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A Monograph of the Trogonidae, or Family of Trogons

GOULD, John (1804-1881) Parts II-III only (of three) in one volume, folio (21 1/2 x 14 1/4 in.; 54.6 x 36.2 cm). 25 handcolored lithographed plates (Part II = 12; Part III = 13) by and after John Gould, H. C. Richter, and W. Hart, printed by Charles Hullmandel and heightened with gum arabic, all relevant text to the two parts present, Part III complete with general title, dedication, preface, and list of subscribers; 3 small stain in background of Trogon Melanocephala, short tear at bottom of Trogon Collaris, and long vertical crease to text for Trogon Meriodionalis in Part II, long vertical crease to title-page, dedication and text for Trogon Macroura in Part III. Contemporary green morocco elaborately paneled gilt with two bands of foliate roll tools enclosing a band of interwoven drawer handle tools, original tan card upper wrappers bound in, spine richly gilt in 7 compartments (2 lettered), yellow-coated endpapers, gilt dentelles, edges gilt; small tears to covers recolored, hinges strengthened, front free endpaper slightly cockled. JOHN JAMES AUDUBON'S COPY OF GOULD'S FIRST EDITION OF THE TROGONS, with his ownership inscription on the top of the first wrapper dated "March 21st 1836 | London." A GIFT FROM ONE GREAT ORNITHOLOGIST TO ANOTHER: before Gould left for Australia, he presented Audubon with the two parts of the Trogonidae, Icones avium, and the two rare cancelled parts of the Birds of Australia and Adjacent Islands. Audubon also underlined a passage opposite the "Trogon Narina," plate that refers to the young chicks: "at the moment the young are excluded [from the nest] they take flight and follow their parents for a considerable period" and penciled the following marginal note: "This beats my little humming Birds which cannot fly until they are one week old. Pray show this Paragraph to Charles Watterton 'Esquire' of Walton Hall." Watterton was an English naturalist and explorer who had invented a new method of taxidermy. Additionally, there is an explanatory typescript note dated 16 March 1950 and signed by Audubon's great grandson, Leonard B. Audubon: "The books were given to my great grandfather, John James Audubon, an American Ornithologist and Painter. Gould at the time was painting along similar lines, and they exchanged copies of their works. These particular books were sent out to Australia forty years ago, and were held in the Audubon family until this year when Mr. Hallstrom purchased the books from the great grandson of John James Audubon." A fact which is attested to by the presence of the bookplate of Audubon's granddaughter, Maria R. Audubon on the verso of the second card wrapper. The bookplate bears the image of a turkey modelled after her grandfather's incised carnelian signet ring and the motto "America My Country." Audubon had subscribed to Gould's first major work, A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1831-32) and his first multi-volume monograph, The Birds of Europe (1832-37). In his preface for the Trogons, Gould credited Audubon and twenty others "for the warm interest they have at all times taken in the present work." The first edition of the Trogons introduced twelve species new to science. Largely inhabitants of tropical rainforests, they got their name from the Greek word ("Trogon") for nibbling, referring to the way in which they gnaw holes in trees to make their nests. REFERENCES: Anker 171; Ayer/Zimmer p. 253; Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 101; Nissen IVB 381 PROVENANCE: John James Audubon (inscription of Part II wrapper dated "March 21st 1836 | London"; Maria R. Audubon (1843-1925), daughter of John Woodhouse Audubon (bookplate on the verso of the second wrapper); Leonard B. Audubon (typescript note signed "L.B. Audubon 16.3.50" on verso of front free endpaper); Mr. Hallstrom (purchased from the Audubon family, 1950)
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A Synopsis of the Birds of Australia, and the Adjacent Islands.

GOULD, John (1804-1881) 8vo (10 3/4 x 7 1/2 in.; 27.3 x 19.1 cm). 73 handcolored lithographed plates by and after Elizabeth Gould, heightened with gum arabic with facing leaves of explanatory text, 8-page "Description of New Species of Australia Birds, Principally from the Author's Collection, with Characters of Several New Genera, Read at the Scientific Meeting of the Zoological Society in December 1837" at the end; occasional spotting or foxing and pigment offsetting, top margin of plate 63 (Genus sphenostoma) stained. Contemporary half green morocco over green pebbled cloth, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt; joints rubbed, corners scuffed. FIRST EDITION OF GOULD'S FIRST WORK ON AUSTRALIAN BIRDS, issued in four parts between January 1837 and April 1838. The last two parts were published just before Gould left for Australia, intending on his return to continue the series but abandoned that project in favor of his greatest work, The Birds of Australia. A remarkable series of head studies of 199 species of Australian birds are represented in The Synopsis, including many hitherto unknown species. In John Gould's Contribution to British Art, Allen McEvey persuasively argues that Elizabeth Gould alone was responsible for the finished drawings and many of the best plates are quite striking, with an almost three-dimensional quality. Gould's aim was to provide descriptions and names for any new species arriving from Australia as quickly as possible. Many of the distinctions he drew up in this early work remain accepted today. REFERENCES: Ayer/Zimmer p. 254; Ferguson, Bibliography of Australia 2271; Fine Bird Books 101; McGill/Wood p 364; Nissen IVB 382 and SVB 198; Sauer, John Gould: The Bird Man 5
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Map of the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, & Alabama

MITCHELL, Samuel Augustus (1790-1868). Single sheet (17 1/2 x 12 1/2 in.; 45.5 x 31.7 cm.). Fine folded engraved map with original hand color in full within an elaborate border of flowers and an attractive vignette on top edge of an eagle and shield; two tables at upper left: "Steam boat routes" and "Principle stage routes, through the states Louisiana, Alabama & Mississippi"; minor early repairs on verso. Original maroon morocco; with minor pale stains (5 1/4 x 3 1/4 in.; 13.3 x 8.3 cm.). PROVENANCE: Contemporary indecipherable ownership inscription on the front pastedown; with the near-contemporary ownership inscription of John Basil Lamar of Bibb County, Georgia, dated 18th March 1835 on the rear pastedown. AN EXCEPTIONALLY BRIGHT AND ATTRACTIVE COPY. First published by Mitchell in his 1831 atlas "A New American Atlas, Designed Principally To Illustrate The Geography Of The United States Of North America; In Which Every Country In Each State And Territory Of The Union Is Accurately Delineated, As Far As At Present Known: The Whole Compiled From The Latest And Most Authentic Information". This map is based on a census of 1830, a number of editions having been published first within "A New American Atlas" and later as individual pocket-maps. The Mitchell Company was one of the first publishing houses to try out the new technique of engraving on steel plates, preceding the majority of the industry by nearly 20 years. During the early years of the company, Mitchell primarily published maps and travel guides. In 1860, Mitchell embarked on an ambitious "New General Atlas" before he retired and turned the business over to his son of the same name Today Mitchell maps are sought after for their fine engraving, sumptuous hand-coloring, and attention to detail. They are some of the finest maps produced during this time period. American Atlases L3584; P11026 and L3585 (Pocket edition). # bci-1-5-30
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Histoire de la Louisiane Contenant la Decouverte de ce vaste pays.

LE PAGE DU PRATZ, Antoine Simon (1695-1775). 3 volumes. 12mo., (6 4/8 x 3 6/8 inches). Half-titles, errata leaf at end of volume III. 2 fine folding engraved maps in volume one: "Carte de la Louisiane Colonie Francaise.1757" and "Louisiane. Golfe du Mexique", and a folding plan of "Nouveau Orleans." in volume II., and 39 engraved plates (some minor offsetting and one or two spots). Contemporary French mottled calf, smooth spines gilt-decorated in six compartments, morocco lettering pieces in two (extremities worn with minor loss, generally a bit rubbed). Provenance: Krasnoff Collection of Western Americana. First edition and an ATTRACTIVE COPY of and important account "showing the French claims to the Southern territory now occupied by several states, but claimed also by the English under the name of "Carolana." The author resided in Louisiana fifteen years, and it is from his relation that most of the details of the life of the Natchez and other Mississippi tribes of Indians have been derived. Later historians have availed themselves of his materials. The plates are barbarous; indeeed, the "Monthly Review," XIX. 296, remarks, "they remind one of the cuts in the old 'Hortus Sanitatis.' The author appears to have been a very sensible and a very worthy man, but with very little talent as a writer. His stile is unequal and diffuse, and his work wants method." See also Boucher de la Richarderie's "Bib. des Voyages," Vol. VII., Faribault's Catalogue, p. 84, and Leclerc's Catalogue, No. 877" (Sabin). Clark Old South I:75; Field 910; Graff 2462; Howes L-266; Rader 2219; Raines p. 73; Sabin 40122; Streeter sale I:127; Wagner-Camp 2b note and 2e note; "Wheat Mapping the Transmississippi West" 158. For more information about this book, or a warm welcome to see it and other books in our library at 72nd Street, NYC, please contact Kate Hunter, M.A. Oxon, in the Rare Book Department
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A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains

GOULD, John (1804-1881) and Nicholas Aylward VIGORS (1787-1840) Folio (22 1/2 x 14 1/2 in.; 62.5 x 36.8 cm). 80 fine handcolored lithographic plates after Elizabeth Gould after sketches by John Gould, and printed by Charles Hullmandel, dedication, list of subscribers; faint pigment offset from approximately 15 plates to text, light foxing to about 4 plates chiefly marginal, neat repair to very short tear to plate 65 (Tragopan Hastingsii, Female), scattered spotting to text for pl. 66. Contemporary green morocco elaborately paneled gilt with 3 bands of foliate roll tools, spine in 7 compartments richly gilt with raised bands (one lettered), marbled endpapers, gilt dentelles, edges gilt; joints and bands lightly rubbed, covers a trifle scuffed. FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE OF GOULD'S FIRST MONOGRAPH, with the backgrounds uncolored. In 1825, Gould removed to London to pursue a career as a taxidermist. In a letter dated 5 February 1844 to Lord Derby, Gould wrote: "You probably recollect that in my first work neither the plants or Backgrounds were coloured; In order to render the Series of my Publications complete I have had those parts coloured in the few copies of I have left " (quoted in Sauer). In 1827, Gould was appointed Curator of Birds and Preserver as a taxidermist for the newly founded Zoological Society of London (1826), which in 1830 acquired a collection of exotic bird skins from the Himalayas. Its acquisition enabled him to produce this, the first of many folio volumes. Gould's sketches were transferred to lithographic stones by his wife, the former Elizabeth Coxon, whose artistic talents were to enhance many of his works until her death in 1841. The text was largely written by N. A. Vigors, secretary to the Zoological Society and Gould's mentor. Failing to secure a publisher for his monograph, Gould undertook the enterprise himself; it appeared in twenty monthly parts with four plates to a part. Nevertheless, "[t]he work scored such a great success that Gould continued for the rest of his life to publish large uniform monographs and faunas all on the same lines" (Anker, 168). REFERENCES: Anker 168; Ayer/Zimmer p. 251; Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 101; McGill/Wood p. 364; Nissen IVB 374; Sauer 1
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The Birds of Europe.

GOULD, John (1804-1881) 5 volumes, folio (21 3/8 x 14 1/2 in.; 54.3 x 36.8 cm). 448 fine handcolored lithographic plates (68 by Edward Lear, the rest by Elizabeth Gould after her husband's sketches) and printed by Charles Hullmandel, dedication to Lord Derby, 2-page list of subscriber's and general list of plates for all 5 volumes in vol. 1, list of plates in each volume; vertical creases to list of plates in vols. 2-5 and to first plate (Snow Goose) in vol. 5, very faint, occasional marginal foxing to plates, neat repair to small tear along bottom margin of Rose Coloured Pastor in vol. 3, overall a VERY FRESH, BRIGHT COPY. Contemporary red morocco paneled gilt, spines in 6 compartments richly gilt (2 lettered), marbled endpapers, edges gilt; joints lightly rubbed, small tear to spine head of vol. 2, covers a bit darkened from leather treatment. FIRST EDITION OF GOULD'S FIRST MULTI-VOLUME ORNITHOLOGICAL WORK, the second in his folio series. As stated in the preface, "the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency." The drawings of continental species were taken from specimens in museums and zoos in Holland, German, and Switzerland, which Gould had toured several times in the 1830s-at least once with Lear, who was the first and one of the greatest of the series of fine artists that he employed over the ensuing half century. "AMONG THE MOST REMARKABLE BIRD DRAWINGS EVER MADE" (Susan Hyman, Edward Lear's Birds). "There is no doubt that Edward Lear was the first person to understand the art of lithograph, and to use it to its fullest potential. It was a legacy that granted the fabled works of Gould their success, and took them into the forefront of nineteenth-century illustration (Isabella Tree, The Ruling Passion of John Gould, p. 43). REFERENCES: Anker 169; Ayer/Zimmer, pp. 251-252, Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 101; McGill/Wood, p. 364; Nissen IVB 371
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The Birds of America, from Drawings made in the United States and Their Territories

AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) 7 volumes, 8vo (10 x 6 1/2 in.; 25.4 x 16.5 cm). 500 handcolored lithographed plates after Audubon by W. E. Hitchcock, R. Trembly, and others, printed and colored by J. T Bowen, numerous wood-engraved text illustrations (some full-page), half-titles and subscribers' lists in each volume, moderate foxing and scattered spotting but most pronounced in vol. 2, some toning occasionally accompanied by faint text offsetting to blank plate versos, upper inside corners of about 6 plates in vol. 6 stained, plates 296 (Pinneated Grouse) and 341 (Wilson's Phalarope) shaved at the top just touching wingtips, occasional marginal staining to text and one large stain affecting p. 90 in vol. 7. Half blue morocco by Stikeman over blue marbled boards, spines in 6 compartments lettered gilt, marbled endpapers, edges gilt; spines faded to brown, joint rubbed. FIRST OCTAVO EDITION. After completing the double-elephant folio edition at great expense in England, Audubon returned to the United States and used the Philadelphia firm of Bowen to produce a more profitable octavo version under the supervision of his sons. The subscription price was $100, making it an expensive but appealing work for affluent individuals and well-endowed institutions. It enjoyed tremendous commercial success, with the initial offering attracting over 700 subscribers, and firmly established Audubon's reputation as the greatest ornithologist of his time. The octavo edition added 65 new images to the original plate count of the double-elephant folio. REFERENCES: Ayer/Zimmer, p. 22; Bennett, p. 5; McGill/Wood p. 208; Nissen IVB 51; Reese, American Color Plates Books 34; Sabin 2364; cf. Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work
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The Natural History of Barbados.

HUGHES, Griffith (1708?-after1750). Folio (16 2/8 x 10 2/8 inches). Subscribers' list, remnants of slip with additional errata and subscribers pasted onto verso of final preface leaf. Folding engraved map of the island of Barbados by Thomas Jefferys, and 30 engraved plates by and after G.D. Ehret and others, all but the first hand-colored in a contemporary hand, engraved vignette head-pieces, woodcut head- and tail-pieces and initials (some minor browning, spotting and offsetting.) Contemporary red goatskin gilt, all edges gilt (recased). Provenance: Amorial bookplate of Lord Colchester of Kidbrook on the verso of the front free endpaper, donated to; the Constitutional Club Library with a bookplate recording the bequest in 1887 on the front paste-down; from the Important Natural History library of Anita Peek Gilger, M.D. "THIS BOOK IS ONE TO PLACE BESIDE CATESBY'S NATURAL HISTORY" (Hunt). First edition, large-paper issue. The first book to describe grapefruit, calling it the "Forbidden-Fruit-Tree": "The fruit when ripe, is something longer and larger than the largest Orange; and exceeds, in the Delicacy of its taste, the fruit of every tree in this or any of our neighbouring islands." (page 127). Not much is known of Hughes, except that he was rector of St. Lucy's parish from 1850, and he was a man who certainly knew his scripture: "The book has many charming features. Not often does a work on natural history contain an index to "TEXTS of Scripture Cited or Illustrated". It is the model work by the colonial parson who knows his poets and would know all he can of the flora and fauna among which he has come to dwell." (Hunt). His description of the Coco-Nut Tree is typical: "Tho' every part of this tree, either in its make or Use, is stamped with so many evident signatures of Divine Wisdom, as to make it justly the object of our admiration; yet, in describing it, we ought not to add to it (as most writers have done) pretended qualities, and excellencies foreign to its nature" (page 103). "Written by the parson of St. Lucy's on Barbados who knew his scripture" (Sitwell "Great Flower Books", p.60). Like his father before him Ehret trained as a gardener, initially working on estates of German nobility, and painting flowers only occasionally, another skill taught him by his father, who was a good draughtsman. Ehret’s "first major sale of flower paintings came through Dr Christoph Joseph Trew, eminent physician and botanist of Nuremberg, who recognized his exceptional talent and became both patron and lifelong friend. Ehret sent him large batches of watercolours on the fine-quality paper Trew provided. In 1733 Trew taught Ehret the botanical importance of floral sexual organs and advised that he should show them in detail in his paintings. Many Ehret watercolours were engraved in Trew's works, such as ‘Hortus Nitidissimus’ (1750–86) and ‘Plantae selecta’e (1750–73), in part two of which (1751) Trew named the genus Ehretia after him. "During 1734 Ehret travelled in Switzerland and France, working as a gardener and selling his paintings. While at the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, he learned to use body-colour on vellum, thereafter his preferred medium. In 1735 he travelled to England with letters of introduction to patrons including Sir Hans Sloane and Philip Miller, curator of the Chelsea Physic Garden. In the spring of 1736 Ehret spent three months in the Netherlands. At the garden of rare plants of George Clifford, banker and director of the Dutch East India Company, he met the great Swedish naturalist, Carl Linnaeus, who was then formulating his new classification based on plant sexual organs. Ehret painted a Tabella (1736), illustrating the system, and sold engravings of it to botanists in Holland. Some of his paintings of the exotics were engraved in Linnaeus's "Hortus Cliffortianus" (1737). "[Ehret] signed and dated his work, naming the subject in pre-Linnaean terms. He published a florilegium, "Plantae et papiliones rariores" (1748–62), with eighteen hand-coloured plates, drawn and engraved by himself. Ehret also provided plant illustrations for several travel books [as here]. His distinctive style greatly influenced his successors" (Enid Slatter for DNB). Hunt 536; Nissen 950; Sabin 33582; Wood p.393.
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Album Pintoresco de la Isla de Cuba.

MIALHE, Pierre Toussaint Frederic (1810-1881) Oblong 4to., (9 4/8 x 13 4/8 inches). Chromolithographic title-page heightened in gold, 27 numbered chromolithographic plates, with elaborate borders and captions in Spanish, all mounted on guards (some occasionally heavy spotting, one or two plates loose, minor marginal soiling) and two folding maps. Original blue cloth gilt (quite rubbed, extremities scuffed). Provenance: Contemporary Havana ownership inscription on the front free endpaper. A reissue of Bernardo May's pirated edition of views from Frederic Mialhe's lithographs for the series "Viage pintoresco al rededor de la Isla de Cuba" printed by Louis Marquier Havana, ca 1848 and sold by them in competition with Mialhe's originals at less than half the price. These magnificent and lively views include images of the entrance to the port of Havana, several fine perspectives of the city itself, local landmarks such as the Plaza de Armas, Puertas de Monserrate, Teatro de Tacon y Parte del Paseo de Jsabel II, Fuente de la Jndia en el Paseo de Jsabel II, Almeda de Paula, the church of Mayor y de Ermita del Buen Viaje, the city of Matanzas, the entrance to the port of Santiago, Trinidad, and local trades and pastimes including a bull fight. In 1853 both Mialhe and Marquier had unsuccessfully sued May for breach of copyright and demanded "the sequestration of the May-plagiarized albums, notification to the press to stop advertisements of said views, and 20,000 pesos as damages". May denied plagiarism on the grounds that ". after all, ladies in carriages, street sellers, churches, monuments, and landscapes were all there in full view to any artist who cared to paint them". The maps of Cuba and Havana were also copied from an 1847 map by Jose M. de la Torre. Following the failed lawsuit May reissued this volume in 1855. Sabin 17748; Palau 5421; 167989 (note); Cueto, Mialhe's Colonial Cuba, pp.1-7, 73-77. For more information about this book, or a warm welcome to see it and other books in our library at 72nd Street, NYC, please contact Kate Hunter, M.A. Oxon, in the Rare Book Department
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Traite des Arbres et des Arbustes que l’on Cultive en France en plain terre.

DUHAMEL DU MONCEAU, Henri Louis (1700-1782). 7 volumes, folio (16 6/8 x 10 inches). Half-titles. Engraved title-page to volume one after Percier et Thibaud engraved by Pillement and Née. 496 fine color-printed stipple-engraved plates FINISHED BY HAND (including more than 400 after P. J. Redouté and some 30 after Pancrace Bessa), and 2 engraved plates. Contemporary half calf gilt, marbled boards, all edges uncut (expertly rebacked preserving the original spines). Provenance: Anonymous ownership inscription: "G[ift] of Mr. John S. Ames, December 1951" on the verso of the title-page of each volume. Second edition, sometimes called the "Nouveau Duhamel" or, "New Duhamel", ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER PRINTED ON LARGE PAPER, is completely revised and enlarged, and bares very little resemblance to the book published by Duhamel with the same title in two volumes in 1755. The magnificent color plates, the majority of them after Redoute, and many after Bessa are new to this edition. Pierre-Joseph Redoute (1759-1840), often called "the Raphael of flowers," was born in the Belgian Ardennes - the son, grandson, great-grandson and brother of artists. From the beginning, Redoute's talents were recognized by distinguished men and women who took pleasure in forwarding his career. For the study of botany, his teacher was Heritier de Brutelle, one of the outstanding naturalists of his day. Gerard van Spaendonck, Flower Painter to the King, taught Redoute the technique of painting in watercolor on vellum. But by the master's own account, the pupil's work was finer. The luminosity of stipple engraving is particularly suited to the reproduction of botanical detail. It is essentially a technique of engraving a copper plate with a dense grid of dots which can be modulated to convey delicate gradations of color. Because the ink lies on the paper in miniscule dots, it does not obscure the "light" of the white paper beneath the color. After this complicated printing process was complete, the prints were then finished by hand in watercolor, so as to conform to the models Redoute provided. Redoute had, as pupils or patrons, five queens and empresses of France, from Marie Antoinette to Josephine's successor, the Empress Marie-Louise. Despite many changes of regime in this turbulent epoch, he worked without interruption, eventually contributing to over fifty books on natural history and archaeology. Du Hamel (later de-nobilized to Duhamel) du Monceau was born to a farming family in Paris. By 21 he was studying at the Jardin du Roi, which later became the Jardin des Plantes, where he became friends with Bernard de Jussieu (1699 –1777?), who recommended him to the Académie des Sciences. He published a number of scientific works on fruit trees and other plants: "Recherches sur les causes de la multiplication des espèces des fruit", "Anatomie de la Poire" (1730-1731), and "Traité des Arbres Fruitiers" (1768). From 1755, Duhamel began publication of the eight-volume work "Traité complet des Bois et des Fôrets" that would attempt to detail "all aspects of trees including their planting, growth, maintenance, and transportation. The first installation started with two volumes titled "Traité des Arbres et Arbustes" (1755). Other titles that were included in the comprehensive work were "La Physique des Arbres" (1758), "De l’Exploitation des Bois" (1764), and finally "Du Transport" (1767). Between the years 1752 and 1777, he authored various works that appeared both in Diderot’s "Encyclopédie" and the "Dictionnaire des Arts et Metiers". Bret Payne for Oak Spring Garden Library online. Brunet II, 871; Dunthorne, 243; "Great Flower Books", p.55' Nissen 549; Plesch p. 211; Pritzel 2470.
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Histoire naturelle des perroquets. Paris: Levrault frères (later Levrault, Schoell & Co.), 1801-1805

LEVAILLANT, François (1753-1824) 2 volumes, folio (22 3/4 x 15 3/4 in.; 57.8 x 40 cm). 145 fine stipple-engraved plates after Jacques Barraband, printed in colors and finished by hand by Langlois under the direction of Bouquet, dedication leaf to B.G.E.L. Lacépède in vol. 1, half-titles and single-page indices in each volume; light, scattered or marginal foxing affecting about 15 plates, occasional light foxing to text margins, minor creases to plates 18 and 77, neat repair to marginal tear on pl. 116, WITHAL AN EXCEPTIONALLY BRIGHT AND CLEAN COPY. Contemporary crimson straight-grain morocco, smooth spines lettered and ruled gilt; board edges a bit worn, top of lower covers of each volume lightly sunned. FIRST EDITION OF ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FRENCH ORNITHOLOGICAL BOOKS, FROM THE CELEBRATED LIBRARY OF BERIAH BOTFIELD. Levaillant, one of France's greatest ornithologists, was born the son of the French consul in Paramarimbo, Dutch Guiana. Having studied natural history at Metz, he became one of the first of a new breed of naturalists who observed and recorded their subjects in their natural habitat. In 1781-1784, he collected specimens in South Africa on behalf of the Dutch East India Company. Jacques Barraband (1767/68-1809) worked for the Gobelin factory and was recognized as the best ornithological artist of his time owing to his attention to remarkably accurate detail and use of naturalistically textured color. Langlois' skillful engravings of Barraband's original watercolor and gouache drawings reproduce their delicate modulations of tone and color as well as their fine lines and flawless draftsmanship. "After he had made himself Emperor, it was part of Napoleon's deliberate policy to initiate a series of magnificent publications that would vie with those undertaken on the orders of Louis XIV. These were sent as presented to crowned heads, men of science, and learned bodies, in evidence of the splendours of the Empire The works of Levaillant owe their sumptuous character to this impetus. His Histoire naturelle des perroquets is, unwittingly, a part of the glories of Napoleonic France" (Fine Bird Books, p. 15). REFERENCES: Anker 303; Ayer/Zimmer p. 392; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 118; Nissen IVB 558; Ronsil 1780 PROVENANCE: Highly Important Books from Beriah Botfield's Library (Christie's London, 30 March 1994, lot 77)
Histoire naturelle des perroquets. Paris: Levrault frères (later Levrault

Histoire naturelle des perroquets. Paris: Levrault frères (later Levrault, Schoell & Co.), 1801-1805

LEVAILLANT, François (1753-1824) 2 volumes folio (22 3/4 x 15 3/4 in.; 57.8 x 40 cm). 145 fine stipple-engraved plates after Jacques Barraband, printed in colors and finished by hand by Langlois under the direction of Bouquet, dedication leaf to B.G.E.L. Lacépède in vol. 1, half-titles and single-page indices in each volume; light scattered foxing to text leaves for plates 64 and 70 and index leaf in vol. 1, negligible toning to plates 103 and 118, light marginal foxing on plates 116 and 128, small faint stain to lower inside corner of plate 103. Nineteenth-century salmon morocco paneled gilt with a double roll-tooled border of acanthus leaves, the spines richly gilt in compartments with slightly raised bands, lettered in the second, third, and final compartments (the last dated "1807" [sic]), marbled endpapers, edges gilt; the spines gently sunned, a few scrapes to board edges with minor loss. FIRST EDITION OF ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FRENCH ORNITHOLOGICAL BOOKS, A BRIGHT, CRISP COPY IN A HANDSOME BINDING. Levaillant, one of France's greatest ornithologists, was born the son of the French consul in Paramarimbo, Dutch Guiana. Having studied natural history at Metz, he became one of the first of a new breed of naturalists who observed and recorded their subjects in their natural habitat. In 1781-1784, he collected specimens in South Africa on behalf of the Dutch East India Company. Jacques Barraband (1767/68-1809) worked for the Gobelin factory and was recognized as the best ornithological artist of his time owing to his attention to remarkably accurate detail and use of naturalistically textured color. Langlois' skillful engravings of Barraband's original watercolor and gouache drawings reproduce their delicate modulations of tone and color as well as their fine lines and flawless draftsmanship. "After he had made himself Emperor, it was part of Napoleon's deliberate policy to initiate a series of magnificent publications that would vie with those undertaken on the orders of Louis XIV. Theses were sent as presented to crowned heads, men of science, and learned bodies, in evidence of the splendours of the Empire The works of Levaillant owe their sumptuous character to this impetus. His Histoire naturelle des perroquets is, unwittingly, a part of the glories of Napoleonic France" (Fine Bird Books, p. 15). REFERENCES: Anker 303; Ayer/Zimmer p. 392; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 118; Nissen IVB 558; Ronsil 1780
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Histoire naturelle des oiseaux de paradis et des rolliers, suivie de celle des toucans et des Barbus

LEVAILLANT, François (1753-1824). 2 volumes, folio (20 1/4 x 13 1/4 in.; 551.4 x 33.7 cm). 114 fine stipple engraved plates after Jacques Barraband by Bouquet, Grémilliet, and Perée, printed in color and finished by hand; half titles and indices in both volumes, errata leaf for both volumes at the end of vol. 2, this issue without the phrase "Libraire de S.A.I. le Prince Joseph" after Denné's name in the imprint; some marginal foxing to a few plates, scattered foxing or spotting affecting about a dozen plates, occasional foxing (chiefly marginal) to text. Fine contemporary diced Russia, paneled gilt, central gilt emblem of the arms of the Knight of Order of the Garter embellished with the armorial stag of the Earls of Dartmouth on an azured field, the spines in 7 compartments gilt, marbled endpapers, edges gilt; rebacked, preserving the original spines, hinges strengthened. FIRST EDITION OF LEVAILLANT'S SPECTACULAR WORK ON EXOTIC BIRDS. Until Gould, Levaillant was the unparalleled producer of the most comprehensive series of works on exotic birds (Fine Bird Books). The present work was originally issued in 19 parts between 1801 and 1806. The superb plates after Barraband effortlessly capture the striking, unique characteristics and rich coloring of each exotic bird species, featuring 24 birds of paradise; 15 rollers; 17 jays; 18 toucans, 24 barbets, 5 tamatias, 3 barbacous; and 8 jacamars. A pupil of Joseph Malaine, Barraband first worked as a draughtsman at the Gobelins tapestry factory and then as an artist for the Sèvres porcelain manufactory. But his work later in life for Levaillant undoubtedly marked the high point of his career and made abundantly clear why he was considered the best ornithological artist of his generation. FROM THE DISTINGUISHED LIBRARY OF THE EARLS OF DARTMOUTH, probably acquired by the 3rd Earl at the time his investiture as a Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1805. Dartmouth served as lord steward of the household from August 1802 and as lord chamberlain from May 1804. He was a trustee of the British Museum from 1802 to 1810. REFERENCES: Anker 304; Ayer/Zimmer p. 393; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 118; C. Jackson, Dictionary of Bird Artists of the World (Woodbridge, 1999), p. 148; McGill/Wood p. 434; Nissen, IVB 559; Ronsil 1780 PROVENANCE: George Legge, 3rd Earl of Dartmouth (1755-1810, gilt supralibros); William Heneage Legge, 6th Earl of Dartmouth (1851-1936, early 20th century bookplate on front pastedown); A. J. Dearden (inscribed on bookplate and dated 1925 and on verso of front free endpaper of vol. 1)
The Natural History of Carolina

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing the Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects, and Plants; Particularly the Forest-Trees, Shrubs, and other Plants, not hitherto Described.

CATESBY, Mark (1683-1749). 2 volumes, folio (20 x 14 in.; 50.8 x 35.5 cm). Title-pages in English and French printed in red and black, double-column text in English and French, dedication leaf in English to the Queen and trilingual index leaf (English, Latin, and French) in vol. 1, dedication leaf in English to the Princess of Wales in vol. 2, 6-page index to both volumes in English, Latin, and French at the end of vol. 2, 220 etched plates with FINE, SATURATED HANDCOLORING, most with Catesby's monogram (vol. 2 plates 61 and 96 by Georg Ehret after Catesby), handcolored folding map of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands and "An Account of Carolina and the Bahama Islands" bound after the plates in vol. 2, vol. 1 Preface with a band of 16 printer's fleurons, etched headpiece by Catesby, woodcut initials; "DU" corrected by hand on title-pages, first 20 text leaves of vol. 2 with attempted corrections by hand, as usual, light text offset to plates and/or pigment offset to text, light vertical creases in vol. 1 (plates 56-69), scattered foxing, spotting, or mottling affecting about a dozen plates, skillful repairs to short tears on plates 3-4 and to small holes on plates 5-8, and 19-21, short tear in right margin outside plate mark of plate 19 in vol. 2. Contemporary French straight-grained scarlet morocco, covers finely decorated with borders of gilt and blind garland roll-tools, inner border of gilt fillets with cornerpieces comprising small tools of birds fleeing a coiled snake in the grass, blue holland endpapers, spines in 7 compartments with raised bands lettered gilt in the second and fifth edges gilt and elaborately gauffred; expertly rebacked, preserving the original spines, board edges a bit worn. "THE MOST FAMOUS COLORPLATE BOOK OF AMERICAN PLANT AND ANIMAL LIFE AND A FUNDAMENTAL AND ORIGINAL WORK FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN SPECIES" (Hunt). The second edition, first edition of the text revised by George Edwards. Trained as a botanist, Catesby travelled to Virginia in 1712, returning to London in 1719 with an extensive collection of plants. This collection drew the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, who helped fund Catesby's second trip to Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the Bahamas from 1722 to 1729. Catesby's preface details his two journeys to the New World and the development of his natural history, including his decision to etch the plates himself in order to ensure both accuracy and economy. "Instead of perpetuating the previous stiff, profile manner of presentation, Catesby devised the method of mingling plants and animals in logical groupings, most often with accuracy and with proportional scale between figure and plant. He did his utmost to convey something of the particular habits or movements of each species. Simple though they are, he infused his compositions with a sense of movement and vitality not usual prior to his work" (Norelli). The first edition was published in ten parts, with the final part appearing in 1743 and the 20-plate appendix in 1747. Work appears to have begun on the second edition almost immediately-if not simultaneously-with the 1747 appendix. According to Stafleu and Cowan, the second edition was published between 1748 and 1756. Recent discoveries have suggested that there are multiple issues of the second edition, including early issues that may partly be comprised by sheets from the first edition. REFERENCES: E. G. Allen, "The History of American Ornithology before Audubon," in Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 41:3 (October 1951), pp. 387-591; Anker 94; Dunthorne 72; Ellis/Mengel 477; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 86; Great Flower Books (1990). P. 53; Hunt 486 (first edition); McGill/Wood 281; E. Charles Nelson and David J. Elliott, The Curious Mister Catesby (University of George Press, 2015); Nissen IVB 177 and BBI 336; Norellli, American Wildlife Painting (New York, 1975); Sabin 11058; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1057; Edwin Wolf 2nd, A Flock of Beautiful Birds (Philadelphia, 1977), pp. 5 -7 PROVENANCE: Shelfmark on flyleaf (pencil inscription "C-34-P-1" in an early hand ); Library Company of Baltimore (bookplate inscribed "Shelf No. 5001, Case N"); Maryland Historical Society (bookplate; Sotheby's New York, 19 June 2008, lot 45)
The Natural History of Carolina

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: Containing the Figures of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects, and Plants; Particularly the Forest-Trees, Shrubs, and other Plants, not hitherto Described.

CATESBY, Mark (1683-1749). 2 volumes, folio (21 x 14 in.; 53.3 x 35.5 cm). Title-pages in English and French printed in red and black, double-column text in English and French, dedication leaf in English to the Queen and trilingual index leaf (English, Latin, and French) in vol. 1, dedication leaf in English to the Princess of Wales in vol. 2, 6-page index to both volumes in English, Latin, and French at the end of vol. 2, 220 handcolored etched plates, most with Catesby's monogram (vol. 2 plates 61 and 96 by Georg Ehret after Catesby), handcolored folding map of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands and "An Account of Carolina and the Bahama Islands" bound after the plates in vol. 2, vol. 1 Preface with a band of 16 printer's fleurons, etched headpiece by Catesby, woodcut initials; "DU" corrected by hand on title-pages, first 20 text leaves of vol. 2 with attempted corrections by hand, light text and/or pigment offset, some scattered spotting and finger soiling, Pl. 101 (Razor Billed Black Jackdaw) and Pl. 167 (Little Brown Bead Snake) and adjoining text foxed, dark stain in gutter of Pl. 149 (Angel Fish) and its text. Contemporary mottled calf, marbled endpapers; sympathetically rebacked, board edges a little worn, vol. 2 upper board scratched, lower board scuffed with minor loss. The LAIRD U. PARK COPY OF "THE MOST FAMOUS COLORPLATE BOOK OF AMERICAN PLANT AND ANIMAL LIFE AND A FUNDAMENTAL AND ORIGINAL WORK FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN SPECIES" (Hunt). The second edition, first edition of the text revised by George Edwards. Trained as a botanist, Catesby travelled to Virginia in 1712, returning to London in 1719 with an extensive collection of plants. This collection drew the attention of Sir Hans Sloane, who helped fund Catesby's second trip to Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the Bahamas from 1722 to 1729. Catesby's preface details his two journeys to the New World and the development of his natural history, including his decision to etch the plates himself in order to ensure both accuracy and economy. "Instead of perpetuating the previous stiff, profile manner of presentation, Catesby devised the method of mingling plants and animals in logical groupings, most often with accuracy and with proportional scale between figure and plant. He did his utmost to convey something of the particular habits or movements of each species. Simple though they are, he infused his compositions with a sense of movement and vitality not usual prior to his work" (Norelli). The first edition was published in ten parts, with the final part appearing in 1743 and the 20-plate appendix in 1747. Work appears to have begun on the second edition almost immediately-if not simultaneously-with the 1747 appendix. According to Stafleu and Cowan, the second edition was published between 1748 and 1756. Recent discoveries have suggested that there are multiple issues of the second edition, including early issues that may partly be comprised by sheets from the first edition. REFERENCES: E. G. Allen, "The History of American Ornithology before Audubon," in Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 41:3 (October 1951), pp. 387-591; Anker 94; Dunthorne 72; Ellis/Mengel 477; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 86; Great Flower Books (1990). P. 53; Hunt 486 (first edition); McGill/Wood 281; E. Charles Nelson and David J. Elliott, The Curious Mister Catesby (University of George Press, 2015); Nissen IVB 177 and BBI 336; Norellli, American Wildlife Painting (New York, 1975); Sabin 11058; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1057; Edwin Wolf 2nd, A Flock of Beautiful Birds (Philadelphia, 1977), pp. 5 -7 PROVENANCE: The American Library of Laird U. Park, Jr. (his sale, Sotheby's New York, 29 November 2000, lot 48); John Spencer (armorial bookplate on front pastedown); H.C. Drayton (bookplate on front free endpaper)
The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America.

The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America.

AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) and Reverend John Bachman (1790-1874) 3 volumes, imperial folio (27 1/4 x 21 1/4 in.; 69.2 x 54 cm). 3 lithographed title-pages and 3 letterpress contents leaves, 150 lithographed plates by J. T. Bowen after John James and James Woodhouse Audubon, backgrounds after Victor Gifford Audubon, handcolored and heightened with gum arabic; title-pages and contents leaves foxed and creased, with small stain in lower right corners, inner margin of vol. 3 title tearing away from text block, neat repairs to tears (most 1-2 in., one approximately 6 in.) on 7 plates, light marginal foxing or mottling to about 9 plates, 3 plates toned (one on verso rather than recto), pl. 65 (Little Harvest Mouse) creased the length of the plate, dark stain in lower right corner of pl. 89 (Say's Squirrel). Modern half burgundy morocco over grey cloth, spines in 6 compartments gilt, morocco presentation label on front cover of vol. 1; extremities a bit worn with some minor losses and tears, lower board of vol. 3 scratched. [Together with]: 3 text volumes, 8vo (11 x 7 1/4 in.; 27.9 x 18.4 cm). New York: J. J. Audubon, 1856 (in roman numerals)-V. G. Audubon, 1851 (in roman numerals). Title-page for vol. 3 supplied with a vol. 1 title-page with volume number altered in ink to read "III,"half-title in vol. 1 only, list of subscribers in vol. 1 continued into vol. 2; half-title slightly trimmed, lacks the 5 supplemental handcolored lithographed plates, many leaves roughly opened (some left unopened), dampstaining in vol. 1, quires 8-48 progressively more pronounced, vol. 2 title and pp. 1-3 guarded, tissue repair to top margin of p. 3, text block cracked but intact between pp. 6-7, vol. 3 title tipped in with first text leaf. Grey cloth by Knowlton dated 1962, smooth spines lettered gilt. FIRST EDITION OF THE ONE OF THE GREATEST COLORPLATE BOOKS PRODUCED ENTIRELY IN AMERICA IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. PRESENTATION COPY, INSCRIBED BY V. G. AUDUBON in the second text volume: "To Dr. A. V. Williams | with the best wishes of his | obliged friend | V. G. Audubon." After an unsuccessful attempt to secure federal funding for his "Great Western Journey," Audubon determined that the commercial potential of the Quadrupeds was sufficient to risk funding the expedition himself. "To render [the Quadrupeds] more complete, I will leave the comforts of my home and beloved family, bound to the Rocky Mountains I cannot tell how long I may be absent, but look to return loaded up knowledge, new and abundant specimens on the shot and not from stuffed museums' moth-eaten remains. I am told that I am too old to undertake such a long and arduous journey, but having the will, I will no doubt safely bear or even surmount the difficulties" (letter to C. Bonaparte, February, 1843, quoted by Rhodes). To his collaborator the Rev. James Bachman, he exclaimed "I am growing old, but what of this? My spirits are as enthusiastical as ever, my legs full able to carry my body for ten years to come, and in about two of these I expect the illustrations out, and ere the following twelve months have elapsed, their histories studied, their descriptions carefully prepared and the book printed!" (Streshinsky, Audubon: Life and Art in the American Wilderness, p. 332). It was to be J.J. Audubon's last major endeavor. Returning home in late fall of 1843 aged 58 and in declining health, he delegated many of the smaller mammals to his son John Woodhouse to draw and the backgrounds to his youngest, Victor Gifford, who also supervised the printing and publication. Despite Audubon's optimistic timeline for the completed work, it took the family five years to publish 150 plates in thirty parts. The first proofs were ready in 1842, but Audubon was Audubon's lithographer J.T. Bowen was immersed in the production of the octavo set of The Birds of America. The last part of the octavo Birds appeared in May, 1844, and publication of the folio Quadrupeds began immediately, with the first number being issued in January, 1845 and the first volume completed within the year. The accompanying octavo text volumes, written and edited by Rev. John Bachman, first appeared between 1846 and 1854. "The massive project was a commercial success, thanks to the close management of Victor" (Reese), attracting a total number of 300 subscribers. PROVENANCE: V.G. Audubon (inscription to Dr. A.V. Williams); Bayard Ewing (commemorative labels on folio volumes presented to the Rhode Island Audubon Society and gift bookplates in text volumes dated 1960) REFERENCES: Bennett p. 5; McGill/Wood 208; Nissen ZBI 162; Reese 36; Sabin 2367
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Histoire naturelle des oiseaux d’Afrique

LEVAILLANT, Francois (1753-1824). 6 volumes, 4to (13 1.4 x 10 in.; 33.7 x 25.4 cm). Half-titles for first three text volumes only, 300 fine engraved plates printed in color and finished by hand (of which 4 folding and one double-page), interleaved with tissue guards, plate 221 misnumbered 121; very faint, chiefly marginal foxing, spotting, and/or discoloration affecting approximately 35 plates, light toning to about 14 plates (of which 5 affected by unobtrusive pigment offsetting from previous plate), offset "ghost" of previously inserted slips of paper touching images on plates 218 and 231. Text for all 6 volumes bound as vols. 1-3, plates bound in vols. 4-6 in contemporary calf gilt, smooth spines decorated with fine gilt tools, 2 red morocco lettering pieces, marbled edges and endpapers; vol. 1 spine detached but present and upper board nearly detached, a few scrapes and tear to vol. 3 spine with some loss, vol. 4 spine and joints rubbed, upper board vol. 5 scratched and minor losses to spine, vol. 6 extremities and spine rubbed, upper joint cracked but intact. A FINE BRIGHT COPY OF THE QUARTO EDITION OF "THE MOST IMPORTANT ORNITHOLGICAL WORK ON AFRICA PUBLISHED UP TO THIS PERIOD" (Mendelssohn). It was issued in 51 parts (1796-1808). A seventh volume with 52 plates was planned but never published. Levaillant, one of France's greatest ornithologists, was born the son of the French consul in Paramarimbo, Dutch Guiana. Having studied natural history at Metz, he became one of the first of a new breed of naturalists who observed and recorded their subjects in their natural habitat. In 1781-1784, he collected specimens in South Africa on behalf of the Dutch East India Company. "It gives a comprehensive account of the birds of South Africa, based on Levaillant's personal experiences and the collections he made during his journeys in that region. The style of the text is lively, and it gives descriptions not only of the names of the birds, but also of their habits and habitats" (Anker). REFERENCES: Anker 297; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 118; Nissen IVB 555; Ronsil 1780; cf. Mendelssohn, South African Bibliography I:892
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Histoire naturelle des oiseaux d’Afrique.

LEVAILLANT, Francois (1753-1824) - REINOLD, Johann Lebrecht. 6 volumes, folio (21 1/2 x 14 in.; 54.6 X 35.6 cm). Half-title in each volume, 300 fine engraved plates IN TWO STATES, printed in black ink and in color and finished by hand; dedication to A. J. Temminck in vol. 1 (2 leaves); half-titles in vols. 1 and 6 , title in vol. 4, text to pl. 131 and pl. 133 creased, vol. 6 half-title, long tear to colored plate 12 slightly just touching image, title, plates from 286 forward stained chiefly in the gutters, marginal or scattered foxing to plates throughout, occasional faint offsetting (plates to text, text to verso of plates), internal tear to pl. 3 (?paper flaw), some toning and marginal dust-soiling. 19th-century half tan calf, grey paper boards; corners renewed, joints and spine ends rubbed, small gouge to upper board of vol. 3. RARE DELUXE ISSUE WITH THE PLATES IN BOTH COLORED AND UNCOLORED STATES OF "THE MOST IMPORTANT ORNITHOLOGICAL WORK ON AFRICA PUBLISHED UP THIS PERIOD" (Mendelssohn). Only five copies in both states (one imperfect) have appeared at auction in the past 20 years. It was published in 51 parts (1796-1808). A seventh volume with 52 plates was planned but never published. Nevertheless,"[i]t gives a comprehensive account of the birds of South Africa, based on Levaillant's personal experiences and the collections he made during his journeys in that region. The style of the text is lively, and it gives descriptions not only of the names of the birds, but also of their habits and habitats" (Anker). REFERENCES: Anker 298; Ayer/Zimmer p. 391; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 118; Mendelssohn, South African Bibliography I:892; Nissen IVB 555; Ronsil 1780
The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America.

The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America.

AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) and Rev. John Bachman (1790-1874) 4 volumes of elephant broadsheets bound as oblong folios (28 x 21 3/4 in.; 55.3 x 71.1 cm). 3 lithographed title-pages and 3 letterpress contents leaves, 150 lithographed plates by J. T. Bowen after John James and James Woodhouse Audubon, backgrounds after Victor Gifford Audubon, handcolored and heightened with gum arabic; titles and contents toned, moderate marginal dust-soiling on most plates, some finger soiling, plates 1, 62, 72, 73, 81 creased chiefly in upper lefthand corner, tape repairs to tiny tears along bottom margins of plates 112-113, small oil stains in gutters of about 13 plates, chiefly in the fourth volume. Contemporary quarter red morocco over brown marbled boards, spines gilt in six compartments lettered "Histoire Naturelle" in the second, numbered in the fourth, and monogrammed in the sixth; extremities rubbed; minor loss to head of spine (vol. 1), vol. 2 head of spine torn but present. FIRST EDITION OF THE ONE OF THE GREATEST COLORPLATE BOOKS PRODUCED ENTIRELY IN AMERICA IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. After an unsuccessful attempt to secure federal funding for his "Great Western Journey," Audubon determined that the commercial potential of the Quadrupeds was sufficient to risk funding the expedition himself. "To render [the Quadrupeds] more complete, I will leave the comforts of my home and beloved family, bound to the Rocky Mountains I cannot tell how long I may be absent, but look to return loaded up knowledge, new and abundant specimens on the shot and not from stuffed museums' moth-eaten remains. I am told that I am too old to undertake such a long and arduous journey, but having the will, I will no doubt safely bear or even surmount the difficulties" (letter to C. Bonaparte, February, 1843, quoted by Rhodes). To his collaborator the Rev. James Bachman, he exclaimed "I am growing old, but what of this? My spirits are as enthusiastical as ever, my legs full able to carry my body for ten years to come, and in about two of these I expect the illustrations out, and ere the following twelve months have elapsed, their histories studied, their descriptions carefully prepared and the book printed!" (Streshinsky, Audubon: Life and Art in the American Wilderness, p. 332). It was to be J.J. Audubon's last major endeavor. Returning home in late fall of 1843 aged 58 and in declining health, he delegated many of the smaller mammals to his son John Woodhouse to draw and the backgrounds to his youngest, Victor Gifford, who also supervised the printing and publication. Despite Audubon's optimistic timeline for the completed work, it took the family five years to publish 150 plates in thirty parts. The first proofs were ready in 1842, but Audubon was Audubon's lithographer J.T. Bowen was immersed in the production of the octavo set of The Birds of America. The last part of the octavo Birds appeared in May, 1844, and publication of the folio Quadrupeds began immediately, with the first number being issued in January, 1845 and the first volume completed within the year. The accompanying octavo text volumes, written and edited by Rev. John Bachman, first appeared between 1846 and 1854. "The massive project was a commercial success, thanks to the close management of Victor" (Reese), attracting a total number of 300 subscribers. REFERENCES: Bennett p. 5; McGill/Wood 208; Nissen ZBI 162; Reese 36; Sabin 2367 PROVENANCE: Gilt cypher in sixth spine compartment; J.R. Walsh (stamps on title-pages and contents leaves); Acquired from Nico Isreal, 1978; The Richard Harris Collection: Natural History and Colourplate Books (Bloomsbury, 13 October 2010, lot 3)
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A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean, and Round the World; In Which the Coast of North-west America Has Been Carefully Examined and Accurately Surveyed Undertaken.

VANCOUVER, George (1757-1798) A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean, and Round the World; In Which the Coast of North-west America Has Been Carefully Examined and Accurately Surveyed Undertaken. Principally with a View to Ascertain the Existence of any Navigable Communication Between the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans.6 volumes, 8vo (8 1/4 x 5 in.; 21 x 12.7 cm) and one large atlas volume (11 x 8 1/2 in.; 28 x 21.6 cm), 2-page publisher's advertisements at the end of vol. 6; light occasional toning, vol. 5 title-page foxed. 2 engraved folding maps and 17 engraved plates in atlas volume; Chart of the Coast of North America reinforced, scattered foxing to Coast of New Holland, 2 plates trimmed. (64F8D) FIRST OCTAVO EDITION, THE SECOND AND DEFINITIVE, CORRECTED ENGLISH EDITION. ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ACCOUNTS OF THE EXPLORATION OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND NEW ZEALAND AND VALUABLE SOURCE INFORMATION ABOUT TAHITI AND THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS in the last decade of the eighteenth century. Vancouver had sailed with Cook on his second and third voyages (1772-1774 and 1776-1780) and "was made commander of a grand-scale expedition to reclaim Britain's rights, resulting from the Nootka Convention, at Nootka Sound, to examine thoroughly the coast south of 60o in order to find a possible passage to the Atlantic, and to learn what establishments had been founded by other powers. The voyage became one of the most important ever made in the interests of geographical knowledge. Vancouver sailed by way of the Cape of Good Hope to Australia, where he discovered King George's Sound and Cape Hood, then to New Zealand, Hawaii, and the northwest coast of America.[he] surveyed the coast of California, visited San Francisco and San Diego and other Spanish settlements in Alta California.investigated the Strait of Juan de Fuca, discovered the Strait of Georgia, circumnavigated Vancouver Island, and disproved the existence of any passage between the Pacific and Hudson Bay" (Hill). Among the important features of the narrative are the engraved views of the Mission of San Carlos and the Presidio of Monterey, most likely the earliest published views of California. The first edition (1798) comprised three quarto text volumes containing one engraved chart and 17 engraved plates as well as one folio atlas with 10 folding engraved charts and six engraved plates of coastal profiles. After Vancouver's death in May 1798, corrections to the text of the octavo edition were completed by his brother John, assisted by Captain Peter Puget. All 17 plates from the first edition text volumes were reprinted using the original printing plates. There are only two folding charts included in the octavo edition because the printing plates for the chart from the first edition text volumes, along with the charts and plates in the atlas were lost, and the decision was made to re-engrave only two charts. REFERENCES: Ferguson, Bibliography of Australia 339; Forbes, Hawaii 1780-1830 I:335; Hill (2004) 1754; Howes V-23; Judd, Voyages to Hawaii before 1860 179; O'Reilly-Reitman, Bibliographie de Tahiti et de la Polynésie française 636; Sabin 98444; Wantrup, Australian Rare Books 63b; Wagner Northwest Coast I, pp. 239-250 PROVENANCE: The Estate of David Spinney (sale, Skinner, 30 October 2016, lot 397)