the World: Java, Siam, Canton (1870), has shown the author's nuanced perspective on Java. Despite his cultural background as a European, as well as the colonial system that he enjoyed, de Beauvoir partly diverted from the common narrative of indigenous peoples as primitive and barbarian. He recognised that his initial apprehensiveness was misplaced and over time, he became increasingly positive in his appraisal of the Javanese. Though he still believed that the indigenous peoples required colonial rule to prosper, de Beauvoir recognized Java's complex situations-including its social interactions and exercises of power. In doing so, his views were distinct from the generalizations made by fellow Europeans such as Houtman, Verrazane, Caunay, and de Vitré." A work much reprinted in various translations, here offered in a 1/4 leather binding.
On Reading as a Means of Teaching Language to the Deaf by Alexander Graham Bell . 2d Edition

On Reading as a Means of Teaching Language to the Deaf by Alexander Graham Bell . 2d Edition

Bell, Alexander Graham [National Conference of Superintendents and Principals of Institutions for the Deaf; Mississippi Institution, Jackson] Second Edition. [1]-7 pages. Grey printed wrappers, string tied. Several stains on the covers, folding, and a short edge tear. Card "With the compliments of Alexander Graham Bell, 1336 Nineteenth Street, Washington, D. C." folded in. Wraps. Prints an Address delivered by Bell before the sixth National Conference of Superintendents and Principals of Institutions for the Deaf (Gallaudet Meeting) held at the Mississippi Institution, Jackson Miss. April 14-17, 1888. The first edition of the pamphlet was printed in 1889. OCLC notes a third edition printed in 1890, but does not record this second edition. The first and third are apparently scarce as well with less than a dozen physical copies between them in OCLC. Alexander Graham Bell makes the case "I would have a deaf child read books in order to learn the language, instead of learning the language in order to read books" and he concludes his talk with "I believe that, in the acquisition of language by the deaf, reading will perform the function that hearing does for the ordinary child. I do not think that any more important habit can be formed by the pupil than the habit of reading, for, after all, the utmost that you can do for his education in his school life is to introduce him ot the wider literature of the world." Bell's wife and mother were both deaf, and his extended family involved with elocution (the skill of clear and expressive speech) contributing to a lifelong connection with related matters - including the invention of the telephone.
Transistor Technology [ 3 volumes in the scarce dust jackets ]

Transistor Technology [ 3 volumes in the scarce dust jackets ]

Biondi. F. J. ; Bridgers, H. E. ; Scaff, J. H.; Shive, J.N. (editors) mixed edition set. Three volumes. Vol One: xxxvii, 661 pages. Vol Two: xiii, 701 pages. Vol Three: xiii, 416 pages. Volume One is a second printing (first was April 1958, here January 1959), the other two volumes are first printings. All three volumes in the traditional blue cloth binding with black and gilt spine lettering. Each volume has the elusive dust jacket, rarely found on tomes that were used in laboratories with some regularity. Djs with chipping, tears, and rubbing. The first volume with the most wear overall. Provenance is enough to make the collector smile - two volumes are stamped "Property of Allentown Laboratories" and the last "Property of Bell Telephone Laboratories". Allentown Laboratories was one of the Bell Laboratories facilities in Allentown, PA near the famous Western Electric facility that manufactured many of the early transistors. Bought and sold across many different companies, the facility whose shelves these once graced is now closed. Cloth. An important set of books in the Bell Laboratories Series. Volume One deals with "The basic principles of germanium transistor fabrication, fundamental to the understanding of the more advanced aspects of present-day transistor technolgoy, with specific information on each step lelading to production on a commercial scale." Volume Two is "A report on the technology of materials and principles of transistor design covering topics of recent principal importance in the field." Volume Three covers "Developments in transistor technology covering the preparation and structure of junction structure, preparation, fabrication technology, measurements and characterizations, and reliability studies." While the transistor was invented at Bell Laboratories in 1948, it wasn't commercialized outside of laboratory and classified military applications until later. These volumes provide an excellent view into the state of the art at the time, straight from the scientists involved in daily innovation in electronics and a multitude of other fields.
Surgical Instruments Bulletin (6 pages

Surgical Instruments Bulletin (6 pages, newspaper size)

George C. Frye ] 6 pages in two parts. First part is on thin yellow paper, folded single sheet, newspaper size (10 1/2 x 17 inches folded). The second part a single leaf printed both sides on blue paper, same size. Both folded multiple times as if for mailing. Many woodcuts on each with "FRYE" identifier. Yellow part with several stains, and a few edge tears on each. Remarkable survival given the quality of the paper. George C. Frye (1843-1921) started out as a apothecary, and gbegan importing and then manufacturing surgical instruments according to widely scattered online sources. The only date on these bulletins is a patent date of 1897 on one item, but the prices are about the same as an advertisement we discovered in Canadian Journal of Medicine and Surgery, Volume 15 from 1903. NLM also has a surgical instruments bulletin in their collection (unclear if it is the same) but they date it to c1900. The listing of items supplied include the usual tools, but more women's needs than others we've seen, with elastic hoisery, uterine supporters, etc. His apothecary background shines through with a full page devoted to Frye's Emulsion and Frey's Pancreomismuth and Pepsin (with testimonials). Vintage maine images adds some information about his wife: "Eunice Nichols Frye of Portland (1852-1923), a native of Vassalboro, was the founder of the Woman's Literary Union in Portland in 1889, and of the Maine Federation of Women's Clubs in 1892. She and her husband, George C. Frye, were active in a number of philanthropies, including the "Wayside Rest or Home for Worthy Women," of which Mrs. Frye was the first president. It later became the "Invalid's Home," the "Mary Brown Home for Women." George Frye made a large donation to the home with the stipulation that it be renamed the "Eunice Frye Home." The Canadian Journal advertisement states in part: "Geo C Frye Portland ME. By consulting page xxiv of this number of the Journal our subscribers will be able to secure some splendid bargains in surgical instruments and supplies generally. The firm is George C Frye of Portland Me who handles a large stock of practically everything needed by a medical practitioner from elastic stockings and abdominal supports to a large operating case." It goes on to highlight some items with prices. Davis & Dreyfus (The Finest Instruments ever Made), note a catalogue from 1881 and a bulletin at NLM, plus one other item.
Medical Manuscript ] "Obstetric Practice of Samuel W. Bragg

Medical Manuscript ] “Obstetric Practice of Samuel W. Bragg, M. D.”

Bragg, Samuel W. First Edition. 7 3/4 x 9 3/4 inches. Stiff thin boards (nearly detached) with marbled paper and bits of remaining thin black paper spine. A worn, re-purposed lined notebook containing the manuscript notes from the obstetric practice of Samuel W. Bragg, M. D. The first page lends us the title. Inside the front board is a pasted down photograph of the outside of Bragg's office, with (presumably) Bragg, a small child, and a dog on the steps (photograph in poor condition). Inked above the photo is a note for the Harvey Hill Enterprise Co with date of Burlington ME, March 5, 1880 with several names. Chipping, loose pages, overall wear, this was a working document. The first entry is Burlington, ME 11-13-1879, "Mrs. Liverind Peasley[?] a girl miss-carried at 6 mo. caused by lung fever. child lived 1 1/2 hours. a good recovery." Two other entries complete the first page, each numbered, with the location and a summary of the birth. The practice records continue through number 483: "Howland[?] Sept 15 1899, to Mrs John Curley A good 3d". Subsequent entries are not numbered, but continue for an additional 40 pages. Occasional pages excised, but apparently from reuse of the notebook rather than removing entries. The last entry is dated 1909. Most entries are just a few lines, others with more substantive information if problems were encountered. Of particular interest is this detail often recorded: the # of number of children the woman had previously. Some entries note the use of ether. Other towns where deliveries were attended include Lincoln, Enfield, South Lincoln, Lowell (ME), Montague,and Chester. Notes in several hands, at different times, most legible. Wraps. Bragg was a graduate of Univ. Vt Med Dept. in 1879. He apparently practiced in Burlington, ME (and surrounding towns based on entries in the practice record) starting in 1880 where he also was a member of the Harvey Hill Enterprises, which bought up mineral rights. He was also active in surrounding communities, being founder and President of the Enfield Telephone Company in 1898. Burlington, Maine is in Penobscot County, Maine, United States. It is part of the Bangor Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 363 at the 2010 census. (wikipedia) In our experience, Obstetric Practice manuscripts are difficult to find, especially for smaller communities.
Homoeopathy ] Catalogue and Descriptive Price Current of Books

Homoeopathy ] Catalogue and Descriptive Price Current of Books, Medicines, and Physicians’ Supplies of Every Description

Duncan Brothers ] First Edition. 64 pages. 6 x 9 inches. Green wrappers, string tied, printed in blue and red. Folded (as if for mailing). Lower portion of spine perished, front cover detaching in that area. An interesting catalogue, starting with homoeopathic supplies (thru page 6), then homoeopathic books (pp7-14), Duncan Brothers Medical and Scientific Publications (pp15-29, probably new releases), list of medicines (pp30-36 in thrre columns/pg), general medical merchandise (nicely illustrated) including cases and medical instruments (pp 37-64). Duncan Brothers were at 133 and 135 Wabash, Chicago starting in 1884 (see below). Their first page of new releases had three editions, all in 1884, and this one is noted as the second edition leading us to date this catalog as we have. Cover title is "Catalogue of the Central Homoeopathic Pharmacy of Chicago". Not listed in Davis & Dreyfus (The Finest Instruments ever Made). No copies online, not in OCLC. Wraps. "Duncan Brothers, Homoeopathic Pharmacists, Publishers and Booksellers, Nos 133 and 135 Wabash Avenue. A house which has deservedly maintained the leading position in the homoeopathic medical circles of the West is that of Messrs Duncan Brothers of Nos 133 and 135 Wabash Avenue. Both as regards enterprise and energy as well as the most careful attention to the progress of medical science and the care bestowed upon the exactitude and purity of all pharmaceutical preparations produced by them or passing through their hands, they have ever held a representative position and retained an ever widening and superior class of patronage. Mr D Duncan, the present proprietor of this handsome and completely stocked establishment, was born in Wyoming County, New York State, though his family moved West while he was yet a child. In early life he was employed in various drug houses acquiring a thorough and practical knowledge of the pharmaceutical profession in its broadest aspect. In 1874 in co-partnership with his brother under the existing name and style, Mr Duncan embarked in business at No 67 Washington Street, continuing there until 1877 when they removed to Nos 131 and 133 Clark Street where they remained until 1884. The steady expansion of their trade and the development of an important publishing and printing business necessitated removal to the still more commodious and advantageously located premises Nos 133 and 135 Wabash Avenue, where is exhibited the choicest and largest stock of pharmaceutical goods in the line of homoeopathy to be found in Chicago; likewise a complete library of textbooks and medical treatises in the wide field of physiological and medical science. In February 1885 Mr D Duncan succeeded to the proprietorship of the entire business and still continues it identically as before under the original and honored name and style of Duncan Brothers. He gives that close personal attention to every department of his business so satisfactory to customers and beneficial to their interests and carries a stock as exceptional for the purity and strength of all ingredients as for its wide range of completeness. He also keeps the latest issues of standard medical works and has developed a wide reputation as a skillful and enterprising publisher of books, monograph, leaflets etc and as printer of all descriptions of fine commercial work. A specialty for which his typographical department has long been famous is the prompt turning out of every description of professional printing including labels, formulas, prescription blanks, etc circulars and directions for the use of medicines and medical appliances. Personally Mr Duncan is universally popular and respected throughout professional and business circles and has manifested executive abilities and pharmaceutical skill and enterprise of the highest order. He has now been a permanent resident of Chicago for upwards of twenty years and fully merits the large measure of success which has attended his well directed efforts." FROM: "Origin, Growth and Usefulness of THE CHICAGO Board of Trade, New York: Historical Publishing Co: 1885-86".