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Naauwkeurige waarneemingen omtrent de veranderingen van veele insekten of gekorvene diertjes.Amsterdam, Johannes Sluyter, 1774. Large folio (43 x 27 cm). With etched and engraved vignette on the title-page and 33 numbered etched and engraved plates showing 70 kinds of insects (numbered in the text), the vignette and all plates hand-coloured. Contemporary boards covered with sprinkled paper, sewn on 4 vellum tapes.

L'ADMIRAL, Jacob. [4], 34, [2] pp.The second, greatly enlarged edition of a set of finely etched and engraved plates depicting the metamorphosis of 70 sorts of butterflies, moths and other flying insects in their natural surroundings, the specimens collected, drawn, etched and engraved, and the descriptions written, by Jacob l'Admiral (1700-1770), first published in 1740 with only 25 plates. The present edition adds 8 plates prepared (along with their descriptive text) by l'Admiral but not previously published, along with a 2-page foreword by the editor, Martinus Houttuyn (1720-1798). Most plates show the species as egg, larva, pupa and adult, both male and female, placed on the plants they frequent in their natural habitat. Scientifically it was a great advance on all that went before, including the pioneering work of Maria Sibylla Merian.With the 1896 bookplate (signed "TM") of "Tine.v.H", the artist and former prostitute Martina Hogervorst (1865-1928) who married the lithographic artist Theo van Hoytema in 1891 (divorced 1902), with a bird, insects and plants. In very good condition and untrimmed, with deckles intact. Spine tattered.l Horn & Schenkling 53 ("Selten"); Landwehr, Coloured Plates 105; Nissen, ZBI 2358; cf. Hunt 514 (1740 ed.).
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Les hylophtires et leurs ennemis, ou description et iconographie des insectes les plus nuisibles aux forèts, ainsi que des autres animaux causant des dégâts dans les bois, avec une méthode pour apprendre à les détruire et à ménager ceux qui leur font la guerre.Nordhansen, Leipzig, B.G.H. Schmidt, 1842. Large 8vo. With 4 folding tables, 2 woodcuts in text and 6 full-page engraved plates, one with useful insects and five with harmful insects, all six hand-coloured by the publisher. Original green publisher’s printed paper wrappers over stiff boards.

RATZEBURG, Julius Theodor Christian (Edgar Bourée de CORBERON, transl.). XXXIV, 246 pp.French translation of a pioneering ecological treatise and one of the earliest scientific studies on noxious wood insects. It was first published in German as Die Waldverderber und ihre Feinde in 1841, followed by a second expanded edition in 1842. Count Edgar Bourée de Corberon (1807-1861) published his present French translation of the expanded edition in 1842, adding a 21-page preface, some notes to the text and a 21-page French glossary. These valuable additions make the present edition more than a mere translation.Ratzeburg (1801-1871), pioneered the scientific study of the damage or destruction of trees by insects. With Waldverderber und Ihre Feinde he for the first time devoted a separate publication to the subject, with fine steel-engravings. The Waldverderber quickly became a standard work on the subject and appeared in many editions to 1876.l Hagen I, p. 138; Horn & Schenkling 3859 (cf. 17685); cf. Arnold Arboretum I, p. 582; Hagen II, p. 62; Nissen ZBI 3309 (German eds.).
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Historia salicum iconibus illustrata.Leipzig, Siegfried Leberecht Crusius, vol. 1: 1785-1787, vol. 2: 1791. 2 volumes. Folio. With 24 engraved plates in vol. 1 (numbered 1-24) and 6 engraved plates in vol. 2 (numbered 25-29, 31: all published), all signed by I. Nuszbiegel after originals by the author, except plate 31, which is signed by Johann Stephan Capieux.Blue sprinkled paper over boards (vol. 1) and limp grey paper wrappers, stab-sewn through the wrappers (vol. 2). Preserved in a professionaly handmade box, made for this book.

HOFFMANN, Georg Franz. 66, [4], 67-78; 12 pp.Both volumes of the first and only edition of Hoffmann's monograph on willows, published in instalments from 1785 to 1791, including the series of 30 engraved plates (numbered as 31) made to accompany them, showing willows, their branches, leaves and flowers. He describes different kinds of willows, their varieties, habitat and sizes. All descriptions refer to the plates, so that readers could use them together.Georg Franz Hofmann was a German botanist and physician. He first served as professor of botany in Erlangen, then professor of botany and director of the botanical garden in Göttingen. Finally he went to Moscow, where he continued his botanical studies, taking charge of the Imperial Academy of Science's botanical garden and herbarium.Plate 30 is never mentioned in the text or bibliographies, so it was apparently never published or was misnumbered "31".With manuscript owner's inscriptions on the title-page of instalment 1 and on the title-page of vol. 1. With the title-page to vol. 1 misbound between instalments 3 and 4. Binding of vol. 1 slightly worn, corners bumped. Paper wrappers of vol. 2 slightly frayed at the corners. With a small professional restoration to the foot of the spine. With some minor stains in each volume, but still in good condition. Both volumes, rarely found together, of a remarkable monograph on willows, with all the plates.l Hunt II, 678; Johnston 565; Nissen BBI 893; Pritzel 4127; Stafleu & Cowan II, 2879.
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Plusieurs descriptions des accoustremens, tant des magistrats et officiers de la Porte de l’ Empereur des Turcs, que des peuples assujectis à son Empire. Avec les figurs des representant le tout au naturel, tirees des medailles antiques & descriptions de ceux qui ont frequenté parmy ces nations, ou des bons autheurs qui en ont escrit. Including: THOMAS, Artus. Tableaux prophetiques des empereur severe et leon, avec leurs epigrammes predisans la ruine de la monarchie des Turcs. [Paris, widow of Abel L’Angelier, 1620]. 2 parts in 1 volume. Folio. With 79 engraved plates, including 62 costume plates (ca. 27.5 x 17.5 cm) after Nicolas Nicolay. With an additional loosely inserted engraving of a “Marchant Juif”. All the plates have explanatory texts on the versos of the preceding plates. 19th-century green half morocco.

NICOLAY, Nicolas]. "64" [=65] ll., 65-114, [3], [1 blank] pp.Nicolay's series of engravings of Turkish magistrates and officers (including descriptions) followed by Thomas' collection of emblems, prophesying the fall of the Ottoman empire, as published in the 1620 edition of Laonikos Chalcocondyle's L'Histoire de la décadence de l'Empire Grec. It doesn't have any date or publisher's information itself, but has the same pagination errors described in the copy of Chalcocondyle in the Staatsbibliothek Berlin ("Bl. 32 als 23 gez. und Bl. 64 doppelt gez."). This history concentrates on the later period of the Byzantine empire and was first published in Latin in 1556. The enlarged French translation with additions by Artus Thomas first appeared 1612 and was possibly reissued in 1616 and 1620. The original costume plates by Nicolas Nicolay were first published in Nicolay's work Les navigations peregrinations et voyages, faicts en la Turquie (Lyon, 1567). It was translated into various languages and left a deep mark on later publications on the same topic. Its success was largely due to the 60 (later expanded to 62) illustrations of the different costumes worn in the area Nicolay visited. Subsequent works on the Turcs also included Nicolay's illustrations, in woodcuts or engraved after the originals as in the Chalcocondyle's edition of 1612.Binding very slightly rubbed and on leaf somewhat loose. Very good copy.l Cf. Atabey 214 (Chalcocondyle 1662), 871 and 872 (Nicolay 1576, 1586); Goldsmith, BMC STC French C-594 (Chalcocondyle 1620); Hamilton, Europe and the Arab world 9 (Nicolay 1576) and 23 (Chalcocondyle 1662); Hiler, pp. 656-657 (several Nicolay editions).
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Beitraege zur Kenntniss der Literatur, Kunst, Mythologie und Geschichte des alten Aegypten. Erstes Heft: Bemerkungen ueber die Aegyptischen Papyrus auf der Koeniglichen Bibliothek zu Berlin.Leipzig, Joh. Ambros. Barth (colophon: printed by W. Haack), 1826. With 4 lithographed folding plates.With: (2) Beitraege . zweites, drittes, viertes, fünftes Heft. = Systema astronomiae Aegyptiacae quadripartitum .Leipzig, Joh. Ambros. Barth, 1833. With a general title-page, a Latin title-page and 4 part-titles, a hand-coloured frontispiece and 10 large folding plates, lithographed throughout. 5 parts in 2 volumes. 4to (22.5 x 26.5 cm). Contemporary richly gold- and blind-tooled polished red morocco in the Romantic style (by the Leipzig master Anton Stumme with his ticket on the first free endleaf).

SEYFFARTH, Gustav. X, 42; XXX, 445, [10] pp.A fine morocco volume comprising the first five of Seyffarth’s monographic contributions to Egyptology (apparently all that had been published at the time of binding: two more were to follow by 1840). While the first part contains the earliest catalogue raisonnée of the substantial Berlin collection of papyri, parts 2-5 (published with continuous pagination) constitute a bold investigation of early Egyptian astronomy and its all-pervading cosmological cult.This section includes a hand-coloured frontispiece of astronomical animal forms and ten large folding plates, all lithographed, showing important pieces of archaeological evidence: the Navicula astronomica (Paris), Zodiacus Tentyriticus (Paris), Zodiacus Taurinensis (Turin), Sarcophagus Sethi (London), Sarcophagus Ramsis (Paris), Monolithus Amosis (Paris), Mensa Isiaca (Rome) and a Papyrus funeralis formerly in the d’Hermand collection. The final part is an astronomical lexicon, a typographical masterpiece that fits more than 1300 lithographed hieroglyphs precisely into their letterpress explanations.A luxury copy printed entirely on wove paper and bound in elaborate morocco with finely goffered edges (unusual for a secular binding of the time) by the Leipzig master Anton Wilhelm August Stumme (1804-67), who also worked for Robert Schumann.Minor wear to binding, occasional foxing as often in early wove paper, coloured frontispiece browned evenly; largely insignificant gutter tears to four folding plates. A crisp, unused copy in a magnificent binding.l Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 229f.
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Histoire abrégée des insectes, dans laquelle ces animaux sont rangés suivant un ordre méthodique. Nouvelle édition, revue, corrigée, & augmentée d’un supplément considérable.Paris, Calixte-Volland & Rémont, [1799]. 2 volumes. 4to. With 1 folding table and 10 hand-coloured engraved plates of insects in volume 1 and with 12 hand-coloured engraved plates of insects (including butterflies) in volume 2, both volumes with woodcut head- and tailpieces. Contemporary sheepskin, marbled sides, gold-tooled spine.

GEOFFROY, Etienne Louis. [4], XXVIII, 556; [4], 744 pp.Third edition of an entomological work by the French pharmacist and entomologist Etienne Louis Geoffroy (1727-1810) on insects that live in the Paris area, as the title of the first edition (1762) mentions. It is important for the history of entomology, because Geoffroy relies on new criteria for the classification of the insects. This attracted the attention of Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778), who often quoted Geoffrey in his studies. Although the beautifully hand-coloured plates of the Histoire abrégée des insectes (1762) illustrate many insects, including butterflies, wasps and mosquitos, the numbers of images on the 22 plates reflects Geoffroy’s special devotion to the study of beetles. His book can nevertheless be regarded as a benchmark in the classification of insects in general.Each volume with an unidentified bookplate and bookplate of the British entomologist Lionel George Higgins (1891-1985) on the front pastedown. Bindings slightly worn, especially around the edges, corners bumped. With some folds in the leaves and in plate II, occasional small chips in the lower or fore-edge margin of vol. 2, not affecting the text or images. Some browning and foxing. Otherwise a nice set in good condition.l Horn & Schenkling 7523; Nissen ZBI 1522; for the author: DSB V, pp. 354-355.
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A choice collection of 6 original plays written by Johannes Nomsz and 10 plays of French playwrights – Racine, Corneille, Voltaire and others – together with other texts highly interesting for the history of the Amsterdam stage, and Nomsz’s historical work on the life of Mohammed in 2 volumes].Amsterdam, Izaak Duim, Johannes Smit, David Klippink, widow of David Klippink, Hendrik Gartman, Johannes Smit, heirs of David Klippink, 1764-1780. 16 plays, 3 essays and 1 biography bound in 11 volumes. 8vo. With two portraits of Nomsz by Reinier Vinkeles (vol. I) and J. Houbraken (vol. IX), a portrait of Mohammed by J. Houbraken (vol. I) and 14 frontispieces by the best engravers of the time: Jan Punt, Reinier Vinkeles, Simon Fokke, P. Tanjé and Th. Koning. Uniform contemporary vellum with a blind-tooled centrepiece and cornerpieces on each board, manuscript titles on spines.

NOMSZ, Johannes. [8], 76; [8], 64; [8], 56; 14; 62; [8], 54; 12, [74]; [4], 54; [12], 74; [6], 71; [8], 71; [6], 58; [12], 78; [6], 112; [8], 82, [2]; 35; [4], 88, [2]; 43; [10], 113; [10], 67; [12], 73, [2]; XXVI, 182; [4], 190 pp.Johannes Nomsz (1738-1803) was a very productive Amsterdam author and playwright. He wrote and published no less than 50 plays, essays and historical works. Six of his original plays are present in this collection: Amosis (vol. II, 1); Iemant en niemant (vol. III, 1); Zoroaster (vol. III, 2); Anthonius Hambroek (vol. VII, 2); Marie van Lalain (vol. IX, 1); and Ripperda (vol. IX, 2), which were all performed in the Amsterdamse Schouwburg, the theatre of Amsterdam.An admirer of the predominant French literature at the time - especially of the work of Voltaire - Nomsz translated or adapted many French plays. The collection contains the following examples: Ferdinant Cortez, after Alexis Piron (vol. I, 1); Titus, after De Belloy (vol. I, 2); De Graaf van Warwik, after Jean François de la Harpe (vol. IV, 1); De Cid, after Corneille (vol. V, 1-2); Bajazet (vol. IV, 2) and Athalia, both after Racine (vol. VI, 2); Amélia (vol. VI, 1) and Zaïre (vol. VIII, 1), both after Voltaire; Soliman (vol. VIII, 1) and De landloopster (vol. VIII, 2), after Charles Simon Farvart.Added are 3 of Nomsz's essays, concerning the manner of play-acting and about his plays Amosis, Zorvaster and Anthonis Hamsbroek, and his historical work or fictionalized biography of Mohammed, Mohammed, of de hervorming der Arabieren (1780), uniformly bound in two volumes, separately numbered I-II.With the bookplates (?) of "De Witte Raaf" (a house in Nunspeet) and an unidentified owner's stamp. An uniformly bound set in very good condition.l For the plays: NNBW, VII, cols. 911-914; Ch. Van Schoonneveldt, Over de navolging der klassiek-Fransche tragedie (1906); J.A. Worp, Gesch. van het drame en van het tooneel in Nederland, II (1908); B. Albach, Jan Punt en Marten Corver (1946); Th.M.M. Mattheij, Waardering en kritiek: Johannes Nomsz en de Amsterdamse schouwburg, 1764-1810 (1980); for the biography of Mohammed: Rietbergen, "De portretten van Jan Nomsz, Zoroaster en Mohammed’, in: De achttiende eeuw, (2003), pp. 3-14.
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Breve relacion, de la peregrinacion que ha hecho de la mayor parte del mundo.Madrid, Juan Garcia Infançon, Small 4to (20 x 14.5 cm). With the title-page in a border built up from cast fleurons, woodcut coat of arms of the dedicatee Charles II of Spain, and some woodcut initials and tailpieces.Gold-tooled morocco, by the leading Barcelona binder Emilio Brugalla (1901-1987), with the arms of the Spanish bibliophile Isidoro Fernandez (1878-1963) stamped in gold on front and back, gilt edges.

CUBERO SEBASTIAN, Pedro. [20], 360 pp.First edition of an interesting and detailed account of the first overland journey from Spain to the East Indies (1671-1680) by the Spanish missionary Pedro Cubero Sebastian. After spending time in Italy where he was appointed as a missionary to Asia and the East Indies, Cubero travelled by way of Istanbul and Moscow to Iran, before he finally arrived in India. He describes the Indian west coast and specifically Goa at length, covering many pages and going into great detail, describing a city in decay. His then crossed to the east coast of India, where he stopped in Madras. There he was struck by the religious rituals that he encounters and describes Hindu traditions. After crossing to Malacca he was thrown in into prison by the Dutch and later banished from the city. He then proceeded to the Philippines and then crossed the Pacific to Mexico and returned to Europe.With bookplates on pastedown and contemporary ownerships inscription on title-page of Pere de Ribes-Vallgornera i de Boixadors, Marquès d'Alfarràs, who was enobled by Philip V in 1702. Some occasional foxing and a small restoration, replacing the outer lower corner of the title-page in a subtle facsimile. With very narrow margins, occasionally just shaving the headlines and quire signatures. Otherwise in very good condition.l Howgego, to 1800, C225; Lach & Van Kley, Asia in the making of Europe III, p. 360; Palau 65756; Sabin 17819; for the author: F.T. Noonan, The road to Jerusalem: pilgrimage and travel in the age of discovery (2007), p. 104.
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Viridarium moralis philosophiae, per fabulas animalibus brutis attributas traditae, iconibus artificiosissimè in aes insculptis exornatum.Cologne, Georg Meuting, 1594 [printed in Antwerp by Christoffel Plantin, 1579]. 4to in 8s. With an engraved title-page (with 3 decorated cartouches) illustrated with about 38 animals, 128 etched and engraved emblematic Aesop fable illustrations (ca. 9.5 x 10 cm), one for each fable: 3 in the preliminaries new to this issue and 125 finely etched, reissued from Plantin’s 1579 edition, most drawn and etched by Marcus Gheeraerts. Early 19th-century half tanned sheepskin, sewn on 3 recessed cords but with 6 false bands on the gold-tooled spine, red morocco spine label.

FREITAG, Arnoldus and Marcus GHEERAERTS the elder (artist and etcher). [8], 251, [1 blank] pp.Rare re-issue (with additions) of the first and only early edition of Arnoldus Freitag's Latin prose emblem book, Mythologia ethica, hoc est moralis philosophiae per fabulas brutis attributas traditae amoenissimum viridarium, printed by Plantin (Antwerp, 1579), but with new preliminaries that include a new engraved title-page, illustrated with about 38 animals, and three additional fables, each with an emblematic engraving. The present issue therefore has 128 emblematic Aesop fables, each filling a double-page spread with the title, the fable itself and the briefer explanation of the moral message (linking the fable and illustration) on the left page and the motto, illustration and a relevant quotation from the Bible (Old and New Testament) on the right page.So Aesop’s pagan fables were adapted to present and promote Christian morality. The series became very popular and influential, and was copied and imitated many times, influencing great artists like Franz Cleyn, Wenceslaus Hollar and Francis Barlow. Philipp Galle bought the copper plates for Gheeraerts’s 107 illustrations in 1571 and probably executed the 18 new etchings that appeared with them in his 1578 Esbatement moral des animaux, French emblematic versions of 125 Aesop fables, edited by Pierre Heyns (1537-1598). The Latin translation/adaptation of this book by Arnoldus Freitag translated and adapted Heyns’s 1578 French text, which which Plantin printed and published at Antwerp in 1579, with the same 125 plates.Slightly browned, and some marginal soiling on the first and last leaves a small tear in one leaf (just crossing the border of one engraving, a small stain in another and a couple worm holes in one leaf, but still in good condition. The foot of the backstrip repaired, the hinges cracked and the board edges scuffed. An important and stunning set of emblematic Aesop illustrations, etched by Marcus Gheeraerts (1567), printed by Plantin (1579) and reissued with additions in Cologne (1594).l FairMur (German) 427; Landwehr, German emblem books, 380; K. van der Horst, Unknown re-issue of Arnoldus Freytag's emblem book .', in: Quaerendo, 36 (2006), pp. 332-333; USTC 701380; VD16, V1581; cf. Arthur Golding, ed., Arnold Freitag’s Mythologia ethica (1987); Hodnett, Marcus Gheeraerts, p. 31 ff.; Jeudwine, pp. 265-256; Praz, pp. 314-315; Voet 1214 (1579 issue).
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Reis naar Madras en China, en terug over St. Helena. Uit het Engels vertaald door N. Messchaert. Met platen. In een deel compleet.Dordrecht, A. Blussé and son, 1816. 8vo. With 7 full-page engraved plates (the second bound in as frontispiece), 2 by J.C. Bendorp, 5 by W. van Senus, all after the plates in the original English edition which were drawn by James Wathen. Half calf, ornamental paper sides, brown morocco spine label.

WATHEN, James. VIII, 357, [2] pp.First and only edition of the Dutch translation of a travel account by James Wathen, originally published in 1814 with the title Journal of a voyage in 1811 and 1812, to Madras and China; returning by the Cape of Good Hope and St. Helena; in the H.C.S. The Hope, Capt. James Pendergrass (London, J. Nichols & son and Bentley, 1814), with 24 hand-coloured aquatints.Wathen (1751?-1828) carried on his father’s business of glover in Hereford. After retiring from the trade he employed his leisure time in walking excursions in all parts of Great Britain and Ireland. In these expeditions he amused himself by making innumerable sketches of interesting objects and scenery. From 1787 onwards he was a frequent contributor to the Gentleman's Magazine, publishing topographical descriptions illustrated by sketches.The translator Nicolaas Messcheert (1774-1833) was a well-known and highly respected school inspector and minister in Rotterdam who also translated the first volumes of Gibbon’s Rise and fall of the Roman Empire. He joined the Dutch Maatschappij der Nederlandse Letterkunde in 1817.Binding slightly worn at the edges, otherwise in good condition.l Abbey, Travel 517 (1st Engl. ed.); Cordier, Sinica, 2107; Lust 386 (1st Engl. ed.); Mendelssohn II, p. 591; Mendelssohn (1979), IV, p. 730; for the Dutch translation, see the favourable review in: Vaderl. letteroef., 1817, pp. 416-420; not in Tiele.
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Herbarum, arborum, fruticum, frumentorum ac leguminum. Animalium praeterea terrestrium, volatiliu[m] & aquatilium, . Kreutter, Bäume, Gesteude, unnd Frücht, .Frankfurt am Main, Christian Egenolff, 1546. 4to. With a large woodcut on the title-page showing a gardener at work with his tools, and about 800 woodcut illustrations in the text. About 700 show trees, fruit, edible and medicinal plants, while the rest show insects, a tick, coral, shells, various sea and land animals and a view of a pond with plants and birds. With all woodcuts coloured by a contemporary hand. Contemporary pigskin over wooden boards, richly blind-tooled in a panel design with two rolls; brass clasps and catch-plates with engraved decoration.

LONICER, Adam?]. [8], 265, [3 blank] pp.Rare first dated edition of an extensively illustrated early herbal, coloured by a contemporary hand, with the title and most of the plant and animal names in Latin and German. The Folger Library notes that F.W.E. Roth attributes this herbal to Adam Lonicer (1528-1586) of Marburg and Frankfurt, who married Egenolff's daughter and became a partner in the firm after Egenolff died in 1555. Egenolff published all three editions of the present herbal. VD 16 lists the undated one as ca. 1545 (citing only the Wellcome Library copy), making the present 1546 edition the second. Another appeared in 1552.With early owner's inscriptions by Georg Volland (1560-1631), an apothecary from Nuremberg, in Latin at the foot of the title-page and in Greek on the facing endleaf. The binding is likely to come from that region as well. With some browning and stains, especially in the first and last leaves. The binding is worn. A 1546 herbal with ca. 800 woodcuts, in contemporary richly blind-tooled pigskin.l Adams H294 (1 copy); Nissen, BBI 2345; USTC 662102 (12 copies); VD 16, H2193 (4 copies); cf. Klebs, Early herbals 71 (undated Egenolff ed.); Wellcome I, 1983 (same undated Egenolff ed.); not in Stiftung Botanik.
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Zee, land, en stroom lust bestaande in . verscheyde gezigten binnen en buytenlandsche vaartuygen en scheepen zoo als men de zelve heedendaags bouwt . | Delices de mer, terre et de rivieres . | Delight full sea, land, and river prospects .Amsterdam, Petrus Schenk, [after 1726]. Full-page engraved title-page, 20 engraved plates depicting different types of ships.With: (2) AKEN, Jan van. [Four engraved views of the Rhine].[Amsterdam], Nicolaas Visscher, [before 1726]. 4 engraved plates with landscapes. 2 parts in 1 volume. Oblong folio (26 x 39.5 cm). Contemporary boards.

LAAN, Adolf van der. Ad 1: Rare work with twenty beautifully engraved plates of sailing ships. The plates depict different types of ships (inland and seagoing vessels, merchant, VOC, whaling and warships), mostly situated close to harbours such as Harlingen, Enkhuizen and Rotterdam. Additionally, the illustrations show several sailing manoeuvres such as getting under sail, tacking, jibing, preparing for anchoring, etc. The two final plates show a sea battle between two Maltese frigates and three Algerian privateers, and a French naval ship riding at its anchors in a storm.Ad 2: The four final engravings bound in in the present volume are views of the Rhine by Jan van Aken after Herman Saftleven, in the third state. They show the river in a mountainous landscape and Wurzbach lists the titles as a conversation of farmers on a hill (1), a man carrying a bundle (2), catching crabs (3), reposing wanderers (4). Wurzbach (I, p. 8) lists four states of Van Aken's four Rhine views: 1. avant the name of Van Aken; 2. with the address of Clement de Jonghe; 3. with the address of Nicolaus Visscher; 4. no address. The present copy is therefore the third state. The engravings measure c. 21.5 x 27.5 cm.Some marginal staining on title-page, pl. 4 and pl. 2 (Van Aken); and pl. 3 and 3 with small stains, pl. 3 marginal tear not affecting illustration. Very good copy of these fresh and very attractive nautical and landscape plates.l Ad 1: Cat. Scheepsmodellen . 1600-1900 (NHSM; 1943), p. 167; De Groot & Vorstman, Dutch Sailing Ships, p. 17, 23; Maggs, Bibl. Nautica II, no. 631; not in Bruzelius, Cat. NHSM, Polak; Thieme & Becker XXII, pp. 159-160 (V.d. Laan); ad 2: Nagler, Allg. Künsterlexikon I, p. 32; Wurzbach I, p. 8 (Van Aken); Wurzbach II, pp. 549-551 (Saftleven).
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Some passages in the life of an adventurer in the Punjab. Originally published in the Delhi Gazette.Delhi, Gazette Press, by Kunniah Lall, 1842. 8vo. With a loosely inserted letterpress printed “Note by the publishers” declaring that in hindsight the publisher would have preferred this edition in larger dimensions and in 2 volumes, but the printer lacked understanding of “the art of book printing”. Also included is a manuscript note with bibliographical information relating to Indian printing. Contemporary half red roan with gold-tooled title on spine, marbled sides.

LAWRENCE, Henry Montgomery. [IV], [III], 275 pp.First edition of one of the first titles published by the Gazette Press in Delhi and printed by Kunniah Hall. The content is a collection of articles that were previously published in the Delhi Gazette, written by Brigadier-General Sir Henry Montgomery Lawrence. He was an advocate for the independence of Punjab and died while defending that in Lucknow, earning the nickname "Lawrence of Lucknow". The book offers a wealth of information on the Punjabs in the form of fictionalised memoirs of Colonel Bellasis, providing many hardly known details about the region and people to the Western reader. Therefore it is of great importance. The present first edition is very rare, WorldCat only offers 3 copies worldwide and we traced 2 more copies in Oxford and the British Library.From the library of Edward Thornton (1799-1875), with his owner's inscription on the front paste-down. Thornton was East India House Officer and author of The History of the British Empire in India (1842). Spine restored with the original spine label laid onto backstrip. Covers slightly rubbed. Otherwise in very good condition.l WorldCat (3 copies); for the author: Riddick p. 211.
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Tafereelen uit eene reis naar Noord-Amerika.Haarlem, A. Loosjes Pz., 1818. Large 8vo. Contemporary half calf, marbled sides.

SVINYIN, Pavel Petrovic (here Paul SWININ, elsewhere SVIN'IN or SUININE). [4], IV, 127 pp.Very rare first and only edition of the only Dutch translation of a Russian description of the United States of America. The title-page notes that it is translated from the German translation (1816) and the preface notes that the first edition, in Russian, appeared in 1815. A second Russian edition appeared at St. Petersburg in 1818 and has sometimes been described as the first.The great Russian author Pavel Petrovic Svinyin or Svin'in, here westernized to "Paul Swinin", is best known for his Sketches of Russia, published in the West under the name "Suinine". The identity of the Dutch translator of the present work is unknown. It gives an interesting "picturesque" travel account of the United States spanning the year 1813 and provides five main accounts covering different subjects: a statistical survey; a religious overview with descriptions of the several Christian communities (naming Methodists, Quakers, Shakers, Baptists and more); a description of the different types of steamboats used in North America; a biography of the French general Jean Victor Moreau, who lived in exile in the United States from 1805 to 1812; and a description of the dancing rituals of indigenous American "Indians", naming the Osage, Arkansas, Sioux and Saki tribes, which the Russian author interestingly compares with tribes in the Caucasus.With the bookplate of the society Doctrina & Amicitia on the front paste-down. Some browning on the first and last few pages. Covers very slightly rubbed. Otherwise in very good condition.l NCC; Sabin 93997; WorldCat 10553560 & 656756512; not in Howgego.
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Oriental commerce; or the East India trader’s complete guide; containing a geographical and nautical description of the maritime parts of India, China, Japan, and the neighbouring countries, including the Easter Islands, and the trading stations on the passage from Europe; with an account of their respective commerce, productions, coins, weights, and measures; their port regulations, duties, rates, charges, &c.London, Kingsbury, Parbury and Allen, 1825. Large 8vo. With 21 folding engraved maps. Contemporary calf, gold-tooled spine with black morocco label, gold fillets on boards.

MILBURN, William. [6], 586 pp.Second edition of a rare work on the practicalities of naval commerce between Britain and the coastal societies east of Africa, edited and in some parts also expanded by Thomas Thornton from Milburn’s 1813 two-volume edition. It includes a substantial section on the coasts of Arabia and the Gulf: "Ras el Khima" ("the capital of the Pirate Coast, . stands on a sandy peninsula . There are several castles, one of which is the residence of their chief"); "Bahreen Islands" ("Manama . is large and populous, the buildings are well constructed, and the appearance of it more decent than any in the Gulph . The Saikh of Bahreen refuses to acknowledge the supremacy of Persia, and suffers none of the coin in the islans to bear the titles of the Persian Sovereign"), "El Katif" ("is said to be a good harbour, and a place of trade, but is seldom visited by Europeans"), etc. Kuwait was named "Grane" then, and Milburn, a sea captain serving the East India Company, writes a lengthy section on articles procurable in the Gulf, ranging from arsenic and lapis lazuli to pearls ("the oyster banks have from 15 to 30 feet water on them . The pearls produced here are not so much esteemed in Europe as those of Ceylon, having a yellowish hue; but the natives of India prefer them. They say they always retain their original colour: whereas the white will in a few years become darker, from the heat of the weather, and that of the person wearing them").Binding rubbed; extremities with some wear. Scattered brown spotting; contemporary owner’s inscription cut from head margin of title-page. Rare: the last copy on the market appeared at an auction in 2008.l WorldCat 6878156; cf. Carter, Sea of pearls, p. 341 (1st ed.).
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Annales Sultanorum Othmanidarum, a Turcis sua lingua scripti:Hieronymi Beck a Leopoldstorf . diligentia Constantinopoli advecti M D L I, .Including: [PESEL, Paul]. Historia Viennae Austriacae a Turcis obsessae .Frankfurt am Main, heirs of Andreas Wechel, 1596. Large folio (32 x 21 cm). With a folding letterpress family tree of ancestors and descendants of Osman I. Modern tanned sheepskin, gold-tooled spine.

LEUNCLAVIUS (LÖWENKLAU), Johannes and Muhammed ibn Hasanjan SAADEDDIN. 260, [26] pp.Latin edition of the most detailed account of the genealogy and history of the Ottoman Emperors to be published in the 16th century. It is based on a manuscript written in Turkish by Muhammed ibn Hasanjan, known as Saadeddin, that gave an account up to the year 1550. Hieronymus Beck brought the manuscript from Constantinople in 1551 and Johann Gaudier translated it into German. Leunclavius (1541-1593?) translated Gaudier's German manuscript into Latin and expanded it greatly, continuing the history to the year 1588. It was in this form that the work was first published, in 1588. Like many Christians of the time, Leunclavius saw the Muslim Ottomans as a dangerous enemy, but for that very reason it was important to understand their history and culture as thoroughly as possible. An appendix provides Paul Pesel's account of the Ottoman siege of Vienna in 1529. The book remains an essential source for the 16th-century history of the Ottoman Empire, and as nearly the only source then available to Europeans it largely determined Europe's view of Ottoman culture.Foxed throughout and with an occasional defect in the paper, but otherwise in good condition. An essential source for the 16th-century Ottoman Empire and nearly the only source available to Europeans of the time.l Adams S51; Apponyi 1926; Atabey 715; Blackmer 1014; BMC STC German, p. 495; Göllner, Turcica 2203;
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Al-Kalim al-nawabigh]. Anthologia sententiarum Arabicarum. Cum scholiis Zamachsjarii.Leiden, Jean Le Mair (colophon: printed by Daniel van Damme), 1772. 4to. With the large engraved arms of Willem V, Prince of Orange, above the dedication.Vellum, manuscript spine title.

ZAMAKHSHARI, Abu al-Quasim Mahmud ibn Umar (Hendrik Albert SCHULTENS, editor). [20], 171, [1] pp.First edition, in the original Arabic with a Latin translation on the facing pages, of a famous collection of Arabic proverbs by the Persian-born scholar Zamakhshari (1075-1144), edited and translated by Hendrik Albert Schultens (1749-1793), professor of oriental languages at the University of Leiden. The book reads from right to left like an Arabic book, but the preliminaries are in Latin with quotations in Arabic. The extensive notes (often longer than the main text) are given in Arabic only below the main text (also below the Latin text) with the Latin notes (with quotations in Arabic) at the end of the book.Little is known of Zamakhshari’s youth. He was apparently well-travelled and resided at least twice (once for an extended period of time) in the holy city of Mecca, where he earned his nickname, Jar Allah. As a philologist, he considered Arabic the queen of languages, in spite of the fact that his own native tongue was Persian (and though he wrote several minor works in that language).Blind stamps of the library of Haverford College, Pennsylvania, on title-page and dedication. Occasional light browning due to the paper, but still in good condition.l Schnurrer 215. GAL I, 292, no. XIV (p. 348). Brill’s first encyclopaedia of Islam VIII, 1207. OCLC 4522262.
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Grammar and Vocabulary of Waziri Pashto. Calcutta, Office of the superintendent of government printing, India, 1902. 8vo. Half calf over cloth boards. Marbled endpapers. Top edge gilt.

LORIMER, John Gordon. [4], X, 345, [1].First edition, one of 400 copies, of the first printed grammar and vocabulary of Waziri Pashto, produced to meet the needs of British officers stationed on the North-West Frontier (now Pakistan and Afghanistan), grappling with the bewildering array of tribes and dialects found there. Lorimer based his work on the dialect of the Mohmit Khel Waziris of the Tochi valley in Waziristan, which differed significantly from standard literary Pashto: "The difference between the Waziri and Peshawar varieties of Pashto is hardly less than that which separates broad Scots from cockney English, and like it extends to grammar and idiom as well as vocabulary." He apologizes for "the bluntness of a few expressions introduced into the vocabulary, which were taken from the lips of living Waziris and are characteristic". John Gordon Lorimer (1870-1914), now best known for his monumental Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf, Oman, and Central Arabia (1908-1915), studied at Edinburgh and Oxford, joining the Indian civil service in 1891. He served primarily in the Punjab and on the North-West Frontier until 1900, thereafter in the foreign department of the government of India at Simla. From 1909 he served as political resident at Baghdad.Calf spotted; light foxing to first and last few leaves. A good, tight copy. The binding is spotted, but also good.l OCLC 18437831. Not in Zaunmüller.
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Mishcàt-ul-Masábìh, or, A collection of the most authentic traditions, regarding the actions and sayings of Múhammed; exhibiting the origin of the manners and customs, the civil, religious and military policy of the Muslemàns.Calcutta, T. Hubbard at the Hindoostanee Press. 1809-1810. 2 volumes. Small folio (23.5 x 31 cm). Contemporary sheepskin, flat spines with red morocco labels.

KHATIB AL-TIBRIZI, Muhammad ibn ’Abd Allah (Arnold N. Matthews, trans.). [6], IX, [1], VI, 665, [1]; [2], VI, 817, [13] pp.The Mishcàt-ul-Masábìh (niche for lamps) by al-Khatib al-Tabrizi (also known as Wali al-Din, d. 741 AH or 1340/41 CE), a revised and expanded version of the Masábìh al-Sunnah by al-Baghawi, adding approximately 1500 hadith (short non-Quranic texts by or approved by Muhammad). This important Sunni text was first translated into English by Capt. Matthews of the Bengal Artillery. Although some of the original hadith are not included and others incorrectly translated, this attempt to publish a translation from the Arabic was a noted accomplishment for its time. The list of subscribers accounts for 122 copies, with an additional 100 copies noted as being published on order of the Governor General in Council for the Honourable Company. A statement in a 1848 issue of the Journal of Sacred Literature suggests that most copies of the work were destroyed at sea, yet it was still advertised for sale in 1817 in the Literary panorama (at the price of £4.4s).Some browning throughout, more pronounced in endpapers, a short tear in the foot of vol. 1, not affecting the text, but still in good condition. A rare Calcutta imprint, bound in India.l WorldCat 15466515.
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Canon medicinae [= al-Qanun].Lyon, Jean Trechsel & Johann Klein, 24 December 1498. 2 volumes. Folio (ca. 31 × 42 cm). With a diagrammatic woodcut.Contemporary blind- and gold-tooled calf over wooden boards, sewn on 4 double supports, one volume with 2 brass clasps (and traces on the other volume).

IBN SINA (AVICENNA). 379; 357 ll.Important 1498 edition of the complete volumes 2 and 3 (of 4), comprising the complete book III, of the greatest monument of Islamic medicine, al-Qanun written in Arabic by Ibn Sina (ca. 980-1037), known in the West as Avicenna, and translated into Latin by Gherardo da Cremona (ca. 1114-1187) as Canon medicinae. This is the first edition edited by Jacques Ponceau, physician to King Charles VIII of France, and the second published outside Italy. It is here preserved in contemporary Renaissance blind- and gold-tooled calf and nearly untrimmed. The complete five books were first printed ca. 1473 and Cremona’s translation remained the standard into the 17th century. About ten editions appeared before the present of 1498, but only Adolph Rusch in Strasbourg had published an edition outside Italy, in or soon after 1473. For the present Trechsel edition, Ponceau for the first time added the unpublished commentaries of Jacques Desparts (ca. 1380-1458), physician to Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, and new commentaries by the leading scholar Johannes Lascaris (1445-1534), a Greek living in Italy. Trechsel and Ponceau clearly went to great lengths to surpass all earlier editions in scholarship, and the king of France (Charles VIII, just before his death?) granted their edition a five-year privilege (Armstrong, Before copyright, p. 7, notes it as one of the earliest book privileges), but Trechsel died leaving the work unfinished. While Johann Klein completed some parts that Trechsel had already begun, he published only 4 volumes: the complete book I (vol. 1), the present complete book III (vols. 2-3) and the first fen of book IV (vol. 4). So this edition never included books II, V and the rest of book IV. Fortunately book III (well over half of the present edition) can stand independently, covering the pathology of and therapy for all parts of the body systematically "a capite ad calces" (from head to toe), including ailments of the ear, nose and throat, as well as obstetrics. This is the longest and in many respects, the most important book of the al-Qanun.Ibn Sina’s encyclopaedic al-Qanun is the most authoritative medical text from the Islamic world and Cremona’s Latin translation formed the basis of medical training in the Western world from ca. 1200 to ca. 1650, exerting "perhaps a wider influence in the eastern and western hemispheres than any other Islamic thinker" (Printing and the mind of man). "The ‘Qanun’ . contains some of the most illuminating thoughts pertaining to distinction of mediastinitis from pleurisy; contagious nature of phthisis; distribution of diseases by water and soil; careful description of skin troubles; of sexual diseases and perversions; of nervous ailments" (Sarton, Introduction to the history of science). "One of the most famous medical texts ever written, a complete exposition of Galenism. Neuburger says: ‘It stands for the epitome of all precedent development, the final codification of all Graeco-Arabic medicine’. It dominated the medical schools of Europe and Asia for five centuries" (Garrison & Morton 43).With a few contemporary manuscript annotations, and traces of bookplates removed from the paste-downs. A pencil note on the front paste-down of vol. 2 notes that the set came from the Fritzlar Cathedral Library, parts of which were dispersed in 1724 and in 1803. It was sold by Venator (Cologne), sale 23/24 (1962), lot 15 (illustration plate IV).Volumes 2 (book III, fens 1-12) and 3 (book III, fens 13-22), without volumes 1 (book I: 452 ll.) and 4 (book IV, fen 1: 142 ll.).Both volumes lack the final blank leaf, but are otherwise complete and nearly untrimmed, giving ample margins and preserving an occasional deckle. Some light browning and marginal water stains (mainly towards end of vol. 2), some mostly marginal worming, but still in good condition. An important edition of one of the greatest work of Islamic medicine, nicely bound in contemporary blind- and gold-tooled calf over wooden boards.l BMC VIII, p. 302; BSB-Ink A 964; Claudin IV, 88-93; Corr. Pell. 1668; Goff A1428; GW 3127; IGI 1125 u; ISTC ia01428000; Klebs 131.13; Proctor 8616; not in Oates; Osler; Wellcome.
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Southern Asia series – Southern Persia sheet – Persia, Arabia and Turkey in Asia[Dehradun, Survey of India Office], sold at the Map Record and Issue Office, Calcutta, 1912. 61.5 x 88 cm. Large photozincographed (heliozincographed) folding map on a scale of 1:2,000,000 in black, blue and red, with relief shown by contours, hachures and gradient tints. Folded.

HUNTER, Frederic Fraser (editor); Sir Sidney Gerald BURRARD (director). Large detailed terrain map of the Persian Gulf and the surrounding area with a legend of geographic denominations in English, Arabic and Persian, such as "Fort: Qasr (Arabic), Kaleh, Kalat (Persian)". The map shows terrain levels in particular detail and the major roads, railways and telegraph lines. The sheet latitude limits are: "24° - 32° north and 44° - 60° south", including Qatar, Kuwait, the Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq and more.The map was published in 1912 by the India Survey Office under the direction of Sir Sidney Gerald Burrard (1860-1953), who was Colonel and Surveyor General of India in that year. He was closely involved in the geographical and cartographic survey of India, especially the Himalayas, and retired one year after publication of the present map.As the Southern Persia sheet, the present map is part of a very large 9-sheet combined map covering the area from the Red Sea to India, called the Survey of India Southern Asia Series (1912-1945). The present map and a separately published index could be obtained only on application through an officer at the Map Record and Issue Office in Calcutta.Some slight foxing. A tiny tear on the crossing of two folds, bottom edge frayed. Otherwise in good condition.l Daniel Foliard, "Conflicted cartographies of a peninsula", in: Geographies of contact, 2019, pp. 71-76; F. Fraser Hunter, "Reminiscences of the map of Arabia and the Persian Gulf", in: The geographical journal, 54 (1919), pp. 355-363.
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Autograph letter to Louis Langlès, signed].London, 18 March 1823. 4to. Folded.

AUTOGRAPH]. MOOR, Edward. [4] pp.Autograph letter written in English by the British soldier and Indologist Edward Moor (1771-1848) to Louis Langlès (1763-1824), a leading orientalist (especially for languages of India and the East Indies) and conservator of oriental manuscripts at the Bibliothèque Royale in Paris, now known as the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. Langlès translated and annotated Persian texts about India and wrote or translated many later books on Indian and oriental history and literature. Moor was soldier for the East India Company, but is particularly known for his pioneering work on the Hindu religion, The Hindu pantheon (1810). The present letter served in part as a cover letter accompanying a few books Moor sent to Langlès, both for his own interest and as donations to the Bibliothèque Royale. Most were written by his relatives and friends. Moor was establishing an Oriental Society in London and asks Langlès if he would consent to be made an honorary member of this society. Moor also asks to whether he himself could be accepted as an honorary member of the Asian Society in Paris and asked whether this Society would be willing to help him publish a new work. At the end Moor mentions that he has also included a gift for Vivant Denon, the director of the Louvre, and mentions that he might publish a new edition of his The Hindu pantheon. The letter contains a manuscript note, maybe from Langlès himself, that it was received on 7 April 1823.Upper right corner very slightly frayed, but otherwise in very good condition.