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American Medical Botany being a Collection of the Native Medicinal Plants of the United States containing their Botanical History and Chemical Analysis, and Properties and Uses in Medicines, Diet and the Arts, with Coloured Engravings

Bigelow, Jacob Boston: Cummings and Hilliard, 1817, 1818, and 1820. 6 parts in 3 volumes. Quarto (9 3/4"x 6 3/4", 245mm x 170mm) First edition, first state. 6 section titles, 3 volume titles. With 60 colored plates, comprising 10 handcolored copper engravings and 50 plates printed in colors, probably from an etched stone. Bound in black half Morocco over marbled paper boards. On the spine, 5 raised bands with title, author, and volume gilt. Red speckled edges to the text block. Minor rubbing to the extremities. Smudging, foxing, damp-staining, and offsetting throughout. Jacob Bigelow (1787-1879) was a physician, botanist and botanical illustrator. Born in Massachusetts, Bigelow had a flourishing 60 year career as a doctor in Boston. He studied at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard medical school, where he taught for forty years, 1815-1855. He wrote and edited American Medical Botany, creating the "first botanical book published in America". The plates were inked with several colors applied with small cotton pads (shaped like a doll or poupée) for each impression. The process is intensively laborious and proved too expensive to continue for long into the 19th Century. Bookplate of Francis Brooks on the front pastedown of each volume. The John Golden Library, Sotheby's, 22 Nov 2022. Nissen BBI 164; Sabin 5294.
  • $5,100
  • $5,100
book (2)

The Birds of America, from Drawings made in the United States and Their Territories

Audubon, John James New York: George R. Lockwood and Son, [1870-1871]. 8 volumes in 4. Octavo (10 1/2 x 7 3/4 , 265mm x 185mm). Bound in later half brown Morocco over cloth covered boards. On the spine, 4 raised bands with gilt lettering and a bird. This is the complete text to the rare final octavo edition of Audubon s Birds of America bound without plates. Extremities and hinges rubbed. Marbled endpapers. Some tanning throughout. Ron Tyler, in Audubon s Great National Work, quotes a letter by the publisher s son, Richard B. Lockwood, noting that some time after 1870 the lithographed octavo plates were destroyed when they fell through the floors in a Philadelphia building. The date of the disaster at the Lockwood firm suggests that this final octavo edition was produced in 1871. John James Audubon (1785-1851) was a French-American artist, naturalist and ornithologist. He pursued extensive studies documenting all types of American birds. His Birds of America is considered one of the finest works of ornithology ever completed. It established him as a great scientist with his careful, detailed research, as well as a talented artist. The octavo Birds of America was originally issued in 100 parts, each containing five plates executed by the Philadelphia lithographer, J.T. Bowen. Changes in subscribers and increased press runs created numerous states of plates as they were reprinted. Ron Tyler lays out the whole story of the book s production, with detailed information about every aspect of the project. He describes the difficulties of book production and marketing that illustrates the world of color printing in mid-19th-century America. Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work, pp. 129, 165 note 10; Nissen IVB 51; Sabin 2364.
  • $4,800
  • $4,800
book (2)

[Double hemisphere world map]

Florianus, Antonius (Antonio Floriano) 2 sheets, joined (21 1/2" x 34 1/2"). Fine engraved double-hemisphere map constructed on a polar projections, with each hemisphere cut into thirty-six gores, in the manner of printed globes. In 1555, the Venetian Senate granted Antonio Floriano of Udine a privilege (the Renaissance equivalent of a copyright) to publish this map of the world. In his application to the Senate, Floriano wrote that he had used his "diligence and knowledge" to create "a mappemonde which has never been made before, with the aid of which one can easily study and learn cosmography and see the entire picture of the world, since it can be reduced to spheric form." Dramatically, Floriano wrote that the map had caused him "so much drudgery and sweat," such "heavy toil," that it defied the imagination. The result of Floriano's labor was this unique world map, which shows not the eastern and western hemispheres--later one of the most popular formats for world maps--but rather the northern and southern hemispheres, with the earth shown as if bisected at the Equator. In yet another graphic innovation, Floriano divided each hemisphere into thirty-six curving triangular segments meant to imitate globe gores: the sections that, when joined at the edges, generated the spherical form. Floriano's gores each encompass ten degrees of longitude (hence thirty-six of them, for a total of 360 degrees). Floriano's intriguing map bears no title, location or date, and two cartouches at top and bottom that were clearly meant to contain text were left incomplete. Although there is no record of a publication date, Floriano's petition to the Senate from early 1555 makes it quite likely that the map appeared the same year. Whatever mystery surrounds the exact circumstances of its publication, the map's refinement is beyond doubt. Floriano's "mappemonde" is finely engraved and splendidly ornamented. The geographical information was gleaned from Gerard Mercator's landmark world map of 1538, including the place names as well as forms. The projection, too, was identical to Mercator's. Floriano shows the Americas as being entirely separate from Asia, and divided into two labeled continents, north and south. A massive sheet of ice occupies the Arctic, while an enormous landmass covers the South Pole, centuries before the discovery of Antarctica. This example of Floriano's map is in excellent condition, with handsome examples of decorative strapwork and circular portraits of Ptolemy and Floriano in the top corners. Very few examples of Floriano's map were issued in the sixteenth century and many fewer survive today. It is legendary for its rarity. This represents a singular opportunity to obtain a striking and unusual map by a prominent Venetian cartographer. Rodney W. Shirley, The Mapping of the World (London, 1983), n. 99; Rudolfo Gallo, "Antonio Florian and his Mappemonde," Imago Mundi 6 (1949), 35-38.
  • $150,000
  • $150,000
book (2)

Pomologia, dat is Beschryvingen en Afbeeldingen van de beste sorten van Appels en Peeren. WITH Fructologia, of Beschryving der Vrugtbomen en Vrugten. WITH Dendrologia, or Beschryving der Plantagie-Gewassen.

Knoop, Johan Hermann Leeuwarden: Abraham Ferwerda and G. Tresling, n. d. [possibly 1763]. Folio (12 3/4" x 8", 325mm x 205mm). 3 parts in one volume. With 39 hand-coloured engraved plates of apples, pears, and other fruits and berries, engraved by Jacob Folkema. Bound in Contemporary half calf over speckled paper boards. On the spine, 6 raised bands with text gilt to red Morocco in the second panel. Gilt plant decoration in the other panels. The boards and extremities are heavily worn with the spine starting at the bottom and along the top hinge. Minor foxing and toning throughout with occaisional seepage through the plates. Lower corner of page H in second work torn without loss of text. Born in Kassel, Germany, Johann Hermann Knoop (1700-1769) systematically researched and cultivated many varieties of apples and other fruits. He wrote numerous books on botany, as well as mathematics and astronomy. In Pomologia, he identifies more than 100 varieties of apples. Princess Maria-Louise van Hessen, a great lover of garden art, appointed him director of horticulture at Mariënberg. The Dowager Princess of Orange and Nassau had a celebrated garden that Knoop contributed to. Knoop learned botany from his father, who was court gardener and manager of the Pleasure Garden at Freienage. The beautiful illustrations appear three-dimensional due to their careful shading and naturalism. Nissen BBI 1077, 1078; Stafleu TL2 3766, 3768
  • $3,100
  • $3,100
book (2)

The Butterflies of North Americafirst [-second,-third] series.

Edwards, William Henry Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888-1884-1897. 3 volumes. Quarto (10 3/ 4 x 8 3 /4, 270mm x 225mm) With 154 hand-coloured lithographic plates. Half-titles to vols l-ll, in vol.ll bound after title and before preface. Third Series volume title bound at beginning of vol. l. Bound in contemporary half black Morocco gilt, edges of text block gilt. On the spine, 4 raised bands, text gilt to second through third panels. Spine sunned and worn, especially at the head of vol. l. Extremities worn. Marbled endpapers. Tissue guards and light offsetting. In vol. I, front free endpaper detached. In 1846, William Henry Edwards (1822-1909) travelled with his uncle Amory Edwards up the Amazon River, as recounted in his popular book A Voyage up the River Amazon (1847). He provided advice, research and letters of introduction to subsequent scientists. In 1868, Edwards began thiis work as a quarto pamphlet series of descriptions and illustrations of North American species. Edwwrds was an American businessman, entomologist and explorer. He was a pioneer in coalfield development in West Virginia and came from a prominent family. He graduated from Williams College in 1842, where he studied Natural History, a new discipline. After studying law briefly, he dedicated himself to the serious collecting and study of lepidoptera. The illustrations here were drawn by Mary Peart, and hand-colored by Lydia Bowen and her sister Patience Leslie. There is an authorial presentation inscription on a pasted slip on prelim To David Bruce with regards of Wm H Edwards 1891. David Bruce (1833-1903) was a Scottish naturalist and collaborator with Edwards. He also performed taxidermy and insect illustration. There is a bookplate on the front pastedown of James J. Waring. He was the first full-time Professor of Medecine at the University of Colorado, where he went to recuperate from tuberculosis. He ran the medical school from 1933-1945. Nissen ZBI 1234.
  • $4,500
  • $4,500
book (2)

Illustrations of Natural History;. Wherein are exhibited upwards of two hundred and forty figures of exotic insects, According to their different Genera; very few of which have hitherto been figured by any author

Drury, Dru London, printed for the author, 1770-1782. 3 volumes. Large quarto (12 x 9 1/2 , 305mm x 240mm). Text in English and French. With 146 (of 150) hand-coloured engraved plates mostly by and after Moses Harris, and 2 plates by P. Mazell after Mary Garside. Vols. I and II are bound in modern brown polished calf over blue boards. Vol. III is bound in the original publisher s boards. On the spine of Vols. I and II, 5 raised bands with text gilt to red Morocco lettering piece in the second panel and floral decoration in blind and black on remaining panels. Vol.I lacking index. Vol. III lacking plates 16, 23, 30, and 31, with index page bound at front. Vol. III with backstrip perished and the whole becoming detached. Blue boards lightly rubbed. All volumes uncut. This important entomological work presents insects largely unknown in the Western world at the time. It is known for its scientific as well as artistic merit. A British silversmith and naturalist, Dru Drury (1725-1803) nurtured his early love of insects, studying entomology and forming his own fine collection of specimens. He would advertise for insect exchange or purchase through foreign papers, and contact a network of ship s officers and collectors. He composed a 3 page pamphlet of instructions on collecting. A member of the Linnean Society, his collection became well known, one cabinet alone held 11,000 insects. Nissen ZBI 1160.
  • $6,800
  • $6,800
book (2)

Illustrations of Natural History;. Wherein are exhibited upwards of two hundred and forty figures of exotic insects, According to their different Genera; very few of which have hitherto been figured by any author

London, printed for the author, 1770-1782. 3 volumes. Large quarto (12 x 9 1/2 , 305mm x 240mm). Text in English and French. With 146 (of 150) hand-coloured engraved plates mostly by and after Moses Harris, and 2 plates by P. Mazell after Mary Garside. Vols. I and II are bound in modern brown polished calf over blue boards. Vol. III is bound in the original publisher s boards. On the spine of Vols. I and II, 5 raised bands with text gilt to red Morocco lettering piece in the second panel and floral decoration in blind and black on remaining panels. Vol.I lacking index. Vol. III lacking plates 16, 23, 30, and 31, with index page bound at front. Vol. III with backstrip perished and the whole becoming detached. Blue boards lightly rubbed. All volumes uncut. This important entomological work presents insects largely unknown in the Western world at the time. It is known for its scientific as well as artistic merit. A British silversmith and naturalist, Dru Drury (1725-1803) nurtured his early love of insects, studying entomology and forming his own fine collection of specimens. He would advertise for insect exchange or purchase through foreign papers, and contact a network of ship s officers and collectors. He composed a 3 page pamphlet of instructions on collecting. A member of the Linnean Society, his collection became well known, one cabinet alone held 11,000 insects. Nissen ZBI 1160.