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Oriental Memoirs: selected and abridged from a series of familiar letters written during seventeen years residence in India.

FORBES, James (1749-1819). 4 volumes, 4to., (11 6/8 x 9 4/8 inches). Half-titles. Engraved portrait of the author as frontispiece and 93 plates, including 7 lithographed of which 5 are hand-colored, and the remainder engraved, of which 23 are hand-colored (some light offsetting and minor staining). Fine contemporary tan calf, each cover decorated with panels of gilt and blind rolltools, all edges gilt (rebacked to style). Provenance: with the engraved armorial bookplate of Edward Harbord, third Baron Suffield (1781-1835), politician, on each front paste-down. First edition, and AN ATTRACTIVE COPY. Forbes embarked for Bombay and a long career in the East India Company in 1765, only returning permanently to England in 1784. During his time in India Forbes wrote beautifully illustrated letters home, describing the flora, fauna, manners, religions, and archaeology of the west coast of India. These later formed the basis of these "Oriental Memoirs", a "remarkable source book for the west coast of India, published at his own expense" (Anne Bulley for DNB). Abbey Travel 436 (later issue with the additional plates); Borba de Moraes I, p.315: ("Magnificent publication"). For more information about this book, or a warm welcome to see it and other books in our library at 72nd Street, NYC, please contact Kate Hunter, M.A. Oxon, in the Rare Book Department
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Orbis Terrarum Typus De Integro Multis in Locis Emendatus

Plancius, Petrus (1552-1622) ONE OF THE FIRST MAPS TO SHOW THE DOUBLE HEMISPHERICAL FORM AFTER RUMOLD MERCATOR'S WORLD MAP OF 1587 AND THE FIRST MAP TO USE DECORATIVE PICTORIAL BORDERS Engraving: 17" x 23" References: Rodney W. Shirley, The Mapping of the World (London, 1983), n. 187. At the time of its publication, Plancius's large-scale, overwhelmingly detailed and decorative map of the world represented innovations in mapmaking on several levels. A minister of the Reformed Church in Holland, Plancius became an expert on navigation and on Dutch explorations to the Indies. He was one of the first to appreciate the significance of earlier Portuguese charts, and in 1602 was appointed official cartographer to the Dutch East India Company. As such, he had access to privileged information regarding the latest geographical discoveries, information not available to many of his competitors. This world map was first issued separately in 1594 or shortly thereafter, engraved by Jan van Doetecum, a craftsman of great skill whose signature appears in the lower left-hand corner and who was associated with a number of Plancius's maps. The two main terrestrial hemispheres are based on those in Plancius's earlier world map of 1590, updated by geographical details and with the addition of two celestial spheres. Korea is drawn as a peninsula for the first time ever on a map, and Japan is shown with an improved, if still not entirely correct, outline. New Guinea, which had previously been represented as a separate island, is now joined to the southern continent named "Magallanica". The elaborate pictorial borders were inspired by drawings in the works of Theodore de Bry, published a few years earlier, and were another of Plancius's innovations that established a pattern of cartographical decoration that lasted for over a century. Symbolical female figures, landscape vignettes, and highly animated illustrations of animals indigenous to each area represent the regions of the world. Included are elephants and camels, a giraffe, a unicorn, an ostrich, the footless bird of paradise, parrots, snakes, monkeys, a rhinoceros, a crocodile, and a giant armadillo. Plancius's map had a widespread influence on other mapmakers and is rarely available to collectors.
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An Important Album of Sketches in Hawaii

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. CARMICHAEL, F. - WOOD, Carlos C. (1792-1856). HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. CARMICHAEL, F. - WOOD, Carlos C. (1792-1856). An Important Album of Sketches in Hawaii. Ca 1838-1840. Oblong folio (9 2/8 x 11 6/8 inches). 5 comic sketches by F. Carmichael; 12 exceptionally fine pen and ink drawings of views and portraits in Pitcairn Island and Hawaii, including one which stretches over 2 pages, and one in South America all by the same unknown artist; 6 sketches by Carlos C. Wood, and one watercolour drawing by an unknown artist, several leaves watermarked 'J. Whatman / Turkey Mill / 1837' (some leaves and gatherings loose). Contemporary quarter red roan, ticket of Ackermann's Repository (covers detached). Provenance: "Jane Ross, H.M.S. President, Valparaiso May 7th 1838", inscription on front pastedown. AN EXCEPTIONALLY IMPORTANT ALBUM OF SKETCHES IN HAWAII, THE MARQUESAS ISLANDS and PITCAIRN ISLAND, INCLUDING THE SECOND KNOWN, AND FIRST DETAILED PANORAMA OF HONOLULU, THE EARLIEST KNOWN VIEW OF KEALAKEKUA BAY TAKEN FROM KA'AWALOA - 'View of the Town Harbour of Honolulu, Woahou, Sandwich Islands', depicting from left to right the prominent 'foreign' buildings including Pearce and Brewer's trading house with American flag, the British Consulate, Seamen's Bethel Church, Robinson's shipyard, Honolulu Fort, Oahu Charity School, 2 sketches on facing pages, 170 x 540mm. - 'View of Karakakoa Bay, Hawaii, where Cook was killed', showing the thatched houses of Chiefess Kapiolani, and the coconut tree stump upon which Captain Bruce of the Imogene affixed a copper plaque in memory of Cook on 17 October 1837, 130 x 260mm. - 'View of the Volcano of Kiruea [i.e. Kilauea], Island of Hawaii', 150 x 210mm. - 'New Burial Ground under Banyan tree, school house and flagstaff, Pitcairn's Island, 1837', 160 x 250mm. - 'Pitcairn's Island, 1837', being a general view from offshore, 140 x 280mm. - 'The Tattauing on the leg of Tahitianain [sic] wife to the King of Santa Christina Marquesas', 170 x 230mm. - 'Head of a Marquesian of Resolution Bay', 230 x 170mm. - 'Head of a Marquesian Boy of Resolution Bay', 230 x 170mm.; all the above by the same hand, in black ink, captioned below in brown ink, the last three with blue and yellow wash - View of a ruined church probably in Latin-America, by the same hand as the above, black ink Preceeded by 5 comic sketches of Peruvians, signed or initialled 'F. Carmichael' or 'FC', pencil and watercolour, some captioned below in brown ink and dated at Callao, 1838 and 1839 Followed by 6 sketches of military and naval subject matter in Valparaiso and elsewhere, Chile, signed or initialled by Lt. Col. C.C. Wood, pencil, charcoal, and ink. THE SECOND EARLIEST PANORAMIC DRAWING OF HONOLULU - a new discovery in an album of Hawaiian views. The first known panorama is in the Bishop Museum - an ink and wash view dated 1834. Of smaller scale and from further out at sea, it gives only a general impression of the shore and lacks the building-by-building detail of the present image (see Forbes, Encounters with Paradise, plate 48). Two similar panoramas were printed or executed in 1840, and one appears in Edward Belcher's 1843 narrative of the voyage of HMS Sulphur in 1836-42. It was also at this time that the Lahainaluna Seminary Press began to publish engravings, including in 1838 a depiction of Honolulu from inland, after a drawing done by Edward Bailey at the foot of Punchbowl Hill (Forbes, Engraved at Lahainaluna, plate 27). While the Pacific sketches are unsigned, there is good reason to think the artist was on board HMS Imogene.The Imogene visited Honolulu, the Marquesas Islands, Pitcairn, Valparaiso and Callao between October 1837 and June 1838. In October 1837, Captain Bruce and the crew of the Imogene were at Kealakekua Bay, where they fastened a memorial plaque to the stump of a coconut tree near the site of Cook's death. The view of the Bay in the present album - the earliest known drawing of the Bay from the Ka'awaloa side - clearly shows the stump in question. The album bears the ownership inscription of a Jane Ross on board HMS President. Commanded by Admiral Ross (not apparently the husband or father of Jane, but likely to be a closely relation), the President certainly came into contact with the Imogene in the summer of 1838 when both ships were docked in South America. This is presumably how the drawings came into the possession of Jane Ross. The six Chilean sketches can be attributed to Carlos C. Wood (1792-1856), who lived and worked in Chile from 1819 until the final year of his life. a painter, engineer, mariner, and military officer. Wood designed the Coat of arms of Chile, which was adopted by the government in 1834, incorporating the huemul and the condor. He also designed the first stamps of the nascent state. He is considered one of the most influential foreign artists who shaped modern painting in Chile. Rich in detail, he captured the picturesque and colorful landscape of Chile, and his sketch in this album captioned "The March of Intellect in Chile" humorously depicting Jane Ross and her husband in a Barouche from Santiago descending a steep slope, is very similar to a finished watercolour sold at Christie's in 2008 . Wood mainly portrayed boats, historical facts, and naval actions. His best known work is paradoxically his only oil painting, the "Wreck of the Arethusa". In addition to the sketch of the road to Valparaiso, Wood has contributed a humorous sketch of four soldiers in "Campaign , or marching order, Chile, 1840", a magnificent panorama of the Battle of Yungay on January 20th, 1839 "The Army Advances, and is crowned with Victory!!", when the alliance formed Chilean Army led by Chilean General in Chief Manuel Bulnes and a force of Peruvians opposed to Santa Cruz, decisively defeated the Confederate Army commanded by Santa Cruz, after only six hours of combat in the battlefield of Yungay, in northern Peru; a very dramatic image of ships in a storm; a tranquil coastal scene by moonlight; and a detail of the Battle of Y
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Neptune des côtes occidentales d’Espagne, de Portugal et d’Afrique .

ATLAS - FRENCH Folio (26 6/8 x 20 2/8 inches). Letterpress title-page and table of contents. Fine double-page engraved map of the world after the discoveries of La Perouse, and 33 further maps. Contemporary French red morocco gilt (a bit scuffed at the extremities). Provenance: Musée de la Citadelle Vauban, their sale 16th July 2010, lot 70. The fine maps, all clear dark impressions include "Carte générale de l'Océan atlantique ou occidental. Publié par ordre du Ministre pour le service des vaisseaux français en 1786", 8th edition, "Côtes d'Espagne : Guipuzcoa, Biscaye et Pays des quatre villes d'après les plans levés en 1788 par Don Vicente Tofino" 1793, "Port du Passage" 1793, "Baie, port et ville de Saint Sébastien" 1793, "Anse et barre de Bilbao" 1793, "Port de Santona" 1793, "Port de Santander" 1793, "Côtes d'Espagne : Asturies et partie de Galice d après les plans levés en 1788" 1793, "Anse de Gijon" 1793, "Port de Vivero, Ribadero et Cedeira" 1793, "Havre de Barquero et Estaca de Vares" 1793, "Côtes d'Espagne : partie de la galice depuis le cap Ortegal jusqu'au Cap Silleiro" 1793, "Plan des Havres de Ferrol, Betanze et la Corogne" 1792, "Port de Ferrol" 1793, "Port de Camarinas" 1793, "Anse et Havre de Corcubion" 1793, "Plan du Havre de Pontevedra" 1793, "Havre de Vigo" 1793, "Carte réduite de la Côte de Portugal. dressée d'aprés les opérations trigonométriques de M. Siera.En 1811. Dépôt général de la Marine en 1816", "Plan de la Bare de Lisbone" 1816, "Carte de la Côte méridionale de Portugal et d'Espagne. Tofino. Siera" 1804, "Plan du mouillage de Lagos. Sr Le Roy" 1737, "Plan hydrographique de la Baie de Cadiz levé en 1807. Dépôt général de la Marine" 1811, "Carte réduite des îles Açores. M. de Fleurie, 1769 et par Don Vicente Tofino, 1788. Dépôt général des Cartes et Plans" 1791, "Plans de la rade d'Angra et de Fayal" 1788 and 1791, "Carte des îles Canaries et d'une partie des côtes occidentales d'Afrique. Chevalier de Borda, 1780", "Carte particulière des îles Canaries et des Côtes voisines d'Afrique. Chevalier de Borda, 1776", "Carte réduite Guillaume de L'ISLE (1675-1726) 29 (212) Carte des îles du Cap-Verd.par Mr. d'Aprés de Mannevillette. M. de Fleurieu et de M. l Abbé de Pingré" 1774; extra-illustrated with "Carte réduite de l'Archipel des Bisagots. 1818 par MM. Givry. et Roussin" 1822, "Carte générale de la côte de Guinée. 1750", "Carte particulière de la Coste d'Or. Département de la Marine" 1750, "Carte réduite des Costes occidentales d'Afrique" 1754, "Carte réduite d'une partie des Costes occidentales et méridionales de l'Afrique" 1754. Compiled from charts available to the French Admiralty, and prepared for Napoleon I (Emperor of the French 1804-1814), who landed in Alexandria as part of his Egypt campaign in July of 1798. Once there, Napoleon's orders were to dislodge the English from their Oriental possessions, build a canal through the Isthmus of Suez, improve the situation of the Egyptian people and establish a permanent French colony. Defeated by Nelson at the Battle of the Nile in August, he nevertheless remained entrenched in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire until August of the following year, when he sailed back to France. Catalogued by Kate Hunter
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Geographical, Historical, Political, Philosophical and Mechanical Essays. The First, Containing and Analysis of a General Map of the Middle British Colonies in America; And of the Country of the Confederate Indians: A Description of the Face of the.

EVANS. Lewis (ca 1700-1756) Small folio (10 3/8 x 7 3/4 in.; 26.3 x 19.6 cm.). IV, 32 pp.; closed tear at top margin of title-page, a few other small marginal repairs, mostly at inner margins, some light foxing. WITH A FINE HAND-COLORED COPY OF EVAN’S "GENERAL MAP OF THE MIDDLE BRITISH COLONIES, IN AMERICA.1755", engraved on a full, folded sheet (20 7/8 x 27 3/8 in.; 53 x 70.2 cm.), frame (39 3/4 x 32 1/4 in.; 110.9 x 81.9 cm.); lightly offset and with a few short fold separations. Maroon morocco gilt binding by Lakeside Press. VERY RARE FIRST EDITION AND FIRST STATE OF BOTH THE TEXT AND MAP, WHICH IS "CONSIDERED ONE OF THE LANDMARKS OF AMERICAN CARTOGRAPHY:" (Schwartz). The map has been beautifully colored by a contemprary hand, as evidenced by the oxidation of the green pigment (verdegris) on the verso. In both the map and the explanatory text (each of which were sold separately), Evans emphasizes the importance of the Ohio Valley in Great Britain’s battle with the French for dominance in North America. JUST TWO COPIES OF THE FIRST STATE OF THE MAP HAVE BEEN SOLD AT AUCTION SINCE 1978, AND ONLY ONE OF WHICH WAS ACCOMPANIED BY THE FIRST PRINTING OF THE TEXT. Evan’s map was MASTERPIECE OF CARTOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS, AND ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT MAPS PUBLISHED IN AMERICA BEFORE INDEPENDENCE (Schwartz and Ehrenberg). He incorporated information from his own observation with that from the best available sources. His intense study of sources was distilled into this ambitious performance which builds upon the work which had resulted in his Map of Pennsylvania, New-Jersey, New-York, and the three Delaware Counties of 1754. For Virginia, Evans consulted an early state of Fry and Jefferson’s Map of the most inhabited part of Virginia and William Mayo’s Map of the Northern Neck of Virginia. From the Fry and Jefferson maps, Evans adjusted the longitudinal position of the Potomac River and added the area claimed by the Ohio Company to Pennsylvania. He also consulted Walter Hoxton’s Mapp of the Bay Chesepeake Bay. His sources for Connecticut were the maps of William Douglas and Thomas Pownall (to whom Evans dedicates the map in the upper left panel). The map was eagerly anticipated by colonists who had heard rumors that Evans had amassed new information on the Ohio Valley, not available in John Mithchell's map of the same year. Mitchell was Evan’s major competitor, and his A Map of British and French Dominions had appeared five months before teh Evans map. The differences in their border delineations exposed both to critical scrutiny, and Evans had the advantage due to the greater accuracy of his data. Mitchell’s map was also more of a general map, and from the start Evans had set his emphasis on the Ohio Valley, the region that was the source of friction between England and France. The borders in the Evans map were based on much better information. However Mitchell had the benefit of official sanction: the Board of Trade and Plantations had sponsored his map. Evans was working without such support, and thus the official response to Evans’ map was cautious. Nonetheless, the great detail and research which informed the Evans map assured its place as one of the most significant maps of the age, and those living in the Colonies recognized its accuracy. "The map evidently excited considerable interest in the Colonies, and according to what Governor Pownall says in 1776, it was for a long time generally accepted as the standard authority for settling voundair3es, purchases, etc. on account of the extreme care and accuracy with which it had been prepared" (Henry N. Ste3vens, Lewis Evans, His Map, p.6). It was published in eighteen editions between 1755 and 1814, and Thomas Kitchin and John Bowles both published pirated editions (in 1756 and 1765 respectively). PROVENANCE: Siebert, 21 May 1999, 267 for $100,000 plus a 12.5% premium for a total of $112,500. ot REFERENCES: Campbell 543; Church 1003; Evans 7412; Hildeburn 1412s; Howes E-226; Miller 606; Pritchard & Taliaferro 34; Sabin 23175; Schwartz & Ehrenberg p. 165; Stevens Nuggets I:1019; Street sale II:819 (first ed. Of the text); The World Encompassed255; Thomson 384; Winsor V:85.
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Geographical, Historical, Political, Philosophical and Mechanical Essays. The First, Containing an Analysis of a General Map of the Middle British Colonies in America; And of the Country of the Confederate Indians: A Description of the Face of the.

EVANS, Lewis (ca 1700-1756) 4to (9 1/4 x 6 3/4 in.; 23.3 x 17.2 cm.). 32 pages. LARGE ENGRAVED FOLDING MAP "A General Map of the Middle British Colonies" (50 x 67 cm. platemark, 53.2 x 70.8 cm. sheet). Modern red morocco; blue cloth folding case. "ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT MAPS PUBLISHED IN AMERICA BEFORE INDEPENDENCE" (Schwartz and Ehrenberg). Second state of the map, with "The Lakes Cataraqui" added just north of Lake Ontario; second edition of the text, first issue, without the addition of the R. and J. Dodsley name and address in the imprint. The second edition of Evans's text is virtually a page-for-page resetting of the first edition with sub-titles added on pp. 6 and 11 and the numeral 2 inserted to the left of the signature on the directional line of the first two leaves of each quire. The map was issued both with and without the Analysis, in which Evans carefully acknowledges his sources. Evans's map was a masterpiece of cartographic synthesis, incorporating information from his own observation with that from the best available sources. His intense study of sources was distilled into this ambitious performance, which builds upon the work which had resulted in his Map of Pennsylvania, New-Jersey, New-York, and the three Delaware Counties of 1754. For Virginia, Evans consulted an early state of Fry and Jefferson's Map of the most inhabited part of Virginia and William Mayo's Map of the Northern Neck of Virginia. From the Fry and Jefferson, Evans adjusted the longitudinal position of the Potomac River and added the area claimed by the Ohio Company to Pennsylvania. He also consulted Walter Hoxton's Mapp of the Bay of Chesepeack, with the Rivers, Potomack, Potapasco, North East, and part of Chester for his delineation of Chesapeake Bay. His sources for Connecticut were the maps of William Douglas and Thomas Pownall (to whom Evans dedicates the map in the upper left panel). The map was eagerly anticipated by colonists who had heard rumors that Evans had amassed new information on the Ohio Valley, not available in John Mitchell's map of the same year. Mitchell was Evans's major competitor, and his A Map of the British and French Dominions had appeared five months before the Evans map. The differences in their border delineations exposed both to critical scrutiny, and Evans had the advantage due to the greater accuracy of his data. Mitchell's was also a more general map, and from the start Evans had set his emphasis on the Ohio Valley, the region that was the source of friction between England and France. The borders in the Evans map were based on much better information. But Mitchell had the benefit of official sanction: the Board of Trade and Plantations had sponsored his map. Evans was working without such support, and thus the official response to Evans's map was cautious. Nonetheless, the great detail and research which informed the Evans map assured its place as one of the most significant maps of the age, and those living in the Colonies recognized its accuracy. "The map evidently excited considerable interest in the Colonies, and, according to what Governor Pownall says in 1776, it was for a long time generally accepted as the standard authority for settling boundaries, purchases, etc., on account of the extreme care and accuracy with which it had been prepared" (Henry N. Stevens, Lewis Evans, His Map, p.6). It was published in eighteen editions between 1755 and 1814, and Thomas Kitchin and John Bowles both published pirated editions (in 1756 and 1765 respectively). PROVENANCE: Frank S. Streeter (bookplate). From the Streeter sale: Christie's, 16 April 2007, lot 185 at a price of $168,000. including buyer's premium. Campbell 543; Church 1003; Evans 7412; Hildeburn 1412a; Howes E-226; Miller 606; Pritchard & Taliaferro 34; Sabin 23175; Schwartz & Ehrenberg p.165; Stevens Nuggets I:1019; Streeter sale II:819 (first ed. of the text); The World Encompassed 255; Thomson 384; Winsor V:85. For more information about this book, or a warm welcome to see it and other books in our library at 72nd Street, NYC, please contact Kate Hunter, M.A. Oxon, in the Rare Book Department
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Flore des Antilles, ou Histoire générale botanique, rurale, et économique des végétaux indigènes des Antilles.

TUSSAC, François Richard de (1751-1837) 4 volumes in 2, folio (20 1/4 x 13 in.; 51.4 x 33 cm). 140 stipple-engraved plates printed in color and finished by hand by Bouquet, Dien, Gabriel, Massard, Robert and others after Redouté, Poiteau, Turpin, and others (a few heightened with gum arabic in vol. 3), title-pages for vol. 1 in French and Latin, dedication to Louis XVIII in vol. 2; short closed tear in upper gutter pl 8 of vol. 1, pl. 24 of vol. 3 shaved at outer margin, some occasional faint spotting to plates and light foxing (chiefly marginal) to text and vol. 1 title-page, text leaves to plates 11-27 and terminal leaf browned in vol. 4, and plates in vol. 4 misbound (as 1-4; 6; 9; 5; 7-8; 10-37). Contemporary green morocco richly gilt by J. Wright, covers ruled with triple fillets and embellished with roll-tool borders incorporating grape, floral, pineapple, and acorn tools, the spines in 6 compartments gilt with floral tools and raised bands (one reserved for lettering), gilt dentelles, marbled endpapers, edges gilt. THE BOTFIELD COPY OF THIS EARLY FLORA OF THE WEST INDIES, FIRST EDITION. According to Brunet, only 150 copies of this lavish work were published in 32 fascicules. Relatively little is known of Tussac's early life, but as a botanist he travelled around the West Indies, visiting Santo Domingo and Martinique in 1786, Haiti and Jamaica in 1802. In Haiti he briefly became curator of a botanic garden before returning to France at the end of that year. Tussac's preface to this work gives a vivid account of his travels and adventures, as well as an account of Toussaint-Louverture's slave rebellion in Santo Domingo. Most of his drawings had been destroyed by fire during the rebellion, but he was able later to recreate them from his notes and collected specimens. REFERENCES: Brunet V:987; Nissen BBI 2017; Great Flower Books 78; Dunthorne 312; Stafleu & Cowan 15:397 PROVENANCE: Beriah Botfield (his sale, Christie's London, 30 March 1994, lot 90; Christie's New York, 6 December 2013, lot 188; Sotheby's New York 18 December 2019, lot 203)
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The Designs of Inigo Jones, consisting of Plans and Elevations for Publick and Private Buildings

KENT, William (1685-1748), editor. 2 volumes in one. Folio (21 4/8 x 14 4/8 inches). Engraved allegorical frontispiece after W. Kent, vignette title-pages with engraved portrait of Jones, 136 numbered plates printed from 102 copper-plates on 97 leaves (24 double-page, 5 folding) by P. Fourdrinier, H. Hulsbergh, J. Cole and A. Herisset, most drawn by Henry Flitcroft, the designs credited to Jones, Kent and Lord Burlington, engraved head- and tailpieces after Kent (without the half-title, intermittent light browning, one or two pale marginal stains). Contemporary half vellum, morocco lettering piece on the spine (extremities a bit scuffed, vellum lightly soiled). Provenance: with the 18th-century discreet ink library stamp of K.F. Stevens on the front paste-down; the bookplate of James Lees-Milne (1908-1997), architectural historian and conservationist on the front paste-down; and the bookplate of Harold Douthit also on the front paste-down. First edition. "The Designs of Inigo Jones is an impressive and important book. Yet oddly enough more influential than any single building depicted in it were its plates of doors, windows, niches, etc. These plates seem to have had a formative effect upon Gibbs's Book of Architecture (1728) and from that point on became a standard feature of eighteenth-century pattern books" (Harris p.251). The publication of 'The Designs' was initiated and funded by Lord Burlington, who had purchased a group of drawings by Jones and his pupil John Webb and 5 drawings by Palladio from Jones' collection in 1720. These were copied by Henry Flitcroft and, together with drawings by Kent and Burlington, engraved by Hulsbergh and others. Intent on promoting public works, in particular the building of a royal palace, Kent and Burlington devoted more than two-thirds of the plates in volume one to designs for a palace at Whitehall, even though this was the work of Inigo Jones's pupil John Webb. Volume one also included a plan, elevation and section of Chiswick House by Burlington, with chimneypieces by Kent. Volume two included the Queen's House at Greenwich, Burlington's dormitory of Westminster school, and a remarkable design for a palace on the Thames at Richmond. Jones's designs for the portico of Old St. Paul's follow at the end of volume two, together with seven plates of Palladio's S. Giorgio Maggiore in Venice. RIBA notes that "most copies. want the half-title." Fowler 162 (lacking frontispiece); Harris 385; Millard British 34 (lacking half-title); RIBA 1624 (lacking half-title and frontispiece).
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Franciae, Austrasiae, et Helvetiae, geographica historiaquae, tabulis aeneis exhibita descriptio : in qva singularum cuiusquae proviciarum natura, coeli . constitutio,incolarum mores . & earum propriae artes, una cum principum qui eispraeferunt serie

METELLUS, Johannes Matalius (1520-1597). Small folio (10 3/8 x 7-1/2 in.; 26.4 x 19.1 cm). Engraved title-page with three figures representing France, Austria and Switzerland, 39 fine engraved double-page maps of Europe; title-page with letterpress overslip, soiled, fore-edge somewhat frayed, a few marginal repairs, most leaves guarded, some marginal dampstaining, centerfold splits to maps 12, 26, and 34, map 33 browned, overslips on right and left platemarks on map 28. Contemporary limp vellum, manuscript title on spine, edges stained red; joints split at the head and foot of the spine, somewhat browned with a few stains, lacking two pairs of ties; recent repairs to wear on top of spine. Modern slipcase covered in artist's vellum. FIRST EDITION AND EXCEPTIONALLY RARE OF THE EARLIEST ATLAS BY METELLUS (AKA JEAN MATAL AND SEQUANUS). Worldcat locates only two copies in Europe. Metellus, a respected cartographer in his day, was born in Burgundy and but spent much of his working life in Louvain. Many of the maps in this volume are after those in Gerard Mercator's Galliae Tabule Geographicae. Metellus later relocated to Cologne where in 1598 his maps of America, after those of Wytfliet, were published in the German edition of Acosta's "De Natura Nova Orbis" as "Geographische und historische. Landschafft America". REFERENCES: Burden 115 forward; Shirley T.met 1; VD 16 ZV 304009 PROVENANCE: early ownership inscriptions partially obscured on the title-page; ink library stamp of Dr. Revillout on the title-page; later bibliographical inscription on the front paste-down and mss. foliation on the verso of the maps.
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Nuevo Mundo [extracted from] Arte de Navegar.

MEDINA, Pedro de (1493-1567) Single leaf (13 1/4 x 9 in.; 33.7 x 22.9 cm). Single leaf woodcut map, first state from a single woodblock, 16 rhumb lines, with text in 2 ruled columns on verso from Libro Tercero, Chapter VII ("Del concierto y orden de las cartas de marear") and woodcut diagram in right column; edges a bit chipped. AN IMPORTANT CHART FORMULATED AND PUBLISHED DURING THE EARLIEST PERIOD OF EUROPEAN COLONIAL EXPANSION TO THE AMERICAS. Medina travelled with Cortés to the New World and collaborated with other cartographers to produce his magnum opus from which this map was taken. The present map of the New World, from the third book of his monumental treatise on navigation, is the first known depiction of the so-called Tordesillas Meridian bisecting the Americas west of the Azores and Cape Verde Islands. The Treaty of Tordesillas was based on the papal bull "Inter Caetera" (1493). Its intent was to apportion the trading and colonizing rights of the New World between the Spanish Crown and Portugal. The Aragonese Alexander VI decreed a Line of Demarcation that evenly divided lands of North and South America vertically, granting everything west of the line to Spain and everything to the east to Portugal. It vividly illustrates for the first time the future influence that the latter was to have over the country we know as Brazil. Central America and the Isthmus of Panama are very accurately delineated, and the Yucatan is correctly shown as a peninsula. The map also depicts the trade routes from Spain and her possessions by the use of a series of seven ships in a circular movement, heading south-westerly on the outward bound journey and returning via the Gulf Stream to the north-east. The map was reprinted in the first edition of "Libro de grandezas de España (Seville, 1548) with one notable difference. In that edition, and the subsequent one of the same title in 1549 only, there appeared a second woodcut which was printed below the American half of the map, extending its coverage to the Strait of Magellan. To accommodate this, the lower border of the lefthand side has been removed and is not seen again (Burden). A singular opportunity to obtain one of the most important maps of 16th century colonial expansion in the Americas, as Medina's complete work, rarely appears at auction or in the trade, and fetches in excess of a half a million dollars. REFERENCES: Burden 14, state 1
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Illustrations of the Birds of California, Texas, Oregon, British and Russian America.

CASSIN, John (1813-1869) 8vo (10 3/8 x 6 1/2 in.; 26.4 x 16.5 cm). 50 handcolored lithographs printed by J. T. Bowen, 18 after George G. White, and 32 drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock; some foxing to text, chiefly marginal and text for plates 6-30 toned, a few plates (with horizontal orientation) trimmed along top margin with minor losses, marginal internal tear to plate 45 and preceding text leaf, not affecting image or text. Contemporary half calf over marbled boards, the spine in 6 compartments gilt with raised bands, red and black lettering pieces, marbled endpapers, edges gilt; extremities rubbed, corners bumped, boards a trifled scuffed. FIRST EDITION IN BOOK FORM, originally issued in ten parts (1853-1856). An important work, it is representative of the era a western expansion of American ornithology. Cassin had approached the Audubon brothers in 1851 with a proposal to create a supplement to the octavo Birds. "At first the Audubons were receptive However Cassin wanted shared credit on the title page and a free hand in correcting the errors of nomenclature of the elder [and late] Audubon, a touchy point with the sons. Cassin went on his own, although clearly following the Audubon format and using J.T. Bowen as a lithographer" (Reese). It was also evidently the first ornithological work by an American to employ trinomial nomenclature. REFERENCES: Anker 92; Ayer, p. 124; Fine Bird Books, p. 64; Nissen IVB 173; Reese, American Color Plate Books 42; Wood, p. 281
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Nuevo Mundo

DE MEDINA, Pedro (1493-1567) Single-sheet map (5 3/4" x 9 9/16") from Pedro de Medina's "Arte de Navegar" (1545). First state with 16 rhumblines and compass rose. VERY GOOD condition with minor, clean tears and press mark visible in the gutter margin. "Among all arts navigation is the most accomplished one, for not only does it draw from each of them, it also contains, by itself, its most important disciplines: arithmetic, geometry, & astrology." The prologue of Pedro de Medina’s groundbreaking "Arte de Navegar" (1545) reveals the work’s Medieval heritage, as the quadrivium - the university curriculum of arts - unmistakably locates navigation within its mathematical system of knowledge. Navigation, as Pedro de Medina suggests, builds on the illustration of the world guided by principles of certainty. At the same time, he refers to Ptolemy and proves himself at a transitional moment of cartography and the Renaissance in general. The present map of the New World is thus a particularly RARE and precious testament to both the socio-political and artistic history of the 16th century. Taken from the third book of his monumental treatise on navigation, the present map of the New World or "Nuevo Mundo" is the first known depiction of the so-called Tordesillas Meridian bisecting the Americas West of the Azores and Cape Verde Islands. The Treaty of Tordesillas was based on the bull "Inter Caetera" (1493) in which the Aragonese Alexander VI decreed a Papal Demarcation Line in 1493; it was meant to divide the trading and colonizing rights of the New World between the Spanish Crown and Portugal. The map is also remarkable for its geographical accuracy. Pedro de Medina had travelled with Hernando Cortéz and, upon his return to Spain, was responsible for debriefing ship crews. He thus relied on authentic source material and the mention of Florida is one of the earliest in contemporary map publishing. Similarly, "Nuevo Mundo" is the FIRST MAP to include the Rio Spiritu Santo in Texas. Maybe its most astonishing feature are the ships grouped around the central compass rose. As a motive they derive from early cartographers’ depiction of vessels and sea monsters to characterize the oceans. Upon closer inspection, however, it appears that they are organized according to what art historians know as simultaneity. The trading ship, departing from Spain, follows the circular movement of the Gulf Stream to reach the Americas; it then takes a Northern route back to Europe. Pedro de Medina utilizes narrative strategies commonly associated with painting to prove a surprising interest in the Stream and its impact on travel routes. The author thus illustrates the practical qualities of sea charts as presented at the beginning of Chapter 7 on the map’s verso. The verso includes a woodblock printed diagram and lists the most important elements of sea charts, including the compass rose and rhumblines. "Nuevo Mundo" can thus be seen as an ideal chart which, in addition to its historical and cartographic merits, introduces a subtle use of imagery and narrative strategies commonly associated with fine arts. Its main purpose, however, remains that of navigational practicality.
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Theatro de la Tierra Universal.

ORTELIUS, Abraham (1527–1598). Folio (16 4/8 x 11 4/8 inches). Elaborate engraved allegorical title-page, double-page world map "Typus Orbis Terrarum", undated and with the South American coastline retaining its destinctive bulge [Shirley 153, state 2] (small separation at foot of the centre-fold), 99 double-page maps of the world, and historiated initials, all with MAGNIFICENTLY RICH CONTEMPORARY HAND-COLOUR IN FULL (without A4, the portrait of Ortelius, the map of Spain a bit creased with one or two short marginal tears occasionally crossing the image, and strengthened at an early date along the verso of the left-hand edge and the centre-fold, short early repair to tear on verso of map of Crete), extra-illustrated with large folding prospectus for a map of the Kingdom of Portugal, to be printed in Salamanca, ca 1738-1753, tipped-in after the Contents, and a small folding engraved plate "Carta del Viage de los Israelites", 1747, at end. Beautiful full 17th-century Spanish mottled sheep, the spine in seven compartments, with six raised bands, tan morocco lettering-piece in the second, the others decorated with fine gilt tools of bunches of daisies interspersed with small cleft pomegranate of Aragon tools, French hand-coloured decorative endpapers captioned 'A Paris chez Les Associes No 119' (lower cover and extremities a bit scuffed). Provenance: with the near contemporary ownership inscription at the head of the dedication leaf "Juan de Calder doscientos" and offset onto the verso of the title-page; profuse 18th-century annotations in a neat Spanish script, adding historical context and referencing important relevant texts throughout, with a Table of Contents "Tabla de las Mapas de Cite Libro", in the same hand, dated 14th August, 1757, tipped in after the printed Contents; with an autograph document signed by Ambrosio Gonzalez, dated 19th April 1858, conferring a military command, loosely inserted. THE RARE FIRST SPANISH EDITION OF ORTELIUS'S THEATRUM ORBIS TERRARUM, PUBLISHED IN THE SAME YEAR THAT PHILIP II's SPANISH ARMADA SAILED AGAINST ELIZABETH I's ENGLAND The first edition in Spanish, and the first of Ortelius's atlases to be entirely published, rather than printed, by Christopher Plantin. Subsequently published in 1602 by Vrients, with 117 maps, and in 1609-1612 with 128 maps. "In contrast with previous editions, this edition was solely Plantin's project and consequently Plantin, not Ortelius, took the role of publisher. Ortelius' contribution was limited to printing the maps. Thus, once the texts had been printed, Ortelius' print atelier saw to the printing of the maps on the backs of the sheets and then returned them to Plantin. The publication of this Spanish atlas appears to have been very important for Plantin. Following his return to Antwerp in 1585, he did everything he could to convince the Spanish of his loyalty, despite his stay in the Calvinist, anti-Spanish town of Leiden. One means of attaining this goal was to dedicate a Spanish version of the atlas to the future king, Philip III. By the start of 1587, Plantin had begun to write to individuals who were close to the Spanish court in order to determine whether this gesture would be well received. Plantin did not dare to start to print the text before he was certain that his dedication to the crown prince would be accepted" (Dirk Imhof "The Production of Ortelius Atlases by Christopher Plantin", in Abraham Ortelius and the First Atlas: Essays Commemorating the Quadricentennial of his Death 1598-1998, page 88). That it was is proven by the fact that the atlas went into production, and between 1588 and 1590 255 copies were printed. the Plantin archives record a few copies of the atlas being sent to the Spanish court, with lavish colouring heightened with gold and silver, however the production values of the ordinarily published coloured copies were still very high. For example 'le capne Alberico paid 36 guilders for a coloured and bound copy in September 1588' (Imhof, page 89). The Spanish edition of the Theatrum was the last edition printed by Plantin, thereafter it was printed by his son-in-law and successor Jan Moretus. Throughout his publishing career and in spite of the ongoing conflict between the Dutch and Spanish, the Spanish market had been a constant one for Plantin, and he was very deferential to the Spanish court, during the 1570's "his employees also had to work at a frantic tempo in order to fill the orders placed by the Spanish court for thousands of liturgical works" (Imhof, page 81). Ortelius and Plantin were lifelong friends, and eventually published five editions of Ortelius's Theatrum orbis terrarium and four of his Addimenta (being a supplement to earlier editions for their owners) together. Their first recorded transaction occurred as early as January of 1558, when the young Ortelius, described in the Plantin archive as "paintre des cartes", bought a copy of Virgil from Plantin. Soon Ortelius was colouring maps for Plantin, and when Ortelius began producing his own atlases in 1570, Plantin bought them in large quantities for resale. "Between June 13 and December 31, 1570 Plantin sold no less than 159 copies of the Theatrum. From 1579 onwards, Plantin is the printer, but not the publisher of the Theatrum. Ortelius himself finances the printing" (Peter van der Krogt "The Theatrum Orbis Terrarum: The First Atlas?", in Abraham Ortelius and the First Atlas: Essays Commemorating the Quadricentennial of his Death 1598-1998, page 65). Although Plantin was the major distributor of the Theatrum, he was not the only one, and he had his own network of distributors, even an affiliated a bookshop in Paris "run by his son-in-law Aegidius Beys [who] was an important buyer of Plantin's productions. This Parisian bookshop also soon became the most important buyer of the Theatrum" (Ibid page 81). The bookshop closed in 1577 and the stock was sold to the dealer Michel Sonnius, who received the monopoly for the sale of Plantin publications in Paris.
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The Discoverie of the Large, Rich and Bewtiful Empyre of Guiana, With a relation of the great and Golden Citie of Manoa (which the Spanyards call El Dorado) And of the Provinces of Emeria, Arromaia, Amapaia, and other Countries, with their rivers, Adjoyni

RALEIGH, Walter, Sir (ca. 1552-1618) 4to (7 x 5 in.; 17.8 x 12.7 cm). Woodcut device on title-page, head- and tailpieces, historiated initials; washed and pressed, a few headlines shaved. Full 20th century red morocco levant by Rivière, marbled endpapers, edges gilt; upper board detached. THE JOHN L. CLAWSON COPY OF ONE OF THE SUPREME WORKS OF ELIZABETHAN TRAVEL LITERATURE. The second edition of Raleigh's account of his second voyage, with all points conforming to Sabin's 67554. Raleigh's voyage took him to modern Venezuela in search of the mythical city of gold, El Dorado. Although the city was not found, Raleigh argued that Guiana had the potential to yield many riches, and be an advantageous stronghold against the Spanish: "Guiana is a Country that hath yet her Maydenhead, never sackt, turned, nor wrought, the face of the earth hath not been torne, not the virtue and salt of the soyule spent by manurance, the graves have not beene opened for gold, the mines not broken with sledges, nor their Images puld down out of their temples. It hath never been entered by any armie of strength, and never conquered or possessed by any Christian Prince. It is besides so defensible, that if two fortes be builded in one of the provinces which I have seen, the flood setteth in so neere the banke, where the channel also lyeth, that no shippe can passe up, but with Pikes length of the Artillerie, first the one, and afterwards of the other (pp. 96-97). Shakespeare is believed to have obtained his knowledge of the "still vexed Bermoothes" for "The Tempest" from this book. REFERENCES: Alden & Landis 596/85; Church 254; Sabin 67554; STC 20636 PROVENANCE: John L. Clawson (1865-1933), his small morocco ticket and sale, Anderson Galleries, 21 May 1926)
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Mammals of India; a Natural History of all the Animals Known to Inhabit Continental India.

JERDON, Thomas Claverhill (1811-1872). 8vo., (9 x 6 inches). Conetmporary half black calf, marbled boards(extremities worn, joints weak). WITH AN EXTENSIVE COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL ARTWORK: 360 watercolors (9 x 6 inches), 105 pencil drawings, 190 proof engravings and lithographs (some hand-colored) and 11 photographs including studies of bats, rodents, whales, bears, cats, monkeys, apes, elephants, rhinoceroses and cattle, the majority annotated by the artist, interleaved with printed text leaves, some with penciled corrections. Loose in three modern cloth boxes. THE UNPUBLISHED ORIGINAL ARTWORK FOR JERDON'S THE MAMMALS OF INDIA, with corrected page proofs. Jerdon, a keen ornithologist and naturalist, went to India as an Army medical officer with the East India Company in 1836. He corresponded with the naturalist William Jardine (1800-1874) on the ornithology of India and his scientific publications on the zoology of the subcontinent began in 1839. Lord Canning later granted him special leave to complete his major works on the vertebrata of India, "The Birds of India" (1862-64) and "The Mammals of India" (Roorkee, 1867). "His work, although valued for its keen observations, was marred by over-reliance on memory and unmethodical recording of detail; a similar lack of attention in domestic matters led to constant debt" (DNB); this indebtedness may be the reason why he was not able to fund the engraving of his artwork, which would have added greatly to the expense of the work, and consequently the artwork for his Mammals remained unpublished. Having contracted an illness in Assam, he returned to England in 1870 where he continued to work on his Reptiles of India until his death in 1872. Purchased at Christie's 13th July 2006, lot 35.
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AN EXTENSIVE COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL ARTWORK for “Reptiles of India, Parts 1-3”.

JERDON, Thomas Claverhill (1811-1872). 445 fine watercolors (9 x 6 inches), 190 pencil drawings and 210 proof engravings and lithographs (some hand-colored) including studies of snakes, lizards, crocodiles, turtles, and frogs, the majority annotated by the artist, loose in three modern cloth boxes. Provenance: Gift of the artist to Dr A. Günther at The British Museum; autograph note signed of Henry Haversham Godwin Austen (1834-1923) inserted in Part 1: "194 sheets containing the figures of Indian snakes . left at Brit Museum by [Jerdon], shortly before his death & given over to me in 1878 by Dr. Günther, they have been numbered by me just as they were left. H.H. Godwin Austen, London Feb 1879'. JERDON'S UNPUBLISHED ORIGINAL ARTWORK FOR HIS UNFINISHED WORK ON INDIAN REPTILES, intended to follow his previous works "The Birds of India" (1862-64), and Mammals of India (1874). Jerdon handed over part of the artwork to fellow zoologist Dr A. Günther at The British Museum shortly before his death (see provenance), presumably for Günther to bring his unfinished work to completion. Jerdon's work contributed to the latter's Reptiles of British India (1864). This artwork then passed to the distinguished surveyor of India, Henry Haversham Godwin-Austen, for whom the Karakoram peak K2 was originally named Mount Godwin-Austen. Purchased at Christie's 13th July 2006, lot 36.
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Strabonis Rerum Geographicarum Libri XVII. Isaacus Casaubonis Recensuit, Summoque Studio & Diligentia, Ope Etiam Veterum Codicum, Emendauit, Ac Commentariis Illustrauit.

STRABO (64/63 B.C.-ca. 25 A.D.) - CASAUBON, Isaac (1559-1614) - MERCATOR, Gerard (1512-1594) - MERCATOR, Rumold (1545-1599). Two parts in one, volume. Folio (13 4/8 x 8 4/8 inches). Titles within historiated woodcut borders, printed in Greek and Latin in double columns, engraved double-page double-hemispherical world map: Mercator's "Orbis Terrae Compendiosa Descriptio", Geneva 1587 (13 ¼ x 20 ¼ inches) (supplied, small marginal tear just affecting the image repaired on verso), (some pale marginal dampstains, and one or two wormstracks). 19th-century red paneled morocco antique, spine in five compartments with four raised bands, an 18th-century morocco lettering piece in one (extremities, front paste-down removed, endpapers stained). Provenance: Contemporary marginal annotations to Casaubon's commentary, and a leaf of manuscript notes at the end. First edition of Isaac Casaubon's famous edition of Strabo's "Geography", one of the earliest and most important scientific treatises of historical geography, containing the FIRST APPEARANCE OF MERCATOR'S CELEBRATED AND ONLY AVAILABLE WORLD MAP "Orbis Terrae Compendiosa Descriptio" Geneva 1587. This variant without text on the verso and with Latin text in the bottom margin. "Gerard Mercator's great world map of 1569 was condensed into double hemispherical form by his son Rumold. The engraving is a model of clarity and neatness, with typical cursive flourishes to the lettering of the sea names." (Shirley). This map was later incorporated in Mercator's influential atlas of 1595. Adams S-1908; Graesse VI:505. (Map) Koeman Me12; Moreland & Bannister p. 243; Shirley 157; Wagner Northwest Coast 146.
The Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya

The Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya, being an account of the rhododendrons recently discovered in the mountains of the Eastern Himalaya Edited by Sir W. J. Hooker.

Hooker, Joseph Dalton, Sir (1819-1911) 3 parts in one volume, folio (19 3/4 x 14 1/2 in.; 50.2 x 36.8 cm). Three title-pages, the first with tinted lithographed vignette, 30 handcolored lithographic plates after J. D. Hooker by Walter H. Fitch; frontispieces a bit loose, pl. 3 creased in upper left corner with a slight nick, pl. 6-7 with lightly discolored vertical band from exhibition mylar, long scratch through 2 leaves and small tear on bottom margin of pl. 15, and long vertical crease on pl. 30 text leaf. Half brown-black morocco over olive cloth, smooth spine lettered gilt; cloth on front cover blistering and starting to lift at corners, boards slightly splayed. HOOKER'S SUPERB WORK ON RHODODENDRONS, "an important work, both for the botanist and horticulturist since it contains descriptions and plates of many of the best garden Rhododendron species which and be grown in this country" (Great Flower Books). Joseph Dalton Hooker spent several years exploring Sikkim, as well as parts of Nepal and Tibet. His field notes were sent back to England from India to his father, Sir William Hooker, who edited this work, which contains stunning illustrations of many of the best species of rhododendron along with accounts of their discovery. J. H. Hooker's studies of the geography and meteorology of the area were fundamental, and included the explanation of the terracing of mountain valleys by the formation of glacial lakes. The species described vary from "alpines" to small shrubs, climbers, large shrubs, and trees-of the 32 species illustrated and described by Hooker, eight are described as trees. "Hooker's travels added twenty-five new rhododendrons to the fifty already known and the spectacular new species they introduced into Britain helped create a rhododendron craze among British gardeners" (Great Flower Books). The plates were lithographed by Walter Hood Fitch, the most prolific of all botanical artists. Many of the plates contain magnified views of the pistils, stamens, and sections of the ovaries. Fitch's vigorous, confident lines and bold coloring recreated the magnificence of these exotic blooms. "Fitch had the greatest competence of any botanical painter who has yet appeared in drawing the rhododendron " (Great Flower Books). REFERENCES: Desmond, The European Discovery of the Indian Flora, p. 144; Great Flower Books, p. 101; Nissen 911; An Oak Spring Flora 104; Sitwell & Blunt p. 60; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 2969 PROVENANCE: The Magnificent Library of D.F. Allen (sale, Sotheby's New York, 26 October 2017, lot 22 for $10,625); Doyle's, 12 November 2019, lot 225